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     Western Front - 1971 March 9 - Page 1



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\  TUESDAY  Mar. 9 t h 1971  BELLI NGH AM  RECYCLE ALL PAPER  /  You've
Come a Long WayBaby, f  Some Bellingham women are fixing a stew, and it
ain't in the  kitchen.  The local Women'sFreedom Brigade is busy slapping
together  plans for celebration of International Women's Week, whichbegins 
today and runs through Friday.  The four-day observance kicks off at 8 p.m.
tonight with awomen's liberation meeting at 1111 Key Street. Women are
welcome,  a spokesman said. A "rap session" for women is scheduled at 7
p.m.  tomorrow night in the Viking Union lounge, and speakers are lined
upfor the Thursday night salute to the women's movement. To cap off  the
week, the freedom brigade willthrow a sisterhood party at 617  North Forest
Street.  International Women's Week, though it is morepopular in Europe 
than in this nation, began in 1857 when working women in New York  City
went onstrike against long hours and bad working conditions.  The freedom
brigade in Bellingham holds meetingsat 7:30 p.m.  Tuesdays at 1111 Key
Street. Following the usual business routine,  the group
discusses"consciousness raising."  Cynthia Townsend, a junior education
major and brigade member,  explainsconsciousness raising as an experience
which "allows all the  sisters to find out that they have allexperienced
the same things."  Men in our society are not allowed to be emotionally
free, Ms.  Townsendsaid. "Emotionalism for men and intellectualism for 
women" is the brigade's motto.  "Women shoulddevelop a sense of
individuality," she said. "A  sister should not feel constrained from doing
anything shewants to do  just because she is a woman."  Women's karate
classes are offered Monday, Wednesdayand Friday  evenings.  Here - on
campus—for those men and women who are 
interested—History 397b(contemporary women's history)
will be  offered spring quarter, although the brigade points out that it
willbe  taught by a man.  The freedom brigade is also attempting to
establish a women's  center in downtownBellingham by this summer. The
center is  planned to include a coffee shop, a day-care center for
childrenof  working mothers and a telephone service for those women needing
a  place to stay or abortioninformation.  models posed for publication 
Code of Conduct Changes Proposed  Story on Page 2



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     Western Front - 1971 March 9 - Page 2



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2 Western Front Tuesday, March 9, 1971  WESTERN WASHINGTON STATE COLLEGE 
Department ofMusic  presents  Scenes from  Rigoletto  Khovanstchina  La
Boheme  Directed by: Mrs. Mary Terey-Smith  Thursday, March 11, 1971 - 1:00
p.m.  College Auditorium  TWO YEAR ARMY  ROTC PROGRAMPossible Flight
Training  $50 a month  Jr. and Sr. years  Successfully complete,  Advanced
ProgramContact: Professor of Military Science  Army ROTC  Seattle
University  Seattle .Washington 98122Phone: 9 (206) 626-5775 
—Attend two summer  camps or receive  credit for one
summer  camp forprevious  . active duty.  Filing deadline March 17th. 
^Moonlight  Drive-InTHEATRE  Meridian-TelegraphRoad  Starts Wed. March 10 
Thru Tue. March 16  7:30-11:20  GRASS  9:30 $1.50  Come see how 
thevampires  doit.  Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer presents  A Dan Curtis Production 
MGM  also an  outstanding.CO-HITi  No Blade  mmm  1224 Commercial 733-9755 
NOW  PLAYING !!  IS A RIP-SNORTER. ATRIUMPH!"  -Judith Crist  "
• • •
• B R I L L I A N T L Y CONCEIVED,  BRILLIANTLY
DONE!DEVASTATINGLY FUNNY!"  —Kathleen Carroll. New York
Daily News  •also-  Adam at 6 a.mWestern May Lower 
Minimum Credit Load  Western may soon join six other colleges in the  state
inlowering the minimum credits required for  graduation from the current
192 to 180 credits.  A sub-committee of the Academic Council  approved
lowering the credit requirement Friday,  but the AcademicCouncil will
probably not act on  the matter until its first meeting spring quarter. 
Tom Cooper,administrative assistant to AS  President Steve Cooper, has
.called for an  all-college meeting at 3 p.m.tomorrow in the  Viking Union
lounge to "generate campus  support" and to explain the proposal
tostudents.  The move to 180 credits was proposed by  Carter Broad,
chairman of the biology department.  It will allow a student freedom to
concentrate on  his main interests, instead of gearing him toward a 
liberalarts, general education curriculum,  according to Cooper.  Central,
University of Washington, WashingtonState University, Seattle University,
St. Martins  and Whitworth have already made such a move.  Coopersaid the
new credit requirement, if  approved, might go into effect spring quarter
if  there in .enough student support. Otherwise, he  said, it probably
would not be implemented until  next fall.  Cooper said that thereduction
in credits would  help students meet rising college costs because  they
would not have to attend an extra quarter to  obtain the additional 12
credits. He said a recent  trend among most colleges was toreduce the 
credit requirement and to consider 15 credits,  rather than 16, a full load
for upper-classmen.The plan for lowering credit requirements is  only one
part of a plan for academic change  proposed by theAssociated Students.
Cooper said  that there are six other areas planned for change.  These
would be toget Western completely  away from a graded system, have students
 construct their own major and minorif they wish,  to make the minor
optional, to broaden the  internship program (work for credit) and
tobroaden the travel abroad program offered at  Western.  Rap Session
Slated for  Conduct Code RevisionsStudent leaders and administration
officials will  conduct an open hearing at 4 p.m. Thursday in  VikingUnion
lounge to discuss the proposed  revisions to the Student Code of Conduct. 
The revised code wasproposed by the student  conduct committee and is
intended to clarify  certain ambiguous clauses in thepresent code,  Dean of
Students, C.W. McDonald said last week.  The campus demonstration
policyrecognizes  the value of active participation in political and 
social issues, while at the same time realizingthe  need to maintain order
on campus.  The present code states that "students shall  not, by
theirconduct, disrupt, disturb or interfere  with classroom activities,
recognized college  activities, pedestrian orvehicular traffic or offices, 
residence halls, meetings or classes."  The revised policy specifically
prohibitsany  demonstration "which materially and substantially  disrupts
the work of the college or therequirements of appropriate discipline."  The
disorderly conduct clause further prohibits  intentionalphysical abuse of
another person or  damage to property at the college or while engaged  in
collegeactivities, on or off campus.  The possession or consumption of
alcholic  beverages and drugs will still beprohibited and  firearms and
explosives are added to the list of  prohibited articles.  The new code
spellsout the room visitation and  details the way in which the policy
becomes  effective in the various halls.Violations of the  visitation
policy constitutes a violation of the code  of conduct and will be treated
in thesame way as  other violations.  A new rule put into the code by the
conduct  committee will require astudent to show his  student
identification card to any security officer  or administrator upon
demand.Judicial review and procedures are spelled out  along with rules
concerning failure to appear when  soordered.  The code's judicial
proceedure section  incorporates the rights guaranteed under the U.S.  Bill
ofRights, and includes provisions for judicial  review and appeal to higher
judiciary boards.  McDonald andAS President Steve Cooper will  be available
to discuss the revisions and answer  questions from theaudience.  The new
code of conduct makes its rules and  regulations reflect recent decisions
issued bythe  U.S. Supreme Court in describing limits to which 
demonstrations can go before action will be taken.The President of the
college is given authority  to call in civil authorities in cases where "a
clear  andpresent danger of physical injury to persons or  property" is
likely or if demonstrations get out of  hand and college authorities are
unable to break  up demonstrations which "materially and  substantially
disruptcollege work and disipline."  Fall Students to Post  $50 Advance
Payment  Students returning next fall willbe required to  post a $50
advance payment of tuition and fees to  confirm their registration,
RegistrarWilliam J.  O'Neil said Friday.  The advance payment, due July 15,
will be  deducted from the remainder tobe paid at a  regular mail-in
deadline.  "This requirement was imposed on the college  by the Council
onHigher Education," O'Neil said.  "As we examined the problems relating to
fall  quarter 1971 we becameconvinced that some kind  of advance payment or
confirmation would be  necessary."  O'Neil said theadvance payment would
have  two favorable outcomes:  First, the college would be able to
moreaccurately predict the fall quarter enrollment,  thereby insuring that
no applicant would be  turned away forlack of space as long as space 
existed.  Secondly, the registration center could cancel  the
advanceregistration of any student who did  not intend to return in the
fall.  Last fall, 375 students who pre-registered did  not show up and
space was held for them that  could have been given to new
applicants,O'Neil  said.  The college can not afford to miss its. 
enrollment figure by any substantial amount thisyear, he said.  "If we
under-enroll we may very well be asked  to return funds to the state
general fund, aswe did  in the fall of 1970.  "If we over-enroll, to any
extent, there is great  danger that we will not be able to accommodate  the
students in class, even though admission  commitments may have been made,"
theregistrar  said.  O'Neil said that provisions would be made to  extend
the July 15 deadline for any studentwho  could not meet it because of
circumstances  beyond his control.  "We have always had advancepayment for
new  applicants," he said. "This is just an extension to  all students." 
All colleges anduniversities in the state have  announced lhat they will be
charging the advance  payment.



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     Western Front - 1971 March 9 - Page 3



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Tuesday, March 9, 1971 Western Front  Draft Dodgers in Exile - Their Own
Stories  mmmMvim  Call itpeace Or call it treason,  Call it love Or call it
reason,  But I ain't Marchin' anymore  — Phil Ochs 
Editor's note: Front feature editor Steve Johnston and reporter Jim 
Thomson spent a day in Vancouver, B.C. lastweek talking with  American
draft escapees and G.I. deserters. They brought back an  interesting
accountof the lives of men in exile—men who left their 
homeland to escape Vietnam, the draft and the military. Ifyou are  thinking
of skipping across the border to beat the draft, it would be  advisable for
you to read thisarticle first.  By STEVE JOHNSTON  Feature Editor  Jim
Perkins decided to desert from  the Marine Corps while he was in  Vietnam.
He took a five day leave to  Hawaii and then hopped a plane to his 
hometownin Portland, Ore.  " I t was about seven Sunday  morning when I got
to my house. I  didn't know my wifeand baby were  visiting relatives in
Washington,"  Perkins said. "I was really keyed up  when I got to thehouse
and it let the  wind out when I found out she wasn't  there."  Perkins
waited for his wife to comehome, then put everything into a car  and headed
for Canada. That was over  seven months ago and nowPerkins and  his wife
Linda are landed immigrants  and on their way to becoming  Canadian
citizens."When I first went into the Marines  I was all for the flag and
everything,  you know that trip," he said as he tried to explain why he
left America.  "But then we started to hear about the  My Lai massacre and
Ibegan to realize  what was going on. I just got sick of  the whole thing."
 The reasons why youngAmericans  are leaving their country are as varied 
as their number, but if it could be  summed up in a fewwords it would be 
"Just sick of the whole thing."  Another American who decided to  leave
everything andseek asylum in  Canada is a husky 21-year-old man  form Long
Beach, Calif. He said his  draft numberwas 179 and that he was  to go in
the Army a few days ago.  He had a scared, bewildered look  when hewalked
into the warehouse  office of the Committee to Aid  American War Objectors
at 628 East  Georgiain Vancouver.  While he filled out the questionnaire 
given out by the committee lie talked  about coming to Canada.  "It was
easy just to talk about  coming up here, but it's hard to make  the final
decision," hesaid. "I mean,  my parents kept saying how it was  going to
ruin my life and how I could  never come back. They even had some  of my
friends try to talk me out of  coming."  He said it would be like copping 
out ifhe went into the Army. "I don't  believe in killing or the military,"
he  said.  "Sure, I would fight if the NorthVietnamese landed at Long
Beach, but  that's the only reason I would."  Now draft number 179 has
joinedJim Perkins and the other 50,000 to  God-only-knows-how-many American
 draft dodgers and desertersliving in  Canada.  When he first came to
Canada, he  did not know where to turn for help  and then he read about the
committee  helping a draftee who had hijacked a  plane early that week. 
"The draft counselor in Long Beach  told me not to come up and I heard all 
sorts of wild stories about soldiers  throwing draftdodgers back over the 
border," he said. "But I didn't have  much choice because I was supposed 
to go inlast Thursday."  By the end of the day, Number 179  had ah
understanding of Canada's  immigration lawsand he was advised  of the job
situation in Vancouver (high  unemployment) and had a list of  hostles
orhouses where he could stay.  But most important he had a place to  go and
have people around him thatwould understand his feelings and he  would be
able to relate to.  There are three counselors at thecommittee, two
Americans and one  Canadian. Marshall Van Deusen, an  American and draft
dodger,came to  Canada in April, 1969 after he  couldn't get a CO. status
with the  draft. Like most Americanswho have  ' been there for a while he
considers  Canada his home and has no thought  of ever returning toAmerica.
 "My advice to people thinking  about coming to Canada would be to  exhaust
all possibilities intrying to get  out of the draft. Do political work in 
the states," he said. "But if faced with  jail then comeup."  The reason
Van Deusen advises  against draft dodgers making the trip  up is because
the jobsituation in  Vancouver is tight. He said the offical  unemployment
rate is up to 11 per  cent.  Still when adraft dodger does show  up, he
won't be turned away. In a  quiet voice, Van Deusen tells the man  aboutthe
chances of getting a job,  where to live and how to get "landed"  immigrant
status, the first step inbecoming a Canadian citizen.  To get landed status
the man needs  to get 50 points. A man can getpoints  for having a certain
amount of  schooling and work experience. Just  about all Americans
getlanded status  after a while. When one is turned  down the committee
appeals the  decision and when theappeal is finally  heard - some 18 months
later - the  dodger has enough points to qualify.  The committee, a
non-political  organization, was started in 1966 by a  group of University
of British  Columbia professorswho saw a need  to provide help and
counseling to  American dodgers anddeserterscoming  to Canada. Itis funded
through private  donations, the Unitarian Church and  the Canadian Council
of Churches.  At firstdraft dodgers outnumbered  the military deserters but
as the war in  Vietnam became less popular moreservicemen began to desert.
Now the  number is about equally divided.  Before 1968 deserters
wererefused  landed status when it was found out  they left the military (a
felony). This  left the men threealternatives: to  leave out any mention of
past service  and hope it is never found out; to  remain illegally inCanada
or to return  to the U.S. and face imprisonment.  Finally the Minister of
Immigration  announcedthat past military status  would have no bearing in
considering  an application. But deserters still havemore problems than the
draft dodger.  Steve jumped ship in Newport,  Virginia with three other
Navybuddies, bought a car and headed  west. They were picked up in New 
Mexico by the police and handedover  to the military in San Diego, Calif. 
Steve and a buddy named Dan  managed to get away and madetheir  way up to
Canada.  "The military just wasn't my way  of life," he explained. "I was
tired of  beingtreated like a machine." He  laughed and said, "My dad went 
AWOL (absent without leave) when he  wasin the service. I guess it just
runs  in the family."  f9%WK $y  lt;$k f  %
?£;•*$?:iJ6 lt;$ t!:-:*f: i-y'':y^
;?.'• -;  ,' ; lt;:v:*'; I * ; " '*  -:. *  gt;* :': *' 
"; gt;•;;:••
gt;'*}•: ' * : ; . ' ( 
•.-*?V''-'..'*'H'?••!:
gt;?? lt;,  lt;•!•'  d  MARINE DESERTER
AND FAMILY: Jim Perkins, his wife  Linda andtheir little girl have been
living in Vancouver, B.C. for  seven months after Perkins deserted from the
MarineCorps while  in Vietnam.  Steve came up with only the  clothes on his
back and no money.  This is thecase of many deserters, who  just get sick
of being in the military  and leave. Draft dodgers are usuallybetter
prepared for the trip financially.  So his needs were immediate.  Housing
had to be found and heneeded food and clothing. At one time  there were two
hostles set up by the  American DesertersCommittee, a  politically active
organization which  has folded up.  Now there is one hostle operating 
inVancouver for dodgers and  deserters. It is run by Larry Martin, a  draft
dodger himself, and houses  around 15 men. For a dollar a day a  man can
stay as long as he wants and  even if he does not have the dollar,Martin
will let him stay.  The cost of running the hostle  partly comes from the
money Martin  takes in andpartly from the Unitarian  Church. Food is
sometimes donated  by local farmers and a volunteer from  thecommittee was
making plans to  pick up a truck load of potatoes and  dropping them off at
the hostle.  But most of the dodgers and  deserters have settled in
different parts  of British Columbia. The committeehelps them to get
settled and then  they are on their own  A few dodgers and their families 
gathered at the Perkins' house and  talked about their lives in Canada. One
 had a magazine that told where they  couldfind free land in Canada and 
they said they hoped to move up  north and start a farm.  "It's not so
tense up here," Linda  Perkins said. "An amazing number of  people think
that when they first  arrive their stay isgoing to be  temporary, but after
a few months  they become adjusted and think of  Canada as theirhome." 
Everyone agreed that there was less  pressure to get ahead than there is in
 America. "No hustle,



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     Western Front - 1971 March 9 - Page 4



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4 Western Front Tuesday, March 9/1971  Front Editorials.... Campus Briefs 
'" To comfort fhe afflicted andto afflict the comforted"  Dorm Visitation 
Advance Tuition  The Council on Higher Education's  decision torequire a
$50 advance tuition  and fees payment for students returning to  college
fall quarter isquestionable.  While college officials here have assured  us
that the July 15 advance payment  deadlinecould be extended for any student
 who could not meet it because of  "circumstances beyond his control," we 
question the original motive.  There is no question that tuition and  fees
will be substantially increased by the  State Legislature this session.
Presumably  the increase (which may range as high as  $190 perquarter for
in-state students) will  take effect next fall quarter. The financial 
burden may be too much for alarge  number of lower and middle class
students  to shoulder.  The Women  It wasn't too long ago that we used to 
sit around the newspaper office and crack  jokes about women's liberation. 
Most of us first-class male chauvinist  pigs were pretty well convinced
that we  shouldered the world's problems. After all,  wewere the ones
getting drafted, the ones  paying alimony (it should be spelled 
all-the-money), the onesslaving away at the  office or mill, the ones
bearing the family  burdens.  But most of that has all changednow.  The
women, who have been cooped up  in their kitchens and split-level insane 
While college officials give some fairly  convincing "favorable outcomes"
to the  advance payment scheme, we are confident  that is was actually
conceived as an aid to  s t a t e b u r e a u c r a t s and college 
administrators.  The most alarming aspect of the new  dictate from the
almightyCouncil on Higher  Education is centered on the factthat the 
policy change was not discussed with  students in advance. The $50 advance 
tuition and feespayment order dropped  out of the clear blue sky.  Students
have the right to be consulted.  in thesematters. When we are left out in 
the dark without facts, figures and  intelligent rationale, the Council
canexpect  student responses similar to the mood of  this editorial. . , p.
.  —John Stolpe  asylums fordecades, are now standing up
 and speaking to their responsibilities and  problems. They want to get
outof the  house and do their thing. They want to be  free from raising a
half dozen tax  exemptions. Theywant financial  independence, among other
things.  What they have to say makes a lot of  sense.  Themen should stop
and listen to what  the women are really saying. They are  demanding their
freedom ashuman beings.  —John Stolpe  EDITOR: John
Stolpe  MANAGING EDITOR: Ron Graham  ASSOCIATEEDITOR: Bob Taylor  PHOTO
EDITOR: Dave Sherman  COPY EDITOR: Mary Peebles !  ASSISTANTCOPY EDITOR:
Marie Haugen  FEATURE EDITOR: Steve Johnston  SPORTS EDITOR: Larry
LemonSTAFF REPORTERS: Jim Austin, Loren Bliss, Patrick Brennen, Bob
Burnett, Rebecca Firth,  SusanGawrys, Roy Hanson, Tony Gable, Mickey Hull,
Bill Johnston, Glen Jones, Jill Kremen,  Jackie Lawson,Paul Madison, Bob
McLauchlan, Mark Morrow, Marilee Pethtel, Mike Pinch, Jim  Thomson,
SteveVanDeventer.  PHOTOGRAPHY: Dave Sherman, Loren Bliss, Ron
Litzenberger.  GRAPHICS: Jon Walker, Phyllis Atkinson.  BUSINESS MANAGER:
Les Savitch  AD MANAGER: Mike Pinch  STAFF ADVISER:R. E. Stannard Jr.  The
Western Front is the official newspaper of Western Washington State
College.Editorial  opinions are those of the writer.  Entered as second
class postage at Bellingham, Washington98225. The Front is represented  by
NEAS, New York and is a member of the United States StudentPress
Association.  Published on Tuesdays and Fridays. Composed in the WWSC print
shop and printedat the  Lynden Tribune.  EDITORIAL PHONE 676-3161
ADVERTISING PHONE 676-3160  Threeconstraints were tacked onto the 20-hour
dorm visitation  recently endorsed by the Board of Trustees.  -that the one
year's period of time be regarded a pilot program.  -that a comprehensive
report be made inone year's time  indicating what effect, if any, 20-hour
visitation has had on academic  achievement ofthose students living in
dormitories with such  visitation and  -that all dorm residents have the
right to haverestricted visitation  hours.  The one-year test of 20-hour
visitation will come up for review in  another yearat which time several
possible decisions could be made,  -according to Keith Guy, director of
residencehall programs: the  20-hour visitation could continue on a pilot
basis, it could be formally  adopted orvisitation hours could be cut back. 
"Based on the recent experience with the Board of Trustees, I  don'tthink
they will approve a 24-hour visitation policy," Guy said.  He believes that
the board has an attitudethat some rules and  regulations should be kept
for dorm residents.  "I don't know how much attitudesmight change in a
year," he  added.  Since the board made the decision to allow 20-hour
visitation, all  thedorms except for Mathes Hall and Ridgeway Kappa have
adopted  the extended hours. Mathes haslenthened their visitation to 10
a.m.  to 12 p.m. on weekdays and 10 to 2 a.m. on weekends. Kappa
hasvisitation from 10 a.m. to 2 a.m. Sunday through Thursday, and 10  a.m.
to 4 a.m. on Friday and Saturday.  Previous dorm visitation was 12 hours.
Dorm students had been  advocating a change for several yearsand favored a
24-hour visitation.  At present, housing is waiting for results on a
questionnaire sent to  dorm residents to determine whether any students
wish to live under  more restricted visitation than the dormthey are in. 
"I don't anticipate that any students will sign up for restricted 
visitation," Guy said.  If somedo there will be problems though, he said.
Since any  student who wishes to live under shorter visitationhours would
have  to be paired with another of similar views and room changes would be 
necessary.  "Ifthey're not willing to move it's going to be damned hard to
set  up a separate dorm," Guy said.  MuskieFavored  Senator Edmund Muskie
pulled away to a safe, leading position  when college faculty membersfrom
across the nation were asked who  they prefer as the country's next
president.  Sitting at the top ofthe list of 12 choices was Muskie with 36
per  cent of the poll, followed by:  Richard Nixon ' 18 per centGeorge
McGovern 14.5  Nelson Rockefeller 5.5  John Lindsay 4.0  Ronald Reagan 4.0 
Birch Bayh. 30Ted Kennedy 2.5  Eugene McCarthy 2.0  Hubert Humphrey 1.0 
George Wallace l 0.5  no answer—other ; 9.0  The survey,
taken in mid-February, placed the faculty opinions  close to those of their
students whowere polled earlier this year.  Two differences stood out
between Kennedy and McCarthy with  the groups.Faculty ranked the two
possible candidates eight and nine  on their list while students plotted
them withMcCarthy, third and  Kennedy, fifth.  For the survey, over 200
faculty members were interviewed on 30  ofthe nation's campuses. 
iHTeLLiGence IKDICM"^ INVASION OF *tnfc . * W TH  Wtft BP1N6 cniNrv
irtToTrie WA.R (otf£) W°^ MP..



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     Western Front - 1971 March 9 - Page 5



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Tuesday, March 9, 1971 Western Front 5  Cooper Defends His Administration 
By STEVE COOPER  ASPresident  Well students, faculty, and administrators, 
student government is dead. The obituary has been printed, the eulogy
completed.  If people take pot shots at this administration  and are
knowledgeableabout their accusations,  that's one thing, but when
individuals set  themselves up as campus know-it-allssuggesting  that
student government is dying on the  vine—without
researched evidence, their credibilityleaves something to be desired.  What
this administration is doing, and what I  promised students duringthe
campaign, was a very  definite change in outlopk and perspective for 
student government this year. Arecent j gt;oll of  graduating seniors at
the University of Washington  asked what, if anything, had theirstudent 
government done for them? Their answer was an  overwhelming "Nothing." And,
I'm sure if asimilar poll was taken on this campus, the answer  would be
the same.  Maybe people are upset becausethings are so  quiet in student
government or maybe that we  don't discuss conflict theory and
frustrationlevels.  Maybe it's the fact that there exists a  "philosophical
disagreement."  Why just last week, an A.S.Legislator  introduced a bill
that would authorize the legal  aids department to investigate filing
criminalcharges against the mayor and city council because  of the
conditions of the dog pound. There reallymust be a philosophical difference
especially when  the preamble of the Associated Student  C o n s t i t u t
i o n states "Our goal (student  government) is to achieve the best
possible  education for those enrolledat WWSC." (p. 6  Navigator)  And
people wonder why they aren't being  represented. And studentgovernment
people in  some circles wonder why students aren't involved.  We have based
this year'sactivities around the  premise that students are more concerned
about  when and how they will graduate,and the  relevancy of their classes,
than student government  politics and game playing. It is
unfortunatehowever, that most.of us in the executive branch  cannot be in
the dorms or off campus speaking toissues for we can only afford eight
hours a day in  student government plus classes and tests. And it isagain
unfortunate that the Western Front has not  covered adequately our major
proposals.  The followingis what we are working on. And  the possible
passage of these issues is excellent:  1.  2.  3.  STEVECOOPER  5. 
Students can now structure their own major    minor.  We are working on
revamping general  education.  We have spearheaded the drive to lower 
graduation requirements from 192 to 180  credits.Researching our promise to
make the minor  optional for graduation.  We are finalizing a proposal to
allow students to travel abroad and work  off-campus for credit.  6. We are
in the process of setting up a center for drug information.  7. We
persuaded the college to raise student  wages.  8. We are involving
morestudents on  committees on this campus than ever before.  9. We helped
in the drive for 24-hour visitationin conjunction with IHC.  10. We are
involved with the Bellingham food  coop which will eventually serve not
only  students but the people of Bellingham as  well.  11. We have
established a community relationsboard that is involved in developing 
programs to fight discrimination on the  college and in the city.  12.We
gave a helping hand to the people  working on the food stamp crisis.  1-3.
We lobbyed in Olympia forH.B. 709 and  against tuition and fee increases. 
And the list could go on.  I submit to this collegecommunity that we are 
attempting to serve students by involving ourselves  and their government
in theireducation. We are  not dying. but changing, and I challenge the 
Western Front to become involved in ourproposals so that this college
realizes what we are  attempting. And finally, I challenge the
A.S.Legislature to become relevant, or at least justify  themselves. 
Daugert Proposal Heads  AS GovernmentOptions  The present form of student
government may  be abolished spring quarter.  And as long as theAS
government's death  rattle is prolonged, more and more people are 
considering alternate plans. TheDaugert Proposal  for an all-college
governance—two years in the  making and the subject of
controversyin the  past—has emerged again as the single
plan receiving  most attention.  The Daugert Proposalproposes an
all-college  senate whose membership is made up of students,  faculty,
staff andadministrators.  Answering to the senate would be an academic 
coordination council, college relationscouncil,  college services council
and a business and finance  council.  Other groups would report to these
councils  until virtually every area of the college had a body 
representing it. The Daugert Proposal is avast  restructuring which brings
together all of the  existing governments in each area of the college
toform a single representative body.  But not everyone in the AS government
favors  the Daugert Proposal."Although an all-college government is a good 
idea," Bert Halprin, speaker of the legislature says,  "Itwon't serve the
students' interests to pass it at  this time."  Halprin favors a "union of
students" made upof volunteers. Halprin would abolish student fees  which
go to the AS and have services and  organizationssupported by the students
who use  them.  "The whole student government concept is  outmoded,"
hesaid.  The legal aids office is crippled because it can't  hire lawyers,
the sex information office is badlythreatened and there is currently no
money  available for political action, Halprin said.  AS President
SteveCooper was opposed to the  Daugert Proposal until recently. But
"certain  concessions were made" andnow Cooper supports  the modified
proposal.  "I'm still somewhat skeptical," he said, "but  with thechanges
that have been made, we would  be better off than we are now."  Cooper said
that the DaugertProposal would  be presented for student body consideration
on  the spring ballot.  Vice-President GaryEvans said that the future  of
AS Government depends on whether an  all-college government is set up
ornot.  AS Housing Commissioner Craig Cole and AS  Business Manager Rich
Hass have been working onan alternate proposal for several months.  The
Cole-Hass proposal would dissolve the  existing structure ofthe AS
Legislature and "let  decision making go to a lower level," Cole said.  He
described the proposal as a "commission"  form of government where
commissions would be  established to work on the variousareas of  concern
such as academic reform, student services  and political involvement.  Each
commission head would be a member of a  general assembly chaired by the AS
president. The  president would stillmaintain his own officers and 
assistants on the executive level.  "This way, the people actually working
inthe  various areas would be the ones making decisions  concerning those
areas," Cole said.  The Cole-Hass proposal was submitted to the  Associated
Students Affair Council to be  incorporated into analternative structure it
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     Western Front - 1971 March 9 - Page 6



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6 Western Front Tuesday, March 9, 1971  What you should know about diamonds
 when you know it's forkeeps  You've dreamed about your  diamond engagemen
taring a thousand  times. But now that youknow it's for keeps, it's time ^
to  stop dreaming and start learning  about diamonds and their
value.Because no two diamonds  are exactly alike, jewelers have  adopted
exacting standards to determinethe relative value of each  and every
diamond in the world.  These standards include a diamond's  size(carat
weight), color,  cut and clarity.  Although it's important to  know the
facts about diamonds,  youcertainly don't have to be an  expert to choose a
Keepsake Diamond  Ring . . . because Keepsakeguarantees a diamond of fine
white  color, correct cut and perfect clarity  or replacement assured.
Thefamous  Keepsake certificate provides  permanent registration, trade-in 
value and protection againstloss  of diamonds from the setting.  COLOR:
Fine white diamonds are  quite rare and valued accordingly.Other shades in
relative order of  their worth are: blue, yellow,  brown and black.  CUT:
The cut of adiamond—the  facets placed on it by a
trained  cutter—brings out the gem's fire  and
brilliance. Anythingless than  correct cut reduces beauty, brilliance  and
value.  CLARITY: Determined by the absence  of small impurities. A perfect 
diamond has no impurities  when examined under ten power  magnificationby a
trained eye.  CARAT: A diamond's size is  measured in carats. As a diamond 
increases in size, itsprice will  increase even more if the quality 
remains constant. But larger diamonds  of inferior qualitymay actually  be
worth less than smaller,  perfect diamonds.  Your Keepsake Jeweler has  a
completeselection of new styles.  He's in the Yellow Pages under 
"Jewelers." Or, dial free day or  night longdistance 800-243-6000.  In
Connecticut, call 800-942-0655.  Keepsake'  R E G I S T E R E D D I A M O
ND R I N GS  HOW TO PLAN YOUR ENGAGEMENT AND WEDDING  Send new 20 pg.
booklet, "Planning Your Engagement and Wedding"  plus full color folder and
44 pg. Bride's Book gift offer all for only 25?. rS-71  Nan  Address.  City
 Stale _Zip_  KEEPSAKE, BOX 90, SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 13201  Ringsfrom $100 to
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Miller Analogies Test  G.R.E. Aptitude Test  NTE CommonExam  Reg./Grad.
Nursing  School Admission  S ^ ' x l l " * Paper •*$4.95
**$4.45, all others $3.95each  See these and many others at  your local
bookstore  COWLES BOOK COMPANY, INC.  WHENthere's so much  riding on the
results, go  into that exam in complete  control. Plan ahead with the 
onfystudy guides that accurately  simulate the test  you'll soon face
— in both  format and level ofdifficulty.  No clutter.
No frills.  Just the facts you need to  pass. Confidence gives a  big edge.
 Insist onQuality  Insist on Cowfes  Think Tank Says U.S.  Education is
Outmoded  Education in the United Statesneeds to be  revamped to include
studies of the history and  culture of minority groups; and education
atWestern is no exception.  This was the general feeling during a
discussion  of minority problems in theBellingham area at last  week's
meeting of the Community Relations  Think Tank-an organization ofinterested
persons  from the city and campus.  Bernie Thomas, president of the
American  Indian StudentUnion on campus, said that  American education
"glorifies the frontier push"  of settlers moving westward,but neglects the
 realities of that movement.  "It was done by slavery and murder," he said.
 "History books ignore the fact that the land was  already in the posession
of the Indians."  Thomas said that students ingrammar and high  school
should be made aware of the lack of  credibility and one-sidedness of
theirAmerican  history texts.  Brian Long, a representative of the
Washington  State Board AgainstDiscrimination, said that  education on
minorities is either not required or  inadequate in most schools inthe
state. Long said  he was not impressed with human relations courses  at
Western.  He suggested that Western revise its education  on minoriters for
both teachers and students.  Thomas said that a generaljob shortage in the 
area and a lack of publicized minority hiring  practices by local companies
havecontributed to  the Lummi tribe's impoverished condition.  Thomas said
many Lummis survive on a day today basis. The Lummi's development of the 
aquaculture project contrasted what he called  Indians'reputations for
being lazy people.  Dean of Students C.W. McDonald questioned  whether the
system ofreservations for Indians  should be continued or abolished. 
Thomas said reservations must be continuedbecause Indians would lose their
identity. "The  only way we have survived is by staying together,"  hesaid.
 The relations board agreed to urge businesses to  notify counsels
representing minority groups when  job openings occur and to organize
committees to  improve minority conditions in Bellingham.  The group will
organize a committee to  research business and hiring policies, one to 
coordinate tutoring and thefunding of tutorials  for Indian students and
one to improve education  concerning minorities at Western.The committees
will make preliminary reports  at the next meeting at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow in
 room 008,Viking Union building.  Also scheduled for tomorrow's meeting is
a  report on the Sehome Arboretumproposal and a  final report on proposed
student internships in  local businesses for Western students next quarter.
 The Community Relations Think Tank was  organized fall quarter to discuss
problems commonto both the college and city. It is open to any  member of
either community.  Future topics include druguse and abuse,  parking
problems and tenant-landlord relations.  New Design Center Helps 
SolveCommunity Woes  A new concept of community-oriented service,  the
Western Design Center, has beenestablished  on campus as the combined
effort of the home  economics and technology departments.  The chief
purpose of the center.is to combine  student problem-solving efforts with
problems  presented to thecenter by the community's  businesses and
organizations.  Marvin Southcott of the technologydepartment, said he hoped
the center would  become the "hub of design for the county."  Southcott
hasbeen instrumental in the  development of the center and designed the  .
center's trademark.  As anexample of what the new center would  do he said
that the technology department was  approached by the Camp Fire Girls
concerning the  feasibility of their constructing a swimming pool  at a
certain location."We worked on the idea, checked it out, and  came up with
some designs," he said. "But we  found that itwould be infeasible for them
to build  it."  Dorothy Ramsland, chairman of the home 
economicsdepartment, pointed out that the  Western Design Center will not
be taking jobs  away from professionaldesign people.  "We are not trying to
take away the designer's  or architect's job," she said. "What we willbe 
doing is more in the line of helping non-profit  organizations."  The
organizers of the Design Center sayit will  serve the same type of needs as
an internship  program. The students who participate in theprogram will
have the opportunity to use their  talents and the community will benefit
from  them.  A course titled, Design Center Research  Project, has already
been approved by the  Academic Council, and it ishoped that the course  can
be taught next quarter. Chairman Ramsland  called this course the first
step instudent  involvement with the Design Center.  Mary Joe Aegerter of
the home economics  department, said that inquiries had been made in  the
business community and that the idea of a  Design Center was Verywell
received.  "In fact, some companies have indicated they  might donate
materials like concrete andsuch for  us to experiment on," she said.  The
Western Design Center is presently using  existing officespace and faculty.
It is hoped that  in the future it will have its own building; housing 
various displays,projects, models, working labs  and offices.  The
long-range planning committee has  discussed theDesign Center and gave a
very  favorable response to its developers.  All of the people concerned
with thenew  Design Center, including Claude Hill of the  technology
department, chairman of the center,  are veryenthused over it.  According
to Ramsland, they feel the center  will be a tremendous community
serviceand will  help to improve relations between the college and  the
community.  Anti-mWtory Detent  GrowingAmong Gl'$  By JON UNGER  IWAKUNI,
JAPAN-Anti-war activists are  proselytizing GIs at R Rentertainment centers
 and U.S. military bases throughout the Pacific.  According to various
members ofthe military,  they are having at least moderate success in
places  ranging from Sidney, Australia, toMisawa in  northern Japan.
Spurred on in part by the  activists' efforts, the past year has seen
theemergence of underground newspapers, political  discussion groups and
associations of militant  blackenlisted men throughout America's Pacific 
forces.  The anti-military organizers are beginning to  gear their
activities to the conditions of their  specific locales. In Hong Kong they
are  distributing an R R guide tothe city which  features recommended
accomodations and sights  plus pointers on military law anddesertion. The 
Hong Kong activists also run a "commune" where  GIs "rap" and bed down free
of charge.A pacifist group in Sidney counsels GIs on  military law and
edits a newspaper aimed at  vacationingsoldiers, while at giant Clark Air
Force  Base in the Philippines church affiliated organizers  are helping
topublish "The Whig," an  underground anti-military newspaper.  On Okinawa,
U.S. and Okinawan peaceworkers  have brought in an American attorney to set
up a  law office to defend anti-military GIs. This office  is the first
attempt of its kind to provide legal  assistance to military dissidents
outside the U.S.  InJapan, where anti-military dissent has been  steadily
growing among GIs, American anti-war  organizershave brought together
disaffected  servicemen and the Japanese anti-war movement.  Japan's
massiveVietnam Peace Committee,  Beheiren, which in 1968 spirited four
crewmen of  the USS Intrepid throughSiberia to Sweden, now  devotes most of
its efforts to working with GIs. A  militant offshoot of Beheiren,The Japan
 Technical Committee to Aid Deserters, has  harbored some two dozen
enlisted men over thepase year.  Under the joint sponsorship of Beheiren
and  the Pacific Counseling Service, a California based  religious pacifist
group, five Americans and 25  Japanese are working full time with the part
time  help ofseveral hundred volunteer students. A few  months ago Japanese
students at Misawa Air Base  opened aGI coffee house where politics are
served  with drinks. In Tokyo, on the Ginza, the city's  plushentertainment
strip, pretty Japanese college  girls have been flirtaciously
propositioning GIs to  join themand discuss Army life and the Vietnam  war.
The U.S. military suddenly discontinued  R R flights toTokyo this fall, and
the  anti-military organizers are convinced that the girls  are the cause.



     ----------



     Western Front - 1971 March 9 - Page 7



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Tuesday, March 9, 1971 Western Front 7  Tech Majors  Find Challenge  in
Arts, Crafts  By STEVEJOHNSTON  Feature Editor  The real challenge for tech
majors is finding a new idea and then  mtting itdown on paper so it can be
built.  For Pete Arnold, an English teacher turned tech major, designing 
indworking with metal runs in his family. His grandfather owned a  bundry
and according to Arnold he was one of the best when it came  o the trade. 
Now he is following his grandfather's footsteps. He first triedeaching when
he graduated from Western a few years ago, but found   gt;ut he would
rather work withboth his hands and his mind.  "My mind was always on
building things," Arnold said as he put  he finishing touches on a mold for
a fuel injection system he designed  or his car.  The fuel injection system
is hisown idea. He showed some of his  irst rough drafts he made trying to
work out the idea of paper and  ;ome of the failures in making the mold out
of wood. Now he feels  he project is ready to go to the campusfoundry and
be poured into  iluminum.  Most of the students make projects they can use
when they finishhem. Dave Bozak built a fiber glass kayak for about $110.
Although  le has never been in one, he said thiswon't stop him from
navigating  t down a river when he gets a chance.  Each tech student has
his favoritematerial to work with; some like  jlastics, others like metal
and Craig Sheldon says he likes wood.Sheldon said he likes the feel of
wood, it has a warm feeling and  ;eems more alive than metal or plastic.He
is working on what he  ailed a "shape" for an art class. The "shape" looks
like a sailing ship  Tom oneangle and a giant Dutch shoe from another. 
Eventually most of his projects wind up on his sailboat,Sheldon  :aid. 
Like other tech students, Sheldon is above average in the  jatience
department and astickler for perfection. He will sand, then  un his hand
along the wood, shake his head, and sand somemore.  ,ach project must pass
the toughest judgment of all: the student's, or  t is discarded and
startedover.  Down in the basement of the tech building, Keith Erwin is
making  children's toy. It is best described as a large tub with a bubble
on the  Craig Sheldon, one of the 450 tech majors at Western, puts
thefinishing touches on a "shape" he designed for an art class.  b Photo By
JIM THOMSON  bottom. Kidscan rock in it or have someone spin them around.
The  tub also doubles as a boat.  Other students aretrying to perfect a way
to reshape wood by  soaking it in anhydrous ammonia gas. The wood is placed
in a special  tank for a certain period of time and then can be bent into
any shape  like clay.  Claude Hill, anassistant professor of technology,
showed some  pieces of wood that have gone through the gas. Somepieces were
tied  into knots and others into circles.  Hiss said the tech department is
not just concernedwith designing  and building, but also in finding a way
to recycle plastic. Because  plastic is chemicallymade, it will not rot and
return to its natural  state.  About half of the 450 tech majors at Western
plan togo into  industry, Hill said, with the rest going into teaching. 
Problems Solved by Design  By PATBRENNEN  Front Reporter  Nestled behind
the Art Building sits the home of Western's  technologydepartment, which is
probably one of the lesser known  departments on campus.  The
technologydepartment curriculum ranges from photography  to driver
education. Located somewhere in between is the field of  industrial design.
 Marvin Southcott, of the technology department faculty, said that 
industrialdesign covers many aspects, but he feels the most important  is
problem solving.  "I believe there is aneed for industrial arts and design
teachers to  start directing students to solve problems using
industrialdesign,  rather than having them learn a specific skill or
technique."  Southcott pointed out models andsketches of objects that 
students had designed and developed as solutions to problems posed  by
thetechnology department staff.  Each problem is solved by means of a
sketch, then a scale model,  and ifpossible, a full sized prototype. He
displayed sketches involving  new waste baskets and display cases for the
school, models of a slide  viewing and editing machine, and a prototype of
a one-man  aibmersiblevehicle.  The submersible vehicle is the brain-child
of Fred Parks, a senior  Parking Revenue  Where hasrevenue from parking
permits been used this past year?  This has even been questioned by the
parkingcommittee.  In a recent meeting, the parking committee voted
unanimously  that all money spentthroughout the year be approved in a
written  memo form by the committee itself.  When asked exactlyhow the
money had been handled by past  parking committees, one spokesman laughed
and said that noone  knew exactly.  He said it was not handled completely
by the parking committee as  it should havebeen, but was handled by several
people in different  Jas.  Because of this, parking money became difficult
to keep track ot,  and as a result the security department and the parking
committee has  difficulty intabulating exact expenditures.  Under the new
policy the committee:  1) Approves the operating budgetwhich the parking
manager is  responsible for and must report monthly to the committee.  2)
Approvesfunds for each parking lot project.  majoring in technology, who
has been working on it since last fall. Ithas progressed from an idea and
is now a partially completed  mock-up, constructed of styrofoam. 
Whencompleted the vehicle termed "Project Seaquest" will be  built of rigid
urethane foam, covered by fiberglass reinforced plastic.  It will be
powered by a lead-acid battery, and Parks hopes it will make  two and
onehalf to four knots underwater.  Parks hopes to have the dolphin shaped,
propeller driven vehicle  finished by early summer.  "If everything turns
out okay, this thing might become something  like an underwatersnowmobile,"
he said. "If the cost is kept low it  could be a very popular item."  Parks
has constructed alot of the material for his vehicle in the  technology
department. Other material will have to be purchasedfrom manufacturers.
Parks cited a lack of money as one of his major  problems. All of the money
iscoming from his own pocket. Parks has  put a lot of time and effort into
the vehicle, and refers to it as hisown  private "trip."  "I would like to
see more people get into the cool type of things  the technologydepartment
has to offer," Parks added. "It really gives  you a chance to show yourself
what you can do."Evergreen College  Mary Ellen Hillaire of Olympia,
currently Supervisor of Manpower  Development for theState Division of
Vocational Education, has been  appointed as a member of the faculty at The
EvergreenState College,  Vice President and Provost David G. Barry
announced today. The  appointment is effectivenext September.  Miss
Hillaire, a Lummi Indian, is the first woman faculty member  named
atWashington's newest public four-year college, which opens  next September
27. Her initial assignment will be in the area of  minorities education,
Barry said.  She is the first of about three dozen faculty membersexpected
to  be selected within the next few weeks to join the present 18 planning 
faculty to prepare foropening the college next fall.  De Paul's  Jewelry 
Diamonds for All Occasions!  Jewelry for Fashion-Minded People!  Graduate
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     ----------



     Western Front - 1971 March 9 - Page 8



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Western Front Tuesday, March 9, 1971  Doctor's Bag Campus Briefs  By ARNOLD
WERNER, M.D.College Press Service  QUESTION: I have heard that  many women
doctors take birth  control pillscontinuously  without intervening periods
and  that the only reason for having  periods when on the pill is a
psychological one.  If I go for two months  without a period I feel a
little  tired and draggy. Is thispsychosomatic? I don't want to  be doing
anything foolish but  would very much like to avoid  periods.ANSWER: Hmm,
now that you  mention it, I've never asked any  of my women colleagues what
 they doabout contraception. On  the other hand, I do know that  some women
who have suffered  with unusuallyheavy menstrual  flow have been placed on 
contraceptives continuously for  many months.  The reason for inducing a 
period while on the pill is  primarily psychological, but I  don't know if
people have  investigated the long-term effect  of continual use of the
pill. The  normal menstrual period occurs  after a buildup of the lining of
 the uterus. What occurs with the  pill is a mild withdrawal bleeding 
because of the change inhormone level when the pill is  stopped.  Going for
two months  without a period shouldn't  effect the wayyou feel under  usual
circumstances. Your  problem may be more complex  and consultation with
yourgynecologist would be wise  before you decide to take the  pill in a
way other than he has  prescribed.QUESTION: We have been  married for seven
months. My  husband is always ready to have  intercourse. I enjoy it but do
not  want it as often as he. I have  never had an orgasm while we  are
having intercourse.Sometimes I have a clitoral  orgasm when I am on top of 
him, but he does not help me.  I make myhusband think  that I do have
orgasm because it  makes him happy. Ever since I  was a little girl, I
haveproduced  clitoral orgasms myself. Could  this prevent me from having 
orgasms during intercourse?ANSWER: Supposedly, one of  the distinguishing
characteristics  of human beings is that they  profit from the experiences
of  other people. While knowledge  may be advanced in some  scientific
fields in thismanner,  when it comes to marriage,  many couples are faced
with a  do-it-yourself project with noinstructions and with little  benefit
from the experience of  millions who have done it  themselves before.Many
happily married people  could tell you (if they were  willing to be candid)
that  adjustments in sexualactivity  are rather common throughout 
marriage, but especially during  the first year or two. Sexualintercourse
often occurs with a  much greater frequency during  the first year of
marriage than it  doessubsequently. It is quite  common for the man to be
more  readily aroused sexually and to  desireintercourse more often  than
his wife. Many women  experience an increased desire  for sexual activity
asmarriage  progresses. The inability to  understand each other's needs 
early in marriage can result in  theman's sexual interest flagging  at the
time his wife's interest is  increasing.  Interpersonal
understanding,nonsexual as well as sexual,  takes place over a period of 
years. Therefore, it is not  surprising thatdifficulties in  adjustment are
experienced by  couples who marry after a long  involvement with each
otheras  well as by couples who have  known each other for a short  time. 
An orgasm is a complex  neurologicoccurrence with an  emotional component
as well as  widespread sensory and motor  manifestations. It isnot located 
solely in the clitoris or vagina or  any other anatomic part, male or 
female. It is a sexualhappening.  If anything, producing orgasms  yourself
(masturbation) should  enhance the possibility ofhaving  orgasm during
intercourse unless  there are other things hanging  you up. You and your
husbandprobably could both benefit  from some further information  about
sex and sexual technique.  Making yourhusband think  that you are having an
orgasm  when you are not may make him  happy, which may makeyou  happy, but
it's not the same  thing as being able to be open  w i t h each other. Two 
inexpensivepaperbacks you may  both enjoy looking at are  "Sexual
Expression in Marriage"  by Donald W. Hastings, M.D.,  published by Bantam
and  "Analysis of Human Sexual  Response" by Brecher and  Brecher, aSignet
paperback.  Women's Commission  An organizational meeting of the Women's
Commission will be held at 4 p.m. today in Viking Union 008, the dean of
women  announced Friday.  The meeting will besponsored by Valkyrie, the
women's service  organization, the Black Students Union, the
AssociatedWomen  Students, the Vikettes and the Women's Recreation
Association.  Dean of Women MaryRobinson's secretary also announced that 
•students and faculty with childern were invited to a
noonluncheon  Thursday in Viking Union 355.  The Rev. and Mrs. Rod
MacKenzie of Campus Christian Ministry  will lead a discussion on the
communications gap.  Wilson Library  Wilson Library has recently
receivedthe Human Relations Area  Files.  This material, which contains
information on some 220 ethnic  groupsand 66 national societies throughout
the world, is valuable  resource material for studying individualcultures,
or for making  cross-cultural comparisons.  The material is available on
microfilm, and moreinformation can  be obtained at the Reference Office of
the library.  Saga Changes  There will be somechanges in the way Saga
operates its dining  program spring quarter, according to Vince
Gallagher,campus food  services director.  Some of the dining hours will be
shortened for the coming quarter.  Thenew schedule for weekdays is: 
—breakfast: 7 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. 
—lunch: 11:15 a.m. -1:30 p.m.—dinner:
4:30 p.m. - 6 p.m.  On weekends the dining schedule will be: 
—breakfast: 8 a.m. - 9 a.m.  -lunch: 11:30 a.m. - 12:30
p.m.  —dinner': 4:30 p.m. - 6 p.m.  The campus
commissary at the south endof the campus, where  about 80 per cent of the
dining hall's food is prepared, will be closed  down forspring quarter and
the food will be prepared at the Viking  Commons.  Gallagher said that the
reason forthese changes is that the dorm  population is expected to drop
during spring quarter, and as a result,Saga will be forced to drop some of
its student employees. He did not  know how many will be laid off atpresent
though.  TONIGHT  360° Sound 26 Projectors  8:30 PM  WESTERN
WASHINGTON STATECOLLEGE  CARVER GYM  Students -$1.50 General --$2.50
Tickets at VU Desk and Puget SoundRecords



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     Western Front - 1971 March 9 - Page 9



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Tuesday, March 9, 1971 Western Front 9  Anthony Caro stands behind his
sculpture titled Piece LXXIV.The sculpture is part of the art exhibit being
 shown in the Western Gallery until March 19.  Photo by RONLITZENBERGER 
Daugert Proposal Still  lAlive and Well, but  ooper "Still Skeptical" 
Contrary to popularbelief, the Daugert  proposal is alive and well. An
all-college  government as outlined in the controversialproposal may
actually be established in 1971.  The Daugert proposal, which outlines a
method  forcombining the various divisions of campus  government into one
all-college senate, was  approved by theFaculty Council for the second 
time as they met last Thursday.  The history of the proposal is a long
andcomplex story about successive maneuvers and  entanglements.  Last
spring the students passed theproposal  but the faculty voted it down. The
Faculty  Council then appointed a committee to design arevised proposal
that might be acceptable to the  Western faculty.  When the revised
proposal camebefore the  Faculty Council the student government listed 
three objections to it, but the council passed itanyway in their March 4
meeting.  Because there was no student representation at  the meeting,
councilchairman Melvin Davidson  and representatives of the AS got together
to  salvage what they could.  Theprimary objections the AS government had 
to the Daugert proposal were:  —inadequate
studentrepresentation on senate  committees and the undergraduate council. 
—review of senate action and the—poor
philosophy of the document.  The first revision by the Faculty Council 
changed the representationof the Academic  coordinating commission from 10
faculty with five  students to 12 faculty and threestudents. The  document
is very vague about representation on  other major committees leaving
thequestion of  representation on those bodies unspecified until  the
senate can meet and decide. On theundergraduate council, the Faculty
Council  changed the representation from unspecified to 12  faculty and
four undergraduates.  "Students lack necessary and minimum  representation'
in the senate but thestudent  representation on major policy and
recommending  committees is either tokenism or unspecified," AS  President
Steve Cooper objected.  "They (the faculty) made changes so the  faculty
would pass it,"Cooper said.  As the document reads now any review of 
senate action will require a petition signed byone-third of any
constituency in order for students  to do this, over 3,000 names need to be
obtained  while the faculty, for example, need only 170  faculty names. 
The third objection of student government to  theDaugert proposal
encompasses its entire  philosophy. While Cooper and AS Vice-President 
Gary Evansbelieve there is a need for some type  of all-college governance,
they see the basic faulty  inference of thedocument placing students' major
 concerns with student services and placing faculty  concerns
withcurriculum and hiring and firing.  Since Faculty Council passed the
first revised  version of the Daugertproposal, AS  representatives made a
quick compromise on their  initial stand and settled for a guaranteethat
the  student representation on lower policy-making  bodies of the
all-college senate would be in thesame proportion as it is in the current 
policy-making committees.  This second revision of the Daugertproposal  was
submitted to the Faculty Council last  Thursday and passed.  Cooper said
that if acompromise hadn't been  reached, the faculty would have formed
their own  senate and quite possiblydictated the number of  students that
would serve on the committees with  less student representation
oncommittees than  exists now.  "Both Gary Evans and I are still skeptical
of  the Daugert proposal," Cooper said, since "there  are a lot of
inequities."  Faculty Council Chairman Davidson said that  he was "more
orless" satisfied with the proposal  and it would now be sent to a faculty
forum for  discussion in April.  Theproposal will be put before students in
the  spring elections during April, Cooper said. Dorm  meetings andopen
hearings will be held to discuss  the proposal prior to the election, he
added.  Flora Opposes VetsPresident  Tuition Increase Proposal  College
President Charles Flora said Thursday  that he is opposed to the tuition
increase proposal  presented by the League of Collegiate Veterans  (LCV) at
Western.  LCVPresident Paul Herbold Jr. had earlier  proposed that the
existing academic requirements  for remaining incollege be enforced. 
Herbold said that currently everyone who is  suspended because of low
grades isreinstated upon  petition.  Flora told the Western Front Thursday
that  students are reinstated only whenstudents present  evidence that
their low grades were due to  extenuating circumstances.  "I think
thepresent standards are sufficient,"  Flora said. "I am opposed to elitist
education."  Reducing the enrollment will not alleviate the  financial
crisis Western faces, Flora said.  "If we reduce enrollment to
8,000students,  the legislature will reduce the budget accordingly." 
Western was required to rebate $160,000last  fall when enrollment was some
200 students less  than the college had been budgeted for.  Flora also
denied that a student had a right to  pay for only that part of tuition and
fees from  which he receives abenefit.  "That is like saying that taxpayers
do not have  to pay taxes to support a mental institution if they  do not
have relatives in one," he said.  "When you start talking that way, the 
argument gets absurd."  He also indicated that the question of  withholding
portions of the fees involved legal  aspects.  "Tuition andfees are legally
collected and  legally spent."  He said that a student would probably end
up  paying theentire amount or not go to school.  LANGE VOLKSWAGEN 
112SamishWay 734-5230  Sales: New andused Volkswagens.  Service: We will
provide transportation for  customers to and from the campus  whileyour,
car is being serviced.  Open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.  Monday - Saturday  HUGE  
WILD DISCOUNTS /STEREO RECORDS   TAPES  SPEEDY SERVICE-SEND FOR YOUR FREE
11ST  THE STUDENTSTORE P.O. iOX 64  REDONDO BEACH, CALIFORNIA 90277  NAME 
ADDRESS  LATHAM'S SERVICE Major and Minor Tuneups  All Needed Accessories 
Service On All Cars  Garden and  Holly streets  t, free dryf  Smith
Cleaners $ gt; Laundry, Inc.  ... ON ALL WASH DONE IN OUR WASHERS!  State 
Boulevard Always Open  arts and lecture  presents series!  The Repertory
Dance  Theatre of Utah  Xj gt;Residency program: March 9-11  £}
gt; Performance: Thursday, March 11, 8:15 p.m.  E gt; MusicAuditorium  |gti
WWSC Students, Faculty   Staff Free  W High School $.75; General $ 1.50 
dinds  PIZZA  SMORGASBORD  Wednesday 4 to 9 p.m.  ALL YOU CAN EAT FOR $1.50
(under 10-half price)  111 E.Magnolia (next to Pay 'n' Save) 734-9365



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     Western Front - 1971 March 9 - Page 10



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10 Western "Front Tuesday/March 9, 1971' 
classifieds...Y//SS////S///////////S////S/////////////////S///////////////S////////////////////////••MMMWMimMMmMtMntiMmiiitnniMiiiiHMiiiniHtiitMMii
 10 MISC. FOR SALE  FOR SALE: T.V.$35; other  appliances also. Call
734-8997  after 5  MUST SELL NOW!! Ski  equipment. Boots, new, withbuckles,
un-used. Size 8D.  $34.95. Skis, metal, excellent  condition. $39.95. Chuck
 D earing, 617 No.Forest.  734-0370.  Jackson Hole 7-Day ski trip  with
Central, U. of W. spring •  break. Transportation,lifts, 
lodging, parties. $85.  Deadline. 676-5277 or  676-4575.  Reg. PERSIANS,
heavy coated  MANX inlovely colors.  TERMS. SIAMESE. Nice  CROSSES. $5  
up.  734-5590.  Bdrm., living room, babyfurniture. Stroller, crib, 
playpen. Must sell-best offer.  Call 734-8997 after 5.  Handcrafted Pottery
byKathryn Roe for sale. March 7  12 noon to 8 p.m. March 8, 10  a.m.-8 p.m.
Museum Art  Studio, 318 W.Champion.  KING-SIZED WATER BEDS.  $35 with
accessories  guaranteed. Call Ken,  676-0888 after 4p.m.  MUST SELL
QUICK!!! 8' x  35' TRAILER. Wi bdrm.,  bath, kit.   living rm.  Remodeled.
Walk dist. to campus. See at 119 N. Samish  Way Number 52 or leave 
message. 676-5748. Dennis.  $1795 or bestoffer.  LAND ROVER, 1966, with 
winch $1500. 733-3086 or  676-3236.  '67 Triumph 650 cc Tr 6  $650,938
Fairhaven.  676-4461. Will deal for truck.  GE washer and drier for sale, 
$50 each. Call Nancy  734-0083.  11 CARS AND CYCLES  nimniiiiimitniMtitui 
March 4 in Lot 16-B behind  power plant, pleasecontact  Rich Lacasso, grad
student in  Psych. Dept. Ext. 3518.  1965 OLDS  734-7168.  442 4-speed.20
FOR RENT  Room for rent,  town 734-1975.  $45 close to  2203 Elm St.  '51
FORD.  Make offer.  734-6503.  Runs  Call  GOOD!!  Dave at  Anybody having
info, concerning  HIT   RUN on rt.-rear  fender of aparked turq. 
Austin-Healey, Thurs. nite.,  3 bedroom furnished house  for 6 students.
$270 per ,  month,utilities paid. See at  1025 High Street, Call  734-6082 
Men, one block from campus.  $125-135 qtr.Kitchen and  laundry facilities.
317 Cedar.  734-6987 after 4:30.  On Lake Whatcom—New 
luxurious 2bedroom apts.-all  electric appliances-wall to  wall
carpeting—drapes—private ;  p a t i o
d e c k - b e ach  front—beach cabana. P One yr.  lease
and deposit. 734-3225.  30 ROOMMATE WANTEDRoommate: 1 girl needed  Birnam
Wood Apts. 676-5622.  WANTED 2 Female Roommates  to share 2bedroom apt. 
Close to campus. 703 Vi N.  Garden. Phone 733-1173  32 WANTED  WANTED TO
BUY:Small  dorm-size refrigerator.  686-5168.  If you have a one bedroom 
apt. that you're moving out of  springquarter, please call  Gordon 734-2293
after 4:30.  Someone to take over Fair-haven  Housing Contract forSpring
qtr. 622 Fairhaven  College, Edward DeWalt. Write  or come to Fairhaven
College  Library from 11p.m. to 1  a.m. when I work there  (except Friday).
 Girls wanted in modern apart.  All utilities pd. 734-8012. 
MHMinmUMaiaMNIHNWMHMWMI NIMIIMIHUMMH^  I 1 Day I  iShirt Service!  s 3  s 3
 1 i  1COMPLETE LAUNDRY |  | AND DRY CLEANING |  | Free Pickup   Delivery |
 I 734—4200 I  205PROSPECT 1 
MNH»atlMIHMmilUUmMimMNUIIIIMNHMimiinMtMt?  1  The cR naway  Car 
Fiat 850Spider  Runs away  . from high  cost and high  upkeep.  4-speed 
synchromesh  stick shift;  dashmounted  tachometer;  front disc  brakes.
Handsome  all-vinyl  interior.  Under-coated  and  ready togo!  $2,335 i 
Wilson Motors  Fiat Sales and Servi®  Across from  the Public
Library  FOR THAT  TERMPROJECT  Typewriter Rentals  Smith Corona Portable 
Sterling Model  Smith Corona Galaxie  SmithCorona 120 Electric  Portable 
IBM Selectric Electric  Month  9.00  12.00  22.50  3 Month  24.00 
33.0060.00  24.00 65.00  Min. 1 week  7.00  10.00  15.00  2 weeks 15.00 
First Three Months of Rental MayApply to Purchase of Machine  Colorful
Candles and Incense  STUDENTS'  Clocks - Timex WatchesSTORE  save your
sales receipts  Campus Briefs  Anti-War Speaker  National anti-war leader
Mike Kellywill be in Bellingham  tomorrow and Thursday on a number of
speaking engagements as.  part of the localpreparation for National Peace
Action Week.  His proposed itinerary is:  Tomorrow: preSs conference
at10:30 a.m.  Faculty party later this evening  Details to be announced. 
..Thursday: Fairhaven College at 10p.m.  Western Campus at 12:30 in the VU
Lounge  Community Workshop at 7:30 p.m. in the  LummiRoom of the YMCA.  The
theme of his speeches will be "The Fraud of Vietnamization.  Kelly is
beingbrought here by the Student Mobilization Committee to  end the war in
Southeast Asia (SMC), as-part ofthe preparation for  National "Peace Action
Week, April 17 to 24.  Kelly has been in the forefront of anti-war
activities since 1964. He  was co-chairman of the 1969 New England anti-war
coalition which  brought100,000 people to Boston Commons.  He was also
director of the Massachusetts anti-war referendum inthe United States.
Kelly was co-ordinator for the Massachusetts State  S.M.C. and was a member
of thestaff of the National Peace Actior  coalition.  He is now
co-ordinator of the Seattle Peace Action coalitionand  director of the
Seattle Peace Initiative, 1971 campaign.  Car Break-ins  Two incidents of
theft fromcars in college parking lots were  reported last week by the
campus security department.  Lee Brown,campus security marshal, said that
between 7:30 p.m.  Monday and 5 p.m. Tuesday a gear shift lever,gear shift
linkage, two  tape decks, a number of tapes and a reverberator unit were
stolen  from a car in lot26-D. The items were valued at about 200 dollars. 
The gear shift knobs were stolen from a car at about3:30 p.m.  Tuesday in
lot 8-A. The value of the knobs was 3 to 5 dollars.  Brown said that the
mostcommon items stolen from cars are tape  decks, tapes, speakers, and
gear shift knobs.  "It's getting tothe point that some insurance companies
charge  extra for theft coverage on cars with tape decks in them, and some 
simply refuse to sell coverage," Brown said.  He added that there are
probably a lot of theftsfrom cars in  campus lots that never get reported. 
"I think that part of the reason people don't lock theircars when  they
leave them is that they just don't like to stop to unlock them  when they
come back. Ifpeople would just get into the habit of  locking their doors,
the number of stolen articles would go downquite a bit," Brown said.  Dean
of Western  The dean selection committee will resume interviewing for
thedean of Western position Thursday and Friday, committee chairman  Robert
Monahan said Friday.  ArthurC. MacKinney, dean of the. College of Science
and Society  at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside, willmeet with
committee  members, administration, faculty and students during his two day
visit  to campus,Monahan said.  He said the best time for students to meet
MacKinney would be  during the CollegeCommunity Tea from 4:15 to 5:15 p.m.
Thursday  in Viking Union 361—363.  Dean of Western
FredKnapman has said that he took the position  for one year only and plans
to return to his faculty position inthe  chemistry department.  Repertory
Dance Theatre  Repertory Dance Theatre, a professional moderndance company 
in residence at the University of Utah, will be on Western's campus  March
9-11.  Part ofthe winter Arts and Lectures series, the group will climax 
three days of workshops with an eveningperformance on Thursday,  March 11,
at 8:15 p.m. in the Music Auditorium.  The group is the onlyrepertory
modern dance company in  America, and is the only one in residence at a
university. The 12members provide thier own ideas for repertoire and
arrangement, and  are considered one of the mostcreative dance groups ever.
 The company will work with oral interpretation classes, sculpture 
classes,acting classes and women's physical education classes.  A grant
from the National Endowment for theArts has made it  possible for the group
to appear at Western.  Ecology Course  In keeping with thecontinuing
concern for ecology, the biology  department is offering a new course,
Current Trends inEcology, for  spring quarter.  The course will feature
lectures and assigned readings on local air  and water pollution problems.
It will be concerned with sources,  effects and measurements of pollutants
and willinclude lectures on  solid waste disposal and noise pollution.  The
formulation and enforcement of pollution regulations at  federal, state and
local levels with emphasis on problems of the Puget  Sound Basin willalso
be studied.  The course, entitled Biology 445b, will be held at 11 a.m.
Monday,  Wednesday andFriday and is available as an upper-division elective
to  students who are not majoring in Biology. It is notavailable to those 
students who are concurrently enrolled in Biology 397, Chemistry  397, or
Biology 307. Students wishing to add this course to their spring schedules
should  obtain a pink slip in the office of thebiology department, Haggard 
Hall 341.



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     Western Front - 1971 March 9 - Page 11



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Tuesday, March 9, 1971 Western hront I  Formers Claim Intolco  Fluoride
Hurts Cottle, Hoy  By STEVEJOHNSTON  Feature Editor  Farmers in the
northern part of Whatcom  County have started a' law suitagainst Intalco 
Aluminum Company. They contend the plant's  by-products are hurting their
cattle andhay.  The farmers say there is a high amount of  fluoride in the
area which gets into the hay and  when thecattle eat the hay it effects
their bone  and teeth structure.  The first suit is to be heard Oct. 1. 
WilliamWieb, a physics professor at Western,  who has made a study in the
area, said there is a  definite effecton the cattle.  "A little fluoride
does not hurt, such as the  amount you get in your toothpaste," he
said."But  this has gone far beyond the limits."  He said the fluoride has
not effected humans  yet.  The fluoridecomes from a bath material called 
cryolite which is used in reducing alumina to  aluminum. Wieb said the
cryolite, a  sodium-aluminum fluoride, is vaporized in huge  vats and fans
suck it into domes to bechemically  cleaned, but some of the vapor escapes
into the air  before it is cleaned.  To correct thisproblem, Wieb said,
Intalco  would have to put in a bigger dome.  Jerry McRorie, a spokesman
for Intalco,said  that the plant is planning on putting in a $15  million
"scrubbing" system that will clean the air.  "Wethought our present system
was very  effective when we first put it in," McRorie said,  "then we got
slapped with a lawsuit from a  farmer." Other farmers have joined in the
suit.  McRorie said the new system isrequired by  state law and should
correct the problems.  Still Wieb feels there is a danger in the area 
withthe present system. He said he has seen the  figures collected by
county health officials which  provethere is too much fluoride in the area,
but  he could not disclose these figures because of the  pendinglawsuit. He
has also seen the cattle and  what effects the fluoride has on them.  He
said because thefluoride does effect the  bone and teeth structure the
cattle are stunted and  have less meat.  DischargePermits  For Several
Local  The federal government is in the final stages of  adopting
environmentalprotection regulations  concerning the discharge of waste
materials into  navigable waters. This will affectseveral local 
industries.  Under the new federal permit program, waste  discharge permits
will be required"for all present  and future discharges into navigable
waters or their  tributaries. Municipalities are generally exempt  from
this requirement," according to the U.S.  Army Corps of Engineers. 
According to PaulDupell, chief public affairs  officer for the Corps'
Seattle office, "All firms  currently discharging intonavigable waters 
without a permit must submit a permit application  to the Corps of
Engineers by July I,1971. The  regulation warns that the absence of
official  objection to past or continuing discharges shouldnot be
interpreted as authority to discharge in the  absence of a permit."  Local
industries which arecurrently, or plan to  dump waste material into
navigable waters include  the Intalco Aluminum Company,the Mobil and  ARCO
refineries in Whatcom County and the Shell  and Texaco refineries in Skagit
County.  Permit decisions will be based on the impact of  the discharge on
anchorage and navigation, waterquality standards and on fish and wildlife 
resources not directly related to water quality  standards.  "Nopermit will
be issued without certification  from the appropriate state or interstate
agency . . .  or when theEnvironmental Protection Agency has  recommended
that a permit be denied for water  qualityconsiderations," according to a
statement  by Dupell.  Industries would be required to identify
thecharacter of the discharge or deposit and  Also the farmers are having a
hard time selling  their hay to feed stores. Wieb sited one example of  a
farmer who lives near Intalco and couldn't sell  his 600 tons of hay.Word
had gotten around that  the farmer's hay was no good and none of the 
stores would buy it. Intalpobought 200 tons of  the hay and sold it
elsewhere.  Another problem the farmers are having is  gettingloans from
banks. The local bankers are  afraid the farmers will go broke and won't be
able  to pay backthe money.  The fluoride seems to be hurting the wildlife
in  the area also. Wieb said that a group ofbeavers  which have been
building dams in a nearby creek  for years, has suddenly stopped
theirconstruction.  He thinks this work stoppage might also be caused  by
fluoride running off the hills into thecreek.  Intalco's fluoride runs in a
"valley," Wieb said.  The wind blows from a northwest direction andcovers
the farms lying with the valley. Like  Northwest Air Pollution, Wieb has
put up testing  stands in the area.  McRorie said Intalco has been buying
farms in  the area, but had to give up because it was gettingtoo expensive.
 Wieb first found out about the fluoride when  he was taking air samples in
the area foranother  project. He said he began talking with the farmers 
and they told him about the cattle. At first hethought they were just
frightened but as he  checked into the situation he found a high amount  of
fluoride. "It does not mean their cattle are dying," he  said, "but there
is reason for concern."  Both McRorie andWieb said Intalco will run  free
tests on the cattle and hay. Wieb said the tests  are honest and that
Intalco would not try to rig  them in their favor.  "There should be an
awareness of the problem,  but not theemotional kind," Wieb said. "The
issue  is that there are pollutants going into the air that  shouldn't
begoing there."  Required  Industries  monitoring devices and procedures
which will be  used. Informationwould include "data pertaining  to chemical
content, water temperature  differentials, toxins, sewage,amount and 
frequency of discharge or deposit and the type and  quality of solids
involved, if any."Industries must determine the effect of the  disposition
of the solids on the waterway and  either assumeresponsibility for the
periodic  removal of solids by dredging or reimburse the  United States for
the cost otdredging.  "The Corps of Engineers will issue a public  notice
stating the name and address of theapplicant, the location of the proposed
discharge  and fully identify the character of the discharge."Interested
parties will have 30 days to express  their views concerning the permit
application.  Applicantswill be furnished copies of the  objections. If
notice of a permit application evokes  substantial publicinterest, a public
hearing may be  held.  "A transcript of the hearing, together with 
relevant documents, will become a part of the  permit application assembly.
 "No permit may be issued which authorizes adischarge or deposit for more
than five years  without providing for revalidation of such  permit." 
Theregulations would provide for possible  suspension or revocation in the
event that the  industry breachesany condition of the permit or if  it is
discovered that the discharge or deposit  contains hazardousmaterials which
may pose a  danger to "health and safety."  Further information on the
regulations may be obtained by writing to: Chief of Engineers,'  Attention:
ENGPA, Department of the Army,  Washington,D.C. 20314.  FOREST A !  FIRES
BURN «  MORE Vi  THAN M  'vtPlia  TREES mk    MM m  YOU'RENUMBER
ONE  WITH US IN 71 AT:  American Oil  Service  U-Haul, Towing,  Tune-ups, 
Engine andTransmission  work.  CLEAN  RESTR00MS.  HI-WAY MAPS.  10% 
DISCOUNT  to all STUDENTS  ANDFACULTY  WITH ID.  ...ON: oil, tires, 
batteries, accessories,  lubes and labor  iOPEN: 6 a.m  -12midnight  Phone:
 733-6020  Located  Across  from Denny's  -Next to  Valu-Mart  You expect
morefromAmerican and you get it!!'  WESTERN WASHINGTON STATE COLLEGE  ART
FILM SERIESPRESENTS...  Marcel Carrie's  Children of Paradise  This is a
film, that moves and excites audiences onso  many levels that no
explication, no matter how  thorough, can even begin to do it
justice.Performance: Friday, March l'i  Because of the unusual length of
this film (3 hours),  there will be only oneshowing: 8:15 p.m. in the Music
 Auditorium Students $ .75; General S1.25  OFFICIAL WWSC  I  I  I  I  I  I 
I  EuROPl  Charter Flights  March 28  April 26 to May 23  June 9 to July 17
 June 10  June 14 to Sept. 20  July 3 to Aug. 16  July 21 to Aug. 11  July
24 to Sept. 11  Aug. 15 to Sept. 12  October 9  RICH HASS211 Viking Union
Building  Western Washington State College  Bellingham, Washington  One Way
 4Weeks  6 Weeks  One Way  14 Weeks  6 Weeks  3 Weeks  8 Weeks  4 Weeks 
One Way  To LondonLondon  London  To Seattle  London  London  London 
London  London  To London  dates on request.Please cal  ina  $160  $249 
$265  $100  $289  $269  $239  $259  $239  $115  !  676-3460 or  676-5195 
II  I  I  I  I  I  I



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     Western Front - 1971 March 9 - Page 12



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12 Western Front Tuesday, March 9, 1971  Tankers Take 3rd Spot  In Evco
Championship  Western'sswim team finished a distant third in  the Evergreen
Conference Swim Championship last  weekend,yielding first and second spots
to Central  and Southern Oregon College.  Sophomore Tom Ward brokeWestern's
varsity  record for the 200 yard butterfly with a time of  2:15.1.  Coach
Don Wiseman said hewas happy with  both the results of the Ellensburg meet
and with  the team's overall performancethroughout the  year. He made no
comment on next year's swim  outlook. Diver Jerry Kelly is the
onlygraduating  senior on this year's team.  The five teams competing in
this year's final  swim meet and theirtotal points were Central  (228),
Southern Oregon College (141), Western  (32), Oregon College ofEducation
(27) and  Eastern Oregon (24).  Last year, Western was second in a three
team  conferencemeet. This year's five-team field was a  result of a merger
that brought four Oregon  colleges from theOregon Collegiate Conference 
into the Evergreen Conference.  Sophomore Rick Wertman placed fifth inthe 
200 yard individual medley with a time of 2:14.6  and fourth in the 400
yard individual medley with  a4:54.1 time.  Bruce Johnson was fifth in the
200 yard  backstroke at 2:25.1 and Tom Ward was sixth  witha 2:33.8 time.
Ross May was sixth in the 100  yard breaststroke with a time of 1:10.4.  In
the 800 yardfreestyle, Larry Caton, Ken  Visser, Tom Ward and Rick Wertman
took fourth  spot with a time of 8:17.Bruce Johnson, Jerry  Gent, Jeff
Stith and Ross May also took fourth  place ir the 400 yard medley relaywith
a 4:15.9  time. Ward, Wertman, Caton and Stith were fourth  in the 400 yard
freestyle relay.  SPORTSHORTS By LARRY LEMON  Sports Editor  WHITE MAKES
ALL-EVCO TEAM: Western's  Gary Whitewas named to a forward position on  the
1970-71 All-Evergreen Conference basketball  team. Along withWhite on the 
first team were Central's  forward Rich Hanson, Eastern's  center Randy
Buss, OregonTech's guard Mel Farris and  Oregon College's guard Bob  Sisk.
Given honorable mention  from Westernwere center Rudy  Thomas, guard Lee
Roy Shults  and guard Mike Franza.  Western's team captain andGary White 
defensive spark-plug Neal Larson didn't make the  list. How soon they
forget, eh Neal?  WETJUMPERS: Members of Western's parachute  club will be
cluttering up the bay next quarter  when theyinject a new goody into their
program:  water jumping. Water jumping is a tricky operation 
involvingdetaching oneself from one's parachute  just before one hits the
water. For those with poor  depthperception, this feat could turn out to be
an  exercise in belly-flops or high-diving. The old pros  of the clubare
readying themselves for a meet in  Boise on April 9. This looks to be one
of the major  meets of theseason and should attract jumpers  from many
colleges.  :}: * * * * :|: * * *  FENCERS STABBED IN SANJOSE: Tenth spot 
in an all-California fencing tourney is not all that  bad, despite what
Western's leadswordsman Tim  McGrath may think. Western managed to hold 
their own pretty well against 14 Californiateams  and a powerful Air Force
Academy squad. The  next event for coach Greg Chase's team may behosting
the Spring Open Tourney on March 20 or  21, if they can get the gym space.
Amazing how  limited gym space and time is for the less  well-known sports
and activities . . . .  YACHTERS STILL SHORT OFCASH: Unless  they can
scrape up another $1500 it looks like the  Viking Yacht Club is going to
have toturn down  its second invitation in three years to the Kennedy  Cup
Regatta back in Maryland. Considering the  fine work they do for water
safety with their free  sailing lessons, you'd think the local
communitymight swing through with a few_ bucks.  ONE LAST THOUGHT TO
GRAPPLE WITH:  How is it that lastyear, when Western had four 
all-conference champs, there was only enough  money budgeted to sendtwo of
them back east to  the NAIA wrestling championships? Yet this year,  when
the college boasts only one all-conference  champ and the big budget
squeeze is on, the P.E.  department has managed to come up with the 
plane-fare for three wrestlers?  1971 'Man'of the Year  Describes Olympic
Career  By JACKIELAWSON  Front Reporter  Cheating, children, the difference
in  American-Russian attitudes towardathletes and a  track star's guide to
world travel were all topics  covered last Tuesday when Seattle's Manof the
 Year for 1971, Mrs. Doris Brown, addressed a  group of Western students in
Bond Hall.  Herpresentation included slides taken around  the world at
various meets, and advice on teaching,  for she is a teacher at Seattle
Pacific College as  well-as being an Olympic track champion.  "All teachers
have aresponsibility to children,  to be aware of their needs and
potential. I use my  experience to broaden theircuriosity," she said. 
Addressing a crowd comprised mainly of P.E.  majors, Mrs. Brown pointed out
thatrunning is an  example of a basic need, the need to enjoy.  "It is
important to help people realize theirpotential and to reap all possible
enjoyment from  an activity," she said.  Recounting her experiences atthe
1968  Olympic Games in Mexico city, she said that the  average age for
participants is 19.  TheOlympics, hovever, are not necessarily run  for the
athletes. She made an analogy between  athletes andanimals in a zoo.  She
said participants saw very little of the  pomp and glamour of the games,
for theywere not  allowed on the track until their particular event  was
announced.  "The doves released at thegames were really  pigeons, and
things became a bit messy when they  were finally let go," she quipped.Her
track career has taken her around the  world to such countries as Great
Britain, Mexico,  Japan,Germany, Romania and Russia. She plans  to travel
to Spain next week for yet another meet.  "You mustcompete year-round or
you can't  keep up," she said.  She ran in Leningrad last summer, and noted
 thatthings seem to be the same the world over,  especially children.  In
Russia, however, if a child happens toshow  talent, he will be sent to
running school, whether  he likes it or not. The pressure on athletes is
very great in Communist countries and it is a privilege  to be an athlete
in Russia, according to Mrs.  Brown.Financial support for U.S. athletes is
nil, she  said. Athletes in the states are rated strictly  amateur
asopposed to those in other countries.  Mrs. Brown placed fifth in the '69
Olympics,  but explained that shewas tripped by a French girl  as she
neared the finish line.  "Americans aren't used to dirty competition,but I
suppose it's just a fact of life," she said.  She emphasized that it would
never happen  again.  Mrs.Brown will try out for the '72 Olympic  Games, to
be held in Munich, Germany.  Bricklayers start to put the finishing touches
on the $560,000  Carver gym addition. When completed in June, it will house
threehandball courts, six offices, additional men's and women's locker 
rooms and a wrestling and gymnasticsroom. Six rows of seats will  be
removed from the south side of the men's gym and 17 rows  added to thenorth
side to increase the total capacity.  Photo By JIM THOMSON  Viking Golf
Team  Starts TrainingWith six returning players and some imported talent in
the way of  a transfer student, Western's golf squad promises to make a
stronger  showing this season, according to head golf coach James
Lounsberry.Lounsberry said junior college transfer Bob Norris has the
talent to  lend a supporting hand to Western'slinksmen.  Last season the
squad came in third in the Evergreen Conference  meet, and fourth in the
NAIA District One tourney. Eastern  Washington managed to come in 28
strokes over Western to take firstplace.  A meeting for students interested
in turning out for the eight man  squad will be held Thursday at 4p.m. in
Carver Gym, Lounsberry  said.  Qualifying rounds will be played Mar. 19 at
the BellinghamCountry Qiib a n d the squad will be picked after the final
rounds are  played Mar. 29, Apr. 1 and 2. rSome of the golfers in
contention for the squad include returning  menbers: Fred Olsen, Herb
Clemo, BillPalmer, Rick Wike, Jack  Erskine and Daryl Adler.  This season
the squad will play in 12 matches,starting with  Eastern Washington and
finishing up with Seattle U.  ie Body Shop has been advertising  inthe
Western Front for two quarters...  student response has been so 
encouraging that we plan to advertise  consistantly."  RICK and LYNN
SIEWERT, owners