Primary tabs

1921_0114

     ----------     

Weekly Messenger - 1921 January 14 - Page
1

     ----------     

The Weekly Messenger  Devoted to the Interests of
the Student Body, Washington State Normal School  VOL. XX BELLINGHAM,
WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 1921 NO. 13  BASKETBALL TEAM  TO PLAY IN
VAN-WILL  MEET CANADIAN EX-NORMAL  TEAM TOMORROW  To Play Whatcom Next  The
Bellingham Normal basketball  team will play the Vancouver Ex-Normal  team
tomorrow evening in the  Canadian city. So far Bellingham has  a clear
record of three victories, one  of which was from the Vancouver team  that
they will play tomorrow evening.  Although the score was 25-19 in favor  of
the Normal in the first game, Coach  Carver is expecting a hard tussle and 
will have his best men on the floor to  meet them. While we cherish fond
hopes  and ambitions, the outcome is not certain,  for strange reverses
sometimes take  place in return games.  WHATCOM NEXT FRIDAY  Next Friday,
January 21, we will meet  the fast Whatcom High School quintet  in the
Whatcom gymnasium. Both of  the Whatcom games have been scheduled  for the
high school gym as it has far  larger seating capacity than the Noraml 
gymnasium.  CHEJJEY JANUARY 21  The Cheney State Normal School team  will
be in Bellingham on Friday, January  21. Cheney has a strong team,  having
defeated some of the best teams  in Eastern Washington. They will play 
Lynden and the Y. M. C. A. while they  are in Whatcom County.  B.S.N.S.  L 
23  Esther Erickson, of Port Angeles, a  student of our school, was married
on  December 23, 1920, to Merle E. Kennedy,  of Seattle. The ceremony took 
place at Trinity Parish Church in Seattle,  at 9 o'clock Wednesday, Bishop 
Bliss, of that city, officiating: Miss  Loretta Goodfellow, of Castle Rock,
attended  the bride and Frank O'Brian, of  Seattle, acted as best man. Mr.
and  Mrs. Kennedy spent the holidays with  the .bride's parents at Port
Angeles.  Mrs.. Kennedy is a member of the Alki-siah  Club,  'THE LITTLE
PRINCESS"  . 10 BE GIVEN JAN. 22  THESPIAN PLAY WILL BE  PRESENTED UNDER
DIRECTION  OF MRS. SMITH  " The Little Princess,' 'a three-act  play,
jiresented by the Thespian Club,  will be staged in the Normal Auditorium 
Saturday, January 22, at 8:15  P. M. This play, which is the Thespian's 
annual production, has a very interesting  plot and the cast of characters 
is well selected for the parts. As the  admission is only twenty-five cents
for  adults and fifteen cents for children, a  large attendance is
anticipated.  CAST  Miss Minchin Betty Graves  Miss Amelia Elsie Minor 
Phyllis Melba Hines  Betty Mrs. Edna Anstett  Nora Gladys West  Dottie
Harriet Rittenberg  Janet Pauline Noll  Mazie Mary Collins  Ram Das Ed
Walters  Ram Dab. Christensen  Mr. Cavisford Charles Powell  Mr. Carmichael
Archie Erickson  Mrs. Carmichael Madeline Hess  Guest  Blanche .Mary Marie
Dewey  Jessie Eula Brown  Lavinia : Fay Durham  Lottie Sydney Smith  Lillie
Esther Cook  Becky Frances Durham  THE PRINCESS BERXADIXE AKANT  Emengard
Mildred Maule  THE PJ.AY  Act I. Scene in Miss Minchin's  Young Ladies'
Seminary in London.  Sara, called "The Princess," is giving a  party to
celebrate her thirteenth birth-continued  on page 2.)  Men's Organization 
Gives Good Program  On Friday, January 7, the assembly  was a lively one,
as the boys entertained.  Heretofore, the young men have  been very bashful
about appearing on  programs, owing to their minority, and  the students
were surprised to discover  some talent, the presence of which was  unknown
before. The program consisted  of a reading, " When I Cremated  Sam Legu,"
by Archie Erickson; a talk  on the history and traditions of the  club, by
Herbert Hansen, and several  musical numbers by their chorus, under  the
direction of Mr. Coughlin, with  Alfred Rosenhall as accompanist.  Hundreds
Visit Normal  On Open House Day  Y. W. C. A. BIBLE  E  MRS. CAMPBELL AND
DR.  SATTLER ARE ADDRESSING  MEETINGS  Tiie Y. W. C. A. is holding the
thirteenth  Annual Bible Institute this week.  Mrs. J. Addison Campbell,
who hajs  been here many times, is one of the  speakers. Dr. Georgia
Sattler, formerly  of St. Louis, Mo., now- of Seattle, is a  most
interesting teacher.  Dr. Packard, from Persia, who presented  the Near
East Relief at assembly  this morning, will remain and give  an address on
his work in Persia in assembly  this evening at 7:30.  The Institute
program is as follows:  Thursday at 2 and 6:30 P. M.  Friday at 3 and 7:30
P. M.  Saturday at 3 P. M.  Sunday at 3 P. M.  In the past, for the Y. W.
this has  been the greatest event of the year and  it promises to be even
better this year.  The membership committee invites not  only the Y. W.
girls, but urges all the  young women of the school to share this  splendid
opportunity of Bible Study.  FIRST PICTURES UN-MOVING  PICTURES OF LIFE  OF
LINCOLN SHOWN  AT ASSEMBLY  On Friday, January 7th, four reels of  moving
pictures depicting the life of  Lincoln. The opening reels showed Lincoln 
as a youth, bringing out the old  familiar stories that have grown up 
around his boyhood. Later he was  shown in the White House as the president
 of the nation. Pictures of his family  life and the struggles leading up
to  the outbreak of the Civil War were particularly  good.  Other reels
showing further events in  the Civil War and life of Lincoln will  be shown
at a later date.  VISITORS ARE SHOWN THE  BUILDING AND  EXHIBITS  Assembly
Plays Given  Wednesday, January 12, in spite of  the inclement weather, was
a real gala  day at the Normal. Those who were  outside its walls were
admitted en masse  to enjoy, observe and be entertained at  the first "
open house" day that the  Normal has ever celebrated.  Visitors from
everywhere Avere seen  in the corridors, .halls and class rooms.  Not only
townspeople but many of the  county and adjoining counties availed 
themselves of the invitation and were  guests of the school.  Exhibits in
the art department were  on display, and the visitors had the opportunity 
to view the work of students  who had made many beautiful pieces of  hand
needle work, basketry, art and  water color posters and books.  The Home
economics gave demonstrations  in cooking and food problems,  sewing and
needle work.  Two interesting programs were given  in assembly, one in the
afternoon and  one in the evening.  Miss Sperry's class in story telling 
was represented by three students who  gave short stories for children:
Lillian  Johnson told the story of "The Little  Pink Rose "; Eleanor
Simpson, " Rag-by  Lug," and Olive Askland gave " Golden  Cobwebs."  The
plays presented by Mr. Hoppe's  class were especially good.  (Continued on
page 2.)  Dr. Nash Entertains  With Mt. Baker Tales  Trie student body was
made better  acquainted with Mt. Baker at Monday's  assembly. Since Mr.
Craven could not  be. present, as scheduled, Dr. Nash read  an article of
Mr.^Craven's which appeared  in the Mazama Magazine, concerning  the origin
of Mt. Baker, Mt. Tacoma  and the Nooksack River. It proved one  of the
most delightful assemblies of the  year. Dr. Nash holds that we should be 
very much interested in Mt. Baker, since  we live so near and it has proved
such  a fertile field for Indian myths.

     ----------     

Weekly
Messenger - 1921 January 14 - Page 2

     ----------     

2 THE WEEKLY
MESSENGER, FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 1921  HUNDREDS VISIT NORMAL  ON OPEN HOUSE
DAY  (Continued from page 10  The following cast gave "Six, Who  Pass While
the Lentils Boil":  The Boy Melba Hinds  The Queen Esther Cook  The Mime
Frances Durham  The Milkmaid : ...Doris Erickson  The Blindman Mary Lewis 
The Ballad Singer Cecile Stevens  The Dreadful Headsman Susy Hicky  You
Eula Brown  Prologue Eunice Washburn  Cast for " Come Michaelmas ":  John
,Cogbill Richard Newton  Mrs. Cogbill Mildred Maude  Charity (a neighbor
girl)  Marion McLaughlin  Both plays, were splendidly acted and 
enthusiastically received.  Dr. Nash presided at both afternoon  and
evening assemblies. Interesting  short talks were given by Mr. Whitcomb 
and Dr. Kh'kpatrick, of the Board of  Trustees; Thomas Cole, of the Rotary 
Club, and Mr. Miller, of the Bellingham  Chamber of Commerce.  Open house
day proved a success, and  we hope it may become an annual event  in our
school!  B.S. N.S.  " LITTLE PRINCESS " TO  BE GIVEN JAN. 22  (Continued
from page 1.)  day. Bad news. The day ends in  shadows. " O, Lottie, love
me! Love  me!"  Act II. Scene, " In the attic where  the rats are." " Poor
Melchisedick, you  are not as hungry as I am." " Lottie,  dear, you mustn't
stay here, it's too  cold. See the snow coming through the  broken window
and listen to the wind."  A party in the garret to which comes  an unbidden
and unwelcome guest.  Act II. Scene, Mr. Carrisford's home.  " We can't let
her stay lost."  "That will not do, Miss Minchin—"  " Once upon a
time — long ago — "  Mrs. Smith, director.  Pauline Bornstein,
assistant with the  dance.  BOOKS AND READING  ^ttmimmiimt(it.mim
gt;uutmimiummmmimuwnummnmvimn}mmnwiimmmmimt\i 
H^JIIiniUllltllllllHMIIIIIIMIIItllMIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIlllilMllllllliailtllllltlltlHIIIllIllltlllllllllHItllEf
=  (Ertrr  | | MONDAY — Miss Baker will speak ||  | | on "Equal
Suffrage." ||  | | TUESDAY — Club meetings, 9 A. M. H  | | WEDNESDAY
— Musical program ||  | | arranged by Mrs. Thatcher. ||  THURSDAY
— Y.  P. M.  W. C. A. at 2 II  FRIDAY — Student program.  (New
York Post)  H. G. WELLS ON GLADSTONE  The eye of H. G. Wells roaming over 
that part of the " Outline of History"  (Macmillan), lying within the
nineteenth  century, lights upon Gladstone with no  gleam of tenderness. Of
Gladstone's  famous controversy with Huxley, Wells  writes: " He revealed
ideas derived  from Buffon (died 1788) uncontamin-ated  by any later
influence." When  Gladstone met Charles Darwin " he  talked al lthe time of
Bulgarian politics,  and was evidently quite unaware of  the real
importance of the man he was  visiting." Similarly with Faraday:  " The man
of science tried in vain to  explain some simple piece of apparatus  to
this fine flower of the parliamentary  world. ' But,' said Mr. Gladstone,.'
after  all, what good is i t ? ' 'Why', sir," said  Faraday, doing his best
to bring things  home tohim, ' presently you will be able  to tax i t . '"
In fine, to quote another of  Wells' sardonic phrases, Gladstone " was 
educated at Eton College and at Christ  Church, Oxford, and his mind never
recovered  from the process."  DID OXFORD EDUCATE?  This trenchant and
sweeping judgment  on the university education of  Gladstone's time is the
occasion of an  interesting exchange of views between  H. G. Wells and the
editors of the " Outline  of History," Professors Gilbert  Murray and
Ernest Barker. Wells says  of tht English universities: " Jews, Roman 
Catholics, dissenters, skeptics, and  all forms of intellectual activity
were  carefully barred from these almost extinguished  lamps of learning.
Their  mathematical work; was poor, a series of  exercises in the mere
patience — games  and formulae-writing of lower mathematics;  science
they despised and excluded,  and their staple training was the  study,
without any archaeology or historical  perspective, of the more rhetorical 
and ' poetic' of the Latin and Greek  classics. Such a training prepared
men  not so much to tackle and solve the problems  of life as to plaster
them over with  more or less apt quotations."  OLD VERSUS NEW LEARNING 
Gilbert Murray's comment on. this  diatribe is that the old clasical
training  was " the education of an aristocratic  leisured cass who had not
to earn their  living. It depended enormously on  leisure, " a small hard
nucleus of compulsory  work, combined with a wide  margin of leisure," and
was the deliberate  antithesis of the modern notion of a  curriculum
covering al lthe possible subjects  of study. This, in the opinion of 
Gilbert Murray, "is educationally disastrous,"  while Prof. Barker holds
that  men with the earlier training " were genuinely  and nobly trained for
statesmanship."  They maintain, therefore, that  Peel and Gladstone, who
used that leisure  in the right way, were not, as Wells  asserts, "
ignorant" men. Wells, however,  is impenitent and reiterates his  charge
against men " with no knowledge  of ethnology, no vision of history as a 
whole, misconceiving the record of geology,  ignorant of the elementary
ideas  of biological science and modern thought Freda Jensen  and
literature!" Hoepewell.  HEADQUARTERS FOR  Groceries, Fresh Pruit,
Vegetables and Bakery Goods.  We make a specialty of Fancy Cakes to Order. 
M. J. O'CONNORS  Successor to  Sweet Grocery Company  1021 ELK STREET 
DIARIES, DATE BOOKS, CALENDARS  E. T. MATHES BOOK CO.  110 WEST HOLLY
STREET  Economize  By Buying Paper  and Envelopes  Separately  Our pound
papers  are priced from 25c  to 75c per pound.  S T U D E N T S '  C O - O
P .  IF YOUR  BUSINESS  IS NOT  WORTH  ADVERTISING,  ADVERTISE  IT FOR SALE
 has primary grades at  DID YOU KNOW  That the Messenger is run  by the
Students of the  Bellingham Normal?  That only a small part  of the expense
is met by  the Students?  That if it wasn't for the  Advertisers the
Messenger  would be an impossibility?  That half the Advertisers  feel that
they are contributing  to charity?  Wake Up!  Give Them Their  Money's
Worth  "PATRONIZE YOUR  ADVERTISERS"  Buy Your Club Pins  and Class Pins at
 MULLER    ASPLUND  JEWELERS  Next to First National Bank  Thursday,
January 6 the Thespians  held a short business meeting. Final arrangements 
for the play were planned.  The main feature of the evening was  the dress
rehearsal of "The Little  Princess." The cast and Mrs.' Smith,  our coach,
have worked hard and faithfully  to present a play worthy of-' the 
Thespians.

     ----------     

Weekly Messenger - 1921 January 14 - Page
3

     ----------     

THE WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 1921 3 
ALUMNI  Sarah Shelton, a November graduate,  was at Christmas time
appointed to a  position in the Seattle schools.  * * *  J. Arthur Griffen
is meeting with success  and thoroughly enjoying his work  as athletic
coach and head of the manual  training department in the Blaine public 
schools.  # * *  Pearl Brock, a summer school student  of 1920, was married
on Christmas day  to Mr. William Rhodes. She resigned  her position at
Anatone, Washington.  * * *  Willis Wood is principal of a two-room  school
at Richardson, on Lopez  Island.  # # *  Miss Hazel Smart is doing very
successful  work as primary teacher in the  Silvana schools.  B.S. N.S. 
WHY, MR. KLEMME!  The following appeared in the Monday  evening's issue of
the Bellingham  Herald. Here occurs one of the common  mistakes of that
paper:  DEBATE SC'HEDULE FOR NORTHWESTERN  SCHOOLS COMPLETE  A schedule for
the third debate of the  school year to be held by high schools  of the
Northwest is announced by E. J.  Klemme, director for this section of the 
state. It will be held February 4 and  the lineup follows:  At Everett
— Affirmative, Everett;  negative, Meridian.  At Nooksack —
Affirmative, Marys-ville;  negative, Nooksack.  At Lake Stevens - •
Affirmative, Lake  Stevens; negative, Sultan.  Meet your friends at the
Brunswick,  1221 Dock Street — *  B.S. N.S.  YOUNG HOUSEKEEPERS
PICNIC  Saturday evening the Young Housekeepers  had another one of their
good-time  meetings in the Normal cafeteria.  The evening's entertainment
assumed  the nature of an indoor picnic. At 6  o'clock forty girls readily
disposed of a  picnic lunch, after which the girls discussed  housekeeping
accounts, recipes,  and exchanged ideas for saving time and  labor, as well
as expenses. Miss Wood-ard  gave a number of practical and  helpful
suggestions. The rest of the  evening was spent in guessing games and  a
unique spelling contest. Altogether  the evening was a delightful
get-acquainted,  get-together meeting.  Are your e y es  strained? Clear
vision  is no proof that  they are not. Consult  Woll and make  sure they
are right.  205* West Holly St.  GENERAL NEWS  The fifth and sixth grades
have each  formed an organization known as the  "Watch Your English Club."
They  held their first meeting on Friday morning  at 9 o'clock. Not a bad
idea for  some Normalites to form such a club.  * # *  The students of the
grammar grades  thoroughly enjoyed the motion pictures  of Lincoln in
assembly on Friday.  * # *  An up and coming little lad from the  training
school visited biology class one  afternoon last week, uninvited, to ask 
the price of coral. It seems that he  wanted to know its price because he 
was planning on going out on an expedition  to hunt some for the United 
States government and wished to find  out how much he should get out of it.
 Incidentally he tried to get Archie to  locate the South Sea Isles for him
but  was unsuccessful. The other members of  the class are convinced that
the little  visitor will one day be a lively debater.  B.S. N.S.  OLDEST
TEACHER DEAD  Miss Elizabeth Blanding, of Attleboro,  Massachusetts, is
dead at the age of 88.  She is said to have taught school more  years than
any other teacher. Her  teaching experience began when she was  16 years
old, and she taught continuously  more than 70 years, retiring only last 
June. Even after her retirement she  taught 14 children to read. —
Current  Events.  B.S. N.S.  Y. W. C. A.  Last Thursday the girls of the Y.
W.  were given a special treat when Dr.  McDonald and Miss Salto, lady
missionaries  from China, spoke of their  work in that country. Dr.
McDonald  told especially of her work in the hospitals,  and of the great
need of medical  work among people on account of their  ignorance of proper
ways of living and  because of their many superstitions.  Miss Salto, who
for the last couple of  years has been assisting Dr. McDonald,  told many
of her experiences among the  people, showing the difficulty of carrying 
on work, both medical and evangelistic,  and getting results. This, also, 
because of their terrible superstitions.  Miss Salto gave an appeal for
more  workers in all branches of the work,  which a missionary must carry
on.  B.S. N.S.  SAGEBRUSHERS  The Sagebrush Club called a meeting  of its
members last Thursday evening  for the pui'pose of organizing and entering 
into the realm of fun. Iva West  was elected president; Valentine Ayres 
vice president; Mr. Bectcher, secretary-treasurer.  Plans are now under way
 for an indoor picnic and mixer. It is  hoped that other Normal students
who  are eligible for this club will sign up  before the next business
meeting. Those  who are already members are asked to  watch the bulletin
board for notices of  events.  B.S. N.S.  Ruth Craig '20 is doing "Junior
high  school work at Puyallup.  New Spring- Suits  and Hats  — AT
—  Apparel of Quality  Now is the Time  to start writing that  Story~
 Poem or  Essay~  for the  KLIPSUN  First Prize, $2.50 in Cash  Second
Prize, One copy of the  Klipsun  START TODAY

     ----------     

Weekly
Messenger - 1921 January 14 - Page 4

     ----------     

THE WEEKLY
MESSENGER, FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 1921  THE WEEKLY CTVIESSENGERQ  Published by
Students' Association of State Normal School, Bellingham.  Entered in the
Postoffice at Bellingrham, Washington, as secoiul-class matter.  Union
Printing, Binding   Stationery Company, Printers  for their splendid
playing and the brilliant victories they have  won for us. We want them to
know that we are back of them  and we pledge our undivided support in every
game. With a  coach like Mr. Carver and a team such as we have, let us stop
 with nothing less than the championship of the state for 1921. 
Subscription rates by mail, $2.00 per year in advance Single copies, 5
cents.  Advertising rates on application.  Address all communications,
other than news items, to The Manager of the  Weekly Messenger, Bellingham,
Washington.  STAFF OFFICERS  EDITOR-IN-CHIEF CATHERINE SHEPHERD  BUSINESS
MANAGER ARTHUR E. BOWSHER  MESSENGER STAFF  Assembly Notes Viola Stuwnan
Club Notes Armeda Fjellman  Faculty Notes Iva West Alumni - -- ----- 
General News Reporter Lois Osborn Exchange Arthur Bowsner  General News
Reporter Arthur Huggins Training School Notes Lilhe Dunagan  Society Doris
Erickson General Brief Margaret Zurbnck 
^V£.j.£l$^,j,,j,,£,.£,£,j,,$,,£.£^  HE
time has come," the Walrus  said,  "To speak of many things;  Of ships and
sealing wax  And cabbages and kings."  *  I *  I *  B * I *  S * I *  I * 
B *  *1 ^K imp ££  *T ^ r It  Keep the telephone of your mind
forever transmitting thoughts  of love, purity, joy and health; then when
disease, sorrow, envy  or hate try to call you up, they will always get the
busy signal.  Soon they will forget your number.  All Normalites were very
agreeably surprised last Friday when  they suddenly woke up to the fact
that our school has the material  for a good men's chorus. The number of
young men being so  small, they have always been very timid about singing
in assembly,  but they have talent and a number of good voices that,  with
some intensive training, would make for our school a splendid  men's chorus
as well as a quartet. Mr. Coughlin has taken such  an interest in the men's
music, we hope he will soon have for us  a large, well trained chorus that
we can be proud of.  In every activity of the school this year the students
have  been very loyal in their support of mixers, plays and games. They 
have responded nobly to the calls for relief money in every drive;  and in
every way have proved their .loyalty to the " Blue and  White."  Let us now
lend our heartiest support by attending the play,  " The Little Princess,"
which will be presented by the Thespian  Club January 22. The cast has been
working hard for some  time and Mrs. Smith assures us it will be an
excellent production.  As the admission is so low, it is hoped that every
member of the  student body will be present and bring a friend. Let us have
a  crowded house!  The Messenger is glad to take this opportunity in behalf
of  the entire school to congratulate the men on the basketball team  Do
your best and give credit to those who do better.  In every organization
there are always those who have the  ability to lead. They are the ones who
sacrifice for the good of  others. When some one is giving his best, the
least we can do  is to back him up and be loyal.  "THE CRAB  To the Editor:
 I suggest that someone establish  a " shoe shining parlor " at the  Normal
for women. I am sure it  would be well patronized. What  do you think about
it? Please let  us hear from some one at an early  date as to what you
think and if  agreeable to you we promise to  lend our heartiest support. 
— A SEXIOR  KIDNAPPED —A PUSSY CAT!  Edens Hall is bemoaning
the fact that  some unkind person, during the holiday  vacation carried off
a pet kitten. Her  name is Peggy. She is black, gray and  white. She knows
her name and also  how to purr.  Please, some kind persons, won't you  help
bring back little pussy, so that  smiles and sunshine may reign once more 
at Edens Hall?  NEWMAN CLUB  Friday evening, January 7th, the  Newman Club
held its first mixer of the  year in the little gym. After lunch was 
served in the cafeteria all participated  in singing school songs, and
giving the  Normal yells.  IE CO.  1025-1039 Elk Street  ATHLETIC GOODS 
Fishing Tackle, Guns and  Ammunition  KELLY-SPRINGFIELD TIRES  Bloedel
Donovan  Lumber Mills  ROUGH AND DRESSED LUMBER.  LATH AND SHINGLES. 
DOORS, WINDOWS, FRAMES.  MOULDINGS AND FINISH.  QUICK DELIVERY.  BRING US
YOUR LIST FOR ESTIMATE  Retail Office, 1615 Elk Street  Retail Yard, Phone
433—Sash   Door Factory, Phone 1257  FOR EIGHT YEARS  CAVE  Has stood
for Pure, Clean, Wholesome  CANDY AND ICE CREAM

     ----------    


Weekly Messenger - 1921 January 14 - Page 5

     ----------     

THE
WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 1921 5  DIRECTION OF JENSEN AND VON
HERBERG  TODAY AND SATURDAY  The Romantic Appeal of New York Life  —
Unified in One Monstrous Production  Would you like to know New York while 
New York sleeps? Have you spoken to  those that have seen?  ONLY TILL
SATURDAY NIGHT TO SEE  "While New  York Sleeps"  COMING THE FIRST TWO DAYS 
OF THE WEEK  CONNIE  TALMADGE  — IN —  "Dangerous Business" 
LISTEN BOYS!  DON'T READ THIS  Oh, girls! Here's a  s w e e t young thing 
who said s h e was  married when she  wasn't. The chap was  only a poor
simp  when he went away,  but he came back a  regular fellow a,n d  —
here, run a w a y,  you boys!  WOW!  A  DOUBLE  BED  DIALOGUE  LISTEN
GIRLS!  DON'T READ THIS  Listen, boys! If a  pretty girl said you  w e r e
h e r husband,  would you tell her pa  you weren't or make  her go through
with  j t , and then — S'no  good! There's a girl  reading this! 
Legend of Mt Balder  c
^i[iiiiiiii[iiMiiiiiiMiiiiiii[ii[iiriiiiiitiriitiiiiiiiiiniuiiiiitiitiiiiiiiitiriitiiiiiiiniiitiiMiniiiiiiMiiiiiiiiitirtiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMtiiuiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiii.'iiiiiiiiiiMtiiMtijiiiiiirriuiiiii[irMirjiijiijiiitiiiiujiiiiifi
=  ^iiniiiMiiiiiimmiimmimiimiiiiiimiiimmiiji!
mmiiimiimmmiiiiimiiiiimiiiiimmiii
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiui
iiluulwinmiiMii?  The following is the Indian legend of  Mt. Baker,
appearing in the article on  Mt. Baker by A. J. Craven, the Bell-ingham 
attorney, in the present number  of the Mazama Magazine. This translation 
from the original Indian story is  by Dr. Buchanan, who for years was in 
charge of the Tulalip Indian School, and  an authority on Indian lore of
the  Northwest.  So unanimous was the enjoyment of  this myth, when read in
assembly by Dr.  Nash, and so difficult is it to obtain  authentic Indian
myths of the Puget  Sound, the Messenger is glad to print  this one, so
each student may have it  for future reference:  " I tell you Indian story
about Kul-shan.  Kulshan, that big mountain on  Nooksack. Well, I tell you.
 "Long, long time ago, old Indian man  he tell his grandchild what his
grand-fadder  tell him when he was little boy.  I do not know the time, but
it was long,  long time. Kulshan he grow up fine  young man, and git
married two wives.  One wife, she look very fine. One wife  she look very
good, she very kind. Kulshan  he like 'em both very much, how  different
no; can tell.  "Well, one wife, long time ago, she  git three babies. That
other wife she  git no baby at all, but she very good to  Kulshan. She hug
up close. Wife who  git three babies she no like it. She  very mad. She
think Kulshan like other  woman better; she hug up close, too.  She tell
Kulshan she have three babies,  he should like her most. But Kulshan he 
say nothing; he just smile little bit.  Then this woman, she try fool
Kulshan.  She tell him she go way. She no want  go way, but she want fool
Kulshan. She  think Kulshan say, ' yes, you mother to  my children; don't
go way, I love you  most.' He like her well, he no want her  to go, but he
no tell her. Kulshan he  very proud. He say, 'You want go  way, you go
way.'  " So she made pack. She think she  think she go just little way and
he say  ' Come back!' She make big pack long  time — flowers, seeds,
roots, berries, all  nice things there around Kulshan. She  go off, long
time ago. She stop and look  back, but he no tell her come back. She  go on
again and stand on hill to see  Kulshan; she stand on toe-tip, but that 
hill grow big and high while she look  back. But Kulshan he see her all
right,  sure, but he very proud; he no say,  ' Come back!' She go on and
on;  where she go and look back a row of  hills, mountains now, but no so
high as  Kulshan. Then she stopped long way  off. She sure he no want her
back.  She stand on high hill and reach up high  to see him and her
children, and that hill  grow to high mountain so, she see them  plain. She
stay there. That woman  she mountain now more high than Kulshan.  Indian he
call that mountain  Takhoma. She scatter all the seeds she  bi'ing in big
pack, flowers, berries,  roots and all nice things she bring. She  have
more now than Kulshan. He see  her there now, way far, high mountain.  That
wife, her name Clear Sky.  " Well, that other wife, her name very  hard to
tell. It means, very pretty girl,  just old enough to marry. She stay with 
him long time. One day she tell him she  going to visit her mother. Her
mother's  home is Hevulch in Indian, but white  man say Puget Sound.  " '
How you can go home,' Kulshan  he say, ' No way, no trail, nothing but 
rocks, hills and trees.' But he like her  well, and she want to go to her
mother.  He call all the animals with claws —  bears, lions, marmots,
beavers, mice and  everything that digs, and they dig a long  ditch. All
the water he turns to this  ditch, and it is Nooksack River now.  That
wife, she go down in big canoe,  and when she come to that big water,  she
leave on every island she go by, a  fish, a berry or something good to eat.
 So all those islands from Nooksack to  her mother's home has Indian name
of  something to eat, something this wife  BROWN'S STUDIO, Sunset Building 
THE PALLAS  The Home of Better  Candies, Pastries    Ice Cream  BROWN'S
STUDIO, Sunset Building  who was going to her mother, left there.  She
found her mother way out in the  water. Then she thought she stand up  high
in the water so to see Kulshan, but  she say, ' No, that other wife she
stand  up high. I will not stand up high.' She  lay down low in the water
so that all the  peoples could reach her head without  climbing.  " This
wife she stay there; she never  go back. She Speiden Island now, and 
Kulshan live alone. He marry no more.  He grew taller, so he could see his
wives  and his children better, and those children  near Kulshan they grow
taller, too,  so they could see better their father and  mother.  "Well, I
tell you now, what the Indian  man, old grandfather tell his grandchild 
when he was a little boy. I tell  you all. You know Kulshan and his two 
wives and the children, what they are  and where they are. I talk no more."
 B.S.N.S.  "Why, my boy! did you fall in that  coal hole?"  " No, of course
not! I was in here  and they built a pavement over me."

     ----------   
 

Weekly Messenger - 1921 January 14 - Page 6

     ----------     

THE
WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 1921 
Aunmmiiiiilltlilliimmmmmiiiiimiml n imiiimm
tiiiiimiHiiliimiiimliiiiiimtiuiimiiiliil I in" iiiininmim i mum
HirammmlMijimimimg  liulimmmmmiimmmmmuiiimmmiiimmii iimmmii n iimmiimmim
urn mmmmim 11 11 i mil mini i i lyfg  SOCIETY  =
7iiiiilttiifiittiiiiiiilliitiiiiitiiiiliiitiiiriitiiiiilliiJiiiiiii
gt;itiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiii*iii
gt;iiiii)iitJlllt)iiaiiiiiaitiiiiiaii*iiliii»iitiiiiii
lt;ititiiiitiit)itiiiitattiltiiiitiiiiiti(tiiiiiiitititiiritriiiiilii
gt;itiiiijtitiiiiiiiiiifiifiiiiiiiriiiiiiiti gt;fin^ = 
Itiiillllliilllllllllllllllillllliiiiillllllliiuuiiiiiiiliiiiiuiiilliiiiilili
i iiiiilliili iiliillllliiiilllimiiiiiiiiiiilln'illiiHillllliliilllillll
nun 1 11 m — "  In spite of the severe snow storm  which was raging
and the fact that the  roads were so icy that driving was dangerous,  a
number of the Normal students  attended a meeting at the Laurel  High
School Saturday evening. The  party, including Eva Bond, Josephine  Hawley,
Catherine Shepherd, Vera Bene-field,  Dora Smith, Austin Bond, Harry  Smith
and Myron Hawley, all reported  that they had a very enjoyable evening  and
would be willing to risk another  such skidding episode to attend the next 
meeting which will be held at Lynden.  Mrs. Isabel Wister, a student of
Normal  in the early days of its organization,  has returned to complete
work for  a diploma. Mrs. Wister has been living  in San Francisco, doing
scenario writing,  and composing songs. One of her  creations, "O Flag of
My Country,"  was dedicated to the women of the National  Federation of
Music Clubs.  * * *  Mr. Cain, formerly a student of the  Kirksville,
Missouri Normal, has joined  the student body of our school.  * # *  Miss
Mary A dele Larrabee, who attended  the university last semester, is 
taking special subjects at Normal this  quarter.  * * *  Many of the
Normalites enjoyed a  delightful banquet at the First Presbyterian  Church
last Friday evening. They  were the guests of the young people of  Mrs.
Templeton's class. Rev. and Mrs.  Templeton join with the members of the 
class in extending to all the young people  of the Normal an invitation to
attend  the Young People's class Sunday  morning and to be present at all
their  social affairs. 
^tliiiltlitaiitiiiaiitiiiiiiitiiiatiiiiitaiiaiiiitaiiiiiiiitiiiiiaiiaitaicaitliaiaililiaiiaii)ii
gt;taitaiiliiiiaitiit)t lt;iiaitiiri gt;iiiiiaiianaiiaiiiiiii
gt;iitiiaiiritiiiaitiitiTniii(iisiiiii]ii]iaiiiaiiiiiE gt;it
gt;itiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiaiittiitii gt;Tititaitiiiii»*_  =
•aaiMiaaaaiaiiaiiaiiatiaiaiiaaBaiiaiuiBataataaiBitaiiLuiiiiaiiaiiaiEaiaiiaraitaitiiaaiaaiaitaiaiitiiaiiarBaitiiiiiiiaiiBiiiiaaiaaaiciiajiiaiaJiiaiaitajiaitaiaaiaitajaiituiA^u^LLtitaiiaiiaaicaiisiiEitaiiaaiiiiiitaiiajieiraitaiiaataaiiaiiiiiaitaiiaiaii^
5  1 Pastimes of Faculty Men  By ARTHUR HUGGINS  Whoever would have thought
as he  gazes at the faculty men assembled in  the auditorium platform, that
their most  strenuous relaxations were reading and  hiking! Yet it is true,
by their own concessions:  A few, Messers. Philippi, Caskey,  Bever,
Kolstad, Coughlin and Heckman  find recreation in hand ball and volley 
ball. These games are played under  the direction of Mr. Carver.  Would you
call hoeing potatoes, weeding  carrots, coaxing little onions to  sprout,
not to mention milking a real  live cow, relaxation? Mr. Bond and  Mr.
Hoppe do, and according to their  wives, they might hire out as all round 
" farm hands " at any time in the year.  Dr. Miiler gardens some and enjoys
it,  but he has not schooled himself in the  various duties of farm life. 
Mr. Kibbe is the champion hiker of  the faculty. He boasts he can outwalk 
any man or woman teaching in the Normal.  We would like to see a race
between  Mr. Hunt, who with pride admits  he enjoys a strenuous hike, and
Mr.  Kibbe, just to the top of Chuckanut  Mountain and back, then out to
the cement  plant, ending at Mr. Kolstad's  home on the lake. We admit that
such  a hike would be a bit strenuous for the  most of us, but after
hearing Mr. Kibbe  tell what he has done, we hope to see  this event staged
in the future. The  street cars would go out of business if  they depended
upon Mr. Kibbe's patronage.  He has ridden on a street car  but two or
three times in the last three  or four years. Every Sunday morning,  i
eleven minutes ?  fishing with Mr.  he walks a mile  (Maybe he's been  Bond
recently.)  Mr. Rindall enjoys literature, a game  of whist; Mr. Kolstad
likes to dance  and Mr. Hunt enjoys the movies (when  he's not walking the
floor with the  twins about 10:30 to 12 P. M.)  Mr. Kolstad, being the only
bachelor  on the faculty, finds great delight in  his wigwam —
washing dishes, splitting  kindling on cold mornings and crumbing  the
sheets on his downy bed. We have  heard that the daughter of Chief Seattle 
will join Chief Kolstad in his wigwam  on the beautiful shores of Lake
Whatcom,  in the near future — but this is a  secret and we should
not have told it.  Mr. Heckman knows how to doctor a  Dodge, when it won't
go! And puts  many precious hours (when he might be  recreating) upon
polishing its body and  tuning its engine.  As for Dr. Nash, his time was
so occupied  when we were gathering data  for this expose that we were
unable to  break through the fortifications of the  outer office. However,
we don't know  whether its recreation or not, but we  never pick up a paper
but Dr. Nash has  delivered an address is going to deliver  one, or is
chairman of some drive,  or is invited to skip across the country  to take
part in some important meeting  — so what time has he left for
leisure?  We do know, however, a couple of  summers ago, he took a trip
through  Yellowstone Park by auto, driving all  the way from Bellingham and
home  again — and he said he enjoyed it.  Newton's  Incorporated 
WOMEN'S APPAREL OF QUALITY  January Clearance  Brings many sharply reduced
prices on  modish and practical Coats, Suits,  Dresses, Blouses,
Accessories  KEMPHAUS C  CO.  Bellingliam's Lotuest Price Goat and  Suit
Store  DRY GOODS, WOMAN'S FURNISHINGS  PICTORIAL REVIEW PATTERNS 
LONGWOOD'S SHOE SHOP  Successor to Berg Bros.  1325 DOCK STREET  Expert
Shoe Repairing  HOME STORE  1312-14 BAY STREET  A. Lawson  BLOUSES, SILK
AND LISLE HOSE  ALL COLORS  ROYAL ICE CREAM  When you order that ice cream
remember  it is Royal that always gives satisfaction.  The ice cream of
quality for the past twenty  years.  THE ROYAL DAIRY PRODUCTS CO.  Phone
46-48 Ohio and Ellis Streets  PATRONIZE MESSENGER ADVERTISERS

    
----------     

Weekly Messenger - 1921 January 14 - Page 7

    
----------     

THE WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 1921 7  Mr. Weir
made a trip to Tacoma last  Friday evening and had the pleasure of  talking
to-the Pierce County Council of  the: Parent-Teachers' Association in the 
Woman's Club Building. Saturday  evening Dr. Weir spoke at Port Town-send 
in the interests of organization  work of- the Central European relief.  *
* *  Miss Keeler is in Okanogan and Chelan  Counties this week, speaking on
extension  work.  » * *  Mr. Klemme left last Monday for  various
parts of the state to speak in  the interest of school legislation.  * * * 
An extension class for the purpose of  studying the characters of
Shakespeare  is being organized under the supervision  of Miss Sperry. The
class is open to  Y. W. C. A. members, girl students of  the Normal School
and ladies of Bell-ingham.  The first class is called for 4  o'clock Monday
afternoon, January 17,  in the Y. W. C. A. building.  * * *  Dr. H. G.
Lull, formerly an instructor  at the Bellingham Normal  School, but more
recently a director of  teachers training at Emporia, Kansas,  has been
called to South America. He  has been chosen as a faculty member of  the
University of Lima, Peru, where he  will be director of the School of
Pedagogical  Science and a member of the  Council of Administration of the
university.  Dr. Lull will be well remembered  by Bellingham people and
students of  the University of Washington where he  was a professor for a
number of years.  » » »  Miss Lee had an enjoyable Christmas
 with relatives in Portland.  * * #  Many faculty members attended the 
concert of Irene Pavlovska Monday  night and were enthusiastic in praise of
 this great artist.  * * *  One of Miss Baker's nature study  classes
climbed to the end of Sunset  Trail Monday afternoon. The students  brought
back a number of interesting  specimens for open house day exhibits  and
regular class work, including ferns,  leaf mold, soils, pussy willows and 
huckleberry twigs. The class reached  the top of the hill just in time to
see a  very beautiful sunset.  * * *  Dr. Hughes and Miss Mead have been 
very busy taking care of students who  had to be vaccinated or whose
vaccination  had to be given again.  B. S.N.S.  BUSINESS GIRLS  Do you know
anything about the  minimum wage law for women, or protective  measures for
women employees,  or the measures that are being taken by  various
industries to make conditions  better?  The following reports were given at
 the meeting of the Business Girls Wednesday,  January 5th: "Minimum Wage,"
 Thelma Court; "Marshall Field," Ethel  Chisholm; "National. Cash Register 
Co.," Alta Cress; "Swift   Company,"  Ada Stevens.  Interesting, thoughtful
and profitable  discussions followed each. It was  unanimously voted that
to work for  either of these concerns would be more  of a privilege than a
task.  B. S.N.S.  In the last Bookman, an interesting  story is told of
Rudyard Kipling. While  living in Vermont, a neighbor wrote him  saying he
heard Kipling sold his stories  at one dollar per word. He enclosed a 
dollar and wanted a word. Kipling  wrote back " Thanks." The neighbor  then
sold the word for two dollars and  wrote Kipling enclosing fifty cents
—  his share of the profits. 
!;»•••••  Patronize  Messenger 
Advertisers 
•••••••••••••ril
 CLYDE BANKS  Does Our Kodak Finishing  STUDENTS' CO-OP  PHONE 648 RES.
PHONE 1543  1310 COMMERCIAL STREET  Freeman Transfer  General Hauling 
Pianos and Furniture Moved,  Packed and Stored  Special Bates on Normal
Baggage  Fireproof Storage — We Feature  Long Distance Hauling  F. B.
FREEMAN, PRO?.  See Us for High  Grade Candies-at  Popular  Prices  F. W.
W00LW0RTH GO.  5ol0-15c Store  HIGHLAND CREAMERY  CONFECTIONERY, ETC.  H.
A. LYLB, Prop.  629 High St.  GREAT WESTERN  Wood and Coal Combination 
Heater, has a big open  front, like a fireplace. Uses  less fuel. Built to
last.  JENKINS-BOYS  COMPANY  Our Portable  Students' Lamps  Will Make 
Evening Work  a Pleasure  PUGET SOUND  POWER   LIGHT  COMPANY  PHONE 200 
The Bellingham  National Bank  Capital and Surplus  $475,000.00  BROWN'S
STUDIO, Sunset Building  WATCH  R E P A I R I N G  CHAS. F. RUNNER  A t
Mathes Book Store  110 WEST HOLLS STREET  First National Bank  U. S,
Depository  Member Federal  Reserve  Total Resources  Over Three  Millions 
H. Goodell—BOUCHEB—Edith H.  Tenor — Mezzo Soprano  OLD
ITALIAN- METHOD OF BEL CANTO  FRENCH, ITALIAN, ENGLISH  R E P E R T O I R E
 BELLINGHAM SCHOOL OF  MUSIC AND AST  401-409 Ezcgf. Bid?. Phono 1303 
POUND  78 Sheets  60c  Two Packages  Envelopes  35c  In Colors  S T U D E N
T S  CO-OP  Miss Luella Whittaker, a Normal  graduate of a dozen or more
years ago,  is achieving brilliant results as a teacher  in the Ethical
Culture School of New  York City.

     ----------     

Weekly Messenger -
1921 January 14 - Page 8

     ----------     

8 THE WEEKLY MESSENGER,
FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 1921  SF/?e Soughing (flat I  I *  I *  — ?*.  I
*  ^  gt; | i i l i i | i l | i i j i l | i i | i l j i i j * l j j i j i i
j 4 i ^ i j i^  A nickel is one of those things a man  jingles around in
his pocket with his  keys, but it doesn't mean anything.  Some people must
learn by experience  that if they desire to criticize a mule it  is best to
do it to his face.  A.: "What's the matter, did somebody  hit you on the
head ? "  Iva: " No, but I wish somebody  would."  said an Irishman, " I
met  ' Hewins,, says I, ' how are  A goat ate all our extra jokes,  And
then began to run.  "I Cannot stoy," he swiftly said,  "I am so full of
fun."  " Honest now," said the office boy for  the third time, " what are
you going to  give me for my birthday? "  "Well," the stenographer snapped,
 " since you must know, I'm going to get  you a muzzle."  ANOTHER FORD JOKE
 " Why are school teachers like Ford  cars? "  " Because they give the most
service  for the least money."  other day,"  Pat Hewins  ye?'  " ' Pretty
well, thank ye, Donnelly,'  says he.  " ' Donnelly,' says I, ' that's not
me  name!'  " ' Faith, thin, no more is moine Hewins.'  "So wih that we
looked at each other  agin, an' sure enough it was nayther of  us."  G R O
C E R I E S  — AND —  CONFECTIONERY  We Cater to the Normal 
Students' Trade  Agency Pacific Laundry  PHONE 1041  N O R M A L  GROCERY 
In- THE TRAINING SCHOOL  Kindergarten, studying the bear.  Teacher: "Have
you a warm coat?"  Class: "Yes."  Teacher: " Can you take off your  warm
coat? "  Class: "Yes."  Teacher: "Has a bear a warm coat?"  Class: "Yes." 
Teacher: " Can a bear take off his  warm coat? "  This puzzled the class a
moment when  one youngster exclaimed, " No, cause  God onlv knows where the
buttons are."  ^atermarisffiiFountainPen  THE BEST PEN MADE  144 PENS
ALWAYS IN STOCK  EVERY PEN GUARANTEED  Students' Co-Op  OWEN MARKET 
GROCERY  PUBLIC MARKET  Pay Cash and Sqve Money  PACIFIC STEAM  LAUNDRY  He
profits most who serves  best Phones 126-127  OH Yotr FORD  "Why is a Ford
ike a rich man's  baby?"  " Because it has a new rattle every  day."  Miss
Yule: " Ah, Mr. Van De Weter-ing,  are you the leading man ?"  Mr. Van De
Wetering: "Sort of —  but I haven"t the nice part. Mr. Tweit  does
all that."  please tell  motor and  Mr. Coughlin: "Mrs. S.,  us the
difference between a  a dynamo."  Mrs. S.:  " I don't know  What's a
dynamo;  I don't know  What a motor be;  I don't know what either am,  But
I'll look in the book and  see."  A little girl attending an Episcopal 
church for the first time was amazed to  see all kneel suddenly. She asked
her  mother what they were doing.  " Hush, they're going to say their 
prayers."  " What! with all their clothes on! "  Seedy visitor: " Do you
have many  wrecks about here, boatman? "  Boatman: "Nope, not many. You're 
the first one I've seen this season.  B.S.N.S.  WHAT ARE THEY DOING IN 
ROOM 113?  ILLUMINATING ANSWERS  A farmer asked a friend to give his 
opinion about late plowing. " Plowing  should not be continued later than
ten  or eleven at night. It gets the horses  in a bad habit and unduly
exposes the  plow." He also asked him "how long  cows should be milked." He
replied  " The same as short cows."  Teacher  Dick?"  Dick: "Nothing 
caught on."  " What did Santa bring you,  this year. I've  "As I was going
over the bridge the  My story has neither a beginning nor  an end. It is a
bird's-eye except from  one continuous narration.  I stepped into Mr.
Olslager's office  about 10:50 Thursday morning and au-daciousely  stood
and watched the panorama.  In his place behind the mesh Mr.  Olslager
sorted important looking  papers. An almost omnious silence prevailed, 
broken only by the scratching of  a pen or the occasional rustle of paper. 
The stenographer conferred with the  bookkeeper, a puzzled frown on her 
brow.  A miscellaneous assortment of notebooks,  crayons, textbooks, class
pins,  etc., like a museum collection, bespoke  very lax memories
somewhere.  The door opened. A girl entered. She  approached the mesh and
was referred  to the long counter. She went to the  long counter and
waited. It was very  warm.  Then a bell rang, and I had to go.  —
FLORENCE SWANSON  The Northwestern  National Bank  Bellingham, Wash.  WE
SOLICIT THE  NORMAL ACCOUNTS  All Splinterville turned out en masse  to
witness one of the largest weddings  ever preformed within its splintery 
gates.  The gleeful groom was a dark knight  named Mr. Howson Lott, and she
whom  he wed was Miss Eldore Knobb. Miss  Ineeda Cook was the flour girl,
and little  Sylver Bell was the ring bearer. Mr.  E. Z. Mark pronounced
them won and  Miss Knobb was turned over to her husband  by her father, Mr.
Isadore Knobb.  Miss Ima Bird sang " On Wings of  Love" and " Up Where the
Skies Are  Blue" before the ceremony. Miss  Neetan Tidy was bride's maid
and Mr.  Royal Baker was best man next to the  groom.  The rooms were
decorated in silver  cob-webs and gold carpet tacks. The  bride's mother,
Mrs. Isadore Knobb, entertained  with a reception at her home  as soon as
the habliments were received.  Mr. and Mrs. Howson Lott will begin 
housekeeping in their house on a lot on  Main Street.  B.S.N.S.  Lenore
Roach '20 has the four upper  grades in a two-room school near El-lensburg.
 The Hat Shoppe  H. E. S. FAGEN, Prop.  ''Better Hats for Less"  PUBLIC
MARKET BUILDING  MAGNOLIA STREET  "Walk a Block and Save a Dollar" .  The
Brown Studio  Has again been chosen the official  photographers for the
coming  Klipsun. This will be our sixth  year to do the work, and we
appreciate  the compliment.  Come in Early if Your Photographs  Are to be
Finished  for the Holidays.  BROWN STUDIO  Gage-  Dodson  Co.  Home of the 
Hart Schaf f ner    Marx  MEN'S  CLOTHING  Patronize Messenger Advertisers.
 Get Your  Candies  and  Ice Cream  at  119 E. Holly  BROWN'S STUDIO,
Sunset BuildingPPPPP