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1921_0211

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Weekly Messenger - 1921 February 11 - Page
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The Weekly Messenger  Devoted to the Interests of
the Student Body, Washington State Normal School  VOL. XX BELLINGHAM,
WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1921 NO. 17  NORMAL BEATS OLD RIVALS  LBE 
GIVEN BY  ELECTED  ANNUAL PRODUCTION TO BE  GIVEN IN AUDITORIUM  ON MARCH 2
 Rehearsals Under Way  One of the most important events of  the year will
take place March 2 when  the Juniors will present the four-act  play,
'•' Rosemary." The cast consists  of the following:  Sir Jasper Geo.
Van DeWetering  William Westwood Roy Tweit  Captain Cruckshank Lambert
Craver  Professor Jogram Edward Kronstad  George Mimfee Antone Frank 
Abraham Alfred Rosenhall  Stillewalker ,V. H. Hoppe  Dorothy Cruckshank
Melba Hinds  Mrs. Cruckshank Elsie Minor  Priscilla Olga Brotnov  Mrs.
Mimfee Olive Osplund  The scenes are as follows:  Act I — Road near
Sir Jasper's home  at night.  Act II — Dining hall in Sir Jasper's 
home early in the morning.  Act III—^Minifee's Tea House and  Tavern
in the afternoon.  Act IV — Minifee's Tea House and  Tavern fifty
years later.  . Synopsis: William Westwood and  Dorothy Cruckshank are
eloping, but  (Continued on page 2.)  PERMANENT OFFICERS ARE  CHOSEN BY
SENIORS  AND JUNIORS  COLLEGE OF PUGET SOUND AND CHENEY STATE NORMAL 
SCHOOL FALL BEFORE BELLINGHAM NORMAL  — SECOND TEAM ALSO WINS GAME 
Following the assembly on Wednesday,  January 26, the Senior and Junior 
classes elected their officers for the remainder  of the year. Those
elected by  the Senior Class are: President, Clinton  Primer; vice
president, Frances Smith;  secretary, Frank Allison; tresaurer,  Madeline
Xitco. The new Junior officers  are president, Ada Stephens; vice 
president, Fay Durham; secretary, Lawrence  Wright; treasurer, Elsie Minor.
 B. S. N.S.  THESPIAN  Will Play St. Martin's College Team Tomorrow  Two
victories have been annexed by Coach Sara Carver's Blue  and White Normal
School team since the appearance of the last  regular edition of the
Messenger. The first game with the State  Normal School team from Cheney
was played in the Fairhaven  gymnasium and won by the close score of 28-26.
The second, with  the College of Puget Sound, from Tacoma, was won by the
com-fortbale  margin of 34-18. As a preliminary, the second team had  a
walk-away game with the Mt. Baker town team, winning by the  score of
45-27.  BISHOP SHEPPARD AD-PUPIL  OF MISS GARDNER  GIVES BEAUTIFUL  PROGRAM
 Leonardine Miller, a pupil of Miss  Gardner's, entertained the assembly 
Wednesday with several excellent piano  selections. She is a young lady of
extraordinary  talent and plays with an unusual  idea of interpretation for
one of  her age. Her friends expect a great  future for her, and we
sincerely hope  that she will visit us again.  At the last business meeting
of the  Thespians, it was unanimously voted  that the proceeds from the
performance  of " The Little Princess," an approximate  sum of §56.00,
is to be donated to  the Near East Relief Fund. The Thespian  Dramatic Club
is the first student  organization in the school to react to  the call of
the Near East Relief Fund  so generously.  A vote was also taken whereby
the  club has agreed to raise a special fund  of $10.00 to give to the
support of the  Klipsun.  The amount that is in the treasury  will be used
to buy a set of portable  stage screens, so that short plays for the 
regular programs can be arranged in the  club room, instead of using the
auditorium  at these times.  B. S.N.S.  JUNIOR GIRLS ARE  WINNERS OF KLINE
CUP  METHODIST BISHOP FROM  PORTLAND GIVES INTERESTING  TALK  Wednesday
afternoon the Junior girls'  basketball team finally acquired the  Kline
cup for this year by defeating the  Seniors 32-17. The first game was also 
won by the Juniors, 37-10.  The special feature of the game was  the
shooting of Elsie Minor, Junior forward,  who made practically all of the 
Junior scores, securing fourteen field  goals. During the second half the 
Seniors rallied foi-' a few moments, but  were unable to either hold the
Juniors  or overcome the lead they j gt;iled up during  the first half.
This will probably  end the interclass games for the season,  as the
Juniors' two straight victories  give them the claim to the cup.  " Many
people are unhappy because  they have misplaced their aims in life," 
declared Bishop O. W. Sheperd, of Portland,  Oregon, in assembly last
Monday.  It is not wealth nor fame that makes  happiness, for the
wealthiest and most  famous people often wish for things  they cannot have,
the bishop declared.  He gave three rules which if followed  guaranteed
happiness: We must find  joy in the world; we must love the work  we have
to do; we must take one side  of a question, and stick to it, for a person 
who is undecided will be dissatisfied:  The address was sprinkled with 
humor, and so rich in practical suggestions  to students that it is hoped
the  bishop may address us again.  B. S.N.S.  Mr. Weir Addresses  Many
Gatherings  Mr. Weir, as usual, has been and will  be busy during this
month. He spoke on  February 2 at the Professional Woman's  Club and later
he gave an address to  the Canadian Club on " Lincoln."  He was present at
Sumas on February  8 and assisted in community work. Today  he will speak
in Wickersham.  February 19 will find him at Alpine,  dedicating the school
house, and he will  conclude the month's addresses at Gulf  Grange Lodge,
partaking of community  work, near the month's end.  C. P. S. GAME SLOW 
One of the slowest games of the season  was that played with C. P. S. on 
our own floor last Saturday evening.  The first half almost reminded one of
 the C. P. S. game of last year in which  the College of Puget Sound was
unable  to secure even one field goal. The first  half showed a score in
favor of the Normal  19-4, C. P. S.'s four points being  due to a field
goal by Stone, center, and  a three throw apiece by Scott and  Brooks,
forwards.  During the second half C. P. S. was  able, to solve the mystery
of passing the  ball through the basket more radily,  making the final
score 34-18. The summary  follows:  Normal (34) C. P. 8. (18)  Yorkston f.
Scott  Jenkins f Brooks  Cone c Stone  Burpee....' g .....Brady  Inge g
........Kinch  Substitutions: Mathes for Cone, banished  on personals,
first half; Wright  for Mathes, last part of second half.  Normal, scoring:
Field goals — Jen-continued  on page 2.)  Whatcom Girls Win  from
Normal 22-20  Saturday evening, January 29, the  Whatcom High School girls'
basketball  team won from the Normal School by  the close score of 22 to
20. In the  opening period of the game the Whatcom  lassies had it all
their own way,  running up a score of 13 to 3. The closing  seconds of play
were full of excitement.  Normal was but two points behind  with about
thirty seconds to play.  In a desperate attempt, Normal caged  the final
basket, tieing the score, the  timekeeper's whistle being lost in the  din
that arose from the side lines. The  referee had not heard the whistle and 
so allowed the Normal two points which  (Continued on page 2.)

    
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Weekly Messenger - 1921 February 11 - Page 2

    
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0. THE WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1921  NORMAL
BEATS OLD RIVALS  (Continued from page 1.)  kins, 3; Yorkston, 2; Burpee,
2; Mathes,  , 3 ; Wright, 1. Free throws: Yorkston,  1 in 1 chance;
Jenkins, 6 in 11 chances.  C. P. S. scoring: Field goals — Scott,  2;
Stone, 3; Brady, 1. Free throws:  Scott, 1 in 5c hances; Brooks, 5 in 7 
chances.  CHENEY NORMAL LOSES 28-26  On Friday, January 28, the Belling-ham
 Normal defeated the crack team of  her sister Normal School at Cheney by 
the close score of 28 to 26. The game  was played on a neutral floor at
Fair-haven  as the larger floor of that gymnasium  affords better
opportunities for  team work.  The first period ended with Belling-ham 
leading 19 to 11. Carlyle Crum secured  four field goals, most of which 
were of the long spectacular variety.  Cheney played a much better game
during  the second half, but was unable to  overcome the lead that
Bellingham had  secured during the first period.  Carlysle Crum, who filled
a forward  position, has left school, but Coach Carver  is developing two
new players in  "Spike" Mathes and Dwight Cone. The  summary follows: 
Bellingham (28) Cheney (26)  Yorkston.. f Leach  Crum f. „....F.
Swank  Cone c H. Wynstra  Burpee '. g Howe  Wright g ...W. Wynstra 
Substitutions: Bellingham — Jenkins  for Yorkston; Frank for Wright; 
Mathes for Cone; Wright for Frank;  Cone for Mathes.  Cheney scoring: Field
goals — Leach,  3; F. Swank, 3; H. Wynstra, 2; W.  Wynstra, 2. Free
throws — H. Wynstra,  6 out of 14 chances. Total 26.  Bellingham
scoring: Field goals —  Yorkston, 2; Crum, 4; Cone, 2; Burpee,  1;
Mathes, 1; Jenkins, 1. Free  throws — Crum, 3 out -of 5 chances; 
Jenkins, 3 out of 5 chances. Total 28.  Referee — Bill Cochran,
Bellingham  city schools.  ST. MARTIN'S COLLEGE TOMORROW  Tomorrow evening
at 7:30 St. Martin's  College from Lacey will play us in  our own
gymnasium. St. Martin's has  a good team and will no doubt provide  a good
game tomorrow evening. One  week from today, on February 18, we  play our
return game with Whatcom, at  Whatcom.  B.S.N.S.  WHATCOM GIRLS WIN  FROM
NORMAL 22-20  (Continued from page 1.)  would tie the score, but since all
who  were in the neighborhood of the timekeeper  admit that the whistle
blew three  seconds before Normal caged the final  basket, the game goes to
Whatcom.  Those who represented the Normal  are: Tyler and Whitmore,
forwards;  Munich and Gilbert, centers; Craine and  Phillips, guards; Elsie
Minor and Ada  Dibble, subs.  B.S.N.S.  " ROSEMARY " WILL BE  GIVEN BY
JUNIORS  (Continued from page 1.)  have a wreck near Sir Jasper's home. 
Sir Jasper finds them and invites them  to make his house their home. The
girl's  father and mother also follow and meet  Sir Jasper. The result is
that all are  under one roof. The rather delicate and  interesting
situation is cleverly worked  out in the following acts.  The players under
the direction of  Mr. Hoppe are working hard and are  determined to make
the play the best  ever given here. The costumes will come  from Seattle
and new scenery will be  bought, thus making everything quite  elaborate. 
The advertising campaign started this'  week, so everyone will know about
it.  The Junior play is one of the big annual  events of the school. 
— - B . S . N . S .  CHORAL CLUB  The Choral Club hour last Thursday 
was spent in beginning the new operetta,  " In India." The girls were
delighted  with the quaint, rather weird music.  This opera is quite
different from anything  given here in the past, and is a  pleasure to look
forward to.  The club will welcome new members,  especially second
sopranos.  B.S.N.S.  THE NORMAL BY THE SEA(?)  One day as I was walking
along Normal  Drive I was stopped by a stranger  and was asked the
following question:  " Did Mrs. Ella Higgenson have this sea  in mind when
she wrote her famous  poem known as 'The Normal by the  Sea'?" He asked
this question pointing  to our athletic field known as the  swam]}. I
answered this question in the  best way I could without disgracing the 
school by answering, "Yes." I am sure  Mrs. Higginson thought nothing of
this  swamp when she wrote her beautiful  poem, painting in words the
wonderful  site of the Bellingham Normal. She was  referring to the large
restless body of  water stretched out before us, known  as Bellingham Bay. 
Is it not too bad that we have to be  ridiculed by strangers on account of
our  poor athletic field • at the south end of  our building? It is
true, much work  has already been done on this piece of  ground, but do you
not think it would  have been better to have waited until  the work could
have been immediately  completed when it had once been  started? I am sure
that most of us will  agree that we have been overlooked in  regards to
athletic equipment at this  school. We have no modern gymnasium  and only a
swamp for an athletic field.  Why is it that we are not supplied with 
these as other institutions of the state?  I am sure that it is not the
fault of  our delegates to the state legislature,  for we all know how hard
and faithful  Dr. Nash has always worked for the  good of the school and
everything connected  with it.  We have no doubt heard it said many  times
that we do not need an athletic  field because of our small enrollment of 
men in the school. It is true that since  the war, the enrollment of men in
our  school has been small but during the  lasfl year it has showed a rapid
increase.  Along with this growth in enrollment,  the need of an athletic
field will grow  and before long we will have athletes  here equal in
ability to any in the state,  and we will have no place to train them,  as
in the days of yore.  HEADQUARTERS FOR  Groceries, Fresh Fruit, Vegetables
and Bakery Goods.  We make a specialty of Fancy Cakes to Order.  M. J.
O'CONNORS  Successor to  Sweet Grocery Company  1021 ELK STREET  Bloedel
Donovan  Lumber Mills  ROUGH AND DRESSED LUMBER.  LATH AND SHINGLES. 
DOORS, WINDOWS, FRAMES.  MOULDINGS AND FINISH.  QUICK DELIVERY.  BRING US
YOUR LIST FOR ESTIMATE  Retail Office, 1615 Elk Street  Retail Yard, Phone
433—Sash   Door Factory, Phone 1257  FOR EIGHT YEARS  CAVE  Has stood
for Pure, Clean, Wholesome  CANDY AMD ICE CREAM  We should not wait any
longer, but  we must act at once and do all we can  to start a movement
that will in the  end bring us an uprto-date athletic  field. It is a
disgrace to have people  call our field a swamp. Wake up and  get busy and
prepare the way for those  coming after us. This is no Ukelele College;  it
is a normal school. We need an  athletic field. When, oh when, are we 
going to get it?  — A. L. H.  B.S.N.S.  JOIN THE KLIPSUN CONTEST 
B.S.N.S.  ALETHEIA  On Thursday evening, January 28,  Aletheia held a very
short but interesting  meeting. Alice M. Baer gave two  piano selections.
These very interesting  and educational talks were given:  " What Women
Have Accomplished in  Music," by Esther Moehring; "What  Women Have
Accomplished in Law," by  Anna Lundahl, and " What Women  Have Accomplished
in Art," by Iva De  Rose.  MISS WOODARD ENTERTAINS  BIBLE CLASS 
Appreciating the fact that we are all  busy people, it was a most happy 
thought that prompted Miss Woodard  to choose the noon hour for an economic
 combination of luncheon and social converse  (the latter so rare and so
coveted  a pleasure, in the rush of daily work)  with the members of her
Bible class, on  Thursday, January 27.  Each guest brought her own tray
from  the cafeteria, or lunch from home as she  preferred, and the " p a r
t y " was held in  the small dining room adjoining the domestic  science
kitchen, where the hostess  served cocoa during the meal.  Interesting and
jolly games with pleasant,  social chat enlivened the hour which  was all
too short, but withal delightful.  The success of the dean's hospitable 
idea was amply demonstrated by the  happy faces and expressions of delight 
issuing from the " banquet hall" when  the 1 o'clock bell trilled its merry
lay.  Encore, Miss Woodard!

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Weekly Messenger - 1921
February 11 - Page 3

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THE WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY,
FEBRUARY 11, 1921 3 
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i iMlllllllliMll I iiiiiilJMlllirliiiitu iiiiiim iiiiiiiriiillllicS  jiiitm
i n i nil" i I" "II" I ""lllllllllr  Nobody likes a person who goes  around
wearing a long face and a chip  on his shoulder, telling the world it is a 
poor place in which to live. If a decision  is made whether it be to attend
 school or join a favorite club one should  stick to it, make his presence
wanted  and acceptable by co-operation instead  of finding fault. Too often
the one  who knocks is the person who has done  the least. Just as
undesirable as the  knocker in an institution is the person  who is
complacent with things as they  aire, who says that everything is good 
enough for him since others have gotten  along well enough under those
conditions.  The person who steps in and says  that he is willing to do his
part, then  goes out and finds his proper place and  fills it, is the one
who is desirable to  have as a school member, a club president  or a
friend. That person will get  along because he boosts present conditions 
on to higher standards and greater  achievements.  * * *  If you are
looking for trouble just  ask Elsie Minor why she cooked so much  rice.  *
* *  Gladys and Iva West spent a pleasant  week end at Park, on Lake
Whatcom.  B.S. N.S.  TACOMA CLUB HAS HI-JINKS  The members of the Tacoma
Club and  their guests, about forty strong, gathered  in the gym last
Saturday night and  proceeded in a body, escorted by Mr.  Ed Morath, to the
home of himself and  his mother, Mrs. Wister, a member of  the Junior
Class.  As the house is picturesquely located  among the pines at the base
of Sehome  Hill, the interior was decorated with  evergreen and resembled
the out-of-doors  to carry out the idea of an indoor  picnic, and in honor
of the club the word  "Tacoma" done in great yellow letters  adorned the
wall, above a water color  picture of Rainier, framed in green pine  twigs.
 The girls, chaperoned by Miss Born-stein,  all wore middy blouses and
walking  skirts, and kept the ball of fun rolling  with games and singing,
assisted with  ukelele and mandolin .  Refreshments were served in novel 
fashion — cafeteria style — the guests  lined up and served
with " hot dogs"  and hot buttered rolls, dill pickles and  coffee in
double quick time by the effi-  Does the printed  page blur? Do your  eyes
burn? Does  your head ache before  night? Consult  Woll, the optometrist, 
about y o u r  eyes. 205 W Holly.  cient servers. " Ruth" handled the 
wienies like an expert chef; Mr. Morath,  who is a member of the Pike's
Peak  Mountain Club in his home town, and an  experienced host for hikes
and picnic  parties, tossed the hot rolls to Miss  Bornstein for butter and
pickles, and  Mrs. Wister poured coffee.  The party broke up at an early
hour.  B.S. N.S.  Valuable Books on  History of Northwest  Are in Library 
How many Normal students know  there are in a special case in the library 
some invaluable books on the history of  this northwest country?  No doubt
there are very few, as the  books are seldom used, yet here is rich  and
abundant material about our own  Pacific Northwest.  There are many old and
valuable  volumes to be found here. Perhaps the  oldest book is "A Voyage
Around the  World," by Dixson, jJublished in 1789.  No doubt the reason for
this neglect  on the part of students is because the  case is locked. Many
students have the  opinion these books are for show, but  in reality they
are meant for the use of  all. The librarian at the desk would be  only too
glad to give anyone the key to  this case.  B.S. N.S.  Miss Keeler Meets 
Former Students  Miss Keeler spent the past month in  Chelan, Okanogan,
Island and Snohomish  Counties and met many former  Normal students.  At
AVenatchee it was surprising how  many of our graduates were teaching 
there. William Training in the Stevens  Building; Ethel Miller and Laurena 
Bushby in the Whitman Building; Florence  Redford, home economics;
Kath-leenne  Nethercutt, primary; Clarice  Oatis, teachers in Wenatchee
also.  At Cashmere, Florence Taylor is doing  excellent work. Esther Thomas
and  Frances Gallagher are at Monitor; Ger-adline  Drake is at Sunnyslope.
Mrs.  Gladys Funk Farley, of Chelan, whose  school now numbers but " 1,"
was glad  to hear from and sent greetings to the  Normal.  In Okanogan
County Dorothy Massie  is at Brewster. Here Miss Keeler also  met Mr. Reep,
father of Miss Ellen  Reep, one of our present students.  Martha Forde,
Dorothy Forde, Luella  Smith, Hazel Lang, Margaret Pillard  were
encountered at Okanogan; Harriet  Hampson, Charlotte Fink, Mai--  garet
Laisure, Ethel Campbell and Mr.  Morgan, at Omak. At Tonasket, Miss  Keeler
met Frances Davis, also Mrs.  Pauline Bair Hockett, who is not teaching. 
Myrtle Berg is at Oroville.  In Island County are many former  students.
Likewise in Snohomish. Edith  Froom, Blanche Sixeas, Bessie Winemil-ler, 
Hazel Tweedy, Albert Dunagan and  several others are at Lake Stevens. At 
Arlington, Nellie Doolittle, Neva Cow-den,  Julia Wright and Miss Luckman; 
Boyd Ellis in Marysville.  B. S. N. S.  THE KLIPSUN CONTEST IS ON 
Beautiful  SKIRTS  So Very Reasonably Priced at  Apparel of Quality  Can
You Draw  A COVER  DESIGN  for the  KLIPSUN  CASH PRIZE  $2.50  Contest
Closes One  Week From Today  Take Some Snapshots For  The Klipsun

    
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Weekly Messenger - 1921 February 11 - Page 4

    
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4 THE WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1921  THE
WEEKLY cTWESSENGERo  Published by Students' Association of State Normal
School, Bellingham.  Entered in the Postoffice at Bellingham, Washington,
as second-class matter.  Union Printing, Binding   Stationery Company,
Printers  Subscription rates by mail, $2.00 per year in advance Single
copies, 5 cents.  Advertising rates on application.  Address all
communications, other than news items, to The Manager of the  Weekly
Messenger, Bellingham, Washington.  STAFF OFFICERS  EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
CATHERINE SHEPHERD  BUSINESS MANAGER ARTHUR E. BOWSHER  MESSErv.GER STAFF 
Assembly Notes Viola Stuwnan Club Notes.. Armeda Fjellman  Faculty
Notes........ Iva West Alumni...  General News Reporter Lois Osborn
Exchange Arthur Bowsher  General News Reporter Arthur Huggins Training
School Notes Lillie Dunagan  Society Doris Erickson General Brief Margaret
Zurbrick  T HE time has come," the Walrus  said,  "To speak of many things;
 Of ships and sealing wax  And cabbages and kings." JI **  *  * t  *  **.s.
 •**  •*!  *~  f *  THE UNDERTONE  We speak of overtones in
music, but we HEAR understones  three times a week in assembly! Seniors are
unusually fortunate  in having front seats, for if we didn't we surely
would miss hearing  announcements and talks. The student body as a whole,
we  are sure, are not vitally interested in how many beaux a certain  girl
has, how many parties someone else went to last Saturday, or  lengthy
gossip on fashions.  Mrs. Thatcher lias our sincere sympathy, and by "
our," we  mean the majority of us. It must be discouraging, to say the
least  to try to lead assembly music with a continual undertone.  If we
talked half as much about our studies our grades for  the quarter would be
assured. The following is not an unusual  conversation as heard by an
innocent bystander: " What was said  in assembly today? " " I don't know.
Why weren't you there? "  "Well, I teach in the morning so I can't go. How
about you?"  " Oh, I was there, but couldn't hear a thing."  We don't
happen to sit in the men's section, but believe that  they are as guilty as
we. Perhaps their undertones do not run  along the lines of boys, parties
and fashions, but instead, girls,  basketball and Knights of the Curb and
Gutter antics.  ; Now let us all try to be more quiet, and remember that
overtones  are permissable while singing, but undertones are unforgivable, 
at any time in assembly or programs. — A SENIOR.  In comparison with
many general libraries, some of them in  larger cities, our juvenile
library is far superior. It is such a  pleasant, well lighted, well
ventilated room, with no musty corners,  nor gloomy walls. Light, warmth
and fresh air are the first few  factors. one notices in entering. 
Parents, if you want your child to have the best advantages  along book
lines, begin at once, if only in a small way. Furnish  him the good
wholesome recreation that is his. heritage —good  books, fresh air
and plenty of scope for imagination.  In a recent survey of many libraries,
county and city, the bad  air and dark and musty corners were noted in many
instances.  Also, it is rare to find such a well selected list of
children's books  as ours. The library is a monument to Miss Wilson's
untiring  care and interest.  The Junior Class has again claimed the Kline
cup by winning  the interclass contest in basketball this year. This
victory has  taken much work and practice on the part of the girls of the
team  and they have been very faithful. The Messenger takes this
opportunity  to congratulate the Junior Class as a whole for the splendid 
work their team has displayed. However, the Seniors havei worked  just as
hard and deserve the praise of the school also.  Are you writing your story
or essay for the Klipsun? Have  you drawn the prize-winning cover design?
These are two questions  which every Normal student should answer and in
the affirmative.  If you have a talent, let others enjoy it, and if you do 
not know your ability, now is the best time to discover it. The  contest is
still on and the editor is anxious that a good response  will be given in
order to make this year's Klipsun the champion  of the school.  While we
are speaking of the Klipsun contests for stories, let  us not forget that
The Messenger will appreciate any. stories,  poems, essays or anecdotes
which the students or faculty have to  offer. Some time when you . have a
brilliant inspiration, write  it down and enlarge upon it till it becomes a
story. Leave it in  " The Messenger Box " in the main hall and receive the
thanks of  the school.  SHAW BANS CHILDREN'S BOOKS  THE JUVENILE LIBRARY 
The juvenile library is one of the most interesting places in  our school.
It is beautiful to see the way the little tots come to  this room with
sparkling eyes, their eager hands reaching out for  the " Fairyland" that
they know can be found on the pages of  these children's books.  The
reading children are the most  important children, said Bernard Shaw  the
other day before a committee of the  Children's Libraries Movement in
London.  He himself had been a reading  child, and it always surprised him
to  hear people speak of the tears they shed  in learning to read. He was
born with  the faculty of reading and well remembered  the annoyance a
governess had  caused him by forcing upon his attention  a spelling book
with the words  senselessly arranged in columns and  desiccated by hyphens;
only one example  of the subterfuges of those enemies  of every reading
child — the publisher  and the parent. Children themselves  would
never buy books " for the child,"  but publishers and parents keep the
witless  traffic up, and thus it comes — Mr.  Shaw said — that
England is such an  unliterary nation. In the new children's  libraries let
there be plenty of phonographs  and pictures, he urged, but let  there be
no children's books. Every one  knows what he means — too many
talking  animals, too many clumsy fairies.  But there are, of course, lots
of fine  children's books that are above the  heads of grown-up readers. 
B.S.N.S.  Draw the Klipsun Cover Design.  B.S.N.S.  SLIGHT CORKECTIOX  "
No, sir," cried the irate parent. " My  daughter can never be yours."  " I
don't want her to be my daughter,"  interrupted the young man. " I want 
her to be my wife." — Edinburgh Scotsman.  SUMMER DAY AT THE  NORTH
POLE  It was midnight on the ocean,  Not a street car was in sight,  The
sun was shining brightly,  Arid it rained  \\ day that night.  It was a
summer day in winter,  And the rain was snowing fast,  A barefoot boy with
shoes on,  Stood sitting on the grass.  It was raining and the rising sun 
Was setting in the West,  The little fishes in the trees,  Were huddling in
their nest.  And a fish fell off the tree top,  Where he roosted cool and
high,  And the little devil drownded,  For, Begob, the state was dry. 
While the organ peeled potatoes,  Lard was rendered by the choir,  As the
sexton rang the dish rag,  Someone set the ice on fire.  " Ploly smoke!'1
the preacher shouted,  And in the rain he lost his hair,  Now his head
resembles Heaven,  For there is no parting there.  — SHAKESPEARE 
Fitzsimons General Hospital, Denver,  Colorado.  Q. M. C.  B.S.N.S. 
Natalie Blix has been absent from  school on account of illness.  B.S.N.S. 
Golf is now a recognized sport at the  University of Wisconsin.

    
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Weekly Messenger - 1921 February 11 - Page 5

    
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THE WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1921 5  AT THE
NEW  DIRECTION OF JENSEN AND VON HERBERG  NOW PLAYING  Zane Grey's  cc The
U- R  il"  ALSO A CHESTER COMEDY  One Best Pet  Coming  FIRST THREE DAYS 
OF WEEK  MR. AND MRS.  CARTER DE HAVEN  In Margaret Mayo's and  Salisbury
Field's Popular  Pajama Play  Twin  eds  A PRAIRIE HOUR  The stars shone
over the lonely prairie  — brilliant and scintillaley in their 
shrines, with a cold — an awesome light  that was answered in turn by
the piercing  winter wind that buzzed and whistled  and sang over the land
of forgotten  summer.  As I touched my dog's collar he looked  at me with
eyes so bright and warm that  I forgot the cold — but only for an
instant.  I walked a few rods further and  stopped. Loneliness — awe
— filled me.  I shivered slightly and drew my collar  tighter to my
chin.  Oh, the moaning — the mystery of the  wind as it passed
— was it nothing?  Could it feel — think — was it running
 away from the prairie? What, oh what,  was it?  The dog gave a tiny whine
and his  hair bristled slightly. Was he feeling  it too?  How many
questions to ask — the  myriad things to know, but no one to  ask....
no one to answer.  The brown earth at" my feet was hard,  cold and still,
the pulsing life had been  carried away by the wind spirits and  the cold
had settled drearily.  Space   how indefinite — the thought  —
how definite and yet mysterious-the  word. All in all — nothing in
all —  which?  A star twinkled in a friendly way but  it warmed the
heart — not the prairie.  We were alone; so alone that the  silence
seemed to be descending on us  — about us — coming to chill our
hearts  — our lives, until we lived and breathed  no more; until we
became one, with the  frozen ground — a shapeless, lifeless  mass. It
became suffocating! A torture—  unbearable. I could not stay — 
yet I must! The dog trembled against  me. " Come," I cried, " we must go
—  we must — we must!"  We turned, walked back to our little 
camp, a mile distant at the foot of the  mountains, among the sheltering,
warm  pines. (  I stood for a moment by the embers  of my dying fire,
thinking. Then I  rolled into my blankets, sighed and —  slept. 
— MARGARET HAYWAUD  B.S.N.S.  PHILOS  The Philos had their meeting
Thursday  evening, January 27. Miss Sutherland  gave a delightful piano
solo. Miss  Xitco lead in parliamentary drill which  was as amusing as it
was instructive.  After this there was a one-act play,  " Owen to Maggie,"
by the following  cast:  Bob Drummond Ruben Aim  Disinherited by his aunt,
Miss  Bird, because he would not marry  her wealthy niece, Sylvia, as he
was  in love with Edith.  Richard Dolorton A. E. Rosenhall  Chum of Bob and
a young flay-right,  famed in college for his impersonation  of soubrette
roles.  Sylvia Bird Elenora Simpson  Ward of Miss Bird and Dick's 
sweetheart.  Edith Hardy Marion Collier  The girl Bob left behind.  Miss
Bird Mable Bond  The wealthy grand-aunt of Bob.  Maggie Maginnis Bernice
Day  Age fourteen, a little mother of  the tenements.  James T. Coyle Mr.
Stephens  Manager of the Olympian Theater,  New York.  Connoly Baby  Scene
— A tenement house room in  New York, five flights up.  Time —
Present.  This play,! which will soon be repeated  in assembly, created a
great deal of merriment.  B.S.N.S.  AN ARITHMETIC METHODS  PSALM  Mr. Bond
is my teacher, I shall not  pass;  He leadeth me to answer in deep
embarrassment  ;  He leadeth me into traps of mine own  setting. He calleth
my bluff.  He leadeth me into dusty paths  among orchards of problems for
mine  own nourishment.  Yea, though I walk with Tennyson- and  Shakespeare 
I cannot recite, for they will not help  me.  Their dignity and their
rhymes they  crush me;  He prepareth me for a plucking in the  presence of
my classmates.  He raineth on my head his questions.  He showeth me up. 
Verily, Arithmetic Methods doth  haunt, me every hour of my life until  I
shall dwell in B. S. N. S. no more forever  !  B. S. N. S.  JOIN THE
KLIPSUN CONTEST  B. S. N. S.  Romayn Gilbert spent the week end  with her
parents at Mount Vernon.  B . S . N . S .—  THE SELKIRKS ON A CLEAR
DAY  Vast stretcher of majestic mountains  Hemmed in by naught by sky, 
Great monuments of purity and strength  That's for us to follow till life
flies.  Stories of the cold steep ascent  Up their sides of glistening
snow,  Mighty peaks unbound by man  And all the creeds he knows.  Each tall
inspiring peak, a finger,  Pointing out to high and low,  The way to reach
the place  We would our thoughts could go.  They would not be in helpful
waiting  Through the ages, snow and cold,  If 'twere not that God had put
them  there  To guide us toward his fold.  — MARGARET HAYWAHD 
B.S.N.S.  JOIN THE KLIPSUN CONTEST

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Weekly Messenger
- 1921 February 11 - Page 6

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THE WEEKLY MESSENGER,
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1921 
.^HiumiimiiiiiHMiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiniiiiHiiiiiiHiiiiM^^ 
HwiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitfiiitiiiiiiiiiiniiMiitfiiiiniuitiiFiit[ii[iiiMtiitMiiitniiiiiMititiifiiiiii]riiiii[t[i]i[iiiitniiJiiJiiiiHij[iitiiMrMu
2  SOCIETY  Harriet Danielson and Helen White-nack,  of Enger Hall,
entertained Donna  Cady and Noma Thompson in their room  for Sunday evening
supper.  * * *  Last Saturday evening after the basketball  game, the
Philos entertained the  College of Puget Sound team and Normal's  first
team, with the two coaches,  Mr. Peck and Mr. Carver; Harry  Smith, Archie
Erickson, Alta Cress and  Vera Nickerson at Eleanor Simpson's  home, 931
High Street. They spent the  evening in playing; games and hearing  a
musical program. Later in the evening  lunch was served.  * * *  Catherine
Joyce and Minnie Collins  spent the week . end in Seattle visiting 
friends.  # * *  The Enger Hall girls had a weinie  roast in the room of
one of the girls  Sunday evening.  • • *  Alma Deierling,
Louise Nelson, Laura  Johnson and Dorothy Bell attended the  party at the
Episcopal Church Saturday  evening.  A number of Edens Hall girls went to 
Whatcom Falls last Sunday afternoon.  * # *  Just at daybreak Sunday
morning,  Edith Kiser, Ada Dibble, Elta Pitman,  Alta Cress, Johanna
Larsen, Sarma  Blum and Grace Rehill, started on a  hike to Mt. Chuckanut.
Notwithstanding  the fact that they lost their way a few  times, they
reached the point at 9:30  where they "immediately built a fire and 
prepared breakfast. They reached home  for luncheon and pronounced the trip
 one of the best of the year.  # # *  Mrs. Nash gave a silver tea for the 
Y. W. C. A. at her home, 1710 Eldridge  Avenue, Friday, February 4, between
 the hours of 3 and 5. Mrs. James Wilson  gave a reading, Mrs. Burlingame a
 vocal solo, Mrs. H. Goodell Boucher a  song and Mrs. Larrabee a short talk
on  the) object of the Y. W. C. A.  February Magazines  Are we all aware of
the many good  things to be found in the February  magazines?  In the
Atlantic Monthly is an article  by Stanwood Cobb in which he advocates 
more freedom for the child. In  progressive schools, there is no -fixed 
furniture. Why should a child be denied  freedom? Much of nervousness in
children  comes from the brutal custom of  holding them to fixed seats for
five hours  a day. They lack also mental freedom.  The best way to make a
child learn is  to make him want to learn. Mr. Cobb  favors abandonment of
formal recitation,  a more flexible program and em-  / phasizes upon
athletics, music, art,. dra-  \ matics and self government.  u Washington
and its code commission  are discussed by J. Orin Olephant. This  '.(/is a
matter of uttermost importance to  all teachers and prospective teachers. 
This will have to do with future salaries,  school terms, day lengths and
work to  be done. In this same issue tribute is  paid D. M. Showalter,
president of  Cheney Normal. His picture appears  on the cover and a resume
of his very  helpful work in the field of education in  Washington.  As a
special favor to the Eng. 23  students, Herbert L. Steward in the  North
American Review, has an article  entitled " Ibsen and Some Current 
Superstitions." In this interesting article  appears criticisms on " The
Dolls  House," "The Wild Duck," "Pillars of  Society' 'and other of Ibsen's
dramas.  Ibsen's distinction lies in his " thoroughness  as a herald of
revolt." Edmund  Burke said' of convention, that each  must decide for
himself. " We are  afraid to put men to live and trade on  their private
stock of reason, that the  individual would do better to avail himself  of
the general bank and capital, of  the nations and ages."  How many of us
are acquainted with  that beautifully illustrated magazine  called the Far
East? It deals with the  home life of the Japanese, their art,  which by
the way is taking new angles,  in that the famous old mountain no  longer
hovers in the background. A  short sketch of the career of Japan's  future
ruler is given, along with political  problems, as they touch ours.  In the
Bay View Magazine a set of  questions under title of "The Community 
Program" by Bessie Leach Priddy,  Ph. D., deals with social conditions in 
our school communities; also an interesting  illustrated article on Mexican
 problems by W. T. Root, Ph. D.  In the Literary Digest, if you want  to
test your efficiency, try Thorndyke's  test for efficiency on page 24 lt;
of the  February 5th number. There may be  considerable falling off of
egotism.  The Klu Klux Klan is back again  with all its mystic operations.
If we  would keep up on information as to its  formation and intentions
read the above  named magazine. A review of Edith  Wharton's novel of Old
New York is of  interest to book lovers, and can be  found in the same
copy.  In the Northwest Journal of Educa-  Newton's  Incorporated  WOMEN'S
APPAREL OF QUALITY  Special Sale of  Jersey Dresses  $9.85  KEMPHAUS 
lt;®, CO.  Bellingham's Lowest Price Goat and  Suit Store  DRY GOODS,
WOMAN'S FURNISHINGS  PICTORIAL REVIEW PATTERNS  DEPENDABLE SHOES With
Style, Quality  and Comfort for Men — Expert  Repairing  LONGWO O D '
S SHOE SHOP  1325 DOCK STREET  N/ALEIMTIINJ  The Co-Op.  tion is something
very new, and very  unique. It has to do with . the new  Ellensburg Normal
Training School and  the supply store. The work of the store  is carried on
by the fifth graders. It is  an article of interest and suggestion to  us,
and is surely motivation in abundance.  Do not miss it. " Social Life in 
Washington High Schools," by J. W.  Lindley, of Cheney, is of extreme
interest  to a good many of us. It takes  up the problem of social life in
school.  Cheney communities favor dancing at  school. Cordial invitations
are given the  parents, so that they may attend any or  all social
functions. No persons riot  connected with school are permitted to  attend.
An assessment of 5 cents is  made to cover costs. Dramatics or  other
variations of programs, precede  the dancing.  The National Geographic has
for its  contribution this month a long article on  that land of interest,
Czechoslovakia, the  key land of Central Europe. The article  is profusely
illustrated with forty-,  six cuts, that in themselves almost tell a  story
of work, home life and festivals, as  well- as sufferings and joys. A large
 new map of Europe is given in this issue,  whereby the new-old countries, 
once again come into their proper and  rightful place.  — ARMIDA
FJELMAM-

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Weekly Messenger - 1921 February 11 - Page
7

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THE WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1921 7 
Faculty Notes  Miss Landis spent last week end at  her home in Seattle. 
» *• *  Dr. Miller gave an address on " Gifted  and Ungifted
Children" at the Lowell  P.-T. A. meeting Wednesday night.  » »
•  Cecil Stevens and Gladys West from  one of Mr. Hoppe's expression
classes  gave readings at the Garden Street  Methodist Church community
dinner last  Friday.  * # *  Several changes have recently been  made in
the teaching schedule. Dr.  Hughes now has the hygiene class, formerly 
taught by Mr. Philippi ,• Mr. Hunt  has Miss Baker's mathematics
class;  Mr. Philippi is the instructor of introduction  to science, and Mr.
Coughlin  has the Nature Study department.  * * *  Mr. Rindal is to give an
illustrated  lecture on Norway at Field this evening.  * * *  Mr. Coughlin
led the community singing  at the Columbia School P.-T. A.  Monday evening.
 * * #  Mr. Philippi spoke Sunday afternoon  at the Y. to a class of boys
on the interesting  subject of astronomy. He has  promised an enjoyable
evening to them  in the future by the use of the telescope  in star gazing
and pointing out the more  common constellations.  * * *  Mr. Weir was at
Everett Friday night  .to judge a debate between Everett and  Meridian High
Schools.  * * *  Miss Cummins, Mr. Philippi and Mr.  Bond judged the
Nooksack-Marysville  debate at Nooksack last Friday night.  * * #  If Mr.
Coughlin seems to be wearing  a more genial smile than usual these  days it
is because he has recently pur-  Stotune  (Erar  | | MONDAY—Rev. H.
S. Templeton. ||  * * *  11 WEDNESDAY — Miss Cummins, cur- ||  1|
rent history; Mrs. Thatcher, ||  32 1 =  11 music; Mr. Philippi, motion || 
i l pictures. I|  * # *  H FRIDAY — Play, " Owin' to Mag- |i  11
gie," presented by Philos. |[  chased a pretty little bungalow on Forest 
Street. All his spare time is taken  up with washing windows, scrubbing 
basement floors and passing opinions on  new rugs. If you wish to please
the  professor just ask him about his new  home.  * * *  WRITE A STORY
— WIN A PRIZE  * # *  Gladys West recently received a letter  from
Dr. Curry, who is now at his home  in Boston, Massachusetts, and who will 
doubtless be remembered by a number  of Normal students, as he was a member
 of the expression department last  summer. He enjoyed the Puget Sound 
climate so much that he is anxious for  his work and interests to bring him
back  here again in the near future.  * * *  Biology class has adopted the
slogan  " Look it up." One of the members received  the erroneous idea that
a coral  belonged to the insect family. He had  a hard time proving it to
the fellow students,  so they all decided to find the  solution for
themselves.  * * *  The department of education is as  busy as ever. Dr.
Miller addressed the  Parent-Teachers' Association at Lowell  School last
Wednesday on " Gifted and  Ungifted Children."  • * -X *  Mr. Kibbe
is in great demand for P.-  T. A. programs, to discuss the newly  proposed
school code.  * # #  Last Friday evening Dr. Miller and  Mr. Kibbe took
part in the speaking and  social good time of the Baptist Sunday  School
banquet.  * * #  Mr. Kolstad and Dr. Miller are being  called on, more and
more, to test exceptional  children in nearby schools.  * * *  Friday
evening of last week the Oregon  Club held high revelry at Mr. Kol-stad's 
cottage on Lake Whatcom.  » * *  The department of education is
completing  a bibliography on the much discussed  project method. The
available  books on the subject are classified by  Dr. Miller and the
magazine articles by  Prof. Kolstad. The first pamphlet is  prepared and
has been distributed  among members of the faculty.  * * *  Miss Speny, on
Wednesday night of  this week spoke to the Woman's Club at  Sedro-Woolley,
on " Nineteenth Century  Essayists."  * * *  Miss Sperry has her extension
class  at the Y. W. C. A. every Monday afternoon.  These classes are full
of interest  and benefit for those enrolled.  * * *  Announcements have
been received of  the arrival of a daughter, January 9, at  the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Merle Mul-ford.  Mrs. Mulford was formerly Miss  Knowles, of our
domestic science department.  B.S.N.S.  Draw the Klipsun Cover Design.  B.
S. N. S.  The University of Wisconsin has 7,004  students enrolled this
year, which constitutes  the largest student body in the  institution's
history.  ALUMNI  jiiimiiiiiimiimimumiimmimiiiiiiiiiiimmmir;  THE KLIPSUN
WANTS A COVER DESIGN  * # . * '  ..Mrs. Annette Vaughn, a graduate of  our
school in 1918, and later a graduate  of the University of Oregon, is now 
head of the English department of  Baker City High School, Baker City, 
Oregon. She is also sponsor for the  school paper, entitled the Nugget.  *
* *  Announcements have been received of  the arrival of a daughter,
Jeanette  Elizabeth, January 3, to Mr. and Mrs.  W. C. Gunther. Mrs.
Gunther was  formerly Miss Beth Shoemaker, a graduate  of this school.  * *
*  Vivian Bettanini '19 is at Port. Orchard  this year.  * * # • 
Edith Froom '19 is teaching at Lake  Stevens.  * * *  Mary Trunkey, a
former graduate,  has fourth grade at Emunclaw. She is  planning on
entering the Tacoma city  schools next year.  * *' *  Estella Burnside '20
has intermediate  grades at Centralia this year.  * * #  Effle Madson '20
is at Great Falls,  Montana.  * # *  The Nagely family are well represented
 in the educational field with Carrie  '17, as a missionary in Persia;
Louise  teaching in Tacoma, and John, near  Olympia.  * # #  Ethel Ogren, a
November graduate,  has a position in Puyallup.  * * #  Crete Grey, a
graduate of 1919, is  teaching at Hoquiam.  * * *  Mrs. Lydia M. Jones has
a position  in Tacoma this year.  B. S. N. S.  JOIN THE KLIPSUN CONTEST 
— - B . S . N . S .  TRAINING SCHOOL NOTES  The grammar grades
enjoyed an old  fashioned spelling match at their regular  Wednesday
assembly.  Johnny had skipped his classes, deceived  his mother, had been
found out,  and caused unhappiness all around. His  teacher took him aside
and had a heart  to heart talk. Johnny sat still, looking  at his teacher
intently, and seemed to be  deeply impressed. His teacher thought  she was
making good headway and that  her sermon was surely penetrating  Johnny's
brains. But you never can  tell about little boys. Just as she had  reached
the climax of her appeal to his  better self a light of discovery broke 
over Johnny.  " Say, teacher," he said eagerly,' " it's  your lower jaw
that moves, ain't it? "  The first and second grades will enjoy  a splendid
Lincoln program today.  The junior high school will give a  program, which
will be followed by a  Valentine box this afternoon.  B.S.N.S.  Write a
Story for the Klipsun.  See Us for High  Grade Candies  at Popular  Prices 
F. W. W00LW0RTH CO.  5c-10-15c Store  GREAT WESTERN  Wood and Coal
Combination  Heater, has a big open  front, like a fireplace. Uses  less
fuel. Built to last.  JENKINS-BOYS  COMPANY  The Bellingham  National Bank 
Capital and Surplus  $475,000.00  BROWN'S STUDIO, Sunset Building  H.
Goodell—BOUCHER—Edith H.  Tenor — Mezzo Soprano  OLD
ITALIAN METHOD OF BEL CANTO  FRENCH, ITALIAN, ENGLISH  R E P E R T O I R E 
BELLINGHAM SCHOOL OF  MUSIC AND AST  401-409 Excff. Bldff. Phone 1303 
MORSE HARDWARE CO.  1025-1039 Elk Street  ATHLETIC GOODS  Fishing Tackle,
Guns and  Ammunition  KELLY-SPRINGFIELD TIRES  Buy Your Club Pins  and
Class Pins at  MULLER   ASPLUND  JEWELERS  Next to First National Bank  THE
PALLAS  The Home of Better  Candies, Pastries    Ice Cream

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Weekly Messenger - 1921 February 11 - Page 8

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8
THE WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1921  «fr.j»—
••• w "—"—:"—•• " •-
" " " TT  i  oMe Soughing (Sat  ;?  FAST LINES IN BELLINGHAM  Clothes
lines.  Tape lines.  Boat lines.  Telephone lines.  Reception lines.  Bee
lines.  JOIN THE KLIPSUN CONTEST  " What course does your son expect  to
graduate in?"  " Course of time, I think, the way  things look at present."
 Draw the Klipsun Cover Design.  Don't be afraid to invest in a smile. 
It's worth its face value.  WRITE A STORY — W I N A PRIZE  Prof, in
assembly: " Order! Order! "  Voice from back of room: " Ham and  eggs! 
Write a Poem and Win Fame.  IN ENGLISH  " Why do words have roots, Mary ? "
 " They have roots," said Mary, " so  the language can grow."  THE KLIPSUN
WANTS A COVER DESIGN  ONE WEEK  The year had gloomily begun  For Archie E ,
his father's — Sun.  He was beset with bill and dun  And he had very
little — Mon.  " This cash," said he, " won't pay my  dues,  I've
nothing here but ones and — Tues."  A bright thought struck him and
he said,  " The rich Miss Goldf ocks I shall —  Wed."  But when he
paid his court to her,  She lisped but firmly said " No — Thur." 
"Alas," he said, " then let me die,  Although hereafter I must —
Fri."  They found his gloves and coat and hat,  The coroner upon them
— Sat.  Draw the Klipsun Cover Design.  DOMESTIC SCIENCE  1. Learning
to loaf.  2. Special study of canning.  3. Preserving your dignity.  4.
Practice in ' taking the case."  5. Getting things in a stew.  6. How to
roast effectively.  T H E KLIPSUN CONTEST IS ON  WRITE A STORY — W I
N A PRIZE  Clyde Campbell wanted to know in  introduction to science class
what star  shines so brightly each morning at 4:30.  Who can say?  If you
cannot see a joke  That's an awful shock!  Find one if it takes a year, 
Don't go out and knock!  Write a story for the Klipsun.  We notice that
when Cupid hits the  mark he generally Mrs. it.  Write a Story for the
Klipsun.  MANUAL TRAINING  The manual training class of boys  Are
furnishing a house.  Don't tell, because those self-same boys  Keep it
quiet as a mouse.  One fellow made a table,  Another made a chair,  Another
made a window seat,  And each in turn a share.  vVnd then they made a
compact,  That the first who got the girl  Would get the house and all
therein,  Now isn't that some whirl?  We wonder — and we wait to see,
 Just who the lucky ones will be!  Write a Story for the Klipsun.  Mr.
Clinton Primer reports that his  new book will soon be available to the 
expectant public. The title of the book  is " Education for a Life of
Needs," and  has an introduction by Prof. Ralph Miller,  of Sedro-Woolley. 
JOIN THE KLIPSUN CONTEST  THE ARMY HABIT  Lady Shopper: "Pajamas, size
thirty-  six."  Ex-supply Sergeant (in reverie):  " Where's yer old ones.
Gotta turn 'em  in; gotta see yer old ones! "  WRITE A STORY — W I N
A PRIZE  THE FACTS OF THE CASE  A student teacher was giving an examination
 in arithmetic. " If any one  has a question to ask," she said, " he  may
come up to me quietly."  Teddy sat frowning over the third example:  "A
little girl had a family of  dolls. She gave one-fourth of them away  and
had six left. How many did she  give away? " Suddenly his face cleared.  He
rose quietly from his seat and tiptoed  up to the teacher. " Will you 
please tell me," he whispered, " how  many dolls make a family? I have
never  heard."  Too LATE !  " I don't like these photos at all," he  said.
" I look like an ox."  The photographer favored him with a  glance of lofty
disdain. " You should  have thought of that before you had  G R O C E R I E
S  — AND —  CONFECTIONERY  We Cater to t he Normal  Students'
Trade  Agency Pacific Laundry  PHONE 1041  NORMAL  GROCERY  The Hat Shbppe 
H. E. S. FAGEN, Prop.  "Better Hats for Less "  PUBLIC MARKET BUILDING 
MAGNOLIA STREET  "Walk a Block and Save a Dollar"  OWEN MARKET  GROCERY 
PUBLIC MARKET  Pay Cash and Save Money  THE BROWN  STUDIO  Has again been
chosen the official  photographers for the coming  Klipsun. This will be
our sixth  year to do the work, and we appreciate  the compliment.  Have
you had your Senior pictures  tkaen yet? Or your" application  photos? Now
is the time  to have them taken.  BROWN STUDIO  PACIFIC STEAM  LAUNDRY  He
profits most who serves  best Phones 126-127  CLYDE BANKS  Does Our Kodak
Finishing  STUDENTS' CO-OP  BROWN'S STUDIO, Sunset Building  The
Northwestern  National Bank  Bellingham, Wash.  WE SOLICIT THE  NORMAL
ACCOUNTS  Gage-  Dodson  Co.  Home of the  Hart Schaffner    Marx  MEN'S 
CLOTHING  THE KLIPSUN WANTS A COVER DESIGN  BROWN'S STUDIO, Sunset Building
 A^termaTYs(M)FountainPen  THE BEST PEN MADE  144 PENS ALWAYS IN STOCK 
EVERY PEN GUARANTEED  Students' Co-Op  them taken," was his reply as he
turned  back to work. — Trade Journal.  PLACING THE BLAME  Professor:
"Why were you tardy?"  H. H. (in geography class): " Class  began before I
got here."  PATIENCE REWARDED  " There's a story in this paper of a  woman
that used a telephone for the  first time in eighty-three years."  " She
must be on a party line." —  Notre Dame Juggler.  OLD HABIT  " I
wonder if men have always complained  about the food their wives served 
them," said Mrs. Peasley.  Get Your  Candies  BROWN'S STUDIO, Sunset
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