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1921_0318

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Weekly Messenger - 1921 March 18 - Page
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The Weekly Messenger  Devoted to the Interests of
the Student Body, Washington State Normal School  VOL. XX BELLINGHAM,
WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1921 NO. 21  DEPARTMENT OF  E  DR. MILLER
REORGANIZING  COURSE OF  STUDY  To Add New Classes  The department of
education under  Dr. Miller is launching forth to greater  things this
quarter than ever before.  The course in psychology is to be  reconstructed
and conducted as somewhat  of an experiment on the project  and problem
experimental plan.  Many new books for this department  are ordered and
will be on display in  the library in a: few days.  There is also to be a .
new office for  measurements, both mental and educational.  This office
will be in room 104,  the room Mr. Hunt now occupies. Mr.  Hunt will take
room 103, the one Mr.  Coughlin has at present.  This new office will be
the headquarters  of Dr. Miller, and Professors Kibbe  and Kolstad, who
hope to organize a  regular bureau of educational research.  They also hope
to hold more conferences  on graphic methods, two or three to be  held in
the spring.  B.S.N.S.  Community Players  Give Entertainments  Y  MARCH '21
IS LAST DAY TO  HAND IN ESSAYS AND  STORIES  PLAY INSTITUTE  HELD AT  Stop!
Look! Listen!  Have you forgotten that the Klipsun  contest closes Monday,
March 1? If  you are endeavoring to win that first  prize of two dollars
and a half you must  submit your work by Monday. A second  prize also will
be awarded consisting  of three copies of the Klipsun. This  contest is
well worth your while, so see  what you can do! Remember — next 
Monday, March 21, the contest closes.  B.S.N.S.  On Wednesday night, March
16, before  an enthusiastic audience our community  players, a group of
talented students  with Mr. V. H. Hoppe as their  director and Mr. Klemme
as manager,  gave an interesting program of music,  plays, readings and
interpretive dance  at Blaine.  The Normal Community Players have  given
many programs of the same type  at the Washington and Franklin grade 
schools in this city, at Belleville, Skagit  County; Geneva, Silver Beach
and at  various clubs and organizations in Bell-ingham.  Future engagements
cover much  ground and the different communities  are impatient for the
date of the program.  Of the Players' future engagements  the most
important are: The  North Bellingham community center, the  First •
Baptist Church, Franklin School  and at the Community Service Dramatic 
Conference at the Chamber of Commerce.  •Mr. Clark, conductor of
community  athletics, Rev. Templeton and Rev.  Sutcliffe spoke at the first
assembly  after the spring recess. Rev. B. B.  Sutcliffe is the director of
the Bible  Institute held at the First Presbyterian  Church this week.  "
The best we can give is necessary for  the progress of the nation, and in
order  to give this we must have agood purpose,"  stated Rev. Sutcliffe. "
The lack  of a good purpose often brings about  the downfall of people that
may otherwise  become great. Many people are  good starters but poor
finishers, but  we who already have a good start must  resolve to finish
well. Above all, we  must not let selfish ideas prevent us  from doing our
best."  The usual program presented by the  players is: " The Six Who Pass
While  the Lentils Boil," a one-act play by  Stuart Walker. The caste of
characters  include Melba Hinds, Esther Cook,  Frances Durham, Doris
Ericson, Mary  Lewis, Cecile Stevens, Susie Hickey,  Eula Brown and Eunice
Washburn.  Reading by Cecile Stevens.  " The Feast of the Holy Innocents,"
a  little play by I. Marshall Isseley. The  cast includes Frances Durham,
Esther  Cook, Susie Hickey, Eula Brown and  Eunice Washburn.  Interpretive
dance by Frances Durham.  " Overtones," a play by Alice Girsten-berg.  The
characters are taken by  Eula Brown, Mary Lewis, Doris Eric-son  and Melba
Hinds.  PLAY DIRECTOR FROM CAMP  LEWIS IN CHARGE OF  THE WORK  A series of
instructions in recreative  games, general athletics and organized  games
began last Monday evening in the  big gym. This instruction will continue 
for two weeks; the course is open to all  men and women who have a real
interest  in recreational life.  The course will be under the direction  of
Capt. T. G. Cook, recreational specialist,  with National Community
Service,  at present in charge of the Northwest  district, including the
states of  Washington, Oregon, Utah, Montana  and Idaho. Mr. Cook during
the war  was athletic officer of Camp Lewis, followed  by a year on the
general staff at  Washington, D. C, as field director of  athletics for the
U. S. Army. He has  had more than thirty years' experience  both as a
participant and a coach in  all forms of ahtletics.  Each evening will be
divided into  three periods with a five-minute intermission  between them.
The first period  begins at 7:00 o'clock and is devoted to  recreative
games, such as tugging, passing1  and chasing games. During- the second 
period the work takes the form of  practical demonstration, including
correct  interpretation of rules. The third  period is devoted to organized
games,  such as .volley ball and indoor baseball.  The purpose of the
course is to fit its  members:  1. To train others in the art of
leadership.  2. To organize groups in recreative  games, general athletics
and organized  games.  3. To act as leaders in various groups.  All
students who expect to teach  athletics should take this course, as it 
will aid them in conducting recreative  and organized games in their
communities.  There are no fees. Students entering  this class should sign
up with  Miss Moffat.  B. S. N. S.  Miss Cummins  Speaks at Assembly 
BANQUET TONIGHT  TO CELEBRATE  INVITE GOVERNOR AND LEGISLATORS  TO BANQUET 
AT SCHOOL  Appropriate Big Sum  Miss Cummins gave an exceptionally 
interesting talk in assembly on Wednesday  on the new administration. This 
is one of a series of talks on current  events that Miss Cummins has given
in  assembly this year. All her talks are  greatly enjoyed.  Dr. Nash who
has been working long  and earnestly with the interest of the  Normal
School at heart, returned home  Wednesday from Olympia and joyfully 
announced that the appropriation has  been granted for the new dormitory. 
The plans that were made out some  time ago are to be used in the
construction  of the new building. The total  sum of the appropriation is
$666,889, and  $217,787 is to be appropriated for the  new dormitory.  All
salaries, equipment, completions  of grounds and improvements are to be 
included.  At 6:30 Friday evening in the Normal  cafeteria dining room Dr.
and Mrs.  Nash will entertain at a banquet in  celebration of the liberal
appropriation  given to Bellingham Normal. Invitations  have been sent to
the trustees of  the Normal and their wives, Governor  Hart and Mrs).;
Hart, chairman and  Mrs. Davis, chairman and Mrs. Wray  and the legislators
and their wives from  Whatcom, Skagit, Snohomish, San Juan,  Jefferson,
Clallam, Kitsap and Island  counties. The dining room will be decorated 
with yellow johnquils. The decorations  and the place cards are being 
planned by Miss Druse of the art department  and by Mr. Bissell. The home 
economics department will prej gt;are and  serve the menu.  B. S. N. S. 
THE P I C E CHAP"  The play " The Prince Chap," given  Monday evening in
the Whatcom High  School auditorium was a delightful affair  and was
enjoyed to the utmost by  all who saw the performance.  Mr. Coughlin in the
role of an English  nobleman was of special interest to  the Normalites. He
displayed an astonishing  amount of talent and with a  small black
mustache, a monocle and a  decided English drawl afforded a great  deal of
humor for his friends.

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Weekly Messenger - 1921 March
18 - Page 2

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THE WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY, MARCH 18,
1921  WELCOME TO NEW STUDENTS  The new quarter which began March  14th has
brought to the school thirty-five  new students.  From the state of Oregon
there have  come three students, while our own  state has given us the
other thirty-two  whose homes are in Seattle, Spokane,  Everett,
Bellingham, Okanogan, Anacor-tes,  Edmonds, Stanwood, Camas, Pacific  City
and Rochester.  B. S.N.S.  BOOKS AND READING  THE WiisTn  By OSCAR
WII-MAHIS  I have known the wind  In a strange, dim place,  Like a cool
pillow  Against my face.  I have felt the wind  when the day was fair,  As
I ran my fingers  Through his elfin hair.  I have heard the wind  Sounding
the deep seas,  Waking blowing twilights  Like hidden harmonies.  I have
seen the wind  Lift gold waves of a stream,  Revealing the weirdness,  The
dark, endless dream.  I shall know the wind  In a strange, dim place,  Like
a cool pillow  Against my face.  Against my face. 
I'JllllllllllllllllllllltllllllllllllltllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliniltlHIIllllllllllllllHlllllllllllllMlllllltlllll^r
 II Faculty Notes (I  Dr. Miller spent part of his vacation  in Seattle,
where he visited the University  and the public school system of  that
city. Dr. Miller drove to Seattle  in his car and reports that the trip 
was a great success.  # # *  Mr. Klemme spoke at Langley,  Whidby Island,
during vacation.  * # #  Miss Earhart has been invited to speak  at a
banquet at the annual reunion of  the Alumni Association of Teachers' 
College, March 18-19.  # * *  Miss Keeler has left for Jefferson  County
where she will do some extension  work during the next two weeks.  * * * 
Miss Cummins spoke to the Women's  Club at Sedro-Woolley on " Some Social 
Problems" during vacation. She  also was one of the judges of a high 
school debate at Mount Vernon.  * * *  Dr. Miller spoke to the
Parent-Teachers'  Association of the Eureka School  last Tuesday. His
subject was " Gifted  and Ungifted Children."  " I remember hearing of one
play  where the curtain rose on an empty  room; a dim lamp was burning; a
woman  in black entered, took a seat at the  table, and gave vent to a long
sigh.  Some one in the gallery said kindly,  ' Well, don't let us keep you
up.' " At  this, according to William Lyon Phelps  in his " Essays on
Modern Dramatics"  (Macmillan), "the audience went into  such hysteria that
the play could not go  on." Prof. Phelps tells the story by  way of proving
the " sheer audacity"  in the dramatic technique of Barrie's  " What Every
Woman Knows," in  which the curtain rises and not a word  is spoken for
seven minutes. He holds  that Barrie's confidence in his audience  was
justified, "though it would be foolhardy  for another to imitate it." Prof.
 Phelps, however, should not overlook the  fact that, the rest of the play
being as  good as it is, it took but a few performances  to educate the
public into perfect  behaviour, though [there w?as at  least one occasion
at the beginning of  its long run in New York when an impatient  skeptic
threatened to interrupt  its smooth performance. Seated far to  the rear
and high up, and feeling at the  expiration of about the fourth minute  of
silence that he was missing something,  he called out, "Louder!"  . B.
S.N.S.  "HEARTS "  . By OSCAR WILLIAMS  Oh, hearts there are that cry at
night,  And hearts that sing by day,  But hearts that cannot sing or cry 
Must dumbly waste away.  Oh, hearts that cry are eased in storms,  And
hearts that sing-, in peace,  But silent hearts in all the world  Can never
find release!  Misses Clark, Edens, Spcrry, Gordon  and Mead spent their
vacations in Seattle.  * -s *  The March issue of McClure's Magazine 
carries one of Miss Edens' stories,  titled "In Place of God."  * * *  Mr.
Coughlirr, Dr. Miller and Mr.  Kolstad recently judged a debate at 
Nooksack between that town and Sumas.  * * *  Mr. Kolstad spent his
vacation in  Seattle and Stanwood. While in Seattle  he worked at the
University. In Stanwood  lie had a very pleasant visit with  his parents.
Mr. Kolstad also spent  some time making a report of a group  of tests
which were recently given at  the Laurel schools.  * * *  During the spring
vacation Mr.  Coughlin was bus%y, working on his part  in the play'
recently given, entitled  " The Prince Chap."  Mr. Coughlin also reports
that he  lias been busy making garden at his new  home on Forest Street.  *
* *  Mr. Weir has been very busy during  the past week with Community
Service  work in Bellingham.  * * #  Miss King recently returned from 
Grays Harbor County where she has  been engaged in extension work. Miss 
King expects to be kept busy with her  work in this county in the near
future,  aiding Mrs. Robins, superintendent of  the schools of Whatcom
County.  * * *  Miss Lee entertained guests from  Portland during
A'acation.  B. S. N. S.  Frances Oltman, a November graduate,  is teaching
the intermediate grades  at Wishkah, near Aberdeen.  HEADQUARTERS FOR 
Groceries, Fresh Fruit, Vegetables and Bakery Goods.  We make a specialty
of Fancy Cakes to Order.  M. J. O'CONNORS  Successor to  Sweet Grocery
Company  1021 ELK STREET  Bloedel Donovan  Lumber Mills  ROUGH AND DRESSED
LUMBER.  LATH AND SHINGLES.  DOORS, WINDOWS, FRAMES.  MOULDINGS AND FINISH.
 QUICK DELIVERY.  BRING US YOUR LIST FOR ESTIMATE  Retail Office, 1615 Elk
Street  Retail Yard, Phone 433—Sash   Door Factory, Phone 1257  FOR
EIGHT YEARS  e CAVE  Has stood for Pure, Clean, Wholesome  CANDY AND ICE
CREAM  EASTER GREETINGS  Large Assortment of Easter Cards and Favors  Now
on Display  © re i © © 3 212 E. HOLLY  ALASKA BLDG.  ARCHERY
 For the first time in the history of  the Normal School, archery has been 
offered to the students. Long before  the discovery of gunpowder the bow 
and arrow was used; it was the English  archers who decided the battle of 
Crecy. In the eighteenth century societies  were formed in England to
preserve  archery for the purpose of enjoyment  and healthful exercise, and
it  is still popular as a healthful sport in  the United States and Europe.
Through  the efforts of Miss Moffat, the equipment  was purchased for the
school, and  the course promises to be very popular.  The classes met for
the first time on  Tuesday and the period was spent in  practicing the
stringing and unstringing  of the bows.  B. S.N.S.  KLIPSUN CONTEST CLOSES
MONDAY

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Weekly Messenger - 1921 March 18 - Page 3

  
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THE WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1921  Apron
Special  Six Dozen at 75c Each  Four Dozen at $1.00 Each  WELL WORTH YOUR
INVESTIGATION  Apparel of Quality  Mmiimiiiniimim IIMIIIIIIIIIIMIMII  gt;
IIMHIII iiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiniii  gt; iinltim.  I ^limiiiiimmiMiMiu: nil till
nil Minn lllllilillll nnyj|  =
5llllllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIllllllllllllltlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli|MllllKi
 liuiiililllliiiiiiinllilillllliiiiiiiillliuitijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiuiiiuiiiiiitiiiitllllllliiiiiiiiili;
 "Well, vacation is over and here we are  back at the " grind " again! What
are  vacations for, anyway? We believe, that  they are just " tantalizers."
You go  away and get a taste of " freedom"  and come back grouchier than
ever. We  spent our vacation in Seattle during  which time we visited some
of our  friends of the school-paper world. We  are sorry to say that we did
not get  to visit all of the schools, as time would  not permit. We visited
three schools  hi Seattle — Broadway, Queen Anne and 
Lincoln—and the Edmonds High School.  We made some very pleasant
acquaintances  and exchanged quite a few useful  ideas. We were shown
around the  schools and made to feel at home as  much as possible. One
thing that we  learned was that " the office" of some  of the schools liked
our paper so much  that they kept it, and did not turn it  over to the ones
for whom it was intended.  Prom now on the papers will  be addressed to the
paper exchanged  with in the larger schools. If this is  the case with
other schools, let us know  about it. As the Irishman said: "If  you don't
receive this write and let me  know about it."  * * *  A new exchange has
come to us from  Gainesville, Florida, and is called the  G. H. S. Comet.
It is a very newsy little  paper and, as unusual, has an exchange  column. 
* » *  While we are thinking about it — wonder  what an exchange
column is? Some  think it is a joke column wherein are  copied all the good
jokes that they see;  some think it a waste of paper and  never have any
and a few really have an  exchange column. Upon our left, waiting  to be
commented on, lies a pile of  exchanges that we have . received and it  is
about a foot high. When we first saw  this pile we were well pleased, but
when  we began to read them we felt like putting  them in, the waste
basket. We may  have gone " nutty" on this exchange  idea, but i t seems to
us that if one considers  it worth while to put an exchange  in the paper,
why not put a  worth-while exchange in? Not a bunch  of jokes or anything
like it, because we  do not have to have an exchange col-  You will never 
make the best possible  s u c c e s s in  school or life if you  must
overcome the  handicap of e y e strain.  C o n s u lt  Woll, the
Optometrist,  205 W. Holly.  umn for that, as we receive a copy of  Judge
every week. We want to see what  papers you exchange with, of what value 
they are, what good ideas do they have  that we may adopt to art advantage,
etc.  Is it that we need an exchange column  or a new editor? Besides the
information  for yourself as the business management,  your student readers
wish to  know what the others are doing also.  Let us hear from you on the
subject!  * * *  Broadway has but three baseball men  back this year but
hope to pick a winning  team from their " prospects."  * * #  The Lincoln
High School (Seattle)  had what they called the " Linconial last  Friday
evening at that school. We are  not quite sure what it is exactly but it 
seems to be a conglomeration of opera,  vaudeville, movies, etc., under the
above  heading. We are waiting to see the  next issue, of the Totem to see
what success  they had.  * * *  From the picture in the Lincolnian  the
Lincoln High School, of Tacoma, has  a pretty good band. Wonder what they 
sound like?  * * *  The School Progress reports that  Mankato (Minneapolis)
Normal School  has a kindergarten band. The instruments  are triangles,
small drums, voco-phones,  etc. "  * # *  The Stadium High School, of
Tacoma,  issued a very attractive number of the  Tahoma under the title "
Freshie Number."  * * *  Not to be outdone by our recent announcement,  the
Nugget from Baker,  Oregon, has announced that it also has  a " son "
— The Junior Nugget. Who  is next with such an " announcement" ? 
(These are not confined to births alone!)  First thing we know we will be
telling  each other the respective merits of our  " child" and will then be
in the pest  class!  * # *  The students in Melvin T. Drotning's  class at
the Franklin (Seattle) High  School have started a new stunt. They  have
the socialized recitation but instead  of the instructor appointing a 
member of the class to conduct the recitation  the class elects one. Aren't
the  teachers getting lazy now-a-days!  * # #  The new swimming pool at the
Buckley  High School is now open for business.  Now, all ready for the
annual  bath!  * * *  The Green and White Courier reports  that the men are
turning out for track  and tennis. They are planning to hold a  track meet
and tennis tournament in  the near future.  * * #  Instead of having April
Fool's day at  the Ballard High School, the school is  going to have an
alumni assembly. A  program will take place in the auditorium  at 1 o'clock
in the afternoon.  That was an awful picture that you had  on the front
page of your issue of  March 4th. Don't you have an art  censor?  * •
•  KLIPSUN CONTEST CLOSES MONDAY  "1921"  CLASS PINS  MULLER   
ASPLUND  JEWELERS  Next to First National Bank  J  THE PALLAS  The Home of
Better  Candies, Pastries    Ice Cream  BROWN'S STUDIO, Sunset Building 
Say, Wa-Wa, we received your paper  the other day, but only have a part of 
it now, as you had rolled it up in the  same way as before. AVe set up a
howl  about it and one of our friends said:  " Here, let me open it. I can
swear  better than you." We gave it to him  and such a flow of language we
have  never heard before! The paper that  we received looks like the mice
started  to cart it off to make a nest with! So  please don't roll your
paper any more, if  possible, because school teachers are not  supposed to
swear!  * * #  Brookings School News: For heaven's  sake, see what you have
let go by in  your issue of March 2nd. It occurs in  the write-up of the
"All High School  night" and is in the second column,  first line. Put an
English accent on it  and you will "know what I mean."  * * *  The girls'
basketball team of the  Lewiston State Normal School is hav-,  ing a great
deal of success in winning-games.  We have a great team ourselves.  * * * 
The high school at Daytona, Florida,  has been placed on the accredited
list of  Dartmouth College.  * * *  The Oyie Ya, of the Whatcom High 
(Continued on page 4.) •  See Us for High  Grade Candies  at Popular 
Prices  F. W. W00LW0RTH CO.  5c-10-15c Store  GREAT WESTERN  Wood and Coal
Combination  Heater, has a big open  front, like a fireplace. Uses  less
fuel. Built to last.  JENKINS-BOYS  COMPANY  The Bellingham  National Bank 
Capital and Surplus  $475,000.00  MORSE HARDWARE CO.  1025-1039 Elk Street 
ATHLETIC GOODS  Fishing Tackle, Guns and  Ammunition  KELLY-SPRINGFIELD
TIRES  H. Goodell—BOUCHEK—Edith H.  Tenor — Mezzo Soprano
 OLD ITALIAN METHOD OF BEL CANTO  FRENCH, ITALIAN, ENGLISH  R E P E R T O I
R E  " BELLINGHAM SCHOOL OF  MUSIC AND AST  401-409 Excg-. Bldg-. Phone
1303  THE EXCHANG  By ARTHUR E. BOWSHER

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Weekly
Messenger - 1921 March 18 - Page 4

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4 THE WEEKLY
MESSENGER, FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1921  THE WEEKLY cTWESSENGER^  Published by
Students' Association of State Normal School, Bellingham.  Entered in the
Postoffice at Bellingham, Washington, as second-class matter.  Union
Printing, Binding   Stationery Company, Printers  Subscription rates by
mail, $2.00 per year in advance Single copies, 5 cents.  Advertising rates
on application.  Address all communications, other than news items, to The
Manager of the  Weekly Messenger, Bellingham, Washington.  STAFF OFFICERS 
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF LOIS W. OSBORN  BUSINESS MANAGER ARTHUR E. BOWSHER 
MESSENGER STAFF  Gneral News Tony Boettclier Jokes Lorna Boone Mullen 
Literary Olga K. Brotnov Boys' Athletics Vernon C. McDonald  jokes
Catherine Deemer Assembly LaNora Washburn  Club Notes Clare Bent Faculty
Vivian Gunderson  Alumni Vera Dunbar Assembly Gladys D. Ryan  Society Lita
Layton General News Donna E. Sarjent  Calendar Judith Lundberg General
Briefs Castlean Swimm  Girls' Athletics Dorothy Bell  * * * * * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  *?  HE time has
come," the Walrus  said,  "To speak of many things;  :**••  I *
I!**  1T **  I *  I *  I * I *  I *  I *  If i! m %• **  ** it  4
» * - . . • gt; io » u n « u "•  gt;« " gt;
•" » gt; «« " »»  gt;" »" " •"
»" " " "« • * • ?•  GREETINGS  With the
beginning of a new quarter The Messenger extends  greetings and good wishes
to old and new students, faculty and  friends.  Remember, students, this is
your paper, so help make it a  credit to the school. Not only those on the
staff, but every one  who finds something of interest each day will greatly
assist in  improving the paper if he will' drop the article, story, poem or
joke  in The Messenger box.  Help make,the paper one of the best school
journals in the  state!  The Messenger feels very grateful for the
appropriation which  was granted our school by the Legislature. It is
heartening to  know that our school will by next September have a dormitory
that  will take care of one hundred twenty-five girls, and serve as a 
social center for the entire school; also that the standard of maintenance 
of the entire school may be held up and necessary improvements  looked
after.  We are not forgetful of the splendid service Dr. Nash has  given
our school in presenting its' needs before the lawmakers.  His patience has
been exhaustless, his faith unwavering during  the whole time the
appropriation has been considered. He had  faith in the justice of the
legislators, and while many grew discouraged,  his firm optimism won in the
end. He is tired out after  these strenuous days and will take a much
needed rest.  Also to the board of trustees and the senators and
representatives  from our county and the Northwest, The Messenger wishes 
to express it appreciation. They, too, spent time and energy in  our cause.
 May we as a school show this mioney has been profitably spent,  by
equipping ourselves while here' at Normal to be first class  teachers in
this state, which we are proud to say believes in the  efficacy of
education.  THE EXCHANGE  (Continued on page 3.)  School is growing in
size. Good for  you! First thing we know you will be  in the proud father
list.  * * * •  The Glendale Union High School produced  " The Chimes
of Normandie' 'on  March 10th and 11th.  # * *  The Junior "Weekly,
Edmonds, we  read with interest your little poem on  " We Would Like to
Know." The first  line read: "Do ships have eyes when  they go to sea ?"
Ships have eyes  when they don't go to " sea." If you  will consult the B.
J. M. you will discover  where the ship's " eyes " are.  * * *  Our old
friend the Kodak has arrived  again. Why don't we receive it every  week? I
thought that we had buried  the hatchet.  • * *  The Exponent has a
writeup taken  from a Kirksville, Missouri, exchange  upon the subject of
calling the Normal  schools Teachers' Colleges. We are in  favor of the
idea ourself, asi it would be  more in keeping with the dignity of the 
profession. The other title sounds like  a reform institution, especially
when  you add " training school " to it!  * # *  One of our brethren, the F
.H. S.  Vacuum, has taken to yellow journalism.  The "outside sheets are
yellow with  a pink insert. Why ruin a good paper?  Our former editor
offers the suggestion  that it looks as if it comes from a colored  school.
Either that or a Siwash  reservation.  # # *  The Hi-Life published an
issue of the  .Junior Hi-Life, within "its gates." Another  paper that has
an offspring, only  it carries the young 'un with it. The  paper must be a
kangaroo paper!  * * *  On Thursday, March 3rd, the R. O.  T. C. of the
Fremont (California) High  School held a review. According to the  report
the band made such a good  showing that it " fussed " the ranks. By  "
fussed " we don't mean that they took  the men in the ranks out that
evening.  # * *  We also received a new exchange  which we value very
highly, as it is  thoughtful enough to print a great  many addresses and
phone numbers of  pretty girls, etc. The name of this "exchange  " is "
Whatcom County Telephone  Directory."  B.S.N.S.  NEW USE FOR A SCULPIN FISH
 Poor old Sculpin Fish! His face  could never be his fortune, but his fins 
might, if the ocean's supply of him  could be utilized to make phonograph 
needles, as is suggested by the interesting  discovery of a California man,
 Aubert Wells, head of the department  of film photography at the Ince
studios,  Culver City, California.  Mr. Wells was fishing off' Santa 
Monica pier recently, when he was surprised  with the catch of a large
Sculpin,  not at all common in that vicinity,  so fishermen say. Now Mr.
Sculpin,  be it remembered, would never take a  prize at a beauty contest,
having a  warty body and a face of grotesque  ugliness, but he is armed
literally "to  the teeth" from stem to stern and can  never be called a "
lazy loafer," for his  job is that of a scanvenger.  In the flesh of his
long back fin protrude  ferocious "stickers" of bone,  sharp as needles,
and exuding a poisonous  sting which produces instant and  acute
inflammation (see his picture in  the "encyclopaedia.)  But by. handling
the fish carefully,  Mr. Wells removed the bones and noting  the ivory-like
quality thereof after  being smoothed and polished with his  of one as a
phonograph needle. It fitted  perfectly and produced a flawless  penknife,
was inspired to make a trial  of one as a phonograph needle. It fitted 
perfectly and produced a flawless  tone, and after innumerable usings
remained  unworn and unbent, though of  the discoverer's supply there is
only one  left, so great has. been the demand from  clamoring friends. 
Needless to say, Mr. Wells is looking  for another Sculpin, and if there
are any  around in Bellingham Bay willing to  make a play for a niche in
the Hall of  Fame for Fish, they will find a warm  welcome off Santa Monica
pier.  —ISABEL WISTEU  B.S.N.S.  A POEM BY EVA SANTEE  Eva Santee, a
1919 graduate, is teaching  her second year in Vancouver,  Washington, in
the junior high school.  She recently helped coach the senior  high school
play, " Fanny and the Servant  Problem." She expresses her appreciation  of
the help received at B. S.  N. S. in English and expression classes.  Miss
Santee served on the Messeneger  staff and the Klipsun staff. She also 
wrote the prize poem for the 1919 Klipsun.  The following is a poem which 
she wrote one evening while watching a  storm over Bellingham Bay at' dusk:
 O N PUGET  The rain clouds come in yon dark sky,  In frenzied, urgent
haste;  Beneath, the many islands lie,  Their shores close interlaced.  Now
faster, deeper, darker grow  The shadows on the rocks,  Awaiting the
oncoming flow  Of dashing, pouring drops.  On ocean's ceaseless, surging
foam  The swelled clouds' gift now falls,  To mingle in its former home 
With waves in Neptune's halls.  Then, onward to the rocky cliffs,  Where
time her pictures trace,  In chasms wide and deep cut clefts,  The
sparkling raindrops race.  So, year by year, in wintry sky  The dark clouds
landward sweep.  They're but a message from on high,  Sent o'er the
sounding deep!  — EVA B. SANTEE '19.  B.S.N.S.  Miss Catherine
Montgomery of the  Normal School will address the local  Y. W. C. A. Friday
morning on the  subject of "The Teacher." She will  take up the topic under
three heads, the  present need for teachers, the scholastic  attainment of
teachers and the type of  individual that should consider taking  up
teaching as a profession. This lecture  will be followed by a round table 
in which all will participate in discussing  the subject.

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Weekly Messenger - 1921 March 18 - Page 5

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THE
WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1921 5  AT THE NEW  DIRECTION OF JENSEN
AND VON HERBERG  Playing Now Until Saturday Night  HOUSE PETERS AND 
FLORENCE VIDOR  Portraying the Characters of Life and Love in  Thomas
Ince's Super Special  "LYING  LIPS"  i  J LLOYD HAMILTON  COMEDY  IP  i
Liberty Orchestra  COMING  FIRST TWO DAYS OF WEEK  The Greatest Mother Love
Picture  of the Generation  DOROTHY PHILLIPS  — in —  "Once to
Every  Woman"  TRAINING SCHOOL NEWS  The training school opened after the 
vacation with excellent attendance. So  far this department has escaped
contagious  sickness. No prevalent diseases  have been reported at present.
 The state passed a new milk bill. So  far the details have not been
thoroughly  investigated. Provision will be made  for every child to study
this problem.  Milk has been served to the pupils in  the primary grades
for a great number  of years at very little expense.  As soon as the soil
can be cultivated  the garden work will begin. The first  four grades will
begin their work which  will cover the next twelve weeks. This  is not only
one of the most interesting  problems but profitable as well. These  grades
usuall yclear from ten to fifteen  dollars each year from their gardens. 
The pre-primary class wil lhave a  garden of its own this year. It will be 
back of the work shop.  The students are now looking forward  to outdoor
play. The last two  quarters they have had numerous restrictions  on their
out-door play.  The pupils of the upper grades have  shown an excellent
school spirit in cooperating  with their new practice teachers  by their
good discipline.  At their last Wednesday assembly, the  junior high school
pupils gave one-minute  talks on events they enjoyed most  during vacation.
 Carpenters have been busy giving the  wood works a thorough going over. 
GEORGE WASHINGTON AND THE CHERUY  TREE  By RALPH THOMPSON MUIR, 6-A  George
went into the field out there,  And fastened his hatchet to his belt  with
care;  He cut down a cherry tree, straight and  tall.  With that hatchet of
his so very small.  Then came Father Washington, strict  and severe,  He
said, " Who has done this ? My son,  come here!"  And Washington answered
right reverently,  That he was the one who had cut down  the tree.  The
strap was all ready but George got  by  By saying, " My father, I can't
tell a  lie."  And you, too, will find that it always  pays best,  To stick
to the truth when you're put to  the test.  B.S.N.S.  SPELLING CONTEST  A
spelling contest has been conducted  in the 5-A and 6-B grades. Three
hundred  words from the fifth and sixth  grade 100 per cent and 99 per cent
of  the Ayres Spelling scale were chosen.  Of these words the number missed
by  the children were:  5-A —Dorothy Smith, 0; Allena  Bever, 0; Jean
Philippi, 2; Leon  Stearne, 1; Henry Basbet, 2; Audrey  Taylor, 3; James
Leibrant, 4; Esther  Caskey, 4; Gertrude Radavich, 5; Ralph  Rushworth, 5;
Howard Erickson, 12;  Rondell Hartman, 26; Allan Robert, 48. 
6-B—Christine Frederickson, 0; William  Genther, 0; Rose Bowen, 2;
Helen  Stine, 2; Henry Parker, 3; Bertha Col-vin,  3; Daisy Gibbson, 3;
Walter Ober-mueller,  10; Earl Eastwood, 12; Lydia  Mullikin, 12; George
Guthorie, 36.  • B.S.N.S.  KLIPSUN CONTEST CLOSES MONDAY  FICTION IN
OUR LIBRARY  " Where may I get a good book to  read in the library? "  "On
the fiction shelf."  "Yes, I know, but I have read most  of those books;
aren't there any more?"  " No, I don't think so," answers Miss  Average
Student.  But hold on a minute; come into the  library and look around.  To
the casual visitor, with the exception  of the fiction case our library 
shelves seem filled with nothing but  texts, history, geography, science,
methods,  bibliography, sociology and many  other books. But let that
visitor look  a little closer. Behold among the American  and English
fiction will be found  novels of romance, love and history. In  fact here
is the very best fiction in the  library.  For those who like bird and
animal  stories, there are many among the nature  study books. For lovers
of Spanish and  French novels, the Spanish and French  Uterature case
furnishes this material.  Novels of history and travel may be  found by
those who will but look for  them.  Just before a vacation the librarian 
makes up a table of reading for students.  Many students take advantage  of
this vacation reading, but more  should. Students, watch for the vacation 
reading table just before spring  vacation.  B.S.N.S.  KLIPSUN CONTEST
CLOSES MONDAY  B.S.N.S.  " I'll tell the world," which has gained  currency
in recent years as a slang  phrase, is not new. It occurs in Chapter  XLIV
of "The Romany Rye," by  George H. Borrow, which was pubnshed  in 1857. The
Romany Rye tells' Mur-tagh  that the Irish owe half their traditions  to
the Danes, and says, " If ever  I publish the Loughlin songs, I'll tell 
the world so." On the title page of  "The Romany Rye," by the way, there 
appears the saying which Roosevelt used  and made famous —" Fear God,
and  take VOUT own part."  B.S.N.S.  KLIPSUN CONTEST CLOSES MONDAY

    
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Weekly Messenger - 1921 March 18 - Page 6

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THE WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1921 
„„„„„„„„, MiuimmniMiimm
imimrai icmi iiiiiiinmii imiiiiir MI mil iiiiimmi i imiiimmimiim
niimiiiiiiiramiiiiie  !!"![!!"!!m!H!!"!!m!!MlmmmmMi"mi!!mi!"n!imm i mm mmm
II.I mmmm urn IIIIMI mmmmiimmii mi 11.11 urn iijjg  SOCIETY  Ruth Case went
to her home near  Union for the vacation.  # '# #  Harriet Danielson and
Helen White-nack  spent the vacation at their homes  near Yakima.  * * * 
On Tuesday evening- during the vacation  week Mr. and Mrs. Kibbe
delightfully  entertained Lula Prather, Anna  Johnson, Mary Middlekauff and
Hazel  Sellers at dinner.  # * *  A junior play banquet was given at  the
Pheasant Tea Rooms last AVednes-day  evening. Mr. and Mrs. Hoppe were  the
honored guests. Mr. Hoppe was  presented with a gold knife as a re- 
• membrance from the junior play cast.  A delicious three-course
dinner was  served consisting of cocktail, asparagus  salad, veal and
dressing, apple pie a la  mode and coffee.  * * *  Melba Hinds was the
hostess of a  luncheon last Thursday afternoon, when  she entertained four
of her intimate  school friends, Fay Durham, Eula  Brown, Alma Fischer and
Eleanor  Lindsley.  * # *  Esther Cook spent her vacation at  Yakima,
visiting friends.  * * *  A number of prominent Normal students  visited
Laurel last week.  * # *  Eleanor Lindsley visited with her sister  Helen
and other friends in Fern-dale  during vacation.  * # *  Brigetta Kankonen
visited her home  m Astoria, Oregon during spring vacation.  * * w  Eunice
Coble is slowly recovering  from her burns. She has given up her  idea of
being an old maid and hereafter  will leave tea alone.  * * *  Ellen Reep
was injured in an automobile  accident near Stanwood last week  Newton's 
Incorporated  WOMEN'S APPAREL OF QUALITY  Special Sale Distinctive Silk
Dresses  $29.75  Taffeta, Crepe de Chine, Canton Crepe  See Window Display 
CEDAR HALL NOTES  . The Cedar Hall girls are welcoming-two  new students at
their home this  quarter — Augusta Ohlin and Genevieve  Rogers.  Lois
Osborn and Nell Smith spent  their vacation at their homes in Por-land, 
Oregon.  Mary King enjoyed a very pleasant  week at her home in Friday
Harbor.  Dorothy Hill and Jean Omstead were  at home during vacation.  When
Evelyn Butters, Adena Kall-ander  and Eva Aim were asked how  their
vacations we).-e spent, they answered,  " We were busy having a good  time
at home."  Thursday, Marie Loga, Gladys and  Iva West spent in the country
at Dorothy  Hill's home. All the good times of  the day cannot be recorded,
but it is  suggested that the 1921 Klipsun snapshot  pages be consulted.
There will be  recorded all the pranks of the dignified  Marie — and
others.  Elsie Minor spent the week of vacation  at her home at Laurel.
Friday,  Gladys and Iva West visited the Minor  ranch and enjoyed three
days there inspecting  silos, hay mows and driving  tractors. Altogether,
the Cedarites enjoyed  pleasant vacation days and are-taking  iip the new
quarter's work at  the Normal with interest.  Lillian Hagstrom and Bertha
Bengt-son,  will not be at Cedar Hall this  quarter. They are sadly missed.
They  have- taken rooms elsewhere.  B.S.N.S.  KLIPSUN CONTEST CLOSES MONDAY
 Not all of the candy was disposed of,  so the girls sold it at school
Monday.  This money is to be used for the bird  sanctuary.  The members of
the Alkisiah Club entertained  the March graduates at a  theater party
Thursday, March 3. Later  a majority of the club gathered at  the Pheasant
where refreshments were  served, after which Miss Wilson and  each graduate
expressed her appreciation  of being a member of the club.  After the club
songs were given they  departed with a true and loyal regard  for the
Alkisiah Club.  — B.S.N.S.  KLIPSUN CONTEST CLOSES MONDAY  ALKISIAH
NEWS-The  Alkisiah girls sold candy and ice  cream at the Normal-Whatcom
game.  BUSINESS GIRLS' MEETING  On Wednesday, March 2, the Business  Girls'
League held the third meeting of  the school year. After a brief survey  of
local conditions, Bertha Thompson  discussed the topic " Our National
Problem  of Unemployment." She mentioned  four methods which have been
tried or  proposed as means of meeting the situation:  First, restriction
of immigration;  second, steady employment on  part time; third, promotion
of federal  and state construction projects during  periods of depression,
and fourth, industrial  insurance. Margaret Stapleton  then discussed the
problem from the  viewpoint of the labor unions, giving an  interesting and
comprehensive statement  of labor's bill of rights. Martha Thompson's 
interpretation of Reinhold's " Impromptu  " delighted the audience. The 
League was favored with a report by  Miss Florence Morse of the state
meeting  of the Business and Professional  Women's Club which met in
Seattle recently.  Miss Morse heard the address of  the national president,
Mrs. Forest,  whose salary is $40,000, by the way, and  KEMPHAUS C , CO. 
Belling ham's Lowest Price Goat and  Suit Store  DRY GOODS, WOMAN'S
FURNISHINGS  PICTORIAL REVIEW PATTERNS  DEPENDABLE SHOES With Style,
Quality  and Comfort for Men — Expert  Repairing  LONGWOOD'S SHOE
SHOP  1325 DOCK STREET  PATRONIZE MESSENGER ADVERTISERS  she spoke of the
importance of a business  girl's health and appropriate dress  and refined
manners.  The League is making elaborate preparations  for its fifth annual
banquet  March 18th.  B.S.N.S.  ATHLETICS  Some of the young men of the
school  are displaying great skill in the art of  boxing, Avhile others are
displaying  blackened eyes as a result of a number  of informal boxing
bouts staged in the  boys' locker room during the noon hour  last Tuesday. 
Mr. Aim and Mr. Elder showed great  endurance by sparring for fifteen
minutes  without once calling "time out."  Mr. Elder had the advantage on
account  of his long reach, and on account of his  height, he was able to
attack his opponent  from above. Mr. Aim, handicapped  as he was, succeeded
in breaking  through his opponent's defense several  times. Mr. Powell, the
referee, gave the  decision as a draw.  SERVICE  Most businesses give
better,  service at a little more in  cost to you.  We give better service
and  save you money besides.  The  Students' Co-Op  C. C. BAUGHMAN

    
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Weekly Messenger - 1921 March 18 - Page 7

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THE WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1921  || General News || 
inmitimii IIIIHIIIMIIIIIMIIIIUIIIIIIMIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
IIIIIIIIIII!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIMINIMIIIIIIMII = 
nillllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllMIMllllllllllllllllllllllUlllllllltllllllllllllllllllllllllllltlllllllllltlllHIll'
 Work has started in the gym classes  under the direction of Miss Moffat
and  Miss Williams for our annual May festival.  All those who attended the
festival  last year know what our students  can do, and we expect greater
things  this year.  * * *  The last basketball game of the season  will be
played next Saturday evening,  March 19th, in the Fairhaven gym,  when the
girls' team of that school will  again contest with our girls for the city 
championship. Two games have already  been played and the honors are
divided.  Let's all turn out and support our team.  Let's make it win, and
to do this the  support of the students is necessary.  Remember, Saturday,
March 19th, at  7:30 in the Faii-haven gym.  * # *  Francis Holman, Lita
Layton, Ruth  Willis, Minnie Collins and Ruth Ogren  attended the C. P.
S.-Normal game in  Tacoma March 4.  * * *  Edens Hall extends a cordial
welcome  to its two new girls, Jessie Read,  of Aberdeen and Elsa Puspennen
of  Camas, Washington.  * * #  Edens Hall girls elected the following 
officers for this quarter: President,  Ernestine Gove; vice president, Nora
 Schane; secretary and treasurer, Brig-etta  Kankonen; fire warden,
Florence  Chabert.  * # #  Most of the students whose homes are  not in
Bellingham spent their vacation  at home and all report a very enjoyable 
time. A few who had too much work  to do, or whose homes are too far away 
to go home for so short a time remained  in town during vacation.  These
persons disposed of their time  in the following manner:  Clinton Primer,
Reuben Aim and  Herbert Hansen helped Mr. Grady the  entire week with work
around school,  which was very necessary.  Charles Powell and William Elder
assisted  Mr. Squires with some work in  landscape gardening the early part
of  the week. Owing to bad weather, it  become necessary, to stop this work
the  last couple of days.  Everett Rice and Tony Boetcher spent  most of
the week in hiking to various  places near Bellingham. Some of the  hikes
were to Lake Padden, Chuckanut  Mountain, King Mountain, Lummi Indian 
Reservation and a hike to the head  of Lake Whatcom.  Archie Erickson
worked the whole  week soliciting ads for the Klipsun. He  is very well
pleased witli the results of  his labor. *  B.S. N.S.  HARVARD'S NEAV KIND
OF  EXAMINATION  By FREDERICK L. AI.T.EX  A significant development in
collegiate  education in America is the adoption at  Harvard of general
examinations for  graduation. Men are still given credit  for passing
individual courses, but in  addition, beginning next year, each  senior, in
order to graduate, must pass  a general examination on the whole subject 
in which he is specializing.  And what is this general examination  like? 
Here are a few specimen questions:  " Compare pamphleteering and propaganda
 as methods of exerting political  influence."  " Why did Voltaire
characterize the  Holy Roman Empire as ' neither holy,  nor Rorman, nor an
empire'?"  " What should be the disposition of  Constantinople? "  "
Compare the foreign policies of  France, Germany, and the United  States
during the nineteenth century."  " What are the rights of minorities,  and
how are they best secured?"  Each of these questions is merely a  starting
point for the student. Nobody  who had merely memoi'ized the subject 
matter of a course in government could  answer satisfactorily the question
about  the rights of minorities. To answer it  really well a man should be
able to think  for himself, and to illuminate his treatment  of it by
illustrations gathered perhaps  from a course in government here,  a course
in American history there, a  course in European history elsewhere.  An
examination composed of questions  such as these is something like a test
of  general education.  One question for men specializing in  modern
history which appeared in the  comprehensive examination last spring 
deserves particular mention because of  the variety of points at which it
touches  the field of the examination. It consisted  of a letter in French,
signed " P.  ENGRAVED CARDS AND INVITATIONS  EMBOSSED STATIONERY  Our
Copperplate Engraving and Steel Die Embossing  Departments Are at Your
Disposal.  Correct Society Engraving  Union Printing, Binding   St'y Co. 
ELK STREET  HOME STORE  1312-14 BAY STREET  A. Lawson  BLOUSES, SILE AND
LISLE HOSE  ALL COLORS  SEND EASTER GREETING CARDS TO YOUR FRIENDS  Full
Assortment Now on Display at  E. T. MATHES BOOK CO.  CONFECTIONERY, ETC. 
H. A. LYLE, Prop.  629 High St.  BROWN'S STUDIO, Sunset Building  WAT CH  R
E P A I R I N G  CHAS. F. RUNNER  A t Mathes Book Store  110 WEST HOLLS
STREET  A. Adet," 'addressed to " Citoyen Min-istre"  and dated
"Philadelphia, le 11  Nivose, An 5e de la Republique Fran-caise  une et
Indivisible." The letter  commented upon Jefferson's foreign  policy and
the attitude of Americans toward  the British and the French. The 
directions to the student taking the examination  were as follows:  "
Translate the following passage and  comment on it in detail, with special
emphasis  on those portions which seem to  you to apply to the conditions
prevalent  today. Give, as nearly as possible, the  exact date of its
composition, and tell  anything you can concerning its author  and the
person to whom it is addressed."  (As a matter of fact, P. A. Adet was 
French minister to the United States,  and the letter was sent to his home
government  in 1796.)  Now consider what that question  test's. A knowledge
of French — to be  able to translate it. A knowledge of  American
history and government during-  the last decade of the eighteenth century. 
A knowledge' of the relations between  the United States, France and  Great
Britain at the time. And further  than that, their ability to understand 
just how far the parallel between the  situation then and the situation now
 holds, and to write intelligently upon it.  B.S. N.S.  Heard on the train:
" Did you see  Antone Frank tell Myrtle Ellengston  goodbye? "  B. S. N. S.
 KLIPSUN CONTEST CLOSES MONDAY  Our Portable  Students' Lamps  Will Make 
Evening Work  a Pleasure  PUGET SOUND  POWER   LIGHT  COMPANY  PHONE 200 
PIIOXE 648 RES. PHONE 1543  1310 COMMERCIAL STREET  Freeman Transfer 
General Hauling  Pianos and Furniture Moved,  Packed and Stored  Special
Rates on Normal Baggage  Fireproof Storage — We Feature  Long
Distance Hauling  F. B. FREEMAN, PROP.  First National Bank  U. S,
Depository  Member Federal  Reserve  Total Resources  Over Three 
Millions

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Weekly Messenger - 1921 March 18 - Page 8

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THE WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1921 
•*•{•• n—» •• a
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•• n . lt; » •• •• » 1«
•• • lt; «•—•*—»-
lt;{i|j.  ' • - • - - • ?*  1 *  I *  I *  I *  II **  I*
 II **  1*  • • * *  GMe H«ughing (gat  y JJ iy» j|j
«J^I i^s* i^"^* i^c»i|jfcy»i|f» i^iyi t|j
*y»«y» ^f"^ *T*il*i*f"T'
^^^^^^^^^ffiffiffiffi^^^^^^^^^^^|¥*|y^j tYj t T ' ' 1^*  Optimist:
"Don't you like my joke?"  Pessimist: " Yes."  "Then why don't you laugh?" 
" Laughed yesterday."  BROWN'S STUDIO, Sunset Building  Say, haven't those
trees out there  leaved out? "  "Yes, they've left."  Gabb; song, " Come
and Go," Audience;  "talk, "Habits of a Bumble  Bee," by B. A. Buzzer; "The
Lay of the  Lost Cow," quartet by Miss Maida Butter,  Mr. O. U. Pasture,
Miss Dary  Barnes, Mr. I. M. Cheese.  A. gumfurious time was hablimented 
by the entire commun.  G R O C E R I E S  — AND — 
CONFECTIONERY  We Cater to the Normal  Students' Trade  Agency Pacific
Laundry  PHONE 1041  N O RMAL  GROCERY  KLIPSUN CONTEST CLOSES MONDAY  "
There's a new branch on the cactus  in Mr. Bond's room."  " Well, don't get
stuck on it just because  it's a new one."  KLIPSUN CONTEST CLOSES MONDAY 
" I'm consumed with jealousy! "  " What's wrong? "  "Why, didn't you see
Bohanon and  Craver in assembly Wednesday?"  BROWN'S STUDIO, Sunset
Building  Heard in the training school:  "Teacher, may I go?"  "My name is
Miss Smith — not teacher,  Jenny."  Jenny: "Well you look kind-a like
 a teacher I had last quarter and I  called her teacher."  Mr. Van De
Wetering,  He is awful jolly.  I have heard him lately  Singing "Dolly,
Dolly."  KLIPSUN CONTEST CLOSES MONDAY  Reuben Aim, Reuben Aim,  Is your
heart now awful calm?  KLIPSUN CONTEST CLOSES MONDAY  Dwiglit Cone is gone
away,  And don't feel gay;  She misses Mr. Cone,  And now she goes alone! 
OWEN MARKET  GROCERY  PUBLIC MARKET  Pay Cash and Save Money  PACIFIC STEAM
 LAUNDRY  He profits most who serves  best Phones 126-127  KLIPSUN CONTEST
CLOSES MONDAY  Wool worth must be doing a great  business these days, so
many Normal  girls are wearing " diamonds" on their  ring fingers of their
left hands! Two  of the faculty have " fallen " also!  KLIPSUN CONTEST
CLOSES MONDAY'  KLIPSUN CONTEST CLOSES MONDAY'  Smiles! smiles! when
Berkland smiles,  Then you see the smiles for miles!  KLIPSUN CONTEST
CLOSES MONDAY  SPI.INTERVIT,T.E NEWS  One of the most happy events of the 
year was had last Friday when the entire  Squeedunk Holler community
attended  bodily an excellent picnic on  Podunk River. The day was spent in
 eating, games and ruff stuff, including  foot races.  Mr. O. U. Swift won
in the men's  fat race. Mrs. O. U. Racer won the  ladies large race. Tommy
Rote fell off  the teeter totter board and broke a  promise.  Mary Young
and I. Will Wedd became  engaged in fishing. Buster Upp  and his canoe
capsized but he was rescued  by Mr. O. U. Shark. Little Ann  Alysis fell in
the cake bucket and was  rescued. on!,y w'hejn Miss Polly Gone  " took the
cake" in the cake walk.  At noon or thereabouts a full sized  tub or two of
eats was indulged in by  the happy throng.  Following is an open-air
program that  was hit off:  Talk, "Open Air Festivities," Mr. O.  C. Aire;
reading, " I n the Sea," Mr. O.  U. Shark; song, " High, Oh High," Miss 
Pole"; story, "Ages and Ages," Miss  Ann Teek; a play, "Miscellaneous" by 
Miss Lotta Junk, Percy Cution, Ella  Cution, Mr. Art Room and Mr. Jim 
Nasium; short sermon by Rev. NWill  KLIPSUN CONTEST CLOSES MONDAY  Elsie
Minor has taken to begging,  And she does it awfully calm,  For she went to
a class  And this she did pass,  "Has anybody an extra.Aim?"  KLIPSUN
CONTEST CLOSES MONDAY  Marion Collier was told to teach a  word by dropping
the first letter and  letting the child pronounce the rest of  the word.
She chose the word singe.  Can you guess why?  KLIPSUN CONTEST CLOSES
MONDAY  CAUGHT IN PASSING  Lita Layton and Ruth Ogren: " The  taxi wouldn't
wait, so we hailed Ed  Wolter."  Antone Frank: "Where's Fritz?"  Mr. Bever:
"General lecture number  forty-six."  Estell Cain: "That other girl has 
Robert Frost."  Geo. Van de Wetering (explaining  the situation in the
Junior play) : " I'm  in love with Dorothy, that's Melba  Hinds, but she
doesn't love me; she  loves William, that's Tweit, you know."  Miss Edens:
"This isn't English 23,  Mr. Cone."  B.S.N.S.  WHO CAN SOLVE THE GREAT 
MYSTERY?  Sydney Smith (to cafeteria waitress):  "Have you something hot
for lunch?"  Waitress: " Yes, we have cocoa and  coffee."  Sydney: "Are
they real hot — boiling-hot?"  Waitress: "Yes, boiling hot."  Sydney:
"Well, then, give me some  ice cream."  Sign on Denver Movie theater:  "
BEHOLD MY WIFE "  and  " DON'T WEAKEN "  Sign on Seattle movie theater: 
"SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT -  and  " I T 'S A BOY"  Why do men eat more pie
than women?  This is a question, which, perhaps,  even our faculty, with
all their  knowledge, are unable to solve. If you  stand in a store and
notice students  buying their lunches, you will see that  more pies are
slipped across the counter  to the boys than to the girls. You  will also
notice the same fact if you  watch the students during the noon hour  at
our cafeteria.  If you are interested in this vital subject  and wish to
solve the great mystery,  seek the managers of the cafeteria or  ask the
storekeeper. Each will tell you  that it is true that more pie is consumed 
by men but they do not know the  reason why. Ask a girl why she does  not
eat as much pie as her brother and  she will quickly reply, " Girls are
sweet  enough — they don't need sweet stuff;  feed it to the boys
— they. need it."  Next ask a boy why he eats more pie  The Hat
Shoppe  H. E. S. FAGEN, Prop.  "Better Hats for Less "  PUBLIC MARKET
BUILDING  MAGNOLIA STREET  "Walk a Block and Save a Dollar"  THE BROWN 
STUDIO  Has again been chosen the official  photographers for the coming 
Klipsun. This will be our sixth  year to do the work, and we appreciate 
the compliment.  Have you had your Senior pictures  taken yet? Or your
application  photos? Now is the time  to have them taken.  BROWN STUDIO 
Get Your  Candies  and  Ice Cream  at  119 E. Holly  CLYDE BANKS  Does Our
Kodak Finishing  STUDENTS' CO-OP  The Northwestern  National Bank 
Bellingham, Wash.  WE SOLICIT THE  NORMAL ACCOUNTS  than a girl and he will
say, " Girls can't  stand that heavy food; it gives them  dyspepsia." But
if you really want to  know ask a doctor. He will say,  "Leave pie alone;
it's bad for anybody."—  A. L. H.  B. S. N. S.  KLIPSUN CONTEST
CLOSES MONDAYPPPPP