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1921_0429

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Weekly Messenger - 1921 April 29 - Page
1

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Devoted to the Interests of the Student Body,
Washington State Normal School  VOL. XX BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, 
gt;£A¥ 29, 1921 NO. 27  WESTERN  I BE  BYE  TWENTY-ONE COUNTIES
TO  BE BENEFITED THROUGH  THIS WORK  Dr. Nash has just returned from
Spokane.  He reports that through mutual  agreement the extension territory
of the  state has been distributed among the  various Normal schools. The
territory  assigned exclusively to the Bellingham  Normal includes Clallam,
Island, Jefferson,  Kitsap, San Juan, Skagit, Sno-hmish  and Whatcom
Counties. Jointly  with Ellensburg we have King, Pierce,  Mason, Thurston,
Grays Harbor, Wahkiakum,  Clarke, Cowlitz, Lewis, Skamania  and Pacific
Counties; jointly  with Cheney, Okanogan and Chelan  Counties. Thus, the
extension work of  this school will enter 21 of the 36 counties  of the
state — all counties west of  the Cascades.  — B. S. N. S. - 
Fl  TO BE 13  The annual May Festival, given by the  Physical Education
Department of the  Normal School, is to be held in the  armory on Saturday
evening, May 13th,  at 8 o'clock. This is to be a demonstration  of the
practical work done by the  girls in the gymnasium classes under the 
direction of Miss Vera Moffat and her  assistant, Miss Pauline Bornstein. 
The program consists of the following:  1 — Grand march.  2
—Wand drill.  3 — Oxdansen, a Swedish folk dance  representing
a mock fight.  4— Swedish exercises. This is an ordinary  " day's
order," embracing  exercises for the entire body, to  develop quickness and
accuracy of  movement, correct posture and  balance.  5 — Stunts,
special students. These require  a considerable degree of skill,  balance,
strength and control.  6 —Musical selection.  7 — Indian club
drill.  8 — "Dawning," an aesthetic interpretative  dance of "At
Dawning," by  Cadman.  (Continued on page 2.)  IS  RE-ELEGTED FOR CO-OP. 
At its meeting Thursday, May 14,  the Board of Control of the Students' 
Association re-elected Mr. C. C. Baugh-man  manager of the Co-op for a term
 of two years, the new term to begin in  June. Mr. Baughman has served the 
Normal Book Store as manager for the  past five years, and this re-election
is  sufficient eulogy. Under his efficient  management the store is doing
about  three times the amount of business it  was doing when he took
charge, and  this is true in spite of the adverse conditions  whicli have
confronted the business  world during his service. It is a  good thing to
stop occasionally and take  a kind of inventory of the advantages  our
school presents its students; and  all will agree that the spirit of our
book  store is " Service of the best quality,  for the people, of the
people, by the  people, past, present and future, in rain  and in shine, or
in any kind of weather."  Accommodation and geniality are two  great
virtues of a business man, and  these are prominent qualities of Mr. 
Baughman's character. In a word, instead  of congratulating the manager 
upon the occasion of his re-election, let  us congratulate ourselves upon
our good  luck in being able to retain so efficient  an officer in our
school community, one  who has inspired the confidence of the  whole
community, and whose business  success has been founded upon this wejl_ 
placed confidence.  B.S. N.S.  NORMAL TAKES PART  IN TULIP FESTIVAL  L  T 
Tonight at 8 o'clock in the auditorium  the Men's Association is giving a
high  class vaudeville show.  Much hard work has been spent by  those
taking part in the performance  and a very interesting show will be-put 
on. Come and enjoy a good laugh.  Opening selection School Orchestra  Coen 
 Co. presents "Cohen on the  Telephone "  Christensen, Kronstad   Reep
present  "The Three Dizzy Swedes"  Hoag, Samuelson, Allison   Inge will 
appear in " The Henhill Quartette "  Prof. Hoppe in "Tony De Dagoe" 
Gilfilin .  Follis in " The Comical Nuts "  Grand Minstrel, Twelve Dark
Clouds in  "The Newest Out"  A large crowd witnessed the conflict  between
the Crimson and the Blue and  White last Tuesday afternoon at Elks'  ball
park. All closses were dismissed  at 3 o'clock, to give students an
opportunity  to see the game.  Our boys led the Whatcomites until  the
third inning when the situation was  reversed and remained so through the 
rest of the game. Our boys made a  desperate rally in the eighth inning 
when Karlson and Coles each batted the  ball for two bases and Inge got a
single.  These hits brought in Bohanan,  Elder and Inge, making the score
ten  to five in Whatcom's favor. This score,  in spite of the efforts on
the part of  our team remained unchanged during  the ninth inning. Our team
as a whole  was not hitting as well as Whatcom,  making six hits and
Whatcom twelve  during the game. The next date with  Whatcom will be played
at Elks Park  May Cth.  The Normal lineup was as follows:  Prevost,
pitcher; Coles, catcher; Wright,  .first base; Inge, second base; Jenkins, 
third base; Elder, shortstop; Bohanon,  -** (Continued on page 2.)  ( lt; "
A T  Mr. Harrison Raymond, a Normal  alumnus who has many times delighted 
the school by his vocal concerts, will  present his choir of the First
Presbyterian  Church in " Stabat Mater." next  Monday evening, in the
church parlors.  This beautifhl oratorio has been rehearsed  carefllly, and
the opportunity  of hearing it is very rare. Mr. Raymond  himself takes a
number of the.  solos. All students are invited to attend.  B.S. N.S. 
Laughter, last of the gods, and of  them the greatest, yes, say I, and
salute  you! — JAMES OPPENTIEIM.  SCHOOL CO-OPERATES WITH 
TOWNSPEOPLE IN MAKING  FESTIVAL BIG SUCCESS  The Tulip Festival beginning
Monday  evening, May 2, with the coronation festivities  at the Armory and
continuing  the next day with a great Tulip Parade  will be one of the most
elaborate affairs  that have, ever been attempted on the  coast.  Dr. Nash
is president of the Bellingham  Community Service. Another Normal  faculty
member who takes an active  interest in Community Service is Mr.  W. C.
Weir, who has the direction and  supervision of the work.  Bellingham has a
greater interest than  any other town of its size in Community  Service.
The co-operation and ability of  the leaders and willing workers has
culminated  in this splendid manifestation of  public service.  Our Normal
and Training School stu-  (Continued on page 2.)  L  Do the students of
this institution fully  realize what a busy man their president  is? This
article will show that many  activities outside of our school life also 
demand a great deal of his time and  attention.  Friday evening Dr. Nash is
to judge  a debate in Seattle between the U. of  W. and O. A. C. May 20th
he makes a  commencement address at Adna. As  president of the Western
Washington  Sunday School Association, he will preside  at the convention
that will be held  in Bellingham June 6th. June 11th he  will give the
opening address of the  Lutheran Convention in Everett. June  14th Dr. Nash
delivers a commencement  address in Aberdeen. He has been  elected delegate
at large - of the Presbyterian  church to represent the state  in a
national council which will meet in  Los Angeles the first week of July. 
Dr. Nash has also been asked to give  a series of lectures in the summer 
school in Hawaii.  B.S. N.S.  " The easiest way! to flatter a man is to 
ask his advice concerning something he  doesn't know anything about.

    
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Weekly Messenger - 1921 April 29 - Page 2

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2 THE WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 1921  NORMAL TAKES BIG . 
PART IN TULIP FESTIVAL  (Continued from page 1.)  dents are going to take
an active and  charming part in both the cornoation  ceremonies and the
parade.  The scenario for the coronation has  . been written by Mr. Victor
Hoppe. The  scenario contains the Court of Winter,  the Court of Time;,
subjects of Tulip  Town and the Court of the Queen. The  part of King
Winter is taken by Mr.  Coughlin who co-operated with Mr.  Hoppe in his
clever plans for the coronation.  This court is coached by Mrs.  Smith
another of Mr. Hoppe's assistants.  Father Time in the Court of  Time is
represented by Mr. Don Gray,  a local man and actor.  Children of the
Bellingham grade  schools represent the subjects of Tulip  Town, as Tulip
Sprites, Earth Gnomes,  Welcoming Winds and Maidens of the  Sunlight.  The
Court of the Queen represents the  winning queen, Alice Hughie, attended 
by her nine defeated candidates, Marion  Chisholm, our Normal Candidate; La
 Verne Farlow, Myrtle Latimer, Loretta  Duvall, all of Bellingham; Nellie 
Brown, Lynden; Garnette Walker, Burlington;  Laura May Clarkson, Ferndale; 
Esther Reddick, Fairhaven High School;  Isabelle Erickson, of the Whatcom
High  School, and Isabelle Downs, Mount Vernon.  The Training School is to
have a  queen from the kindergarten department.  Mrs. Witten, who is
supervising  this pageant, presented an outline for  the Training School's
part in the parade  that was unanimously selected by the  other
supervisors.  The Training School parade is centered  around the
kindergarten queen  who rides in a two-wheel silver cart,  drawn by
Brownies of the first grade.  Clowns of the eighth and ninth grades 
announce the arrival of the queen. The  queen's banner is to be carried by
boys  of the first and second grades. The  Training School banner is to be
carried  by boys of the seventh, eighth and ninth  grades. Girls of the
second, third, fourth  and fifth grades are to be maids. Girls  of the
remaining grades are to be flower  girls.  Mrs. Witten met with the three
art  teachers, Miss Druse, Miss Boring and  Miss Landis, to work out the.
costumes  and material to be used by the Training  School. The primary
department made  250 cut paper tulips which are to trim  the costumes,
pinned on the hems of the  white dresses. The upper grades made  30 helmets
and 30 shields. The girls  made tulip caps of crepe paper, designed  by
Miss Landis. The designs  for the shields and arrangement of  tulips on the
dresses was also designed  by Miss Landis. The Art Department  has general
supervision of all the art  work for the fancy costuming for the  children.
 ' Plans are also made for the entire  student body of the Normal to take
part  in the parade. Miss Moffat of the  Physical Education Department
assisted  by Mr. Coughlin, have charge of the  girls' military drill and
the Literary  Club formation. Each club is to march  in its own line and
present different  marching evolutions. Following these  will come
twenty-four girls in military  and fancy formations who will march  on
various street corners. The non-club  girls will follow in groups of eight
and  will do some inarching following the  military tactics. All the girls
are to  wear white middy suits. The club girls  will wear blue and white
Dutch caps,  alternating the colors, and blue middy  ties to carry out our
Normal colors.  The Men's Association has plans for  a float decorated in
our national colors  in which Miss Catherine Shepherd  dressed as the
Goddess of Liberty and  Mr. Cone as Uncle Sam, will ride.  Marching before
them will come the  Minute Men with fife and drum, and  carrying a flag.
Representatives of the  Revolutionary War period will also  march ahead of
the car. Some of our  Normal boys will march, dressed either  in their
khaki uniforms or navy suits.  Plans are also being worked out for a 
probable float representing some other  period of our history.  Mr.
Heckmann has been assisted in  these plans by Mr. Bond, Mr. Kolstad  and
four Normal boys, Herbert Hansen,  Frank Allison, Clinton Pruner and 
Lawrence Wright. The suggestion that  the Men's Association take a definite
 part in the parade was made by Director  Weir.  The Normal School is glad
of the opportunity  to co-operate with the people  of Bellingham in their
huge celebration  of the disposal of King Winter and his  powerful allies,
Strong Tide, North  Wind, Arctic Snow, Tide Rips and Jack  Frost and the
ascendency to the throne  of the Queen of Tulip Town with the  Maidens of
Sunlight, Tulip Sprites,  Warm Winds and Spring Rain.  B.S.N.S.  ANNUAL MAY
FESTIVAL  TO BE GIVEN MAY 13  (Continued from page 1.)  9 — Dancing
on the green, a folk dance  to give the players the joy and  freedom of
wholesome play.  10 —Dumbell drill.  11—: Fancy military
marching. •  Both Miss Moffat and the students  have put forth every
effort possible to  make this demonstration a success, and  all of those
who saw the festival of  last year know something of what to  expect from
them.  The Normal appreciates the fact that  the use of the armory was
given to them  for the demonstration, free of charge.  There will be no
admission. Mr. Bissell  has kindly assisted to do the printing  and the
costumes are purchased by the  school out of the funds from the
demonstration  of last year. The students  are making the costumes and they
are  then returned to the school after the  demonstration for further use. 
The school and the community are  looking forward to May 13th with much 
anticipation and Miss Moffat and Miss  Bornstein deserve much credit for
their  work.  — B.S.N.S.  NORMAL LOSES TO WHATCOM  IN HARD FOUGHT
CONTEST  (Continued from pagre 1.)  left field; Karlson, center field;
Miller,  right field.  HEADQUARTERS FOR  Groceries, FreBh Fruit, Vegetables
and Bakery Gbods.  We make a specialty of Fancy Cakes to Order.  M. J.
O'CONNORS  Successor to  Sweet Grocery Company  1021 ELK STREET  Bloedel
Donovan  Lumber Mills  ROUGH AND DRESSED LUMBER.  LATH AND SHINGLES. 
DOORS, WINDOWS, FRAMES.  MOULDINGS AND FINISH.  QUICK DELIVERY.  BRING US
YOUR LIST FOR ESTIMATE  Retail Office, 1615 Elk Street  Retail Yard, Phone
433—Sash   Door Factory, Phone 1257  ROYAL ICE CREAM  When you order
that ice cream, remember it is Royal  that always gives satisfaction.  The
Ice Cream of Quality for the Past Twenty Years  THE ROYAL DAIRY PRODUCTS
CO.  PHONE 46-48 OHIO AND ELLIS STREETS  A Complete Line of Cards for 
MOTHER'S DAY—MAY 8  — AT-E.  T. MATHES BOOK CO.  Whatcom lined
up as follows: McDonald,  pitcher; Buzzard, catcher;  Tryggvi, first base;
Bateman, second  base; Johnson ,third base; Vanderford,  shortstop; Holt,
left field; Poplak, center  field; Dawson, right field.  The game was
umpired by Boyd  Staggs.  COMING ATHLETIC EVENTS  As we go to press, there
are four  baseball games scheduled to be played in  the near future. The
teams to be  played and the dates are as follows:  Harmony, April 28th, at
Elks' Park;  Ferndale, Saturday, April 30th, at  Ferndale; Whatcom, May
6th; Fair-haven,  May 19th. The last two games  are to be played at Elks'
Park.  May 14th has been set aside as the  date for the track meet with
Whatcom.  Judging from the records made by  Whatcom in a recent inter-class
meet,  the Normal track. team will be a good  match for Whatcom.  The
students were very glad to see  Mrs. Thatcher again in assembly Wednesday. 
It seems very good to have her  with us once more. Miss Gaynor and  her
sister, Miss Boyd, pupils of Mr.  Mount, a former Normal student,
entertained  with three pretty songs. The  first and perhaps the sweetest
song  which Miss Gaynor sang was " The Blush  Rose."  A gentleman who was
taking pictures  of Bellingham wished to photograph the  life of the
Normal, so a very lively  crowd paraded before his camera.

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Weekly Messenger - 1921 April 29 - Page 3

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THE
WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 1921 
iitititmuHuiiiunuuiit;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuHiiuiiiHiiiii|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiij|
 ALUMNI  il, I n l l 1IM1IMIMIIMIMIIMIMIMIMI1M1II1IIII1I Illlllll I Mill I
I lllV=  CiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiniiiiMiiiiiiiiiii "it" uiimiiimmiiiiiiiiii
iimmiiimiiiiimiinmr;  Mrs. Lydia Manchester Jones, a  graduate of last
summer, is now teaching  in Seattle.  * * *  Dennis Troth '17 is teaching
at the  University.  * * *  Marcella Craft, a graduate of the Normal,  is
now assistant in German at the  " U."  * # *  Avis Dodge, a graduate of
'19, is  teaching in Vancouver.  * # *  Gladys Hepton '18 is living at her 
home in Lewiston, Idaho.  * * *  Mr. Ewing, who is now teaching in  the
city, is to be superintendent of the  Blaine Schools next year.  * * * 
Chester Tee Garden '18 is teaching at  Hamilton.  * * *  Hazel Beach, a
graduate of '19 and a  former assistant in art at Normal, is  attending the
university this year.  * * *  Nettie Thompson '19 is teaching in 
Ketchikan, Alaska.  * * *  Marian Osborn '18 is teaching at Port  Orchard. 
* * *  Among our undergraduates we find  Vivienne Croxf ord at Three Lakes,
 Pearl Stroughton at Snohomish, Clarence  Johnson at Statche Prairie,
Elenore  Mead at Entiat, Mabel Walters at  Mount Vernon and Vera Merchant
at  Burlington.  B.S.N.S.  SENIORS WIN MARATHON  Last Saturday was the
official day  set for the annual Marthon race. For  some reason or other
Mother Nature decided  to give us a downpour of H20 on  the morning of that
important day, with  the result that instead of having Chuck-anut  alive
with Normalites the old mountain  enjoyed a rather quiet day.  However, a
few of Normal's hearts  remained undaunted and scaled the slippery  side of
the old hill.  The Seniors won the race by a small  margin over the Juniors
and the faculty  was also represented by a few names.  The total number who
reached the top  of Chuckanut and registered was 44.  Eyestrain h e a d
aches  will never be  Relieved p e r m a nently  except b y  correctly f i
t t e d  glasses. C o n s u lt  Woll, the optometrist,  about y o u r 
eyes. 205 W. Holly.  Organizations  All of the literary clubs are busy
making  the caps which they are. to wear in  the Tulip Festival parade. 
ALKISIAH  Rumors are being circulated concerning  a delightful Alkisiah
banquet which  is to be held soon.  Attention! Philos, don't forget the 
6th, 7th and 8th of May. Maybe it isn't  your duty to go to the week end
party,  but unless you're a pessimist you'll be  there — with bells
on.  B.S.N.S.  OHIYESA  Thursday evening's program consisted  of the
following numbers:  " Handicraft, Its History and Value "  Mary Bennett 
Reading Augusta Ohlin  Piano solo Alma Deierling  Reading Miss Wallace 
Piano solo Mayme Bogdanoff  Piano solo Lucile Parsons  Vocal solo...
.....Pearl Ingalls  After the program the remainder of  the evening was
spent in sewing.  B.S.N.S.  Y. W. C. A.  At the regular meeting last week
the  new officers for the coming year were  installed. The present officers
and  members of the cabinet introduced each  new girl, telling her of her
future work.  The new workers for the remainder of  the year and next year
are: President,  Lois Henderson; vice-president, Alma  Burdick; treasurer,
Frances Rosen-burg;  secretary, Judith Ring. The cabinet  members which
they have chosen to  help them are Goldie Baird, Catherine  Shepherd,
Florence Swanson, Pearl  Hemmi, Evelyn Fraser and Brigetta  Konkanen. Miss
Woodard, representing  the faculty,, talked to the girls on 
"Faithfulness," followed by a talk by  Miss Sperry of the advisory board. 
B.S.N.S.  GIRLS' ATHLETICS  The P. E. Major girls are preparing  some very
unique stunts in the way of  pyramid building, somersault turning,  etc.,
for the May Day demonstration.  These gymnastics are especially Cleveland 
will cause great surprise when seen.  B.S.N.S.  CLUB NOTES  The Aletheian
Club met in Miss  Woodard's rooms at Edens Hall Friday  evening and elected
the following officers:  President, Dorothy Bell; vice-president, 
Katherine Joyce; secretary,  Lita Layton; treasurer, Florence Swan-son; 
Sergeant-at-arms, Francis Still.  B.S.N.S.  The only "shimmy dance" that is
 really worth anything is the one the  wash woman does over the tub.  * * *
 The milk of human kindness is not to  be found in every heart. It will not
mix  with gall or greed.  300 PAIRS  NEW LOW SHOES  Black, Brown, White 
Choice $4.75  Apparel of Quality  iiimmiiifiiiimiiiimtiiMiMimmiiui 
'imiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimmiiimiiiiiiimimmmiimmmii lining:  Assembly Notes 
Assembly on Friday was evenly divided  between the pleasing and the
unpleasant.  The " W " Club sent two uplifting entertainers  who gave
several short  sketches. They gained a volume of applause  for their
cleverness. Many Normal  students attended their show at the  Whatcom High
School that night.  After this short relaxation, the students  took an
intelligence test, directed  and presented by Mr. Kolstad.  One of the
purposes of this test was  to get the intelligence average of this  school,
to be compared with other  schools. We wonder—.  * * *  James W.
Evans, a Y. M. C. A. entertained  in Paris during the war, gave  a short
talk on the " Inner Workings  of the Amusement Business," in Monday's 
assembly. Mr. Evans has been  in the amusement business for twenty-five 
years.  He gave a plea for better shows, but  maintained that managers give
the public  shows that they want. The public  are the judges as to the kind
of shows  that will be shown the most often. Mr.  Evans said, " It is up to
the people what  the civilizing influences of this country  will be.  The
talk was full of wit and common  sense, and immensely enjoyed, as the
applause  at the close proved.  B.S.N.S.  ELKS' SHOW .  Last Monday and
Tuesday the annual  Elks' show was given at the American  Theatre. This
time the show was a high  type of musical comedy, carrying with it  a few
intense dramatic situations. This  show is of more than ordinary importance
 because of the fact that a large  majority of the girls were Normal girls,
 and men. Along with the show was a  style show. This display of styles was
 as interesting as that held by the students  last week. Those that took
part  in both the style show and the play were  the Misses Chisholm,
McCush, Mouso,,  Lee, Oberlatz, McCush, Hinds and Richard  Newton.  See Us
for High  Grade Candies  at Popular  Prices  F. W. W00LW0RTH CO.  5c-10-15c
Store  GREAT WESTERN  Wood and Coal Combination  Heater, has a big open 
front, like a fireplace. Uses  less fuel. Built to last.  JENKINS-BOYS 
COMPANY  The Bellingham  National Bank  Capital and Surplus  $475,000.00 
MORSE HARDWARE CO.  1025-1039 Elk Street  ATHLETIC GOODS  Fishing Tackle,
Guns and  Ammunition  KELLY-SPRINGFIELD TIRES  H.
Goodell—BOUCHER—Edith H.  Tenor — Mezzo Soprano  OLD
ITALIAN METHOD OF BEL CANTO  FRENCH, ITALIAN, ENGLISH  R E P E R T O I R E 
BELLIITOHAM SCBTOOI. OF  MUSIC AITD ABT  401-409 Excg-. Bldff. Phone 1303

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Weekly Messenger - 1921 April 29 - Page 4

    
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THE WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 1921  THE WEEKLY
cTWESSENGERj  Published by Students' Association of State Normal SchooU
Bellingham.  Entered in the Postoffiee at Bellingham, Washington, as
second-class matter.  Union Printing, Binding   Stationery Company,
Printers  Subscription rates by mail, $2.00 per year in advance Single
copies, 5 cents.  Advertising rates on application.  Address all
communications, other than news items, to The Manager of the  Weekly
Messenger, Bellingham, Washington.  STAFF OFFICERS  EDITOR-IN-CHIEF LOIS W.
OSBORN  BUSINESS MANAGER ARTHUR E. BOWSHER  MESSENGER STAFF  Alumni.:
_„::..„ Vera Dunbar General News J 1°^ Boettcher  (D. L.
Newton  S o c i e t y Llta L a y t 0 n Assemb* Boys' Athletics Vernon C.
McDonald {l\^?**y™n SS f °*aK-Broteov  Training School Castlean
Swimm ^ j Catherine Deemer  Calendar Judith Lundberg ' I Lorna Doone Mullen
 Society. : Lita Layton Club Notes :. Donna E. Sargent  General Briefs
Donna E. Sargent Girls' Athletics Dorothy Bell  SCHOOL DAYS  By Lois WILMA
OSBORN  There's a little school house standing in a hollow,  And the
friendly hills protect it from all woe,  There's a little winding trail
that I must follow,  And down it every day there I must go.  There's a
friendly look about the schoolhouse shining,  Where the sagebrush loves to
grow around the door,  I often wonder — will I be repining  When the
door is closed and locked forever more?  Won't I miss those boys and girls
and merry chatter?  Won't I think of hours spent there again some day?  And
recall again the busy, noisy clatter,  When I'm gone from it, in years so
far away?  Yes, I'm sure I'll long some time to see the hollow,  Where the
little schoolhouse stands in sun or gale,  And in dreams gt;once more I
certainly shall follow  Across those hills — that little winding
trail.  INK - .. -;:-:;™;-  What is the exact power of ink in our
modern every day life?  Who does not admit that ink has made him sad,
happy, ambitious,  discouraged or indifferent?  A letter comes, some friend
has used this powerful medium  of communication to make us happy. We read a
book, either for  entertainment or for knowledge. Each page is printed in
ink. The  daily newspaper appears splattered and splashed with inked
headlines  and we keep abreast of what is happening in the world today. 
Ink in swift and trained hands amuses us. Bud Fisher and  many others of
his talent would languish and fade without this  medium to toss their
cleverness before the world.  Ink has laid the foundations for towering
structures of the  world. Cosy vine-covered bungalows and stately colonial
mansions  all had their beginning with ink. People acknowledge that they 
live for the pleasure the ink on their weekly or monthly checks  bring
them.  Who is not under the spell of this magical fluid — ink!  TULIP
QUEEN CONTEST  Last Monday night the Tulip Queen contest was ended and 
Miss Alice Hughie was elected. She was the candidate of the  Central Labor
Council. We are glad she won, but at the same  time we feel that our own
school had a candidate in the field and  who was only half supported. There
is more than one kind of  failure. One of the greatest failures is to start
out to do something,  then fall down on the job. Next time let's all pull
together  and put our candidate overf  TRAINING SCHOOL'S PART  IN THE TULIP
PARADE  ANY NORMAL GIRL  Look into her eyes and you see a little angel;
look a little  longer and you see a little imp!  Also —  One hour a
day to study —  One hour a day in which to eat —  Two hours to
think how tired I am —  • And twenty hours to sleep!  A
prejudice is a conviction not shared by you.  GOSSIP  We have all heard the
expression, " Give the devil his due."  Perhaps, we do give that notorious
personage all he deserves, but  we are not always so charitable with our
neighbors. How often  we have believed the worst — not the best
— of an acquaintance!  How quick we credit every bit of gossip we
hear! Or, if we don't  believe it, we think of it every time we meet the
person.  Many of us would not think of taking a pencil belonging to 
another student, but carelessly, thoughtlessly we, by an unkind  word, take
away his good name! We may not rob him of his  reputation all at once; but
a little insinuation, a thoughtless remark,  is not forgotten by our
hearers. •  It seems to be human nature to forget all the good things
 heard of a person, and remember only the bad.  If only we all were kinder
in our judgments of fellow students,  school would be a happier place. When
we hear some ugly gossip,  consider it a lie until we have the proof. And
above all, don't  repeat it. Let's try to give our neighbors the benefit of
the doubt.  A large banner, made of blue with  " Normal Training School" in
white letters  is to be carried by three boys. Fifteen  clowns will follow
them announcing  the arrival of the queen. These  clowns shall wear large
paj gt;er bags, the  top of which is in the form of a tulip.  Sweaters will
be stuffed and put on at  the waist line. Boys, wearing helmets  to match
the shields, made of gray  building paper with a silver band  across the
front and a red tulip in the  center, will represent the knights who  come
next. These will be grouped to  form a triangle. A banner of white on 
which will be the gold letters, " Our  Queen," will be carried by two
Brownie  boys. This parade is centered around  the queen who is a little
kindergarten  girl, drawn about by Brownies. Queen  is laced in by garlands
of flowers carried  by girls wearing white dresses,  around the bottom of
which are tulips.  They will have red and yellow hats,  alternating, green
bands which fasten  under the chin. Flower girls dressed in  white, with
bands around their hair,  will all carry baskets.  The supervisors who were
requested  by Dr. Nash to co-operate with the  school and townspeople in
giving the  tulip parade, had a meeting and voted  unanimously to accept
the plan as outlined  by Mrs. Witten, which is the one  that has just been
given. The art teachers,  Misses Druse, Boring and Landis,  consented to
work out the patterns. They  are supervising the Training School  children
who are making the material to  be worn. Mrs. Witten wishes to express  her
thanks to the Misses Druse, Boring  and Landis, and Training School 
supervisors for their assistance and cooperation.  The following is the
committee which  has charge: Chairman, Mrs. Witten;  queen, Miss Tompkins;
Brownies, Miss  Montgomery; maids, Miss Gordon;  flower girls, Miss
Crawford; knights,  Miss McDonald; clowns, Miss Wallace;  garlands and
banners, Misses Bell and  Moffat.  B. S. N. S.  COLLEGE EDUCATION  " To be
at home in all lands and all  ages; to count nature a familiar
acquaintance,  and art an intimate friend;  to gain a standard for the
appreciation  of other men's work and the criticism of  one's own; to carry
the keys of the  world's library in one's pocket, and feel  its resources
behind one in whatever  tasks he undertakes; to make hosts of  friends"
among the men of one's own  age who are leaders in all walks of life;  to
lose one's self in generous enthusiasm  and co-operate with others for
common  ends; to learn manners from students  who are gentlemen, and
character from  professors who are Christians — these  are the
returns of a college for the .best  four years of one's life.  " Not every
student comes to that  fullness of living, but every student is  helped
toward it by his college life, and  no one who ever lived within college 
walls needs to be told that these things  were held out to him." —
Exchange.  B. S. N. S.  In "Chips of Jade" Arthur Guiii  man has rendered a
number of Chipese  and Indian proverbs into English  of epigrammatic power.
Here  maxim: •  "Recorded words are fetters; i  When angry don't
write letters."  And a story is swiftly sketched in two  lines :  "Two
sparrows for one rice grain made  a riot;  The cat was arbitrator —
all is quiet."

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Weekly Messenger - 1921 April 29 -
Page 5

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THE WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 1921 
SOCIETY  nniiiiiniKuiiuiiimiittititiitiitiiiimilimilHmimilNutilmiuiimlltil
liMiiiiiiiuiuilulliiiliiiiLmimillMiiiuUiiiiiaiiuiiniiiiimml t maHunii
riliiimiltiluiuiiiiiiiiiiniiiliimliiililmlliiJiilililiiinnniiiiumuiiiiluitijiiiiiiiiiiMliiMtitiiiiiiuuiiiiiiimliiiiiiiimiiiiiii
niiiiiMiiintiiiiiiiliiiliiiuuuuitmuiiiiiiHiiuiuuiiiili
ramiuiiuiuiiuiuiuuiiiiu  iSiuSiiniMlimiltlltltimtlim " tmnmimmillllll I
UlllllllllllltllllllllllllllliHllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIUIIIinillllllllllllliUUIlUlllllllUllll
 Eva and Elsie Kankonnen, of Astoria,  regon, visited their sister,
Brigetta, at  Jens Hall over the week end.  * * #  Dorothy Jones and Marion
SChisholm  ent the week end in Carbonado. Sun-iy  they motored to
Bellingham with  r. and Mrs. Jones and their son.  • # #  Madeline
Hess gave a charming dance  the Garden Hall last Friday evening.  »' #
«  Florence Ringman spent the week end  Everett.  • •
• »  Viola Edmundson was the week end  lest of Mildred Nuttal at
Edens Hall.  # * #  Sunday evening the girls at Yoe's en-rtained  in formal
evening gowns. •  • * •  Misses Meade and Cummins,
Dorothy  ell and Pauline Noll went on the ex-irsion  to Orcas Island Sunday
morns'  After an absence of more than six  weeks we are glad to have Lois
Henderson  with us again.  * * »  The Normal Quartet sang at the
Century  Club program last Tuesday evening.  Pearl Ingalls sang in the Odd
Fellows  program at Liberty Hall Monday  evening.  * * *  Miss Marguerite
Brotnov, farmer Normal  student, spent the week end at her  home in
Bellingham. Miss Brotnov is a  member of the Liberal Arts course at  the
State University preparatory to the  Law Course. Gn Friday she visited our 
Normal.  * » *  Dorothy Gray, Mary Bennett, Esther  Midgarden and
Ernestine Gove spent  Sunday picnicking on the shores of  Lake Whatcom and
rowing on the lake.  Later the contents of a birthday box  were spread on
the beach and eagerly  devoured.  iimiiimililllllliiliiiiiim
iiuiuiiiiiiuiuiimiiiimiiiuiiiimuiiiiiii imiumiimmiiiimuci* 
iiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiinii
iimiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiimiimMimMiiimnitiiiiiuiiimiiiiiii£§
 General News H  Rain and more rain — yet how reso-tely  and steadily
progresses the work  1 the new dormitory! Trucks chug up  id carry off
loads of gravel, hammers  ing1 and clang as carpenters weild  iem. " Whoa,"
" Gee," " Haw," sound  ie voices of teamsters! Behold the  og pond has
disappeared and the place  ir the new building is assuming a level  id
dignified appearance.  * # •  Byron Samuelson, who has been conned, 
to his bed for a number of days,  ;cause of an attack of measles* is now 
mvalescent.  • * *  Clyde Burmaster is suffering from a  idly
infected hand which threatened  i develop into a case of blood poison. 
here is now no danger.  •» # •  Mr. Newton McCoy, a former
student  id graduate of the Normal School,   gt;ent the week end visiting
friends in  ellingham.  • * *  Lambert Craver has returned to  :hool
after a sickness of several days.  * # #  Dr. Hughes is enjoying her
vacation  ith her family in Bellingham. .  # » #  A number of Normal
students hiked   gt; the government bulb farm last Sat-rday.  The tulips
are now in bloom, and  joyous sight.  # • » #  Miss Wilbur, who
so successfully  lunched the movement of community  rama in Bellingham, is
now conducting  community drama conference in Seat-e.  Rehearsals for the
senior play, "The  Servant in the House," are progressing  splendidly. The
play will be given on  the evening of June 2.  # # •  Walter Liddell,
a student at Normal  in the early days of the school, and now  a successful
farmer in Skagit County,  was a visitor last week.  # # #  Margaret Wells'
mother came to Bellingham  where she will remain with Margaret  to the end
of the school year.  # * *  Messrs. Wynn and Boucher are sleeping  at
present in the Hotel de Bunk and  have succeeded in ruining the sleep of 
the community during that time by  "sawing wood" so diligently. (Hotel  de
Bunk is a sleeping tent located behind  Jenkins Hall.)  B.S.N.S.  WANT TO
BE MOVIE  ACTOR? —READ THIS  " Do they take movie scenes more than 
once? " is one of the questions most frequently  asked by picture fans. 
Ben Deeley, leading man for Jane  Novak in the William M. Selig production,
 " Kazan," wants to emphtically answer  that question right now. He says, 
"YES," and here's why he says it:  The script of the James Oliver Cur-wood 
play, which will be the attraction  at the New Liberty Theater next week, 
demanded the Deeley be knocked out by  Edwin Wallock, the film villain. The
 first trial was a clean knockout, Wallock  using a stick of firewood-
(padded) to  do the job.  And then — Bertram Bracken, director, 
megaphoned, " Let's, do it again,  boys,, we might get it better." Four 
times Deeley was knocked down, jumped  on and rolled on, and then Director 
ENGRAVED CARDS AND INVITATIONS  EMBOSSED STATIONERY  Our Copperplate
Engraving and Steel Die Embossing  Departments Are at Your Disposal. 
Correct Society Engraving  Union Printing, Binding   Sty Co.  ELK STREET 
HOME STORE  1312-14 BAY STREET  A. Lawson  BLOUSES, SILK AND LISLE HOSE 
ALL COLORS  Bracken casually remarked, " I guess  w'll use the first one;
it would be hard  to improve upon."  " Can you beat i t ? " queried the
disheveled  leading man as he rubbed his  swollen jaw and blackened eye. 
The only man who hasn't time to enjoy  a feeling of importance is the one 
who is really important.  » » *  Today is the tomorrow you
worried  about yesterday.

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Weekly Messenger - 1921
April 29 - Page 6

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6 - THE WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY,
MAY 29, 1921 
jiiittiniuiiiitiiiiitiuiHiutuitainimumitmmmmirmitiiiiimiirtniimiiitimmiiiiittiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiK
uifinuiiiiiiitiniiinuiiiitiiiMinuiiuuiiuiinHiuiiHininiHiiiiiiiuiiiiiitiitiiiinuiuimiitiiiiiiiiitiniiu^
 SgiiiutiiiiitiuniiiiiHitiiiiiiitiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiitniiiiHiiiitiiiiniuuiuitiiniiiniiiiiiiiiitiiiiuniiiiiiijfs
=iNiiiiiinitiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiii[iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiintiiiiiiiiii|[iiiiniuiiiiiiMiniiiiHHinmiiniiintimi^
=  II Faculty Notes || 
5.niiHiuitiititiiiniuitiiuitiiiiiiiuitiiititiuinitiuiniiiiiHitii[iiiHitMiitiiiHitiiiitiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiuiiMinI
 ^iitiiiiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiuiiiiniiiniiiinittinuiiuiniitiiiiiitiniiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiitiiiitiiiiiiniitiu
 Miss Crawford, accompanied by Misses  Longly and Moffat, who were her week
 end guests, motored to Tacoma on Friday  evening and returned Sunday
evening—  tired but happy and with a memory  of a wonderful week end.
 * # *  Miss Montgomery will leave shortly  for Seattle where she- will
visit the Seattle  schools.  * * *  The Collegiate Alumni enjoyed a very 
enjoyable luncheon at the Pheasant Tea  rooms on Monday. The hostesses were
 Misses Douglas and Reismeyer of Fair-haven  High. Members of our faculty 
who were present were Misses Cummins,  Morse, McDonald, Wallace, Keeler, 
Woodard and Countryman.  * • *  Misses Druse, Boring and Landis are 
busy as bees this week preparing costumes  for the children who will take 
part in the Tulip Festival. Such reds  and rich yellows have my eyes never 
seen!  Miss Keeler is in Snohomish County  at present and Mrs. Wiley is
beginning  her work in Mason County.  * * *  Mr. Klemme spent last week in 
Thurston County where he visited a  large number of schools. In the
majority  of these schools he found former  Normal students who are making
good  in the teaching profession.  * * •»  At the community
meeting of the N.  U. A. in Seattle last week Dr. Miller  was elected as a
delegate to the N. E.  A. This is a great honor to be bestowed  on one and
the Messenger joins  in congratulating Dr. Miller.  * * *  Superintendent
of Schools Jennie  Robin was a Seattle visitor last week  end. She attended
the executive committee  meeting of the, N. U. A. on Saturday.  * * *  The
Exchange is in the hands of the  printer at present.  * * #  Miss
Funkhauser developed a case of  " hay fever" while arranging posies on  the
desk in the library. Otherwise she is  "pounding" the- typewriter as per 
usual.  * * *  Miss Wilson is at present at the Hotel  Frye in Seattle. She
has not yet decided  where she will spend her vacation.  B.S.N.S.  Training
School  " " The Princess" is a play which has  been written and dramatized
by the fifth  grade pupils. It was based on fragments  of stories the
pupils had read or  heard. The play was the independent  work of the
children, as the suggestions  given them were few and meagre.  # * #  What
is the W. Y. E. Club? It is  one we could all join with the grade  pupils
— " Watch Your English" Club.  * # *  Seven of the Girl Scouts of the
Normal  hiked to Whatcom Falls Saturday  morning, being accompanied by
Marie  Pederson. They had a very good time  and "loads of eats." Later some
of the  girls went to visit the Whatcom High  School Girl Scouts who were
also spending  the day at the lake. A few of the  girls requested me to cal
Ithe girls who  went on the hike " Good Scouts."  Newton's  Incorporated 
WOMEN'S APPAREL OF QUALITY  DR. NASH WORKS FOR  THE TULIP FESTIVAL  As
president of Community Service  League Dr. Nash tried to get the  mounted
police of Canada, for our Tulip  Festival, but was unable to secure them. 
Congressman Hadley has given the  committee permission to obtain thousands 
of beautiful blossoms from the  bulb farm for the Festival. This attraction
 will add greatly to the dignity  and beauty of the festivities.  Thelma
Newell is captain of the girls'  baseball team of the Junior High School. 
Other members of the team are Yarda  Carlson, Evelyn Axelson, Mariam
Collier,  Marguerite Johnson, Miriam Bixby,  Gertrude Radivick, Elin Worden
and  Adelaide Baker. The first game takes  place Wednesday afternoon with
Eureka.  Eureka won the first scheduled game  from the Junior High Training
School  baseball team by the score of 10-9.  Royal Young, Alvin »
Hanson, Elden  Bond, Ed Locke, Albert Hendrickson,  Jimmie Bartel, Wayne
Stevens, Frances  Stearns and James Clap are the members  of the team.  # *
*  Resolved: "That Ireland should be  given her independence," was the
subject  for debate in the 8-A class for last Wednesday's  assembly. The
negative won  the debate. Iris Van Horn, Agnes  Clark and Miriam Bixby were
the affirmative  debaters while their opponents  were Ted Carter, Merle
Kibbe and  Benecia Genther.  * * *  " Why is China so backward when she 
had such an ancient civilization?" ask  members of the 7-B class, and they
will  tell you, China was shut off from other  nations by natural barriers,
and the  Great Wall which she built. These barriers  shielded her from her
enemies  while she developed a remarkable civilization.  Then she shut
herself behind  these barriers and stopped developing,  and when she woke
up she found herself  four thousand years behjnd the times. A  minor reason
was her worship of ancestors.  KEMPHAUS C  CO.  Bellingham's Lowest Price
Goat and  Suit Store  DRY GOODS, WOMAN'S FURNISHINGS  PICTORIAL REVIEW
PATTERNS  DEPENDABLE SHOES With Style, Quality  and Comfort for Men
—Expert  Repairing  LONGWOOD'S SHOE SHOP  1325 DOCK STREET  PATRONIZE
MESSENGER ADVERTISERS  of the Normal School. The Training  School pupils
have pledged themselves  for two cases of milk, and hope to increase  that
amount greatly.  B.S.N.S.  CITY Y. W. TO GIVE MAY  FETE AT LIBERTY HALL 
Henry Schupp, charged with not  combing his hair and washing his face 
before goin gto school, is to be tried  this afternoon (Friday) at 2:50
before  Judge Ted Carter. De Lahcy is the  p'laintiff and Royal Young is to
be the  lawyer. The jury will be chosen jist  before the trial.  * * *  "
Send Whatcom County Dairymen's  Association Milk to Starving Children  of
Armenia," is a sign seen in all parts  On Saturday, April 30, the city Y.
W.  C. A. will give a May Fete at Liberty  Hall, the proceeds of which are
to be  used for the conference funds. The  doors will be open from 12 to 10
P. M.  and programs are to be given at 3 and  8. The special features of
these programs  will be a play by one of the city  schools, and orchestra
music. In addition  to the programs there will be  booths where home baking
and fancy-work  will be sold. An admission of  twenty-five and fifteen
cents will be  charged.  B.S.N.S.  Most men who would like to reform 
something, usually want to begin on the  other fellow.  Mother's Day  May 8
 A choice selection  of Gibson's cards at  Students' Co-Op  C. C. BAUGHMAN,
Mgr.  "i$

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Weekly Messenger - 1921 April 29 - Page
7

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THE WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 1921  OUR
HALL OF FAME  ROOSEVELT — Dynamic Christian citizen;  national and
international statesman;  the typical American of the twentieth  century. 
WAGNER — Reformer and acknowledged  master of music drama; wrote  the
text as well as the music of his  greatest works.  BEETHOVEN —
Composer for piano, orchestra,  opera and oratorio. Unexcelled  in depth of
emotional power and skill  in workmanship. The idol of the great,  yet a
man of the people. His works  have done more to uplift humanity than  those
of any other, and will live as long  as music lives.  HORACE MANN —
Gave up a promising  legal career to accept the unpromising  task of
reorganizing a school system because  he believed the race could be
improved  through education. He is to be  remembered also as father of the
normal  school in America.  PESTALOZZI— Deserves the very first 
place among educators in any hall of  fame. He conceived of education as a 
means of regenerating society, as well  as increasing the happiness of the
individual.  He stimulated interest in children  and education to such an
extent  that education has been extended enormously  since his day. 
PASTEUR — Great French chemist;  founded science of bacteriology;
gave  the world the idea of milk "Pasteurization";  found cure for
hydrophobia;  great in the field of preventive medicine.  KOC"H —
German bacteriologist; isolated  tuberculosis germ; discovered bacteria  of
Asiatic cholera; received Nobel  prize in medicine.  BENJAMIN FRANKLIN
— Apostle of  thrift; statesman, inventor, writer, philosopher; 
signer of the first four great  American state papers; best produce  of
American colonial life, and since then  one of the very great influences
through  the years.  GEORGE WASHINGTON — " Father of  his country,"
American commander in  the Revolution, presiding officer of the 
constitutional convention, first president  of the United States,
pronounced by  Byron "the first, the last, the best, Cin-cinnatus  of the
West."  SHAKESPEARE — The world's greatest  dramatic poet.  TENNTSON
— Writer; his great genius  consecrated to the service of humanity 
and truth; his great work, "Idylls of  the King."  MOSES — Hebrew
leader, lawgiver; his  moral statutes the basis of modern civilization, 
though promulgated 3,000 years  ago.  LUTHER — German religious
reformer;  founder of Protestanism.  GOETHE — German poet, novelist,
playwright,  scientist, critic of life; his  " Faust" and other works are
the " organ-  voice" of a unique and memorable  epoch.  HERODOTUS —
The first great writer of  history; an inimitable story teller, interesting
 and instructive, but credulous,  biased and superstitious.  THUCYBIDES
— The model of historical  writers, critical, unbiased and
scientific.  DARWIN — English naturalist; specially  known for his "
Origin of Species by  Means of Natural Selection."  NEWTON — Easily
ranked as the greatest  scientist and mathematician of all  ages. 
GRUNDTVIG — Danish theologian, historian  and poet; his writings
exercised  a great influence, on the religious and  political thought of
Denmark.  PLATO — Writer of dramatic and lyric  verse; great
philosopher.  WILLIAM JAMES — American psychologist  and philosopher;
known especially  in the field of analytical psychology;  author of many
philosophical books.  FRANCES E. WILLARD — American pioneer 
temperance worker; chief organizer  of Woman's Christian Temperance  Union;
champion of woman suffrage  ; instigator of first effort to relieve 
suffering Armenians.  FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE — An English  woman who
devoted her life to reforming  hospital conditions; trained nurses  for
intelligent care of the sick; established  model hospitals during Crimean 
War.  CLARA BARTON — American nurse behind  the battle line in Civil
War; first  president of American Red Cross; extended  service of
International Red  Cross Society to peace time as well as  war time.  MARY
LYON — Founder of Mount  Holyoke Female Seminary in 1837.  Foremost
advocate of women's right to  education similar to that of men; set  the
standard for women's colleges and  for co-education in America.  ELIZABETH
CADY STANTON — Earliest  advocate of equal suffrage, and champion  of
women's rights under the law.  SUSAN B. ANTHONY — Co-operated  with
Mrs. Stanton, advocating co-education  and property rights of women; ardent
 supporter of equal suffrage.  H. C. ANDERSON — Has charmed and 
instructed children of all countries; has  imbued all objects of nature,
animate  and inanimate, with deep meaning and  fascination.  SOCRATES
— Greek philosopher; father  of the Socratic method; advocated new 
political methods of government.  ARISTOTLE — Greek philopsopher; one
 of the greatest thinkers and scientific investigators  the world has ever
known.  Prolific writer on philosophical subjects.  LINCOLN — The
great exjionent of a  " government of the people, by the people,  and for
the peojile."  FRANCKE — Clergyman and philanthropist;  founded,
organized, endowed  educational institutions; father of normal  school
movement in Europe.  STOWE — Aside from Lincoln, the  greatest single
defendant of abolition of  slavery.  JOAN OF ARC — Heroine of France.
 Canonized as saint. — Exchange.  B. 8. N. S.  ALKISIAHS PLAN ROOM 
FOR AN INFIRMARY  The Alkisiah Club is the first to plan  for the
furnishing of a room in the infirmary.  They are planning a restful, 
attractive room in which some of Miss  Baker's furniture is to be used; and
 the girls are making a beautiful quilt  which is decorated with the emblem
of  the club and the name of each member.  FOR EIGHT YEARS  CAVE  Has stood
for Pure, Clean, Wholesome  CANDY AND ICE CREAM  Our Portable  Students'
Lamps  Will Make  Evening Work  a Pleasure  PUGET SOUND  POWER   LIGHT 
COMPANY  PHONE 200  "1921"  CLASS PINS  MULLER    ASPLUND  JEWELERS  Next
to First National Bank  THE PALLAS  The Home of Better  Candies, Pastries  
 Ice Cream  WATCH  R E P A I R I N G  CHAS. F. RUNNER  A t Mathes Book
Store  110 WEST HOLLS STREET  BROWN'S STUDIO, Sunset Building  YOES YARNS
First National Bank  U. S, Depository  Member Federal  Reserve  Total
Resources  Over Three  Millions  The " Three Cousins " entertained the 
Yoes girls with a spread early Sunday  evening. Later in the evening Mr.
and  Mrs. Yoes surprised the girls with ice  cream and cake.  The Yoes
girls turned out ensemble  %o see " Way Down East" Tuesday  night.  Bernice
Broadbent and Margaretha  Appel represented the Yoes house on  the Marathon
Saturday morning.  Helen Wood has been very ill for the  past week and will
not be at school for  some time.  B.S.N.S.  HIKERS' CLUB CLIMBS  MT.
CONSTITUTION  PHONE 648 RES. PHONE 1543  1310 COMMERCIAL STREET  Freeman
Transfer  General Hauling  Pianos and Furniture Moved,  Packed and Stored 
Special Rates on Normal Baggage  Fireproof Storage •—We Feature
 Long Distance Hauling  F? B. FREEMAN, PRO?.  The Hikers' Club of
Bellingham, of  which organization a number of the  faculty and students of
the Normal belong,  climbed Mt. Constitution of Or-cas  Island last Sunday.
A special boat  carried the hikers from Bellingham fat  8 o'clock in the
morning, and brought  the weary travelers back in the evening.  Misses
Morse, Cales, Moffat and  Bornstein climbed the mountain, Miss  BROWN'S
STUDIO, Sunset Building  Mead and Miss Cummings spent the day  on the
island.  B. S. N. S.  " Correctness and precision in the use  of the mother
tongue is one of the first  marks of an educated man." — NICHOLAS 
MURRAY BUTLER.  HIGHLAND CREAMERY  CONFECTIONERY, ETC.  H. A. LYLB, Prop. 
629 High St.

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Weekly Messenger - 1921 April 29 - Page
8

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THE WEEKLY MESSENGER, FRIDAY, MAY 29, 1921  fjcil
•• in -r - - • " •" " " m — _ T  3Me
Sloughing (Ei  I *  I *  !:**  s *  I1**  I *  I * 
^.|iiji^.f.ji.|..f.li.ji.f.f.|i.f.ji.f.|i^.|.i|..^  In English class Mr.
Squires had just  given his oral composition but he had  failed to mention
his point of view. So  Miss Sperry asked:  " We wonder where he was, do we 
not, Miss Lewis ? "  Miss Lewis: " No, I didn't care where  he was." 
BROWN'S STUDIO, Sunset Building  Tom: " When I was in the army I  was
considered a hero."  Bill: "What did you do in the  army? "  Tom: " I did
picket duty."  Bill: "What is picket duty?"  Tom: "The soldiers caught the 
chicken and they got me to pick it;  that's what I call picket duty.  "Look
yere, Pete," said a knowing  darkey, " don't stand dar on de railroad!" 
"Why, Joe?"  " Kase, if the cars see dat mouf of  yours, dey tink it am de
depot and run  right in."  fice boy. The next morning there were  some 50
boys in line. He was about to  begin examining the applicants when his 
stenographer handed him a card .on  which was scribbled: "Don't do anything
 until you see me. I'm the last kid  on the line, but I'm telling you I'm 
there with the goods."  Mr. Fox: "Write this down while I  dictate in
shorthand:  "'Oh, tell me why is Bowling Green?  And why did the Irish
Stew?  Where, oh where, has my Lima Bean?  And what did the Evening Dew?'" 
UNSOCIABLE HENRY  " I think you were absolutely wrong,  Henry, about that
furniture! "  " Yes, dear! "  "And about the wall paper."  " Yes, dear."  "
Now, look here, Henry, if you're  not going to be sociable I'm going to 
bed!"  Notice in English grocery:  " Provided you get one bad egg from  us
we will on your returning it give  you two for it."  THE STRIKE FEVER 
Schoolmaster (as school reopens):  " Here, my young friend, why aren't  you
returning to school ?"  Laborer's son (doggedly): " I want  $3.00 a day and
a four-hour school."  SHE DIDN'T  " I find the professor's statistics
stupid."  " I don't. He told me there were  sixteen hundred million people
in the  world and that I was the prettiest girl  in the lot."  ABOUT 5,000
FEET UP  Nervous passenger (in aerial taxi):  " W-what are you 1-laughing
at, driver ? "  Driver: "I'm just laughing at the  superintendent. About
this time he'll be  searching for me all over the lunatic  asylum.  "
Mither Joneth, you can't thwim very  well, can you ? "  "Why — what
makes you think that? "  " My big thithter said you were a  poor fish." 
North: " How do you manage to order  from that menu? Can you read  French?
"  West: "No, but I can read prices."  A business man advertised for an of-
 MR. BOND'S PsAi.nt OF HATE  My car is a Ford: I shall not want  another. 
It maketh me lie down in wet places; it  soileth my clothes.  It guideth me
in paths of ridicule for  its name's sake.  Yea, though it runneth through
the valley,  it is towed up the hills.  I can not have happiness while it
is  with me;  Its rods and its engines discomfort me;  Its tank runneth
over;  It prepareth a breakdown before me in  the presence of mine enemies;
 It annointed my head with oil.  Sure to goodness and mercy if this  thing
followeth me,  I will dwell in the house of the insane  forever.  ICE CREAM
SODAS  MALTED MILKS AND  MILK SHAKES  NORMAL  GROCERY  P. G. GULBRANSEN,
Prop.  Phone 104-1  OWEN MARKET  GROCERY  PUBLIC MARKET  Pag Cash and Save
Moneg  PACIFIC STEAM  LAUNDRY  He profits most who serves  best Phones
126-127  ductor, " but if you damage any of the  ironwork of the bridges
you'll have to  pay for it."  Pearl Ingalls sang and sang: " I will  hang
my harp on a willow tree-e-e; I  will hang my harp on a willow tree-e-e," 
each time breaking on the high note.  Finally, the patient father from the 
next room ventured: "Better hang it  on a lower limb, Peai'l."  Miss
Funkhouser: " What do you expect  to be when you come of age,  Wynne? " 
Noel Wynne: " Twenty-one."  Florence Porter: " Hear them cylinders 
knocking? "  Dick Newton: " It's not the cylinders;  it's my knees."  Mr.
Hunt: "And now, class, I just  want to tax your memory."  " Good heavens!"
exclaimed one of  the class, " has it come to that ? "  " Better keep your
head inside the  window!" warned the brakeman.  " I kin look out the window
if I want  to! " Burmaster responded with a wink  at his companion.  " Sure
you can," answered the con-  Mother, talking to her fond son:  " Now be
good, dearest, and when you  die you will go to heaven and wear a  gold
crown."  Willie: " I don't want a gold crown!  The dentist put one of those
on my  tooth once."  Young lady in English I class: "Whoever  brings me the
cup I shall make  my son-in-law."  Miss Sperry: "Why?"  " Who is the most
popular host at  Edens Hall?"  " Bennie McDonald, of course. The  girls
even quarrel over who shall sit at  his right hand and the waitresses take 
turns sitting at his left."  Mrs. Mayhew: "Mr. Story, why were  you late
this morning? "  Mr. Story: "Well, breakfast; it took  so long for
breakfast."  Heard at the fashion show Wednesday  morning: "Model No. 4 is
a  Hoover apron and is especially good  for cooking because it can be
boiled."  Heard in passing 610 Cedar Street:  Irene Monson reciting "
Bob-o-Link."  Beryl White, " Oh my other side! "  Hazel Sellers, " Make
things snappy."  Mary Collins: " I've a kink in my  heart."  Miss Zurbrick:
"Mr. Bohonon and I  were talking about getting married the  other day in
the library."  THE BROWN  STUDIO  Has again been chosen the official 
photographers for the coming  Klipsun. This will be our sixth  year to do
the work, and we appreciate  the compliment.  Have you had your Senior
pictures  taken yet? Or your application  photos? Now is the time  to have
them taken.  BROWN STUDIO  Get Your  Candies  and  Ice Cream  at  119 E.
Holly  BROWN'S STUDIO, Sunset Building  The Northwestern  National Bank 
Bellingham, Wash.  WE SOLICIT THE  NORMAL ACCOUNTS  CLYDE BANKS  Does Our
Kodak Finishing  STUDENTS' CO-OP  Our Watchword  We Make Everything Run 
that Has Wheels  Complete Line of Watches  and Fine Jewelry  GEO. E. LUDWIG
 Watch Expert1  1250 ELK S T .— EXCHANGE BLDG,  New Location Exchange
Bldg.PPPPP