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1922_0317

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Weekly Messenger - 1922 March 17 - Page
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The Weekly  Devoted to the Interests of the
Student Body, Washington State Normal School  VOL. XXT BELLINGHAM,
WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, MARCH 17,1922 NO. 22.  AT  E  Be A Booster. BUY!  COACH
CARVER BUYS  ALL NEW UNIFORMS  After winning the non-conference 
championship of the northwest in football  and nothing in general in
basketball,  our attentions are turned to baseball.  There is a great deal
of material in  school. Two of the boys, Parkers and  Rankin, are signed
up-in the Northwest  baseball league. These are but two of  the pitchers.
About eight are going to  turn out. The State Normal team will  be one of
the best equipped teams in the  Northwest. During the trip of the
basketball  team to Tacoma and Lacy, Coach  Carver stopped at Seattle and
ordered  new uniforms and other baseball material.  The suits, which were
ordered are  of the same style and material as those  worn by the Seattle
club in fhe Pacific  Coast League. The suits which were  iised last year
will be issued to the second  team.  Turnouts are being held in the large 
gym, but as soon as the weather permits,  the team will turn out at the old
 Elks' park. Due to the fart that the  Norcnal grounds are in no condition
for  baseball, the team is compelled to use  the old park, but according to
reports,  the Normal field will be in fine shape by  summer.  B. S. N. S. 
Before you can say Nizhnii Kolymsk, the 1922 Klipsun zvill  be off the
press and in your hands, fust close your eyes and  sniff the fresh ink and
hear the crackling paper. There never  zvas a Klipsun that wasn't bright
and 'breezy. Agreed. Bnt  THIS Klipsun is going to cap the climax for
freshness and  originality. Remember, it's YOUR annual. It's yours as much 
as it is the editor's of the staff's. Every person in the school will  be
represented in the production.  The Klipsun will cost you just $2.50. It
zvill pay dividends  all your lifetime at 1000%. Order nozv. The first
copies go to  those who pay first. By paying nozv you assure the finances
of  this edition and shozv your appreciation of Mr. Hall, Mr. Cain  and the
staff. Buy nozv.. Hurry!  TULIP QUEEN AND  LEADING CANDIDATE TO  APPEAR IN
ASSEMBLY  E  The following are sales people for the  Klipsun:  Ray Tweit. 
Catherine S^ieppard.  Mable Miller.  Edna Aristett.  Gladys Bucholtz. 
Estell V. Cain.  Student's Co-op Store.  Order your copy now.  B. S. N. S. 
T  Tomorrow, members of the Alumni  and of the June graduating class are 
giving Dr. Nash a farewell banquet.  Saturday, March 18, at Edens Hall, at 
least 200 persons are expected. The fact  that the committee refuses to
divulge  any detail in regard to the program sets  anticipation on edge and
guarantees  pleasant surprises for those in attendance.  Arrangements are
being made to give  Dr. Nash the best banquet ever tendered  him.  There is
also to be a faculty farewell  banquet in. honor of Dr..Nash on Monday, 
March 20, at Edens Hall.  Seven hundred girls are attending the  Bellingham
State Normal School—Seven  hundred picked beauties of the Evergreen 
State. Now;, why can't the Tulip Queen  come from our school? She can and 
WILL. The only thing necessary is to  pick the candidate, and the school
will  do the rest. If Ave get some live, enterprising  clubs to back our
candidate,  it will help immensely, but that will be  forthcoming. The
matter before us is,  "Who shall be the Queen?" A Normal  girl, of course.
Then the question, "Who  is to be the Normal girl?" That is for  you to
decide. In the back of the Messenger  you Avill find a ballot. Write  the
name of your ideal queen in the  blank space and place in the Messenger 
box TODAY. The three leading candidates  . will appear on the platform on 
Monday and the Normals candidate will  be elected from these three at that
time.  Talk 'er up.  —B. S. N. S. -—  L  SEASON OPENS 21ST  All
girls intending to play baseball  this season please ..meet in the small 
gymnasium, Tuesday, March 21, at four  o'clock,sharp, to arrange for
practice  days arid .hours;.  MANAGER ELECTED  T  ROY TWEIT CHOSEN  FOR
THIRD QUARTER  At the regular meeting of the i3oard  of Control, Roy Tweit
was elyected Athletic  Manager for the third quarter 1922.  He was
recommended by Coach S. E.  Carver for the position. It has not been  the
policy of the school to have a student  manager, the coach usually being 
athletic manager. During the past two  quarters Mr. Carver found himself
flooded  with work and brought about the  election of a student manager.
The position  carries some responsibility with  it as the manager helps
with arranging  games and takes care of all miscellan-efcus  matters
connected with track and  baseball. The manager accompanies the  team on
all its trips.  Kolstadt Appointed. •  Arthur Kolstadt was appointed
to the  Student Board of Control taking the  place of Mr. Bond as factuly
advisor. Mr.  Bond is having his vacation this quarter.  Mr. Kolstadt baa
served several  times on the Board and can be counted  on in all
emergencies.  Debate Entertainment.  Esther Cook was appointed at the 
Board meeting to arrange for a program  on the night of the debate with the
 Cheney •.Normal on March 31.  DR. FRYE OF U. OF W  TALKJEDNESDAY 
THE KINDS OF SCD3NE  FOR GRADE TEACHERS"  Dr. Frye, professor of botany at
the  University of Washington, addressed the  student body Wednesday. He
gave a  very interesting talk on "The Kinds of  Science for Grade
Teachers," in which he  stated that the teachers could be of vast  help to
a community by taking interest  in outdoor plants and animals.  Conspicuous
plants and animals are  the kind children between the ages of  five and
fifteen notice. Recognition anil  comparison of plants and animals are  two
things which should be taught children.  Dr. Fry deplored the fact that
there  are no books on western plant and animal  life suitable for nature
study for  children. He plead for research work in  this field and said it
was the task of a  Normal student to write such a book.  Dr. Fry's
concluding statement was,  "It is not the great who are doing  things, but
those who -are doing things  are great."  B. S. N. S.  Spring comes and
with it also comes  many new students to our Normal. The  third quarter
opened March 13. Many  students had registered previous to this  date and
several hundred more enrolled  this week. As usual, the new students 
out-number the previous quarter's  graduates. They come from nearly 
everywhere.  Welcome new students! We wish you  the same success we have
all been enjoying  for the past few quarters. Old  students, meet your
latest fellow-workers  as we line them up. Here they are:  Marion Anderson,
Vader, Wash.  Alice Anthony, East Sound, Wash.  Mrs. Sigrid C. Barron,
Aberdeen, Wn.  Eleanor Barrow, Kake, Alaska.  " Iris L. Bartlett,
Marysville, Wn.  Helen Bergman, Bellingham.  Millie A. Bethke, Eldorado,
Wis. '  Madge Callahan, Burlington, Wn.  Mary A. Carter, Everett, Wn.  Inez
Coomer, Edmonton, Wn.  Eleanore Costello, Mt. Vernon, Wn.  (Continued on
Page Two)

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Weekly Messenger - 1922 March 17 - Page
2

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2 BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, MARCH 17,1922 
NORMAL  GROCERY  431 Normal Drive  PHONE 1041  We cater to Normal Students'
 trade.  Groceries, Vegetables, Fruit  and Confectionery  Agency Pacfic
Lanmlry  Post Office Station No. 8  GOOD THING TO EAT  HOT LUNCHES SERVED 
at the  BAKERY  NORMAL  627 High Street  HHHHHHHHHHHHH  J. C. F. COLLINS I 
OPTOMETRIST AND  OPTICIAN  1312A Dock St. Bellingham  Office Phone 83 
Residence 2835  .We Grind Our Own Lenses  HBHBHHISHHEHHI3  Application
Photos —  Good Ones. Your Choice  of Four Sittings. Jukes 
Photographer, Sun s e t  Block.  OWEN  MARKET GROCERY  NO. 3  Garden Street
 Near Oak  On mules we find  e Two legs behind,  And two we find before. 
We must stand behind  Before we find  What the two behind, be for.  B. S.
.N. S.  NEW STUDENTS HERE  FOR SPRING QUARTER  BOOST YOUR  ffvLIPSUN. 
SCHOOL. BUY A  (Continued From Page One)  Mrs. Elva Garner Curtis,
Duckabush.  H. A. Christensen, Anacortes, Wn.  Minnie Dorst, Clallam Bay,
Wn.  Martha Eide.  Arietta Eller.  Margarette Frank, Wenatchee, Wn.  Anna
Fries, Seattle, Wn.  Nellie V. Gibert, White Salmon, Wn.  Irene Gerow,
Chinook, Wn.  Helen M. Howell, Deatur, Wn.  Tsabelle Hallenberry,
Vancouver, Wn.  Carolyn Hillburn, Bellingham.  Selma Henrich, Chehalis. Wn.
 Maxine Heath, Okanogan, Wn.  Tillie C. Harvey, Centralia, Wn.  Stella
Hanke, Grandview, Wn.  Alice B. Hall, Olympia.  Marguerita Ines.  Hugo M.
Johnson, Lynden, Wn.  Olive E. .Tennis, East Stanwood, Wn  Gladys Roach
Lechner, Seattle.  Sarah Moawood, Kalama, Wn.  Margery McLeod, Bellingham. 
Mrs. Leta McDonough, Sattle.  Mary S. McCauley Newberg, Ore.  rs. Florence
MaeGregor Port Angeles  Bertha iNemitz, Snohomish.  Antoinnette Rochefort,
Bellingham.  Helen Radcliff.  Doris Patrick, Seattle.  Peggy Emily Pad don,
East Seattle.  Mrs. Laura Pettit, Point Robert, Wn.  Martha M. Peterson,
Vining, Minn.  Dorothy Pcarce, Seattle.  Pichard Allan Parker.  Adeline
LaRouche, Seattle.  B. B. Robinson. Republic. Wn.  Rosivell J. Oliver,
Bellingham.  Minnie Swnnson, Marysville, Wh-  Charlotte Irene Squier. 
Ethel MacStorrey. *  Mrs. Rose G. Steiman, Seattle.  Gladys Southard.
Ephrata, Wn.  Tvathorine C. Smith, Mt. Vernon.  Edison C. Smith, Toledo.
Wn.  Dona Smith. Bellingham.  Fred" Schaefer, Bellingham.  Esthr M. Thomas,
Bellingham.  Arthur Thai, Bellingham.  Ruth Wallbam, Bellingham.  Janet S.
Wallace, Seattle.  -. B. S. N. S.  REGISTRATION.  Half an inch, half an
inch, half an inch  onward  Squeezed the six hundred.  Dented and shoved
about  Gradually thinning out.  Each o'er the.snmp old route,  Crept the
six hundred.  Half an hour, half an hour half an hour  later  Still swayed
five hundred.  Out of the a,wful mash.  Robbed of their goodly cash.  Blame
them for looking rash,  Patient five hundred.  All day long, all clay long,
all day long  standing-  Yet groaned one hundred.  Cruel words descend on
these  "Come in tomorrow, please,"  Then each official flees. 
Fated—one hundred!  B. S. N. S.—-—:'  10% DISCOUNT  To
Normal Students on all  Ready to Wear Garments,  Dry Goods and Shoes 
MONTAGUE    McHUGH  feerijattg?  "Billy" Rue: "Lend me a dollar for a  week
old man?"  Mason H.: "Who is the weak old  man ?" " ' "  Just got back
after a week's vacation  spent delightfully' entertaining Mi-. Flu,  a most
exhilerating process to say the  least. 'We thank those exchanges most 
heartily for their courteous mention, of  our little paper, and only wish
that  more would sit up and take notice and  SAY something about us!  "The
Hi Hi," a very neat little paper  from Kirkland, Wash., has a new
interesting  column entitled "Our Seniors,"  which promises to run through
several  copies.  "The Kapunahou," from Honolulu, T.  H., have chosen
"Clarence" as their annual  Senior play. Say, don't we wish we  could see
your performance! "Swimming  is a Riot of Fun," says a headline  in this
paper. We think so too! We  read your paper with much enthusiasm.  Twelve
students are March graduates  from Cheney Normal. Cheney's school  carnival
was a complete success. Congratulations?  They haA'e a. very interesting 
editorial on "The Near East."  Really, North Central (Spokane,) we  envy
you your clever cartoonists' They  surely do liven up a paper! Bracht  will
prove himself, we believe, a worthy  successor of your far famed Mai'shall.
 Beginning with the new quarter all students  at North Central will be
expelled  who "flunk" in three subjects. Good!  Your paper is anxiously
looked forward  to!  Ballard High School has published a  "veracious" issue
of the "Talisman!" Tis  a corker, too! The audience witnessing  the Senior
plays were moved to laughter  and tears by the honest, clear-cut comedy 
that was well presented by the Seniors.  Three hundred Ballardites will 
leave to attend the new Roosevelt High  School this new semestr. when the
city  revises its school districts. They also  have an interesting
interview with  Gladys Walton, movie star in this issue.  Good work!  The
"Spot Light," from Denver, Col.,  improves and improves. It is indeed a 
very well written, interesting little  paper—so neat and trim that it
is a  pleasure to read it.  We thank and acknowledge the following 
exchanges: "The Powwow," Winona,  Minn.; "Apple Leaf," Wenatchee, Wash.; 
"The Tolo," Franklin High, Seattle;  "Echoes," Council Bluffs. Iowa;
"Porpoise,"  Daytona, Fla.; "Scarab," Cleveland,  Ohio, "Sky Flash,"
Skykomish;  "Mannelite" Kansas City, Mo.; "Opin-  Patronize Messenger
Adertisers.  Start Hatumal iattk  U. S. Depository  Member Federal  Reserve
 CAPITAL • AND SURPLUS  $500,000.00  R. H. LEAGH  UPSTAIRS JEWELER 
2nd Floor Mason Bldg.  MANUFACTURING, REPAIRING  DIAMONDS WATCHES  CLOCKS
JEWELRY  GEO.E. LUDWIG  WATCH EXPERT  We make everything run  That Has
Wheels  1250 Elk St. Exchange Bldg.  STATIONERY SPECIAL  24 Sheets 24
Envelopes  In White, Pink, Blue, Buff  23c BOX  E. T. MATHES  BOOK CO. 
ion," Ellensburg; "Hi Life," Puyallup;  "Ilsaso," Port Angeles;
"Hesperian," Ho-quiam.  -—B. S. 1ST. S.-  BOOST YOUR SCHOOL. BUY A 
iKLIPSUN.  B. S. N. S.  Why Ship Is She.  Here are some answers to the
question:  "Why do they call a ship she?"  If you ever tried to steer one
you  wouldn't ask.  Because it takes so. long to get them  ready to go
anywhere.  They need almost as much dolling up  and painting as an}' woman
you ever  saw.  A ship's gotta have its own way or it  won't go.  Ships
always come off the ways  backward like the members of a certain  sex
alighting from street cars.  It costs so much to keep one in operation. 
They are always calling at some place  or another.  Because shipbuilders
can't live without  them.  Who ever won an argument" from,  them?

    
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Weekly Messenger - 1922 March 17 - Page 3

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BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, MARCH 17,1922  Normal Nntos  Most of
tlie students report a splendid  spring vacation even though the weather 
wasn't very '"springy."  Miss Long spent all but one day of  her spring
vacation in Bellinghani. Lnsfc  Tuesday she went to Sedro-Woolley :-.nd 
spent the whole day at the public schools  teaching gymnastics. She
reports. a  splendid time.  During the last three weeks of her vacation, 
Miss Watrous visited friends at  Lumnii Island.  Mrs. Thatcher visited the
University  of Washington while visiting her brother  in (Seattle during
her vacation.  J)r. Miller will speak at the Whatcom  'High P. T. A.
meeting Thursday evening.  1-Jis subject will be "A New Chance  in Life." 
B. S. N. S. —  BOOK IS WRITTEN BY  FRIEND OF NORMAL  We have found
the work of another of  Dr. Nash's sons-in-law in the library. It  is a
boold entitled. "Picturesque New  Zealand," by Paul Gooding.  Von see, Paul
married a Normal student  several years ago.  Mr. Gooding made three trips
to New  Ze.nand and it is said that the book was  writtin while at the home
of a friend  in Sacramento, California. At present  he is the star reporter
on the Bellingham  Herald.  The book is richly illustrated with pictures 
of rivers, mountains, Jakes and  native tribes.  One interesting story- is
told of a native  leader, Kua, who led his people to  believe that he
possessed divine power.  Therefore, it was his privilege to have  four
wives, while the others were allowed  but one apiece.  As an instance of
his influence, Kua  announced that on a certain day he  would waik on the
river at Whakatane.  A great crowd collected to see him.  Standing on the
bank Una asked:  "Uo \ou beiieve .1 can walk on the  water V"  "Yes,"
shouted a number of natives.  "Weil," said .Una, "so long as you believe  1
can do it. that is all that is  necessary," and he walked awav.  B. S. N.
S.  Miss Mead says disease strikes our  weakest spots, and most of us have
colds  in our heads.  B. S. N. S.  Senior: "Can't you express your  thotsV"
 Junior: "No."  Senior: "Send it by parcel post."  B. S. N. S.  'Tlapped in
slumber," quoth the burglar,  as lie hit the sleeping damsel with a  candle
stick.  B. S. N S. --  "When do leaves commence to turn?"  Ans.: "The night
before exams."  The wearing of glasses  is not an indication of  age, but a
sign of wisdom  in conserving vision.  Consult WoU, the  Optometrist. 205
W.  Holly St.  Miss Lindquist, our music teacher,  prepared a musical
program last Tuesday.  The 7th grade sang first, then the  eighth grade.
The Junior orchestra took  part as also did a quartet of girls. We  all
sang "'The Star Spangled Banner."  The 8th A class took charge of assembly 
and gave interesting talks on  Hygiene. Ethel Meador and Helen  Hunt gave
poems which they had written.  As last week was A-acation, none of  the
clubs met The »irls of the Handicraft  club decided to have a picnic.
The  time was set for Alonday but it rained  and we were disappointed in
hot being  able to go.  Everyone in the Junior high school  had a very
pleasant vacation and was  glad to return to school Monday.  Normal
Training School,  Bellinnham. Wash..  March 14th, 1!)22.  Mr. Frank 1.
Sel'rit,  Bellinghani Publishing Co.  Bellinghani, Wash.  Dear Sir:  We
wish to thank you for the courtesies  you extentied to us- while we were 
visiting your newspaper p'ant.  I. was interested in the Engraving
department,  while other members of the  class were interested in other
departments.  Thanking you again, we remain,  Hcsp:'.ctfullv vours,  Sth A
English Class.  PARADISE.  A cosy little Paradise  Away up in a tree.  Oh!
don't you think it would be nice,  My dear, for you and me?  i; will gather
all the feathers.  You can get the moss and string.  We will work in any
weather,  Then we'll sit and sing.  We will have four tiny eggs.  I. will
let no robber nigh!  Soon in the nest they'll try their logs,  Then we'JJ
teach them how to fly.  Oh, in such a cosy Paradise  Away up in a tree, 
Don't you think it would be nice  Mv dear, for you and me''  —M. H. 
B. S. N. S.  Mrs. Vaughan: "Mr. Turner, please  sit down in front."  Mr.
Turner: "I can't."  B. S. N. S.  Mr. C'oughlin: "Please discuss the Sea 
Horse."  Junior: "It's the present tense of saw  horse."  —B. S. N.
S.  Why are a lot of -music students like  prisoners.  Ans.: Because they
are always behind  several bars, and can't reach the key.  :_B. s. N. S. 
Irma Bond: "Have you forgotten what  vou owe me*:"  Catherine Whitcomb:
"No, but I'm  trving mv best to."  • , B. S. N. S.:  "Hello, old top,
new Ford?"  "No. old Ford, new top."  THE IRISH PRINT,NG CO.  QUALITY
PRINTERS"  NEW DRESSES  KREPE KNIT, TAFFETA  JERSEY, ETC $15.00 
Exclusively "Women's, Misses', Children's and Infants'  Ready-to-Wear
Apparel and Accessories  The Quality of our Work does not permit a Discount
 EVERYONE TREATED ALIKE  SHOE REPAIRING  AND SHINE PARLOR  LONGWOOD'S  1325
Dock Street Bellingham  KEMPHAUS CO.  Bellingham's Lowest Priced Cloak and
Suit Store  In All Styles and Qualities  ORCHID UNDERWEAR  SHOWN HERE  A
GOOD NEGATIVE willMata  A GOOD ENLARGEMENT  HAVE YOU GOT ONE?  LOOK 'EM
OVER  BELLINGHAM NAT'L BANK BLBG.  Dock   Holly  BELLINGHAM  Downstairs 
WASH.  PHOTOSHO'P* Finishers for the Co-Op.  TAKE HOME A BRICK OF  ROYAL 
ICE CREAM  "Not Just as Good, But Better  Royal Dairy  Products  Co.  1815
ELLIS ST. PHONES 46 and 48

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Weekly Messenger - 1922
March 17 - Page 4

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BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY,
MARCH 17,1922  The WEEKLY MESSENGER  Published by Students' Association of
State Normal School, Bellingham.  Entered in the Postoffice at Bellingham,
Washington, as second-class matter.  THE IRISH PRINTING COMPANY, PRINTERS 
Subscription rates by mail, $2.00 per year in advance. Single copies, S
cents.  Advertising rates on application.  Address all communications,
other than news items, to The Manager of the Weekly  Messenger, Bellingham,
Washington.  STAFF OFFICERS  EDITOR-IN-CHIEF OLIVER R. INGERSOLL  ASSOCIATE
EDITOR ANNE BRANNICK  BUSINESS MANAGER WADE BRISTOL  MESSENGER STAFF 
School News Ellen Zurn Girls' Athletics, Jokes .... Helen Hightower 
Faculty Emma Simonson  Training School Eva Cummings  Board of Control
Carroll Haeske  Men's Athletics Warren Blaney, Jr.  Club Notes Gertrude
Stout  Assembly £r a , ce Huseth  Evelyn Myers  Feature Articles
Myrtle Martinson  BEYOND THE ALPS  Napoleon Bonaparte, five feet two and a
half inches with his  shoes on, stood before his vast columns of men at the
foot of the Alps  in the southern part of Switzerland. The men were tired
and weary,  many of them but half clothed, all of them ragged and most of
them  half starved. Napoleon, standing before thesle disheartened men 
spoke, and his speech—-'one of the shortest ever made in the history 
of mankind—has come down to us through the years: ''Beyond the  Alps
lies Italy."  It is needless to state how his half naked, half starved and
poorly  equipped troops ascended St. Bernard's Pass and despite the snow 
and ice—despite all obstacles that stood in their way—crossed
the  Alps into Italy. What a struggle it must have been! But what a 
struggle awaited them! What student of history will ever forget the  battle
of Marengo. Who will ever forget how Napoleon's men,  with practically no
equipment except the determination and will to  do, won the day.  Beyond
the mountain of struggle lies the valley of success.'  Surely the person
who really struggles to get an education, who is  able to overcome the
obstacles that stand in his way, will be able to  achieve success in life's
battles that follow.  Students! What matter if we must work five or six
hours each  day after school ? What matter if our spare moments are few ?
What  matter if we must burn the midnight oil ?... What matter if we must 
forego certain luxuries? What matter if our clothes are old and  worn? What
matter if our burdens seem almost too heavy to bear?  "Beyond the Alps lies
Italy."  —B. S. N. S.—  OUR CANDIDATE FOR TULIP QUEEN.  We are
about to select a Normal candidate for Tulip Queen.  Now is the tme to put
all personal favoritism and dislike aside and  choose a candidate that
represents the Normal in the most beautiful  sense of the word. It is not a
question of "Whom I like best," but a  question of "Who is the most
beautiful ?" Not only that, but "Has  she personality, is she popular,
would people looking at her for the  first time say, 'She is an ideal
Queen' ". As we can not hope to elect  our candidate by Normal support
only, we must have a girl who is  willing to work towards the goal of the
sovereignty of the City of  Bellingham for three days. She must have
ambition enough to appear  before vari'ous clubs and organizations of the
city to enlist their  support, she must overlook extreme modesty and
bashfulness and  work for her position as Queen of the Tulip. It is very
probable that  a local girl at W. S. N. S. would have a better chance, but
that matter  is left to the student body.  —B.S.N. S.— 
Attention is called to the section of the Messenger given over to  Edens
Hall activities this week. This is to be a regular feature of the  paper
and we feel assured that it will be welcomed by all Normal students.  It
will directly, and perhaps vitally, interest at least 114 students,  and
undoubted^ will hold the attention of several hundred  more.  B. S. N. S. 
Have you signed up for )'om* Klipsun yet i  SENIORS  Do you realize that
the KLIPSUN is YOUR Publication?  Have you, a Senior, contributed anything
toward it's success  beside your picture? Do you want it to be a one-man
publication?  Write a Poem, a Joke, an Essay—anything. Drop  it into
the Klipsun Box, and it will be given a fair and square  consideration, DO
IT NOW.  MASON HALL,  Editor.  OTHER GOOSE RHYMES.  Van," "Van," a Normal
Man,  Hooked a ball and away he ran.  He tossed it in, n' with a grin, 
Cried out, "I told you we would win!'  • * «• #  Three
wise guys from Normal  Went to "See" .in a Ford.  If that Ford had been
stronger  My song would be longer.  *- * *  Here am I  Big Dwight Cone 
When nobody's with me  I guess I'm alone.  " * * *  Little girl, little
girl,  Where have you been ?  Down to the office to visit the Dean  Little
girl, little girl  What did she there ?  Had me pull all the rats out of my
hair:  * * •» .  Jog on, jog on, the same old way,  And keep
thyself in style, boys.  A merry heart, with lots of coin,  And one girl
every mile, boys.  There is a little girl  Who wears a little curl  Right
down the middle of her forehead.  When the sun shines  That curl neatly
twines,  But when the air's damp it acts  horrid.  THE PALLAS  The Home of
Better  Candies, Pastries, and  Ice Cream.  Hart-Schafftier   Marx Clothing
 For Men  GAGE-DODSON CO.

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Weekly Messenger - 1922
March 17 - Page 5

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BELLIN HAM, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY,
MARCH 17,1022 5  EDXNS HALL  EDENS HALL EDITORIAL STAFF  Editor .'. Marie
Tinker  First Floor Reporter. ...Brigitta Kankonen  Second Floor Reporter
Gertrude Sennes  Third Floor Reporter Florence Philippi  Jokes Alice
Jennings  Dining Room Reporter. Esther Pinckney  Girls Enjoy Vacation. 
Cecelia McGreevy spent a part of the  vacation with Betty Yost and Gaynell 
Moses, at their home in Edmonds.  Marie Tinker spent an enjoyable Saturday 
evening at Lynden.  Wie haven't yet found out what Lila  Schaefer didn't do
when she was home  at Puyallup.  Florence and Ruth Chahert renewed  their'
acquaintance with the cows and  chickens on their farm at Yclm.  Ceclia
Huntington and Edna Carnine  spent a profitable vacation at their  homes in
Hoquiam—we hope.  Lena Itucker and Leona Kapp had a  very restful
week at Edison. They are  both most anxious to work again.  We hope Seattle
profited by the presence  of Bernice Boes, Helen Dillabought,  Marian
Hastings, and Jean Eiindall.  Elonar Antrim reports the best time  over
from Winslaw, where she visited  1011a Wallace.  Emogene and Josephine
Powell spent  GARLICK'S  NEW SHOE SHOP  2031/2 West Holly  Ladies' Work our
Specialty  HOTEL  LEOPOLD  LUNCHEON 60c  Table d'hote Dinner at $1.00  Per
Person, from 5 to 8:15  P. M., Every Evening  _ Sam Rathman's Music  Your
social obligations may  ' be taken care of by a  Dinner at Leopold  Special
attention to parties,  large or small, on  short notice  a most enjoyable
week with their parents  in Chehalis.  Miss Martha Anderson, a popular
Ta-coma  belle, reports a "perfectly lovely  time."  Ella Norling always
has a good time.  She was in Tacoma last week.  Jessie Macomber was glad to
see her  sister, Corine, who has been very ill at  her home in Tacoma. 
Clare Kersting, the promising young  Edenite nurse, rested with Miss Mead. 
She is now ready for work again.  Elsie Silver spent a very restful week 
up in the infirmary. She is now fast  recuperating in her own room.  Becky
Kankkonen suffered the loss  of two teeth while at home in Astoria, 
Oregon—auto accident, or what.  Vera White enjoyed a "rest" at her 
home in Blaine.  Edens Hall  Vacation Left-Overs.  With weeping eyes and
mournful  hearts, we witnessed the departure of  the greater part of the
Edenites. But  for twenty peppy left-overs to be  grouchy, just because we
weren't going  home, was absurd so we just packed up  our troubles and had
a good time.  There was the night that ghosts really  walked in our rooms
as a result of the  wierd stories told in the dimly lighted  beau parlor. 
Our serenade was a grand (?) success,  noted especially for its silence. 
One evening was pleasantly spent in  the dining room around the open fire. 
We hope the boys who were our guests  enjoyed the games, marshmallows and 
peanuts as much as we did.  Even Miss Meek saw fit to leave us  for two
whole days and a night, which  proves that we were no ordinary group.  We
were glad of course to have the  other girls come back, but not one of  the
twenty has yet admitted that she  Direction of Jensen   Von Herberg 
COMING—  WEDNESDAY  4% presents Penro with Freckle  ALU THE UATEST 
POPULAR MUSIC  HARTER   WELLS PIANO CO.  211 EAST HOLLY STREET 
Bellingham's Oldest Music House  ALLAHAN'  EXCLUSIVE SHOP  FOR WOMEN  1319
Dock Street 8  was lonesome or tired of vacation. These  are the
left-overs: Dorothy Zinser, Dorothy  Brown, Marie Allwrath, Hazel 
Birchard, Margaret Bennett, Evelyn  Taylor, Florence Philippi, Daphne
Hau-gen,  Esther Jenkins, Violet Huff, Bur-della  Lavelle, Elsie Silver,
Ethel Temple-ton,  Cecelia McGreevy, Marie Tinker,  and Grace Spiger.  Mr.
and Mrs. Kibbe entertained some  of the "left-overs" at dinner Sunday. 
Those enjoying their hospitality were:  Marie Alwardt, Dorothy Zinser,
Margaret  Bennett, Evelyn Taylor and Hazel  Birchard.  Edens Hall  Scraps
from the Dining Room.  Cain (at the Dorm): "Waitress, how  did that hair
get in the apple sauce."  Waitress: "I really don't know. If  there's a
hair in the butter, we blame it  on the cow, and if there's one in the 
chicken we blame it on the comb; but I  don't know how it got in the apple 
sauce, because I picked those apples  myself and they were all Baldwins'." 
We miss a number of familiar faces  from our midst and welcome a number  of
new ones at the various tables.  Dorothy Forsch certainly ought to be 
getting fat—five slices of butter at one  meal is going some.  It
started full and sweet on the air,  and flowed gently along for a few meas-
 PACIFIC LAUNDRY  Blankets Cleaned, Carded and Made  Like New. Our Curtain
Department  Equipped With American Curtain  Dryer.  PHONE 126 ESTABLISHED
1889  ures; then a mighty crash and a piercing  shriek, followed by a dead
silence over  the dining room. A sigh of relief fluttered  from every
breast—it was only  Peep's table singing "The Old Mill  Stream." 
Waitress: "Tea or coffee."  Dorothy: Coffee, without cream."  Waitress:
"You'll have to - take it  GETTING- 3UST A LITTLE  "0DRED"AT EDENS M L .

 
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Weekly Messenger - 1922 March 17 - Page 6

    
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BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, MARCH 17,1922  without
milk; we're out of cream.  There's an old saying that in the  spring
youngsters would rather fly or  make kites than eat. How about it, Abbey 
and Hansen?  Abby sure feels lonely at noon. Watch  out, Mildred.  Things
were rather upset the first few  meals after vacation, but thanks to Miss 
Meek and her assistants, we are all  eating in proper style again.  There
are two new men eating in the  dining room now. The strain is more  than
the rest of us can stand.  There are one hundred sixty-one hungry  people,
(including Margaret Morrison)  to be fed at the dorm every day.  Some job,
we'll.say.  Frances Hcrron evidently entertains  beliefs along the same
line as the auth- r  of "Hortense." At any rate/she started  "May Showers"
in full force Tuesday evening.  Edens Hall  Imaginary Trip Much Enjoyed. 
After packing their traveling bags  and enjoying an imaginary trip to
Portland  the left-overs in 201 with two of  their friends at the Y. W'. 0.
A. started  for Canada afoot Wednesday morning of  spring vacation. They
say they owe  a debt of gratitude to the town of Blaine  which received
them with open arms and  When Traveling to  SEATTLE  and Way Points use the
 Interurban. Clean, Convenient,  Comfortable. Leaves  Elk and Holly Streets
as  follows:  A. M. P. M.  6:30 2:00  8:00 4:00  10:00 6:00  12:00  (Noon) 
Fare One Way, $3.00  Pare Round Trip, $5.80  Stop overs Mount Vernon  and
Everett  The Modern Way  PACIFIC NORTHWEST  TRACTION CO.  Have your Hair
Shampoed  and Dressed before having  Your Photoaranh  Taken  THE ELITE 
HAIR STORE AND  BEAUTY PARLOR  P H O N E  311 W. Holly  2 1 6  Bellingham 
THE CAVE 1  PURE £l gt;f?j  - s ^ g f"  CANDIES^** - ' ^ ^
•*•/'*••-•  ICE CREAM J  made them forget
they had feet weighing  thirty pounds each, immediately  upon arriving. In
Vancouver, B. C, and  in Victoria, B. C, Canada's "Garden  City of the
Northwest," limy enjoyed the  Britishers with their afternoon teas,  their
walking sticks, and their accent  (don't you know!)  ''Conic up to 201 and
have something  good to drink" sounds really awful when  you consider tha.t
the girls have been  across the line, but the scandal falls  out of the
scandal when they pass you  a glass of water.  Edens Hall  LESSONS IN
ETIKETT  1. How to attend Assembly.  First, go 'home after your mail ajul 
come in four minutes after the bell has  rung. Disregard Mr. Grady's
outstretched  hand and march halfway clown  the aisle before you realize
that a special  number is being given. Hesitate,  look around, drop a book,
giggle, and  when everybody is looking at you, decide  to go on. Go into
your seat from the  wrong aisle, causing seven girls to rise,  whereas only
two would have had to rise  to admit you at the other end. Subside  into
your seat with a slam; open your  letter, and begin to read, rustling the 
sheets and making audible comments to  your chum. Pay no attention to the 
black looks cast at your from all directions.  During the announcements,
tell  her about the dance you attended last  night and the perfectly
wonderful man  you danced with. Take a nap during the  speech. When the
bell rings, go out with  the training school teachers, remarking,  "'Gee,
assembly sure is dry today." Next  morning when someone asks you why  you
missed club meeting, and tells you  that it was announced in assembly, tell
 her, "Good night. I never heard it, and  I was there all the
time."—E. C. P.  Edens Hall.  Miss Irene Fadness says and bears out 
the fact that she had a wonderful time  at her home in Parkland,
Washington.  The first part of the week was spent in  Seattle with
relatives and friends. While  in Parkland she played with the Parkland 
College basketball team and therein  received her dark orb from her
opponent  on the Athletim team. "It was  worth it, however," she states. 
Miss Margaret Morrison spent her  vacation in Olympia, where she was the 
guest of Alice Jennings and Dorothy  Christiansen, and in Centralia with
her  sister. While there she had the pleasure  of "subbing" one day in the
Edison  school.  Albertina Pearson hiked her way  about the hills
surrounding Lake- What-  Newton's  Incorporated  WOMEN'S APPAREL OP QUALITY
 The HOME STORE  1312-14 BAY STREET  A. LAWSON  BLOUSES, SILK AND LISLE
HOSE  ALL COLORS  Bloedel Donovan Lumber Mills  Retail Department, 1615 Elk
Street PHONE 433  Sash and Door Department, Corner Iowa and Ellis 1257  If
you are in need of anything in the line of Lumber,  Shingles, or Sash and
Dooi:s, call at the Retail Yard, 1615 Elk.  The prices "will be right and
the service prompt.  Patronize Messenger Advertisers  IF YOU WANT THE VERY
BEST IN THE  GROCERY LINE  We Can Certainly Fill the Bill  Our Prices are
Always Fair Considering  THE QUALITY OF OUR GOODS  YOUR CREDIT IS GOOD WITH
US  Phones 417 and 482 M. J. O'CONNOR  com during her vacation spent at
home.  Arleta Eller has just returned to Normal  after spending four weeks
at home  owing to an illness. Glad to see you  back. Arleta, and hope
you'll be well  from now on.  Mabel Jensen and Nettie Godlove divided 
their week between Seattle, Bremerton  and Tacoma. ''"Had a perfectly 
wonderful time, were very loath to return,"  they declared.  Tripping as
she goes on her light fantastic  toes, Miss Vareen Rankin spent  her
A'aeation in Seattle.  Among the new girls who have come  to our Hall this
quarter are: Miss Irene  Squire, of the U.; Kathryne Smith, of  Mt. Vernon;
Wilma Randall, of Tacoma,  and a former student at C. P. S., and  Doris
Patrick, of Seattle, a graduate of  Ballard High.  Miss Eva Hancock was
another of the  Seattle voyagers who spent their vacation  with friends and
relatives.  Miss Norma Rakes entertained Miss  Margaret Bowen at her home
on North  Park. The young- people . entertained  with dinners and a party
in honor of  their returned favorite. One day was  spent by the students at
Ballard High  School visiting friends and classes helpful  in their own
work of teaching  Miss Dorothy Cave spent her vacation  at her home in
Winslow. She also visited  with friends in Seattle.  Officers were elected
for the third  quarter at tlie regular business meeting,  Tuesday, March
15:  President—Esther Jenkins.  Vice President—Helen
Dillabough.  Secretary-Treasurer—Betty Yost.  Fire
Captain—Florence Chabert.

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Weekly Messenger -
1922 March 17 - Page 7

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BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON,
FBIDAY, MARCH 17,1922 7  MORSE  HARDWARE  COMPANY  Established 1884 
Distributors of  ATHLETIC AND  SPORTING GOODS  Pine Mechanics' Tools 
Samson Auto Tires  1025-1039 Elk St.  For Firstclass Workmanship  and
Material  SEE MORLAN  Shoemaker  1224 Elk St.  Our Products Are 
"Delicinusly Different"  W H E E L E R ' S  BAKERY  1307 DOCK STREET  We
Specialize in Home  Made Bread,  GREAT WESTERN  Wood and Coal Combination 
Heater, lias a big open front,  like a fireplace. Uses less  fuel. Built to
last.  JENKINS - BOYS  COMPANY  Normal Cafeteria  TRY US ONCE  And We Know
You Will  COME BACK  The Northwestern  National Bank  Bfillingham, Wash. 
WE SOLICIT THE  NORMAL ACCOUNTS  MAPLE  GROCERY  P H O N E 1 5 61  702
Maple Bellingham  Junior boy: "I want a. pound of beans"  Clerk: "We have
nothing but string  beans."  Junior Boy: "Oh! how muh are they a  string ?"
 B. S. N: S.  BOOST YOUR SCHOOL. BUY A  KLIPSUN. "  SMEMM  (Ltifi (iflfij 
THESPIAN CLUB.  Then out from the dark night  Came a most hideous sight. 
"Oh, John, where and why are all  those wonderful poems and dramatic 
sketches escaping from?"  "This is Tuesday, March 21, and the  Thespians
are holding their quarterly  tryout in Room 308. Since it is not a  secret
club, I will tell you partly of  their tryout. All those who wish to
affiliate  with the Thespian club go to rhe  meeting prepared with a
selection or  some definite number which they present-.  They are then
dismissed, and live  in anxiety until Wednesday, March 28th,  when the
names of those accepted appear  on the bulletin board. The people voted  in
are then initiated on Thursday, April  G.  Active members of the
club—Lest ye  Forget—the initial meeting of the club  will be
held Thursday, March 23rd. All  members- be present for there will be  many
questions of interest to settle. The  predominant one will be the election
of  officers for the ensuing quai-ter.  Rumor has it that Howard Nessen is 
very likely to be re-elected president.  Rumor also has it that there will
be  a little shake-up or "earthquake" this  quarter so that the club will
rank first,  last, and always.  ALKISIAH CLUB.  The members of the Alkisiah
club  held their first meeting Thursday, March  1G. Many matters were
brought up for  discussion, including plans for the new  quarter. They
elected the following officers  and have already begun the new  quarter
work with as much enthusiasm  as of old.  President—Johanna Miller. 
Vice President—Esther Skrondal  Secretary—Jean Acorn. 
Treasurer-—Julia Murray.  Chairman of Program—Mrs. Bunting.  1.
Floy Southern.  2. Reta Gard.  Hostess—Bern ice Bacs.  B. S. N. S 
BOOST YOUR SCHOOL. BUY A  IvLIPSUK  B. s. N. s.  Virgil P.: "I get a
haircut everv  week."'  Roscoe A.: "How long will it take you  to set them
all cut?"  sni:  HEAR LA MARECHALE  LATE GEN. BOOTH'S ELDEST DAUGHTER 
MARCH 19  TO  APRIL 9  FIRST  PRESBYTERIAN  CHURCH  MRS. CATHERINE
BOOTH-CLIBBORN  "The World's Greatest Womaji Preacher"  RACKETS  ATA 
SAVING  Students'  Co-op.  KUEHNOEL'S  HEMSTITCHING PARLOR  1312A Dock St.
Phone 83  Bellingham, Wash.  HIGHLAND CREAMERY  Confectionery, Etc.  H. A.
LYLE, Prop.  629 High St.  DR. W. R. WEDDELL, D. O.  OSTEOPATHIC  PHYSICIAN
 202-203 Long Bldg.  Bellingham, Wash.  Osteopathy Properly Understood  Is
An Excellent Road to Health  Phones Office No. 1011  Res. No. 2043 
WATERMAN PENS  CONIKLIN PENS  SHAEFFER PENS  MOORE PENS  MULLER   ASPLUND 
Jewelers  Adjoining 1st Natl Bank  BAGGAGE MOVING  Phone 70 or 15  Quick
Service—Rates Reasonable  MODEL TRUCK    STORAGE CO.

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Weekly Messenger - 1922 March 17 - Page 8

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BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, MARCH 17,1922  A TRIP THROUGH  THE COAL
MINES  Tuesday evening a rather motley  throng gathered at the dorm for
supper.  Trousers were much in evidence,  both on boys and girls. Flannel
shirts,  sweaters, boots, in fact anything but  what might be expected.to
be worn at  supper, were to be seen. The persons  thus arrayed seemed to be
in a hurry  for supper to start and when it did,  seemed to be in more of a
hurry for it  to be finished. All records for fast  eating were broken and
the "hard boiled"  looking gang immediately made their  excuses and left. 
Persons not in on the secret by diligent  inquiry, received the information
 that the "gang" were going to go thru  the coal mine that evening.
Florence  Porter was at the head of the party as  a friend from her home
town had vol-untereed  to take some of her friends on  a tour of
inspection. The party included  Min Collins, - Willa Lowman, Blanche 
Davey, ElHen Reep, Esther Skrondal,  Beatrice Morrison Mildred Carman. 
Chauncey Davis, George Newell and Harold  Smith. ' ; • ' . '  After,
the short delays, which are  always incident to such an expedition,  the
.party started. Of course they  missed the Garden Street car so they 
walked to the Court House line, Avhere  they finally boarded a car. After
riding  as far as they could, they decided to  walk the rest of the way, a
distance of  about a mile.  They arrived at the mine about seven  o'clock,
where they met Mr. James Ross,  who had arranged the trip. Here the 
members of the party each received a  lamp. Another short delay ensued
until  the arrival of Supt. Cormine, who Avas to  conduct the party thru
the mine.  When he arrived the party boarded a  string of empty coal cars
downward  bound. The comments made during the  downward trip were varied,
some wanted  to go slower, some faster and some  didn't care how fast they
went just so  they got there. The ride ended at the  second level, .which
was about one thousand  feet down the slope. Here all the  members of the
party registered and  then the tour of inspection began.  First, 'they went
down the slope a  short distance and then turned off into  a drift on the
right. They "followed this  to the end. The members seemed to be  greatly
surprised to see that there was  coal on every side. After retracing their 
steps a short ways they turned off into  another drift and there saw some
of the  miners at .work. Some" of their fondest  illusions were shattered.
It is true $hat  they encountered several patint mules,  hauling their
loads, but, the miners  themselves were the chief source of
disillusionment.  Insetad. of drilling by  hand and swinging picks, as the
visitors  had expected, thty were using the very  latest compressed air
drill's. After several  of the "girls had tried their hand at  the. "Jack"
they left "Mabel's Room," as  their guide informed them it was called,  and
went on down the slope five hundred  feet to the next level. Here much  the
same things were seen as before,  and aftr inspecting the drifts on this 
level they went on down to the fourth  level. Here they saw the "Iron
Swede"  at work. This was a compressed air  shovel, which was used to load
the coal  into the cars.  From this they went to the "Potato  Patch," the
lowest point in the- mine.  This was three thousand feet down the  slope or
about six hundred feet vertical.  After viewing this they started on their 
climb to the second level where they  were to again take the cars and ride
to  the surface at nine o'clock. Enroute  they were treated to a thrill, as
their  guide stopped them in the mouth of a  drift in which some blasting
was going  on. He also showed them the new  quarters then under
construction for the  mules. Several members of the party  expressed a
desire to stay there, as they  were beginning to feel the effects of so 
much walking.  At last, however, they arrived at the  second level again
where their cars were  waiting for them. The ride to the surface  provd to
be much more thrilling  than the one going down as the speed  was much
greater. When they arrived  again in fresh air, all breathed a sigh of 
relief and then hastened to the lamp-house  to dispose of their lamps. 
Here it was discovered that every  member of the party was taking a  sample
of the coal home with them.  However most of it was in the form of  black
hands and faces, so the superintendent  did not object. After thanking  Mr.
Cormine and Mr. Ross for taking  them on such an interesting as well as 
instructive trip they started for home.  Miss Beatrice Morrison invited the
 "would-be coal diggers" to • a "feed,"  which was very much
appreciated. The  party then separated, tired and happy,  and each
expressing the thought in his  own words that it was "some" trip. 
SENionfiir  At 11 o'clock on Wednesday the officers  of the Senior class
for the third  quarter were elected. Harold Smith,  graduate of Anacortes
high school and  former student at the University of  Washington,, was
elected to. the office of  president. Mabel Miller, of Bellingham,  was
chosen for the position of vice president.  Mrs. Edna Anstett, of
Bellingham,  was re-elected treasurer. Jessie  Macomber, of Tacoma, is the
secretary  for this quarter.  The matter of the dedication of the  Klipsun
was discussed but nothing definite  was decided on. Miss Druse made  an
appeal for posters for the Senior  play, cuts for the Klipsun and posters 
for" other senior activities.  B. S. N. S.  Mr. Weir: "When you examined
that  clog lung under the microscope, what did  you see?"  Bright Student:
"The seat of Ms  pants, I suppose."  -B. S. N. S.  Roses are red.  Violets
are blue.  "N' so is a fellow  When test time's due.  American as^aaaaacaHa
 4 DAYS STARTING  FIRST DAY OF THE WEEK  CECIL B. DE MILLE  PRODUCTION 
"FOOL'S PARADISE"  With  Dorothy Dalton  Conrad Nagel  Mildred Harris 
Theodore Kosloff  John Davidson  Julia Fave  A Paramount Picture  A picture
that sweeps from  Texas to Siam, and gathers  into a hundred lavish scenes 
the love and beauty of the  world.  PRICES  OPENING DAY MON. TUES. and WED.
 MATINEE EVENING  ADULTS -:. 50c ADULTS .... 30c 50c  CHILDREN 10c CHILDREN
10c ....• 10c  ^reEPl^ra«BEEBMgEBHBBEHHl  A PLEASANT SURPRISE 
FOUND IN LIBRARY  In rummaging in the library last  Tuesday it was
discovered that the library  had recently re-enforced its history 
complement. The librarian believes  the only way of really studying history
 is by the "direct method." This cannot  be overemphasized and should be
coupled  with source material. New additions by  famous statesmen include:
Diplomatic  history and sources, biographys, memoirs  and political
writings. There is only  one way of knowing what a person accomplished, 
that is by letting him tell it  himself. Among these writers were  found
the names of: John Adams, Samuel  Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander 
Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, James  Madison, John C. Calhoun, Daniel
Webster,  Charles Sumner and last but by no  means least, George
Washington. These  sets range in size from ten to twenty-five  volumes, and
should be of especial  interest to anyone contemplating a public  life. 
-B. S. N. S.  BOOST YOUR SCHOOL. . BUY A  •KLIPSUN.  AH! FOND
FAREWELL.  "Alas!" once more, a quarter ends  And loud cries Mrs. Vaughan. 
"What shall I do! What shall I do!  • When .this fine staff hath
gone?"  "I've never known an Editor,  As qualified as Anne;  For Mr. King
my praise doth ring  Fetch me a better man."  "Brave Miss Dehaven's scoured
the halls,  And duly interviewed  Celebrities. I'll tell you now,  It takes
a maiden shrewd."  "The way the faculty's been picked,  •And
tempered, most to killing,  To fill the "Normal Notes" (and space)  Does
credit to "Peg" Shilling."  "And there are other splendid folk  Who
manufacture news,  That they might shed before your eyes  The light on
certain views."  'Tis now a fond farewell I bid,  Come ye! who have the
gall.  And spend the next ten weeks or more  On staff, with Ingersoll." 
H2.  Place in Messenger Box  Bellingham Normal's Candidate For  TULIP QUEEN
 HAND IN TODAYPPPPP