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1922_0623

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Weekly Messenger - 1922 June 23 - Page 1

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The Weekly Messenger  Devoted to the Interests of the
Student Body, Washington State Normal School  VOL. XXI BELLINGHAM,
WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, JUNE 23, 1922 NO. 36  WASHINGTON FOREST
TRAIL—c'yde Banks-  L  tf !»  Normau students are to have the
privilege  of hearing John Drinkwater's "Abraham  Lincoln" the most widely
"known  and discussed play of the English-speaking  world, at the Grand
Theatre, Wed-  (Continued on Page Two)  DR. CAROLINE HEDGE  TO SPEAK HERE
SOON  Dr. Caroline Hedge, Child Nutrition  specialist, from the Elizabeth
McCormick  Memorial Fund, of Chicago, will spend  Wednesday, June 28, at
the Normal. She  will speak in Assembly at 10 a. m., and  (Continued on
Page Two)  NORMAL EIGHTY HAS  VERY GREAT FUTURE  About 100 students and
instructors o{  Bellingham Normal joined in the hike to  the Normal eighty,
lying along the shore  of beautiful Lake Whatcom.  Group lunches were
enjoyed and coffee  E TO  LAKE PADDEN; HAVE  WONDERFUL TIME  GETTING IN
CONDITION  FOR WET. BAKER HIKE  (Continued on Page Eight)  Acting as
inspection officers, Mr. Kol-stad  and Mi:. Wasltke lust Tuesday at 5 
o'clock, (.'entered a somewhat critical eye  on about 110 enthusiastic
students eager  for tlie trip; to ascertain whether or  not there were any
high heels or other  objeetional paraphernalia in the group,  before
launching forth for the trip to  Lake Padden.  • Bright-eyed and
joyous, the hikers  stepped briskly along, with the two officers  in the
lead. Along the way a stop  was made to ([ucench the thirst of all  from a
nearby hose. As we tramped on  from South Bellingliani-, the hot, dusty 
road was very soon forgotten, and in  its stead there merged into view a
little  winding pathway, cool and verdant,  while all about lay a fairy
woodland of  ferns and flowers.  The party arrived at the lake just a 
little after six, when the roll was taken.  Then from the temptingly laden
baskets  many ''goodies" were brought forth. The  :50-minute period left
was spent in exploring  the numerous nooks and glens  until' the start for
home in the waning  twilight was begun. Everyone reported  as having the
"bestest time ever."  These hikes are to be given every  Tuesday after
school, from 5 to 8,  leaving the study hour (men for all, so  all those
who wish may fit themselves  for the biggest time of all; namely, the  M.t.
Baker trip at the summer's close.  B. S. N. S. s  ENTERTAINS AT DINNER  IN
HONOR OF GUY S. ALLISON  Miss Woodard, Dean of Women, entertained  as
dinner guest at Edcns Hall,  Monday evening, June 10, Mr. Guy S.  Allison
of Los Angeles, who is here to  lecture on finance.  Miss Mead and the
girls were invited  to meet him in the drawing room after  dinner. A
pleasant feature of the evening  was the reading by Mr. Allison of  several
poems from his volume "Poems  of the Pacific." A number of humorous  ones
and others describing the Puget  Sound country were immensely enjoyed.

   
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Weekly Messenger - 1922 June 23 - Page 2

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BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, JUNE 23, 1922  ICE CREAM SODAS  MILK
SHAKES  MALTED MILK  Phone 1041  431 Normal Drive  NORMAL  GROCERY  HAIR
NETS  THE BEST MADE  FOR 25 C  Will positively outwear  any other hair net
made.  Give them a trial  Students'  Co-op.  HHHHHHHHHHHHH  j J. C. F.
COLLINS  OPTOMETRIST AND  OPTICIAN  1312A Dock St. Bellingham  Office Phone
83  Residence 2835  "We Grind Our Own Lenses  HHHHHHHHHHSHH  LET US FINISH
YOUR  KODAK FILMS  — Best Work in Town —  E. T. MATHES  BOOK
CO.  110 W. Holly St.  "Tommy," said his mother reprovingly,  "what did I
say would happen to you  if I ever caught you stealing j am again ?"  Tommy
thoughtfully scratched his  sticky finger.  "Why, t h a t ' s funny, Ma,
that you  . should' forget it, too. Hanged if I can  remember I"  The
standing line was fast becoming  a lengthy one, and T was glad t h a t I
had  fallen in when I did. Rows upon rows of  tempting dishes seemed to
beckon me on,  while tin; sweet-flavored odor or perking  Java floated
tauntingly out through  the halls. • gt;  Salads, daintily dressed in
fresh,  crisp, lettuce leaves bowed proudly to the  a r r a y of stately
dishes of ice cream who  returned a.cool greeting. And then, suddenly,  1
spied a huge stack of popping  hot buns anxiously waiting to be chosen. 
Resting wearily, first upon one foot  and then upon the other I was rapidly
 losing my energy, when for a moment,  the line was broken, and Mr. Kolstad
 and 'Mr. Washke passed by, each with  a heavily laden tray, stepping along
with  exceeding briskness, as if afraid t h a t the  rosy layers of
strawberry shortcake  would venture to take leave.  When, at last, I had
passed from the  line, with my temptingly filled tray, a  number of
hungry-looking faces caught  my eye. The ever sparkling glances, so 
prevalent in the various cliques of laughing  girls about the halls, had
completely  vanished, while in their stead were  weary, darkening
countenances, because  of that awful pang t h a t so ofen besets  the small
boy who has one large blue  eye on a certain jam jar in mother's  pantry. 
However, feeling assured that such  feelings of emptiness would soon
disappear  when they, like myself, had withdrawn  from the line with a
delicious t r ay  full. I hurried on, hastily concluding  t h a t my
noon-day trips to the Normal  Cafeteria had only begun.  The Normal
Cafeteria is in charge of  the Home Economics department, with  Miss
Longlcy at its head. It is operated  for the good of the school, charging
just  enough for the wholesome food to cover  cost. Last year the
approximate expenses  for -Mine were from 700 to $800.  and in July they
exceeded even t h a t . The  number served daily is nearly 200 but  the
high watr mark was reached last  Friday when 214 passed through the line. 
From'the menus t h a t are printed daily  on the board in the basement hall
a  representative one, reads as follows:  Cream of Pot (iravy .10  Boiled
Beef and Gravy .10  Potatoes .' '. .05  Macaroni and Cheese -05  Tuna Fish
Salad -10'  Fruit Salad -12  Lettuce Salad • lt; gt; lt;'  Ham Buns
-05  Parker House Rolls ;3e; 2 for .... .05  . Apple Pie -05  Vanilla Ice
Cream .04  Pie a la Mode... .09  Custard -05  Rocks 3c; 2 for : -05 
Cookies -01  Coffee| Tea or, Milk, Cocoa .05  Oranges, Apples -05  Bananas
-06  The dining room, however, is very  much too small to comfortably
accommodate  the number who daily patronize  the Cafeteria. Because of this
inconvenience  the students hasten, to vacate  their places to make room
for other hungry  ones in line.  Mrs. Ella Kussman is at present
responsible-  for the cooking; and with her  are ten students who assist
with the  preparation of ..the sandwiches, the salads,  tliei serving a n d
' t l i e dish washing.  DR. CAROLINE HEDGE  TO SPEAK HERE SOON  (Continued
From Pane One) •  at the Hygiene 2 class at !) and the Hygiene  1
classes at 2 and ?,. Several oth  er classes especially interested in her 
work may be dismissed to hear these  special talks. . Dr. I ledger,
lectured for  three weeks at the. Oregon Agricultural  College last summer,
and is to return for  another three weeks this summer. Miss  Milam, dean of
the school of Home Economics,  considers her one of their  strongest
speakers.  No one in the school can afford to  miss the •opportunity
of hearing a specialist  upon this subject. The teacher  should be able to
recognize an undernourished  child and to know how to help  make health
conditions such that her  work of instruction shall not be given  in vain. 
-B. s. N; S-STUDENTS  WILL HEAR  "ABRAHAM LINCOLN"  (Continued From
Pa»c One)  nesday, June 28. It was produced in  Birmingham and then
played in a tiny  t h e a t r e on the outskirts of London. Not  only
London, but all of England and  this country heard of it as a great play. 
I t is the first time Abraham Lincoln has  been brought so nobly to the
stage.  The demand by the Normal students  to see this play is so great t h
a t they will  not be able to accommodate all in the  balcony of the Grand
Theatre, reports  Mr. Hoppe.  B'. S. N. S.——-  The plate for
the stone which marks  the northwest corner of the bird, sanctuary,  has
arrived and been put in place.  The bird bath has also been put up. The 
circular granite bath contains water in  which birds may be seen taking a
bath  or a drink. The latter addition to our  campus were given the school
by the  Alkisiah club, while the former is the  contribution of friends
about town. They  are dedicated to Miss Ida Agnes Baker,  an instructor
here for twenty-one years,  and a friend of the birds.  B. ,y. N. S.  THE
PSALM OF B. S. N. S.  Tell me not in mournful numbers,  Learning is an
empty dream,  For the one is lost who slumbers,  And books arc n o t what
they seem.  Work is real, work is earnest,  And this day is not its goal, 
For the future, it returneth,  To the teacher on pay roll.  In our school's
broad field of learning,  Thus enhanced by students all,  Be not first to
pleasure turning,  Be the first to duty's call.  Lives of graduates remind
us,  We can make our names of fame,  And departing leave behind us, 
Records in the school we claim. .  Records that perhaps another,  Sailing
o'er school's tossing main,  Sore discouraged and despondent,  Seeing,
shall t a k e heart again.  Let us then forget our failures,  And our pass,
whativer they be  Think of nothing but the future,  And success we'll
surely see.  3\XB\ National lank  U. S. Depository  Member Federal  Reserve
 CAPITAL AND SURPLUS  $500,000.00  R. H. LEACH  UPSTALRS JEWELER  2nd Floor
Mason Bldg.  MANUFACTURING, REPAIRING  DIAMONDS WATCHES  CLOCKS JEWELRY 
Good Things to Eat  at the  NORMAL  BAKERY  627 High  Fresh Pastry, Cooked
Meats  Royal Ice Cream  Not Open on Sunday  IT PAYS TO  ADVERTISE  NORMAL
STUDENTS  PATRONIZE MESSENGER  ADVERTISERS  READ THE BIG ADS  READ THE
SMALL;  DON'T YOU STOP  'TILL YOU'VE READ 'EM ALL.

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Weekly Messenger - 1922 June 23 - Page 3

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BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, JUNE 23, 1922  GUY ALLISON GIVES  IE  Guy
S. Allison, a former graduate of  Bellingham Normal, and now a wholesale 
dealer in California fruits and vegetables,  lias made us think seriously 
about money matters. Mr. Allison left  school fifteen years ago with eight
dollars  in his pocket and a three-hundred-dollar  debt. Through careful
spending  and other legitimate means, he is now  the possessor of nearly
forty thousand  dollars.  One of the best ways of saving is by  taking out
life insurance. For the young  person, a twenty-year endowment policy  is
the better. By this means one saves  each year, what might have been spent 
needlessly.  Another important factor in saving is  the keeping of a
budget. In this way,  one will know exactly liow much is allowed  for food,
rent, clothing, improvements,  savings and such, each year. Be  sure that
your earning power is at least  as great as your expenses.  "(let
acquainted with your banker and  learn how to use the checking system in 
paying your bills. The banker is y lt;.in-best  friend and the sooner one
realizes  it the better his successs at saving will  be. It is wisest for a
beginner to put his  money in the bank on interest rather  than to
speculate."  Other things .Mr. Allison includes in  his lectures are:
••Owning Your Nome."  "Saving with n Purpose,"
•"Investments  and Speculation/' -Broke at Twenty, Financially 
Independent at Kilty."  It is needless to say that the lectures  have been
enjoyed by the large number  who have been in constant attendance.  "To
attain any object it is necessary  to have a purpose hack of it." said Mr. 
Allison in his lecture .Monday. "A person  never accomplishes anything
without a  purpose."  "Saving for a vacation is necessary.  Men can do more
work in eleven  months with one month of vacation, than  they can in twelve
months of steady  work. Everyone needs a vacation and  should save for it. 
-Saving for the purpose of educating  yourself or members of your family is
 another worthy purpose. It is not generally  a good policy to go into
debt. But  one is justified in borrowing money to be  used for educational
purposes.  "Of course it costs more for two to  live than for one, so
saving for marriage  is another purpose. It is well to  learn to save
before you marry, so you  It has been proved tiaat  seven out of every ten
who  read this ad need glasses, yet  only two out of tha seven  wear them.
Are you one of  the three or the two or the  five? If in doubt, consult 
Wall, the Optometrist. 205  W. Holly St.  may save for a home afterwards. 
"Saving as a provision for one's family  is another worthy aim. Children
have  a right to spend money, and by giving  them an allowance they are
taught to  save. Give them, or deposit for them,  one dollar for each
birthday. When they  are of age they will feel independent  with a small
nest-egg to their credit.  "Everyone should save for old age.  Friend's are
nice to have, but we can not  depend upon them when we cannot support 
ourselves.  THOU DYING DAY  Oh, stay, thou lingering twilight, do,  For thy
passing brings a tear;  Yea, at thy dying fades for aye  Another swift
flown year.  Another voir—how brief the tir.ic  Since first those
bells so clear,  Upon the midnight's silent air,  Hang in thy welcome
cheer.  Another year—ah, can it be  Twelve months have flown aw;iy. 
And I have come so soon to see  Thy last, lone dying day?  Another year,
ah. is it true  That each and every hope  Which vet has failed. but
promised  b.'oom.  Must die before they ope?  Another year, ah, yes, 'tis
tnie.  lias passed fore'er away,  And all its hopes yet uimttained  Must
die as dies this day.  Another year—"Forever pist,"  My conscience
says tome:  Well then, dear God. since such must be  I pledge myself to
thee—  That thru the coming year my work,  My plans, my all, shall be
 Here dedicated to tliv cause—  Myself I give to thee.  —Guv S.
Allison.  |i. s. X. S.  L STATEMENT  FOR THE 1922 KLILSUN  Cash
Receipts—  Students' Association, Clubs, Faculty.  Sales of Klipsuns,
Advertising Receipts,  Senior Play and Sundries $2,294.25 
Disbursements—  Engravings. Photography. Printing,  and Sundries
$2,148.32  Balance turned over to Students' Loan  Fund $ 145.JKJ  ESTILL V.
CAIN,  Business Manager  Klipsun Annual (1922)  B. S. N. S.  You'd never
Believe It if You Hadn't  Seen it or Hems from the House.  Mr. Gchlman
industritusiy polishing  the bacon sandwich which he dropped  with his 0.
D. handkerchief before he  handed it to a lady.  Miss Woodard skipping
gleefully  toward the onion patch.  Mr. Coughlin doing a stunt a la Cabaret
 on the picnic tables.  Miss Keeler with her hat tipped rak-ishly  over one
ear, a cup of coffee in  one hand, a bacon stick for a baton in  the other,
majestically leading the latest  operatic air:  "My name is Yohnson.  I
come from Wisconsin."  Mrs. Vaughn consuming untold quantities  of coffee
from a tomato can.  Mr. Bahskopf assuring a bevy of  young things that his
heart was permanently  located in.- the. rjght, side and  was going to do
business at the old  stand for some time to come.  The Quality of our Work
does not permit a Discount  EVERYONE TREATED ALIKE  SHOE REPAIRING  AND
SHINE PARLOR  LONGWOOD'S  1325 Dock Street Bellingham  KEMPHAUS CO. 
Bellingham's Lowest Priced Cloak and Suit Store  A SPECIAL DISPLAY AND 
SALE OF NEW STT.K  SWEATERS PRIC15S $4.95t0 $ 15.00  WHEN PATRONIZING 
ADVERTISERS,  PLEASE MENTION THE  MESSENGER

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Weekly
Messenger - 1922 June 23 - Page 4

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BELLINGHAM,
WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, JUNE 23, 1922  The WEEKLY MESSENGER  Published by
Students' Association of State Normal School, Bellingham.  Entered in the
Postoffice at Bellingham, Washington, as second-class matter.  THE IRISH
PRINTING COMPANY, PRINTERS  Subscription rates by mail, $2.00 per year in
advance. Single copies, 5 cents.  Advertising rates on application. 
Address all communications, other than news items, to The Manager of the
Weekly  Messenger, Bellingham, Washington.  STAFF OFFICERS  EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
MARIAN OUREN  BUSINESS MANAGER • WADE BRISTOL  MESSENGER STAFF 
.Edens Hall Helen Rouner  Athletics Lorraine Winters ._..„  Tokef
Margaret McPherson LUCY GIBBONS  f b, Adeline La Rouche ALTA MARTIN 
Officfal"Typi8rZZZZZ Fyrne Agee MRS. PAULSON  REPORTERS  NELL HENRY  AGNES
NORDLUND  CLYDE TRUEBLOOD  LET'S GO  SMILIN' THROUGH 1922  Smiles Week
Starts June 24th  SQUARE DEAL FOR GOOD.  •'Give your best impulses a
square deal. In the long run you  •will find you will win out. Don't
be afraid to be associated with a  good movement in your community, no
matter how unpleasant it may  be. There are unpleasant things that have
been done. Have courage  to join the one or two who will go to it.
Distinguish between things  that are wrong, and those that are unwise." 
• B. S. N. S.  "Sum up at night what thou hast done by day,  And in
the morning, what thou liast to do.  Dress and undress thy soul.  B. S. N.
S.  If you wish to be miserable, think about yourself, about what  YOU
want, what YOU like, what respect people ought to pay YOU;  and then to you
nothing will be pure. You will spoil everything you  touch; you will make
misery for yourself out of everything which God  sends you; you will be as
wretched as you choose.—Chas. Kingsley.  gt;  -B. S. N. S. • 
Let us appoint ourselves a committee of one to see that the campus  is kept
clean and free from paths. One surely cannot be proud of  a campus that is
littered with papers and rubbish of all sorts. There  are some barrels
outside for that very purpose. Get in the habit of  using them.  An old
adage says, ".Haste makes waste." That is what you do  when you ' ' c u t
the campus." No matter how hurried you are, stay  on the walks. Don't make
any paths!  B. S. N. S.  THE HIGHEST SUCCESS.  I shall not have gained the
Highest Success until I have lived  well, laughed often and loved much;
until I have earned the respect  of intelligent men and the love of little
children; until I have filled  my niche and accomplished my task; until I
have left the world better  than I found it, whether by an improved flower,
a perfect poem or  a rescued soul; until I have never failed to appreciate
the best in  others nor to give the best I had; until I have made my life a
blessing  and my memory a benediction.—Anonymous.  —B. S. N. S.
 SHALL THE TEACHERS' WAGES BE LOWERED?  Education is frankly recognized by
thinking people everywhere  as the basis of successful democratic
government. Therefore it should  be supported and developed-as never
before. Otherwise, the future  development of civilization is threatened
Avith disaster.  At the heart of the educational system stands the teacher.
If  the teacher is wise, progressive and influential the foundations in 
good citizenship will be sure. To obtain such teachers it is necessary  to
have candidates Avho are strong, and capable of dealing with the  difficult
problems of education. Such training is costly and strenuous.  The
responsiblity of the teacher is great and she plays an important  part for
the progress of the future generations. Is it not  more important then that
some inducement be made to increase her  wages as a return for the noble
work she is rendering to society, rather  than discouraging her by lowering
the wages?  If the teachers' wages are lowered their intrests will
undoubtedly  turn to more attractive opportunities for service, and other
fields  outside of teaching. What will the natural outcome be if the
teachers  leave their positions? Economy in the right place is a good
thing,  but if it will be at the expense of the educational system, it is a
fatal  mistake. Democracy cannot afford to undermine the source of its 
strength and security—the school. Modern society is able to afford 
adequate education. It should be willing to pay the price.  B. S. N. S. - :
 Finish every day and be done with it. You have done what you  could. Some
blunders and absurdities no doubt crept in; forget them  as soon as you
can. Tomorrow is a new day; begin it well and  serenly and with too high a
spirit to be encumbered with your old  nonesense. This day is all that is
good and fair. It is too dear, with  its hopes and invitations, to waste a
moment on the yesterdays.— Selected.  . B. S. N. S.  Once upon a time
a wonderful prince came out of the mists and  looked for the Princess of
his dreams.  Through field and forest; through city and town he went, but
she  had passed before his arrival, always, until he came to B. S. N. S.. 
where he found her the Idol of the whole student body.  At B. S. N. S., the
students had been looking for a King; when  the Prince arrived they
recognized him as the one who could rule  them as they wished to be ruled. 
But as the Prince was not at all selfish, he asked the Princess to  become
their Queen. Together they now sit on the throne; KING  SUCCESS and QUEEN
AMBITION.—Selected.  VWWWWWWWVWWWVWWV^rWWWMrtflflflJWMWflWWV  A
SPECIAL IN  PERMANENT HAIR WAVING  done by  CARRIE DITTMAR  Evenings and
Sundays by Appointment  at  Windsor Apartments—Elk Street  Men's Hair
Arranged to Suit  MAPLE GROCERY  Phone 1561 M a P l e a n d I n d i an 
MILK CREAM FRUIT  VEGETABLES BAKERY GOODS  WE DELIVER  Don't Go Without
Your Credit Is Good

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Weekly Messenger - 1922 June 23
- Page 5

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BBLLINGHAM, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, JUNE 23,
1922  EDEN'S HALL  EDENS HALL EDITORIAL STAFF  Editor Helen Rouner  1st
Floor Reporter Josephine Powell  2nd Floor Reporter Violet Neal  3d Floor
Reporter Mildred Carver  Joke Editor Gertrude Sennes  Dining Room Reporter
Marie Alwart  The -Cope girls have left second floor  and are now in Room
122.  flip, hip, hoorray the showers are fixed  again. You never miss the
water till  the well goes dry, do you girls ?  Mrs. Michael Freimuth, known
to most  of us as Eva Hancock, paid an unexpected  visit to lV^r dorm
friends last  Sunday. She and her husband are on  their way to Canada where
they will  spend their honeymoon. Perhaps we  shall see her on their
return.  What's the matter with Mil and Tina  this week? Don't worry; they
are just  , trying to find the sleep they lost while  on Mount Constiution
last Saturday  night.  Esther Jenkins now takes her beans to  the F gt;eau
Parlor. Ask her for explanations.  At a meeting of the second floor girls 
Mil Kinsey was elected their representative  on the Board of Control. 
Violet Huff and Alice Vickers attended  a social at Geneva last week. Alice
 hardly recognized her poor skinned shoes  when she got home, but both
girls had  a good time and want to go again.  Esther Jenkins and her roomie
moved  to room 202. Esther moves and moves,  but always stays on second
floor..  Second floor has some hones-to-good-ness  cabaret dancers. They
gave an exhibition  last week, the main feature of  the program being
"Heel, Toe and Away  We Go."  Esther Pinckncy, a dorm girl of last 
quarter, spent the week-end with some of  her old friends here. She will be
in  town all summer, and promised to visit  Edcns Hall often.  The
disappearing beds are still playing  jokes on the new girls. Yon can hear 
the beds come bumping to the floor almost  any night.  We can't see foot
prints on the sands  of time but we can see finger prints on  the front
doors. Now I wonder who—.  Ruby lost five pounds this week playing 
tennis but Dorothy R. has gained  half of them already.  We were mighty
glad to see Mil back,  but oh, you strawberries she brought  with her. Have
you ever eaten strawberries  and ice cream with a knife at—  Oh, some
time after "lights out?" Try  it. It's mighty good.  Miss Evelyn Geisness,
a new student  from the University, spent the" week-end  with her friend,
Violet Neal. Miss  Geisness thinks as all of us do, that our  dorm is
"simply wonderful."  Ida Geibrok spent the week-end with  her sister in
Lawrence.  Second-floor girls are at last acquainted.  Oh, yes; we are sure
of it for  clothes are being borrowed and lent.  When Miss McKorkle was
asked what  she had done this week, she said, "Made  a perfect fool of
myself in expression."  Don't worry; Ave all do that.  "The other Zada came
to make her  home with us," says Zada Tinker.  Talk of intelligence tests.
A girl from  the East on her way to B. S. 1ST. S. looked  from the car
window and seeing a beautiful  tree, exclaimed. "Oh, look at the 
cherries," And, to her consternation,  was told it was a holly tree.  Marie
Alwart and Florence Olson deserve  the credit of arranging the names  of
the girls of the hall in alphabetical  order for the convenience of
telephone  and door callers and also to aid  greatly the monitor and
proctors.  Mrs. Connors, addressing Esther at the  dining table:' "Is the
girl at your left  a guest?"  Esther: "No, she just washed her  hair."  15.
Cain: "Waitress, bring us some  blonde bread, please."  Wihna Randol,
answering the telephone:  "Did you say go to be earlier."  Voice: "No, Mam.
I said, "What is  your bread order."  It is a test of good manners to be
able  to avoid showing your feeling toward  bad manners.  How can one keep
a tidy room and  take basketry?  "It is a great sensation to get a letter 
from home, but better still is a box  of goodies," says Nellie Craw. 
Everybody a.nxiously awaits the postman  and then the scramble. If it isn't
 a letter from Pa or Ma, it may be from  one of those dear pupils.  Mr.
Bever, at assembly—"The intelligence  test will be tomorrow morning
at  eight o'clock."  •Faculty member, speaking privately:  "It should
be a courtesy test."  I wonder if we can make a better impression  on the
faculty.  No hopes of dancing in the small din-  1000 COPIES OF  NEW MUSIC 
ON SALE AT QC EACH, OR 3 FOR 9 5 °  HARTER   WELLS PIANO CO.  211 EAST
HOLLY STREET  Bellingham's Oldest Music House  FOUR DAYS ONLY  S T A R T I
N Q  T 0 D A Y  The Most Sincere Drama Ever Screened—  A Story That
Challenges Criticism.  NORMA TALMADGE  In Her Most Recent First National.
Picture  S Reels of Storm- and Sunshine 8 '  "SMILIN' THROUGH"  JOY BROWN
at the Organ  ATMOSPHERIC PROLOGUE  ing room. Other hungry folks are with 
us and now four tables are served in  this room. There are now around 325 
boarding at the Hall. The dormitory is  full, accomodating HIS gilds, two
to a  room.  Miss Dunning is anxious to get acquainted  with the Gnish
sisters.  Many of the girls participated in the  picnic given by the M. E.
Epworth  League last Saturday night at Whatcom  Falls Park.  Those of the
hall who climbed to the  top of Mt. Constitution were Tina Pearson  and
Mildred Kinsey. They began the  ascent at 10:30 and reached the top at 
2:30.  The Bible class, conducted by Mrs.  Templeton, in the lobby on
Wednesday  nights, is enjoyed by the girls.  HOW SAD TO MY HEART  Those
little white cards, two inches  by four are bearers of such sad news. Oh, 
how they are hated, despised and detested  !  C in algebra, B in English, F
in history  and C in science! Wouldn't the  receiver of the gift rather
have been-left  in ignorance than to learn his fate from  the little slip
of cardboard?  Eyeing grimly and scanning intently  its white face with an
eager expression  the poor unfortunate receives no hint of  sympathy,
nothing by Sphinx-like grim-ness.  Ah—it wasn't a love letter nor 
her picture but-—that old report card!  "Be sure to return 'them
tomorrow,  with your parent's signature," exclaims  the donor as if she had
willed a kingdom,  palaces and infinite pleasure to the  student. But with
a torture-raked brain  he drops the sweet missel in his pocket  where it
burns on his conscience that  day.—The Talisman.  fl^ii® !3il 
Something" Nice  "TULIP ICE"  TULIP CREAMERY CO.  1329 Dock Phone 137  ran 
ILEL

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Weekly Messenger - 1922 June 23 - Page 6

    
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BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, JIJNE 23, 1922  WE CARRY 
In addition to our complete  line of Stationery and  Athletic Supplies: 
HAIR NETS  HANDKERCHIEFS  BATHING SUITS  BATHING CAPS  EASTMAN FILMS  ALARM
CLOCKS  BOOK BAGS  COLLEGE JEWELRY  GYM STOCKINGS  SHOE STRINGS  GARDEN
TROWELS  CARPET TACKS  ETC.  And we save you money on  these.  Mario Kvans:
"My h;ur is falliiiy' out.  What can I. get to keep it in?"  Mrs. Porteous:
"A sack, with lace  around it."  H. s. N. S.  Phil Arnold: "Oh,, dear! I
never will  learn to spell correctly!"  Mr. Caskey (sympathetically): "Do 
yon spell as badly as yon type?"  HOTEL  LEOPOLD  LUNCHEON 60c  Table
d'hote Dinner at $1.00  Per Person, from 5 to 8:15  P. M., Every Evening 
Sam Rathman's Music  Your social obligations may  be taken care of by a 
Dinner at Leopold  Special attention to parties,  large or small, on  short
notice  GARLICK'S  NEW SHOE SHOP  203V2 West Holly  Ladies' Work our
Specialty  LADIES' SHOE SHINING  PARLOR  All Kinds of Shoes Cleaned  and
Dyed.  CAMPUS  WALKING  When oiix motor appendages are alternately  shoved
forward and the body is  shifted in an onward direction that eliminates 
distance and at the same time  preserves equilibrium we have a mechanical 
action called "walking."  There are six types of walking -found  on the
campus, namely: hustling, stomping,,  gliding, mincing, trudging and 
shuffling. These types are not distinct.  The hustler glides. The stomper
shuffles,  the glider minces and so on. Each  individual retains certain
walking characteristics  as his own, which, though  innocent to him are a
boon of humor  and interest to the casual campus observer.  Often these
walkers attempt to conceal  their walking type. Some wear  galoshes. Some
wear camouflaged white  bucks calculated to confuse the onlooker  and make
him guess whether the operator  is going or coming. Others wear  hightops
that act as straight jackets to  the type.  Let lis station ourselves
casually beside  "Hello" walk. Along comes Miss  Business. She wears
low-heeled English  walkers. She stomps. She efficiently  uses up the
maximum amount of skirt  room at the climax of each stride.  Dottie
follows. Her demure step is  full of self-consciousness. She minces 
trippingly along, her skirt swishing carelessly,  meaningly as she goes.
Then  conies Bull Brumble. Me utilizes a wavy  hustle and gazes fixedly
through the air  before him, as if he were totally concentrated  on
covering five miles of distance  in twenty minutes of time.  Tall, graceful
Louise glides into the  foreground, and greets us with a slight  droop of
the head, which might well be  called a Grecian nod.  Miss Wait-a-jVfinute,
whose avoirdupois  is constantly interfering with her  speed of locomotion,
trudges wearily a  few steps behind, and never seems to  succeed in coming
abreast of her graceful  friend.  We turn our gaze toward the building, 
and suddenly see a pair of feet shamble  awkwardly into view, around the
scenic  corner. Following these, is the tall,  lanky figure of shuffling
Bill. He drags  his feet as if the load were too great to  permit of
lifting it above terra, firma.  We ourselves are one, or a combination  of
these, and it would be well for us to  go "a campus gazing" quite
frequently  in order to improve our own methods of  walking by "seeing
ourselves as ithcrs  see us."  —Pow Wow.  B. S. N. S.  Teacher: "Who
can translate Brutus'  expression, ;Away! Away! Slight man!'  into modern
English?" •  Pupil: "Aw, g'wa.n, an' beat it, you  little shrimp!" 
B. S. N. S.  "Sav, young man," asked an old lady  at the ticket office,
"what time does the  next train pull in here and how long does  it stay?" 
•'From two to two-two," was the curt  reply.  "Well, I declare; be
you the whistle?'  Newton's  Incorporated  WOMEN'S APPAREL OF QUALITY  The
HOME STORE  1312-14 BAY STREET  A. LAWSON  BLOUSES, SILK AND LISLE HOSE 
ALL COLORS  Bloedel Donovan Lumber Mills  Retail Department, 1615 Elk
Street PHONE 433  Sash and Door Department, Corner Iowa and Ellis 1257  If
you arc in need of anything in 1 lie line oL; Lumber,  Shingles, or Sash
and Dooi:s, call at the Retail Yard, 1(5.15 Elk.  The prices ivill be
right- and the service prompt.  Patronize Messenger Advertisers  NORMAL
STUDENTS  If Quality and Service are Appreciated,  Our Success Is Assured 
M. J. O'CONNOR  Our Complete Line of Grociries Will Supply You  Our Service
Will Please You Our Friendship Will Last  PHONES 417 and 482 1021 ELK
STREET  Ethel Hall Phone 216  THE ELITE  Hair Store and Beauty Parlor 
Shampooing, Massaging, Manicuring  and Scalp Treatment  311 West Holly St. 
THE IRISH PRINT.NQ co.  QUALITY PRINTERS"  THE PALLAS  The Home of Better 
Candies, Pastries, and  Ice Cream.

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Weekly Messenger
- 1922 June 23 - Page 7

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BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON,
FRIDAY, JUNE 23, 1922  MORSE  HARDWARE  COMPANY  Established 1884 
Distributors of  ATHLETIC AND  SPORTING GOODS  Fine Mechanics' Tools 
Samson Auto Tires  1025-1039 Elk St.  For Firstclass Workmanship  and
Material  SEE MORLAN  Shoemaker  122-t Elk St.  Our Products Are 
"Deliriously Differenl "  W H E E L E R ' S  BAKERY  1307 DOCK STREET  We
Specialize in Home  Made Bread  GREAT WESTERN  Wood and Coal Combination 
Heater, has a big open front,  like a fireplace. Uses less  fuel. Built to
last.  JENKINS - BOYS  COMPANY  Normal Cafeteria  Attractive, Well Cooked 
Food at Reasonable Prices  The enrol linent has passed the KJUO  mark as we
go to press.  . 13. S. N. S.-  Mystery: Lillian or Dorothy?  Unknown to us,
we have been liar-  ' boring an actress ('!) in our three o'clock 
geography class. Is it Lillian or Dorothy  (Gish) v  The Northwestern 
National Bank  Bellingham, Wash.  WE SOLICIT THE  NORMAL ACCOUNTS 
£LUB fiflflj  GERROLD HALL  At the house meeting at GerroUl Hall, 
Julia Bowers was elected president and  Minnie Meyers reporter.  Friends of
Leitha Ducumun are very  glad that she is again one of their number  at
Gerrold Hall.  Miss Woodard organized a Bible class  :it our hall last
Wednesday night.  Some of the Normal boys honored the  Gerrold Hall girls
with a serenade the  other night.  There are only two alarm clocks on 
second floor so the girls take turns in  waking each other.  B. S. N. S. 
PHILOS PLAN HIKE  Starting the summer season with a  salmon bake, which was
a gala occasion,  the Philos are planning a number of exhilarating  hikes
and excursions for the  quarter.  While nothing definite has yet been 
decided the club probably will make several  trips to Lake Whatcom, a trip
or  two to the State Park and several hiking  trips to some of the many
beauty spots,  of the section. The Philos also will turn  out in full
membership for the excursion  to the Sucia Islands and for the hike up  Mt.
Baker.  Wi'th President Bond at the helm, and  with the very fine personnel
of the club  this summer, the Philos anticipate one  of the most successful
quarters of their  history.  B. S. N. S.  Y. W. C. A. OPENS BIBLE CLASSES. 
Under the direction of Miss Irene Goss,  chairman of the Bible Study
Committee,  Bible study classes have been organized  and will take up their
work immediately.  The classes meet every Wednesday evening  at G:30 at the
following homes:  Dormitory, Mrs. Templeton as leader;  McClellum and the
Cedars will meet at  Davis Hall, with Miss Sperry as leader:  Johnson and
Engers Hall will meet at  •Jerrald's with Miss Woodard as leader; 
all girls living on Garden street will meet  at Nichols Hall with Mrs.
Vaughn as  leader; and those living on 21st street,  will meet with Mrs.
Miller, at Jenkins  Hall. A cordial invitation is extended  to all girls to
attend any of the Bible  Study classes, whether they are a member  of the
above listed halls or not. Already  a large number have enrolled to  share
with the privileges of such a  study.  B. S. N. S. —  Janitor
(leaning outside, washing windows)  : "It makes me dizzy to be so high 
up."  Other Janitor: "Oil, I don't mind how  high up I am, just so I can
have one  foot on the ground."  SENIOR CLASS ELECTS  Although the
representation at the  Senior class meeting was comparatively  small,
officers were elected for lliy  summer quarter, as follows:  President, Mr.
W. K. O. Badcliffe.  Vice President, Mr. Bin-master.  Secretary, Nell
Henry.  Treasurer, Enid Smith.  Reporter, Esther Windley.  Arrangements are
being made for a  Senior get-to-gether to take place in the  very near
future. A very important  meeting will be called Monday, June 2(i,  at
12:o0 o'clock, in room 220.  The committee appointed was: Mrs.  Brooks,
Margaret Spaight, and Harold  Smith.  A greater number are urged to attend 
the meetings in the future.  B. S. N. S.  So you're 'way down in the dumps,
 Blue, you say?  Think you've played out all your trumps'!  Oh, go 'way! 
Life's not like a game of poker;  In this game you use the Joker.  It's the
card you hold the longest;  It's the one you find the strongest;  Laugh,
and drive the blues away!  Laugh, I say! a  aH2H2HHHHKjHK3[2  Messenger 
Ads  Bring  Results  HHHHHHHHHHHHH  SPECIAL  We have just received  a
shipment of Vanity  and Hand Bags. Look  these over when in our  store. 
THE OWL  PHARMACY  10% DISCOUNT  To Normal Students on all  Ready to "Wear-
Garments,  Dry Goods and Shoes  MONTAGUE    McHUGH  PACIFIC LAUNDRY 
Blankets Cleaned, Carded and Made  Like New. Our Curtain Department 
Equipped With American Curtain  Dryer.  PHONE 126 ESTABLISHED 1889 
APPLICATION  PHOTOS  That will produce  the desired result.  Ask others.  J
U K E S  Sunset Block  LOST COLUMN  LOST—A good grade in psychology,
due  to loitering in the halls. May he recovered  bv breaking this habit. 
LOST—-Somewhere between eight and  five o'clock, a bit of ambition. A
reward  of good scholarship offered for its  recovery.  LOST—A
lesson, during the absence of  a careless student. May be recovered  by
more regular attendance.  LOST—During a lifetime, all opportunities 
for achievement, because of a.  lack of education. A reward of -success  is
offered to those who stick to the  motto, "It is never too late to learn." 
1 9 2 2  CLASS PINS  Will Be Ready About  MAT 6TH  MULLER    ASPLUND 
Jewelers  Adjoining 1st Nat'l Bank  BAGGAGE MOVING  Phone 70 or 15  Quick
Service—Rates Reasonable  MODEL TRUCK    STORAGE CO.

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Weekly Messenger - 1922 June 23 - Page 8

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BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, JUNE 23, 1922  PHONE 567 1250 ELK ST. 
GEO.E.LUDWIG  WATCH EXPERT  Watches and Fine Jewelry  "Wateli Inspector for
all  Railroads Into Bellingham  Exchange Bldg., Bellingham, Wn,  KUEHNOEL'S
 HEMSTITCHING  PARLORS  Hemstitching, Pleating, Buttons  and Button Holes 
Chain Stitching and Cable  Stitching also Pinking  1312A Dock St. Phone 83 
HIGHLAND CREAMERY  Confectionery, Etc.  H. A. LYLE. Prop.  615 High Street.
 NORMAL EIGHTY HAS  VERY GREAT FUTURE  (Continued From Page One)  was
served by the stndi'iit body.  The afternoon was spent in rowing,  hiking,
playing games and performing  stunts. Some went home by way of the  boat
and some hiked back as far. as the  car line at Whatcom Falls. All were
tired  but the trip along the beautiful Lake  Whatcom, thru the wooded
paths, hemmed  in by lofty pines and firs and  bedded by moss and ferns of
every description  will linger long in their memories.  Lake Whatcom lies
among hills without  rival, fringed by forest and jungle.  The students of
Bellingham Normal  should be justly proud of this wonderful  hike front now
in their possession.  Mr. Kolstad entertained the party  with a. prophecy
of what we will find  at the eighty in a few years. Sites are  already
chosen for the hockey field,  baseball diamond and swimming pool.  The
first building will be a Community  Lodge, which will doubtless be built on
 the sidehill just above the old cabin now  standing. Three bluffs with
rare outlooks  over the lake probably will bear  the first lodges erected
by individual  clubs.  .Mr. Kolstad's thrilling but practical  vision also
embraces boat houses, canoe  fetes and regattas in which boat races 
between selected crews from Washington  University and Bellingham Teachers'
 College will be . a prominent feature.  Needless to say, a paved auto
road,  leading all the way to the ground will  obviate the necessity of the
present arduous  but thoroughly delightful hike.  B. S. N. S.  Mr. Kibbe:
"There are onlv about fr--  j gt;eople in here that know their lessons." 
Miss Bennett: "Who are the other  nine?"  A DILEMMA  There is no law to
protect us. from  him; we are even prohibited by law  from killing him. And
so, daily, he is  driving us to desperation. Slowly but  surely he is
forcing- us from the home  we have loved and cherished for eighteen  happy
years. No, he is not a hardhearted  money lender foreclosing a 
mortgage—lie is much worse. He is a  woodpecker, a tap-tapping devil
of a!  woodpecker who is driving us insane! In  fact one momhor of the
family, is al-!  ready past hope. He lies in bed, open-'  ing and closing
his hands futilely, and  mumbling strange imprecations. The:  rest are
slowly tending toward a similar  state.  This woodpecker has decided to
in-!  habit our attic and he is using his head  to do it; that is, he is
drilling a hole  through the gable end of the house.  There is no way of
getting rid of this  tormentor. My brother declared that he  could hit him
with a rock if he wanted  to, and we all told him that from the  words he
used in speaking of said wood-!  pecker, one would certainly imagine he 
wanted to. So he tried it. Well, he  came within three feet of the "cross-!
 eyed-son-of-a bow-legged monkey." (that  is what he called aim). But alas!
and  alack! the spot he hit happened to be in  the middle of the window
pane. He has  broken three more windows since then  and used all the known
cuss words and  some he invented special for the puH  pose. The woodpecker
doesn't mind.  Our own ladder won't reach the hole  he is drilling, nor
will any we have  begged, borrowed, or stolen. By risking  necks and knees,
not to mention the  seats of our pants, we managed to reach  the
ridge-pole, just a.bovc his diggings;  and, by stretching till our
suspenders  broke, we managed to reach within two  feet of him. Him? Oh, he
flies off into  the apple tree and fairly bursts himself  laughing.  Mother
suggested using the hove * SQ  we tried that. He went off and sat in  the
tree till we were through and then  came back and flirted his tail to thank
 us for softening up the wood a bit. I  We've been tempted to call out the 
fire department but by the time it ar-rived  Mr. Woodpecker had flown the 
coop. i  Besides all this, he's a dirty nonunion  scab! No eight-hour day
for him •  be starts at four o'clock o' the morn  and works steadily
till dark. He isn't  even decent enough to take an hour off  for noon; lie
swallows a couple of  worms,'gulps a. drop or two of water and  is back
working for dear life. And we,  all loyal members of the union, must sit 
idly by and let this scab work on our  house.  And what can Ave do more
than we  have done? He doesn't even let up  work when we stand out and
watch him!  The impudent wart-toad-of-a-dried-up-mud-  puddle sits there
and drops slivers  in our eyes! Ye, Gods! I wonder we're  not all
Bolsheviks! !  Alice Oliver. Eng. T.  B. S. N. S.  Older Sister: "Ask
mother if wc may  go."  Young Sister: "No. You ask her.  You've known her
longer."  —The Western Breeze.  B. S. -N. S.-  John: "How many
subjects are you  taking?" '•  Bill: "Carrying one and dragging 
three."—The Western Breeze.  B. S. N. 8-  Professor: "You know,
Indians are  very stoical. They are never known to  have laughed." 
Student: "Oh, but Longfellow made  Minne-ha-ha."—The Western Breeze. 
-B. S. N. S. •—  Teacher: "What three words do the  Juniors use
most?"  Student: "I don't know."  Teacher; "Yes, that't right." 
—Wa-Wa.  AN UNUSUAL  PUNISHMENT  "But, mother, why can't I go,"
wailed  a voice.  "Because we can't afford it," came the  sharp answer.
"You've had seventy-five  cents already this week."  Tears flooded Jimmy
O'Brien's eyes  as he went out on the porch. Five min--  utes later he
returned with the intention  of continuing the argument, but his  mother
was not in the kitchen. As he  stood in the doorway a thought came  to his
mind. . He knew that his mother,  kept a small amount of change in a cup 
in the pantry. He tiptoed over to the  pantry and found the cup. As his
fingers  touched the coins, he hesitated. He  left the kitchen with
twenty-five cents  in his pocket, and a guilty feeling in  his heart. Five
minutes later he deposited  it in front of a ticket-seller's window  and
passed inside.  The show was good, and in the excitement  of the play he
forgot his troubles;  When he came outside however, the full  significance
of his crime dawned upon  him. He made his way home with some  misgivings.
Before entering the house  he peeped in the window, xiis father  was
sitting in the front room reading  the paper. The sight reminded him that 
he had not carried in the wood so he  sneaked around to the back door
hoping  to find the wood box empty. If his  father had carried in the wood,
that  meant a whipping sure. He cautiously  opened the door; First he saw
the cupboard,  then the table, and tnGn the  woodbox. His heart fell, for
it was full  of wood. He pushed the door.open and  slipped in. His mother
was sitting by  the table. '•  "Son," she said, "what made you go,' 
after mother told you not to?"  A lump rose in his throat. He had  expected
something so different.  "But, mother. All the other fellows  were going,"
he answered weakly.  She put her arms around him and drew  him close. 
"Promise mother you'll never do d  trick like that again."  With
tear-dimmed eyes he promised. •  Now run of to bed," she said.
•  "But isn't Pa going to lick me?"  "No."  - "Who got in tlie wood?"
 "I did, before your father came home."  He turned his head in shame and
left  the room. He' had' learned more that  night than a dozen whippings
could have  taught him.  Later, when he was asleep, a form bent  over his
bed and kissed his forehead. She  prayed that his action that day was only 
a boyish prank; and that she had taken  the right course in correcting it. 
Frank Reff. Eng. 1.  B. S. N. S.  J. F.—Where does the jelly fish get
its  jelly?  F. I-L—I don't know. Where?  J. F.—From the
currents in the ocean.  B. S. N. S.  In Hygiene II.  Dr. Hughes: "Do you
understand my  explanation, Mr. Still?  Lloyd Still: "Yes'm."  Dr. Hughes:
"Good. Now I am sure  that everybody will understand it.  AMERICAN 
WttJWVSJWWWJWJW*  Friday and Saturday—  TOM MIX  SKY HIGH  also 
"ROMANCE OF  GRAND CANYON  THE TEACHER  Keeper of the light house station, 
Pioneer of civ'lization,  Worker of the transformation  . In the life of
every race,  Out of hist'ry's gloomy ages,  'Cross the glorious gleaming
pages,  Slowly, steadily by stages,  Honor doth they'footsteps trace. 
Poverty thy way hath hounded,  Prejudice thy path hath pounded,  But thy
foes awoke astounded,  At the product of thy pain:  Engineers and statesmen
builded  Authors wrote and artists gilded,  Man with marvels, man
bewildered,  Taught by thee how t c attain.  Through all history, thou
stalkest,  Leading little ones thou walkest,  By the great and small thou
talkest,  For they are a part of thee;  Ever wilt thou give to others, 
Ever lift and lead they brothers,  And thy joy shall be like mothers'  In
their lives eternally.  —Cliauncy R. Piety.  B. S. N. S.  Absence
makes the marks grow round-  Motto for typing: Eternal hammering  is the
price of success.  It is better to fall short of a high  mark than to reach
at a low one.  Better be an hour too early than a  minute too late.  Two
ways of shaping your career:  1. Drift with the tide.  2. Have a definite
goal.  WHICH?PPPPP