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Weekly Messenger - 1926 October 29 - Page 1



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iSIBlHi^^M  I S SEEl " D E A R ^ R U T U S^  l ^ T O M O i F l O W ^
E V E N I NG  S E E F Q O T B ^ X :  lt; ^ \ M E ^ | |  T O M O R R O W - A
# 2 : 3 0 : % |  V O L . X X V t - N a 5 WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL,
BELLINGHAM, F A S H I N G T ON F r i d a y , October 29, 1926  Cedar Chips 
By Ted  However, Mr. Berg IS broadminded.  When in college a few years ago,
he  bitterly disliked these objective tests.  Now he hardly minds them at
all. .  • • •  Ralph Johnson telephones in that  he found
a tack in a doughnut at the  cafeteria the other noon.  "Why, the ambitious
little thing,"  said one of the Cafeteria girls... "It  must think it's a
tire."  • * *  RUSH.  Bertha Sundeen, Beyer's first aid and  one of
the most rapturous in this beauty  barren Normal, staggered in with the
following  telegrams, just a few minutes ago.  OCT 29 11:30 A M  HOPT YOU
HAD" GOOD ASSEMBLY  STOP LOOKS LIKE  FINE GAME AHEAD STOP  HYDE PICKED TO
STAR  FOR VIKINGS  EDDIE HYDE  OCT 29 11:30 A M  HOPE YOU HAD GOOD ASSEMBLY
 STOP LOOKS LIKE  FINE GAME AHEAD STOP  SHELTON UNDOUBTEDLY  ELLENSBURG'S
BIGGEST  DANGER  LELAND SHELTON  Can it be, Miss Johnson, that  four of
these have pyorrhea ?  * * * *  SULLY MAKES HIT  WITH QUEEN ;  Queen Marie
had just finished her  royal breakfast and sent off her testimonial  to
Battlecreek. Our own  Bernard Sullivan was interviewing  her as he thought
regal articles would  go over bigger in "tapping the line  with Sully" than
Y. W. C. A. notices.  "You know, Sully," coughed Her  Majesty, as Sully
firmly but politely  refused the cigaret of a St. Louis  firm which she had
pressed on him,  "It's a toss-up whether to lunch at  the Chuckanut Manor
or at the Normal  Cafeteria, while passing through  your rich country,
abounding in resources,  its delightful climate." A  child could tell you
that the Chamber  of Commerce had peddled a lot  of bulletins even into
Rumania.  Deftly the queen removed a diamond  studded tiara, and scratched 
her head.' With that trained and  alert mind that Sully continually 
carries with him, he .could tell that  she was thinking. Man of action that
 he is, Sully did nothing.  "My daughter, Ileana—or something  like
that, is still, well, very  young—^and unmarried."  Here she gave a
knowing wink at  iSully.  "I've decided when II—II..."  "Ileana,"
whispered Sully.  "Thank you, my young friend.  When she is an old lady
like me,"  and the queen waved Sully aside as  he was- about to protest, "I
have decided  that Ileana shall go'to. Belling-:  Jham and help dedicate
the breaking  of the ground f»r your library."  Sully, as you might
imagine, had  been weeping softly, but was braced'  up by this cheerful
optimism of this  Rotarian, Kiwanian, Board :,?% Control  like queen.  ,
"Just tell your people that I love;  'them all—yes even Sam Carver
and  ITtAickmich." - •':::---A"-:"^ '••%--:-  TO MEET
ELLEI  TOMORROW IN CRUCIAL GAME OF YEAR  Coach Carver's Men Go Through
Strenuous Training Preparing for  Contest in Eastern Washington Town, Clash
Doped as One of the  Season's Hardest, with Sandberg's Men Slight
Favorites.  Coach Sam Carver's Viking grid-ders  have been going through
some  stiff workouts this week, in preparation  for what will probably be
the  most crucial encounter of the season.  The Bellingham-Ellensburg game,
 scheduled to be played in the eastern  city's arena at 2:30 tomorrow 
afternoon, will without a doubt put  both teams to their utmost. 
Ellensburg, on its record this year,  appears strong. The Tri-Normal title 
is at stake in tomorrow's battle, consequently  a win for the Bellingham 
team will mean much. Coach Boy  Sandberg's Eastern Washington team  holds
victories over two strong  squads in the junior conference,  namely, the U.
of I. Frosh and the  U. of W. Frosh. For the first time  in many years,
Ellensburg is conceded  a good chance of defeating  both of its Normal
rivals—Bellingham  and Cheney.  Ellensburg Powerful.  Ellensburg
holds a 6-0 verdict over  the U. of W. Frosh, while Normal  played a 0-0
tie with them. All indications  point to a close and exciting  contest. 
Coaches Carver and Keeney have  been drilling the squad all week in 
preparation for this important game.  Many combinations have been  worked
on. In the last two turnouts  only one-half the men that started  the
initial game of the season have  been practicing on the first squad.  Both
the line and backfield have  seen radical changes in their personnel.  At
center, Don Stickney and  Eddie Hyde are having a stirring  battle for the
position. On Wednesday  Blizzard and Baxter were at the  guard posts,
neither of whom saw  service in the opening contest. Blizzard,  after a
slow start, has been improving  rapidly. Shelton and Chris-man  seem to
have the. tackle positions  well in hand.  Thorsen and Drake are doped to 
start at the end positions tomorrow.  With Edmundson and Brown in reserve, 
four strong wing men will be  on hand.  (Continued on Page Three)  Former
Normal  Football Star Is  Accidently Killed  RICHARD BRULAND,  Former
Normal Football Star  Richard Bruland, formerly a student  at the
Bellingham Normal,  was electrocuted at Ellensburg  at 10 o'clock, Sunday
morning, while  working at a hydro-electric plant in  that city.  Bruland
was well known throughout  the state of Washington, through  his. wonderful
ability as a football  player. He played quarterback on  the Normal eleven
in 1923 and 1924.  He was by .far the best general that  ever donned a
Viking football suit.  During his attendance at the Normal,  Bruland made
many friends. He was,1  well .liked by those with whom he  came in contact.
 .'The students ;.,: of the Normal  school join with Brulahd's relative^ 
and.; hosts of friends in an acknowr;  ledged bereavement and expression 
of .heartfelt': sympathy for his deatH.\  fudge Ben Lindsey  Gives
Interesting  Tall to Students  "In the school the teacher molds  the life'
of the child as does the potter  his clay, according to his artistic 
ideals,' was the substance of Judge  Ben Lindsey's address to the students 
in the auditorium on Wednesday  morning.  In commenting on his interview 
with Edison, the genius inventor,  Linndsey quotes, "I would like to be a 
teacher, because to me there is nothing  more inspiring to deal with than 
a machine of flesh and blood. To  deal with life is the highest ideal  a
man can realize. In learning we  must combine the faculties of the eye 
with the faculties of the ear. Terrific  explanation of child psychology 
is necessary to understand child  behavior. In a way, and just in a  way,
is there a comparison between  the machine and the child. This  comparison
is not without some worth  however. There is intelligence even  in matter,
in steel. The future of the  world might be shaped by the way  children are
brought up. A boy of  fourteen contributed more to the radio  than any
other person. The five  to fifteen year old kids of today will  be the new
Columbuses."  In the course of his lecture Judge  Lindsey mentioned Marconi
and Bur-bank.  He gave their views of modern  education and the child. 
Judge Lindsey gave several concrete  examples to conclusively prove  how
the attitude of the state toward  juvenile criminals has changed  from one
of violence and force , to  one of tact, skill, knowledge based  on
bioligical, psychological and physiological  facts, and patienct, which 
involves infinite time.  The conclusions concerning child  psychology and
juvenile criminals  held by the Denver Judge have been  acquired through
actual experience  rather than through reading.  FACULTY MEMBERS  AT W.E.
A. MEETING  Miss Rich Speaks on "Professional  Aspects of Teacher
Placement,"  Thursday Afternoon.  The Washington Education Association, 
which is meeting in Seattle  yesterday and today, is attended by  many of
the Normal faculty. The  training school is closed for these  two days. 
The Normal teachers will have a  special luncheon Friday noon. Miss  Mary
Rich spoke on Thursday afternoon  on the topic "Professional Aspects  of
Teacher Placement," before  the Department of Classroom Teach-errs  of the
National Education Association  of the United States, at  Broadway High. -
Also on Thursday  and Friday noons, there was a luncheon  by the National
Association of  Women in Adminstration, which  brought women with common
problems  together. ;  The faculty members who attended  were: .. Misses
Fannie Ragland,  Mary Rich, Nora Cummins, Bertha  Crawford, Winnie
Spieseke,: Eleanor  Osborn, Anna Beiswenger, Marjorie  Dawson, Augusta
Pragst, Orpha Mc-  Pherson, Blanche Wold, Pearl Mer-riman,  Anna Peterson,
Priscilla Kinsman,  M. Esther Ctfsely, Grace Moore,  Linda Countryman,
"Marie Druse,  Hazel Plympton, Olive Edens, Maude.  Slawson, Messers James
Bever, H. C.  Philippi, and. F,sS. ^Salisbury. :. ;;'.  CLASH TO F E M E 
Numerous Returning Grads to  Renew Past Friendships at the  ' Mixer,
Saturday Evening.  S E R P E N T I N E   BONFIRE  Luncheon Will Be Served
at  Edens Hall and Cafeteria,  Following Registration.  Plans are 'rapidly
assuming definite  form for the third annual Homecoming  on Saturday, Nov.
6. A bonfire,  serpentine, banquet, big mixer,  and thrilling football game
are  awaiting the participation of all the  students, faculty and alumni. 
Serpentine.  On Friday evening, November 5,  the prologue of the annual
event  will take place in the form of a serpentine  and bonfire. The
serpentine  will assemble in front of Edens Hall  at 6:30 sharp. The course
of the  serpentine will be down High street  to Holly, and thence into the
business  district, where a few yells will be  given. The serpentine will
return to  a huge bonfire on the hill, where a  mock trial, put on by the
Thespians;  speeches by President Fisher, Mr.  Kibbe, Coaches Carver and
Keeney,  will pep up the B. S. N. S., so that  the Viking spirit will be
overflowing  when the opening scene of the Homecoming  takes place on
Saturday  morning.  Registration and Luncheon at 10.  Beginning at 10 a.
m., the registration  and reception of old grads will  take place.
Following this, will be  the luncheon at Edens Hall and the  Cafeteria.
Plans have been so perfected  that entertainment will be  going on at both
dining places at  the same time. The clubs are furnishing  the programs, so
everyone  will be assured of getting good entertainment,  says Katherine
Leach,  chairman of program committee.  Football Game.  When the clock
strikes two-thirty,  what a crowd of Viking rooters will  be in the
grandstand on Waldo Field!  Why ? Because that is when the biggest  event
of the day comes off;  Nomral is playing Cheney in the annual  home coming
tussle.  To further entertain the visitors,  a skit has been arranged
between  halves of the game by the Thespians  That which is expected to
take place  (Continued on Page Four)  miAi nnics  RUSH THRU THE HALis
—  IT SAVES TIME..  USE ASSEMBLY-T  i l e ro  WRITE THAT  LETTER.  TO
 ' MOTHER.  TIOQLE THE. PESK,  REMEMBER You ARE  THE ONLY ONE WHO WANTS  TO
USE. THE CftHO CATALOGUE  OPT tvNPER A /^.t^  CLASS ROOM l *v  WINDOW  AHD
START THE J^SY"  SMOKE AT THE GAMES  'HOWDY, pOLkS*' WE  HAVE QEEH
TEAC.HINQ  AND I HAVE  FORGOTTEN HOW,  TO ACT ON THIS  \J gt;ACE
—ALMOST.  Souvenirs to be  Ready for Next  



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Weekly Messenger - 1926 October 29 - Page 2



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fiP^i^^^  *?:fefi£|   gt;»bli.h»d by
StudcnU'AMOcUtiqn of State Normal School/^ellingHam,.yaihingt lt;m  Ttotwed
in the Poatoflice at Bellingham, Washington, aiiecond class matter.  MILLER
  SUTHERLEN PRINTING CO;, Printers  S«b«cription rate by mail,
$LS0 per year, in-advance; single copies 5 cents;  . /, Advertising Rates
on Application.  Address all comnmnicatiens, othr than hews items, to The
Business Manager  et* the ^eekly Messenger, Bellingham, Washington.
;.'• '. -' ' [.'  SVERRE "ARESTAD  THEODORE CEDERBERG  ROBERT WAGNER 
ROBERT FISHER  OLIVE HARDAN ...—..— -  BRYAN HANKINS
._—,_-  HERBERT E. FOWLER .__.  ^ ; Editor-in-Chief  ~r.~ Associate
Editor  Sport Associate  _ 2 . . - Sport Associate  _.._„..._..._
Society Editor  „". ; , Business Manager  „•. _V Faculty
Advisor  Theodore Cederberg  Robert Wagner  ' Lois Brown  Shirlit Smith 
Mildred Buskett   gt;STAFF  Olive Hardan  Ruth Sturman  Robert Fisher 
Jessie Whitten  REPORTERS  Ethel Leadbetter  Theo Norby  Everett Baxter 
Myldred Hense  Helen Wright  Verta Templeton  Gladys Burton  LITERARY
CONTEST  Due to the fact that so few students have responded to the
Literary  Contest sponsored by the Weekly Messenger, we are extending the 
time to November 15. You have been reading articles in the Messenger 
regarding the contest. Hand in that essay, short story, poem,  drama or
whatever form of literature it may be. You have as good a  chance to win as
die next fellow. Loosen up. Pilot some of that excess  energy into your
aesthetic channels and produce the prize winner.  Ruth Sturman is acting
assistant editor of the Messenger for this  issue.  BEAT ELLENSBURG!!  Last
Saturday you held the battering Freshmen to a scoreless tie.  The game was
yours several times but fate played her role. Once you  missed a drop-kick.
Another time you were one yard from the line.  A third time you had
opportunity to score but again fate interposed. You  outplayed the
Yearlings in every department of the game. Ellensburg  bieat the Frosh by a
lucky run in the last thirty seconds of play. The  battle tomorrow is not
going to be a snap." Not by any means will it  be a walkaway. Ellensburg
has the best team it has had in years. If  you go at the Ellensburg gang as
you started out after the Frosh,  tomorrow's game promises to be a real mix
up.  THIS IS A JOKE.  One questionnaire of last week entreated the
Messenger to include  a joke column. The temptation was great, and we
almost fell. There's  a hot cut in the office with the inscription "JOKES,"
which has lain  dormant these many Fridays.  If such a course were pursued,
all the reporters would have to do  would be to copy a half dozen bits from
the "Literary Digest" and an  equal portion from "Life" Why not make your
own choice? Such  departments of a paper smack too much of high school
stuff. If some  of the students were to read the U . of W . Daily or some
other standard  college publication, they'd think that another Library
Methods course  was being doped out to them.  "We wonder why that nice
Dodge coupe comes every night to  Mabel's house" or "Why is Fred spending
such late hours at the library  now?" afford mirth but to a very few
students. The whole assembly  would hardly laugh its head off at such
outbursts.  Student Opinion  A Challenge Answered.  I would leave it to
another  department of this school paper  to knock off chips, as a rule, 
but. when a 'disgruntled V. A. V.  flings out the challenge to any Philo 
to uphold the name of the Normal's  choicest and most forward society, a 
finger of explanation must be raised.  Heaven be thanked that every  Philo
"aspirant" did not lift his  voice in song. If such were the case,  99
44-100% of HS would get out,  and the ruin of the club would be a 
consummation devoutly wished.  (Hamlet's helping us, V. A. V.)  But, dear
V. A. V., to business let's  proceed. From a delightful little  book, in
the possession of which a  few rejoice, I mark these following  words,
to-wit: 'The aim of the  Philomathean Literary Society is to  improve its
members jn literary,  musical, and social attainments. In  the club
meetings held every two  weeks, the literary side of the. program  is
emphasized."  Now, really, V. A. V., it'd be the  height of the, ridiculous
to announce,  bi-weekly, by gplly, "The PhilomatH-ean  Literary, Musical,
Social, Debate  and Parliamentary Drill Society will  hold its regular
meeting next Thurs-  : ^ e y e n i n | / ' 'Why, it,would take 
^;t^,njeinber8,, what; with pur below  ;':«eajievei I. Q's., about two
quarterfl  }:just to learn the name of our soci-   gt;*ty; The Messenger
would black-ball  Will the Philos flicker in the Literary  Contest? Let's
wait until the  final letter is scanned, and the  judges have made their
grand decisions;  then we'll see V. A. V., if there  is any good which can
come out of  this Nazareth.  - Philo (Preferred Stock)  Three o'clock! The
big bus waiting.  Our team, dressed in their  best, ready to leave for
Seattle,  where the first game away from  home was to be played.  Were we
back 'of them? Did we  send them off with cheers ? Cheers  which they could
carry with them all  through the next day's fight? Did  we show that we
were with them and  for them, win or.lose?  We did not! We failed to do our
 part. That'big bus pulled out with  its load of fighters, without a cheer.
 A mere handful of the faithful stood  by to wave them off.  Put yourselves
. in their • places.  Wouldn't you just feel like fighting  your
hardest for your school if you  knew that every member of the student  body
and faculty cared enough  about you and the game to come out  "and give you
a; send-off ? ^  There's not a person in this world  .who doesn't; do
better work if •' he  knows its being appreciated.  ; Are we
going-'ioi let- such a thing  happen again, fpiks? ; I  By V  A few days
ago we read a notice  in the library. In substance it prohibited 
conversation, or visiting durT  ing the~ev.enings in the library. Logical 
en0ugh| ^ u t there is;' another  side: to it. .-By no-means could it; 
stop nor prevent two hearts from  exchanging sentiments. Fortunately  there
are small pieces of paper by  the card index, and the magazine  index. Two
hearts can understand  each other thereby upon snatching  one of these
handy things and scribble  a line'or two. Necessity leads to  discovery. ' 
* * * *  A class in history was once discussing  on the subject of Art and
the  Aesthetic Sense. ..The topic on rythm  "wfcs brought up... And many
examples  were mentioned. .."How about  the baby's cry," asked a pupil.
"Well,  there's rhythm in it," retorted the  teacher. This is perhaps
sufficient  to account for the prominence of divorces  in couples without
children.  Human nature demands satisfaction  of the aesthetic impulse.  *
# * *  The other day the Men's Club met  and decided to organize, and in
fact  they did begin to organize a fire  squad for emergency purposes in
the  school. ..No understanding., more  commendable than this could
possibly  be conceived of for the Normal men.  Nor here comes a challenge:
What  would the Women's League do to  balance this splendid idea?  * * * * 
The traditional Homecoming event  is looming up with bright hopes and  rosy
expectations. Figuratively, there  is no stone left unturned to make  this
year's Homecoming the best  ever recorded in the annals of the 
"Normal-By-The-Sea." The warmth  of loyalty and sincerity of devotion  to
dear Alma Mater will be felt in  the camus once more when the grads  of
this institution will set foot once  again on the self-same corridors and 
campus paths they had daily trod ni  the days that .were, not so very long 
ago. Familiar names, and faint images  of familiar faces. The present 
student body will gladly welcome  those who have made the history of  this
institution; and the grads will  come with a sense of a renewed pledge  of
loyalty and service to their Alma  Mater.  * * * *  What constitutes
success? The  men's class in social ethics digested  this question the
other day and bom-barede  it with all sorts of answers.  Common opinion
among" the men harped  on the familiar tune of "service"  to humanity.
Anyway, there's always  a big whale of difference between  opinion and
practice. "Flowers my  bloom on burning volcanoes.'  * * * *  It seems,
however, that there are  three major considerations in weighing  the
question of success. ..First,  the attainment of an ambition, an  ideal, a
goai; second accomplishment  of achievement along one's chosen  career;
third, the quality of service  one renders to humanity in general  as an
outcome of one's training in a  specialized line.  To hear Judge Ben
Lindsey speak  last Wednesday morning was a rare  privilege. His oratorical
eloquence,  occasioned sense of humor, and above  all the importance and
weight of his  speech in relation to teaching and  present-day condition of
society, have  undoubtedly left an indelible imprint  upon all who heard
him.  • # • *  Judge Lindsey's lecture has filled a  wide gap
and satisfied to some extent  at 



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Weekly Messenger - 1926 October 29 - Page 3



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s ^  1:;IS.;STROM2  BHHPniiHiniiinmmiiuiiniiami  i l x k^ u  Hitting
the Liiie  WITH SULLY  Wkere i8 the spirit of this school?  How caii a
winning team be expected  when the student body does not support  them?
Last Friday, the team  left for Seattle and there was but  four people to
see them off. Where  were the Yell Leaders and the rest  of the students?
The team needs  your backing, so try .and be out next  time.  The Vikings,
although held to a  scoreless tie with the University  Yearlings, vow
vengeance on Ellens-burg,  so a. sad afternoon is in store  for Sandberg's
pets. Coach "Sam"  Carver has been "pointing" for this  -game, and as this
is the first hurdle  to regain the Normal School Championship,  the team
will give it's all.  Evennje who went to Seattle last  week-end was treated
to two wonderful  football games.. First, the University  Freshmen held the
Normal  to a tie, while the University of  Washington-Washington State
College  game was a thriller from start  to finish. The Cougars won 9 to 6,
 when "Butch" Meeker scored a  touchdown on a perfectly executed  reverse
play in the last minutes of  the game.  The Viking squad lost one of its 
valuable reserves, when "Three Gun"  Benson had his shoulder injured, thus 
putting him out for the season... Benson  has been out every night, always 
fighting and taking many hard  knocks, which it is up to the second 
stringer to give, without hope of reward.  He will be missed by the  squad.
 California Teams  Are Eliminating  Tie Grid Contests  Southern California'
interscholastic  grid teams have devised a way to  eliminate tie games. The
teams are  given a two-minute rest after the  final whistle. Then the ball
is put  in play at midfield, the captains tossing  a coin to see who has
possession  of the ball. Ten downs are played,  each team alternating at
carrying  the ball on every play. The team  which makes the most yardage or
 which advances the ball in its opponent's  territory wins.' The success of
 the plan is being watched closely by  football men interested in finding a
 solution for tie games.  VIKINGS TO MEET  ELLENSBURG MEN  (Continued from
Page One)  Backfield Is Shifted.  After many shifts, a backfield 
combination that is sure to start the  game is still lacking. The most
probable  combination seems to be Odell,  Stickney, Hawkings, and Seymour. 
Of these, Seymour is the only one  playing in the position started in  the
St. Martin's contest. Ray Odell  has been shifted to the quarter post. 
Estill, who handled the team last  week, may start the battle and is a 
sure bet to get in the fray some stage  of the game.  Stickney, a regular
from last year;  has been practicing in one halfback  position. /  Hawkings
Halfback  Hawkings,. the greatest surprise of  the last two games, is
slated to start  in the other halfback position.  Coach Carver, is taking
the follow-'  ing men on the trip to Eiiensburg:  E.;Hyd^ ^ Stiekneyy
Hinds, Beignle,  Iyjerson, Blizzard, Baxter,.; .Shelton,  Drake, Edmundson,
Brown, Odeil,  Estill, Sfifcickii y, Clarke, Hawkings,  Seymour, and
Hansen.  WM$M$mBM^ M  Women's Sports  Continue Popular  Among Students 
Swimming tests have recently  been given to both beginner's and advanced 
classes. Those successfully  passing the beginner's test were Dor-othey 
Busick, Annie Nelson, Sarah  Collins, Allegra Jones, Elsie Cummins, 
Borgheld Jensen, Margaret Ma-goon,  Margaret McKay and Jean  Woll.  Those
who have passed the Red  Cross Swimmer's Test are: Phyllis  Crabill, Eileen
Galloway, Madeline  Bosshard, and Carrie Hamilton.  If enough girls are
interested, a"  recreation period will be held at the  Y. WL C. A. every
Friday from 4 to  5 oclock, beginning next week. The  rfee will be the
nominal one of ten  cents. Names must be on the Athletic  Bulletin board
before Friday  noon. Jean Woll can be seen for further  particulars. 
Hockey, soccer and volley ball  turnouts continue to run high, and  the
classes are fast developing the  technique of the games. The teams  will be
chosen soon.  A great amount of equipment is  being added, including six
new soccer  balls. Both hockey and soccer goal  posts have been put up, the
field  has been leveled and the grass cut.  To relieve the increasing, call
for  adhesive tape, it being feared that  the manufacturers would be unable
 to supply the demand, hockey shin  guards have been ordered and will 
probably be here for the next practice.  A number of girls went horseback 
riding last Saturday morning instead  of Friday afternoon. This  week the
horses will be brought to  the school on Friday. Already a  number have
signed up, but there  are enough horses for all who desire  to go.  If
enough girls are interested in  horseback riding for Saturday mornings 
arrangements will be made for  this as well as for Friday afternoons. 
Q.A.G.-U.S.G.  LEAD CONFERENCE  # : ~~  Washington's Title Hopes Dashed 
When W. S. C. Team Upsets  Dope and Conquers.  Washingtons' hopes for
another  Coast Conference football championship  were dashed on the rocks
laBt  Saturday when a Cougar team, led  by "Butch" Meeker, defeated them  9
to 6.  U. S. C. completely outclassed the  Bears by drubbing them 27 to 0. 
Stanford, in its first conference  game, defeated Oregon 29-12, and 
Montana blanked Montana State 20  to 0."  Next Saturday's conference games 
are: Stanford vs. U. S. C, Calif or  nia vs. Oregon, and Oregon Aggies  vs.
Idaho.  The conference standings are:  Team— Won Lost  U. S. C ,-. 2
0  Oregon Aggies „ 2 0  Stanford 10  Washington State 2 1  Washington
2 1  Idaho ..... 1 1  Oregon 0 2  California ......Z 0 2  Montana 0 3 
Bellingham Normal 0, Washington  Frosh 0.  Washington State College 9,
University  of Washington 6.  U. S. C. 27, California 0.  Montana 27,
Montana State 0.  Whitman "9, Pacific 9.  WHY?  Go out of the building for 
LUNCH  Serves Delicious Hoi Lunches  V-V "froBiyU to 1 o'clock ;v.v;  lee
Oream Oonw, Fruit,  Sandwiches, Milk, Candy  7:30 t o*  OFFENSIVE 
THREATENS FROSH  THROUGHOUT GAME  Yearlings on Defensive Until Last 
Quarter. Both Teams Miss in  Field Goal Attempts.  VIKING LINE STRONGER 
Odell, Seymour, Carry Brunt of  Normal Attack. Thorspn and  Stickney in
Fine Form.  Although forcing the play practically  the whole game, the
Vikings  were Hnable to score against the  University Freshmen last
Saturday  and the two teams battled to a scoreless  tie.  The Frosh defense
built around the  towering "Pat" Jessup, former  Whatcom High star
tightened in the  pinches and averted an oft threatened  Viking score. The
Normal line,  heretofore of uncertain strength successfully  withstood all
Frosh attacks  and apparently had little trouble in  opening holes judging
by the yardage  the backs were able to make. A  weakness was shown in
returning the  punts, the Frosh ends getting down  on Odell on nearly every
kick. The  Viking backs showed a greater ground  gaining ability than did
the Frosh.  Odell and Seymour being the heaviest  ground gainers. "Russ"
Seymour's  190 pounds carrying two and three  Frosh tacklers with him.
Several  times the big fellow ripped through  for 20 yard gallops. Ray
Odell proved  the best open field runned of the  day, getting away for long
gainB  several times. Lyman Stickney netted  good yardage on off end runs. 
Vikings Threaten Early  The Vikings made the initial kick-off  and soon
gained possession of the  ball in Frosh territory. They advanced  within
the yearlings 15 yard  line but could not send the ball over.  A place kick
was attempted later  but failed. The Vikings had forced  the play through
the first quarter  and continued on the offense the rest  of the half. They
started a hard  drive toward the Frosh goal and came  within 11 yards, the
final line where  a grounded pass stopped the attempt.  The Frosh were on
the defense until  the last quarter when the Vikings  weakened. A drop kick
missed the  bar just a few feet and just before  the game ended the Frosh
completed  a 25 yard pass into Viking territory  Aside from the last_iew
minutes  of the game the Vikings held the advantage  and had two exellent
chances  to score. The game was called at 12  noon as a preliminary to the
Univeri  sity-State College game in the afternoon.  The Vikings lined up
„with Drake  and Thorson ends, Wanamaker and  Shelton tackles, Hinds
and Baxter  guards, Stickney center, Odell, Stickney,  Seymour, and Estill
in the back-field.  Substitutions were Hawkings for  Estill, Edmundson for
Drake, Bieghle  for Hinds, Drake for Edmundson,  Christman for Wanamaker,
Stickney  for Hyde.  S. K. SCHELDRUP, D. C, Ph. C,  Palmer Graduate
Chiropractor, 210  Kulshan Bldg.  Always Something New . in  Records and
Sheet Music.  Stark Piano Co.  1317 Cornwall Ave. 
wuuanniHinitiBnuuiwiQtnHRinuciiuuHiiuiQiiminnn mmmammwu  Manx Hair Shoppe 
Specializing in the New  NestleCirctiline Process  of Permanent Waving 
$15.00  V Lee Oil $10.00  Six Expert Operators in every  Department of
Beauty Culture  MR. ROPER  Ladies' and Children's Haircutting  1216
Cornwall AT. Phone 592  Jack On The Sportstalk 
wuiianmimniamiiNiiHiaimHUHHainnuHmnHrimii  Ellensburg next!.' The crucial 
game of the season and the first  of the year with a rival Normal  School
comes on Saturday, in the  city across the mountains. Ellensburg  for the
first time in many years  is rated as a strong squad and is the  favorite"
for the ,Tri;Normal title,  holding victories over the Idaho  Frosh,
Washington Frosh, and Whit-worth  College. Idaho succumbed 7-0,  and the U.
of W. team 6-0. Both of  these wins were over strong teams  and in the
nature of upsets, so a  hard game is on hand for the Vikings.  * •
• *  Carver's boys played a nice game  against the Frosh and semed to
deserve  better than the 0-0 verdict received.  Still Coach Wayne Sutton's 
yearlings were strong—doped as having  one of the best teams in
years—  and a tie with them means something.  The Washington..
Freshmen. have  been very unsuccessful against Bellingham  in the last four
years, taking  only one victory in that time, in  1924... At that, the 1924
team was  composed of Louis Tesreau and many  men who now are leading
varsity  players, so a defeat at the hands of  these men was no disgrace. 
• • # • .  Upsets continued to be the rule  in last
week's grid contests throughout  the country.  One of the greatest was
Washington's  defeat at the hands of the W.  



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Weekly Messenger - 1926 October 29 - Page 4



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W ^ S H l K C a ^  ^BBUHininnnntiHBcsnnmnKaniamiuniuuninnanni 
HIKERS CLIMB HARD  g TRAILTO^SKYLINE  Twenty W. A. A. Girls, Under 
Guidance of Gunnar Berg, Enjoyed  Mountain Trip Saturday.  The W. A. A.
hike to Skyline, Saturday  proved to be a success. The  stage left promptly
at six o'clock,  carrying ..twenty half-awake enthusiastic  hikers to
Glacier. When the  stage stopped all tumbled out eager  to begin the long
hike up Skyline.  With Mr. 'Berg as a leader, all fell  in "line and the
climb began.  The first halt was made near the  top, for lunch. After
resting, the  hike was continued and the top was  reached at 2 o'clock. 
Due to. the favorable weather conditions,  -the surrounding country was 
indeed very remarkable. Mt. Baker,  Mt. Shuksan and the Canadian  mountains
were seen clearly.  " The trail was free from snow, but  small patches were
found on the  trail. The hikers returned to Glacier  in time for supper and
were ready  to leave for home by 6:30.  The members of the faculty who 
made the hike are: Miss Skalley,  Miss Keeler, Miss Weythman, Miss 
Cummnis, Miss George, Miss McPher-gon,  Miss Dixon, and Mr. Berg. The 
students who went are: Jean Wall,  Phyllis Paul, Blanche Hamilton, Vert  a
Larson, Mildred Buskett, Francis  Christinsen, Elizabeth Scott, Edna 
Runden, Ardis Van Allen, Claire  Christensen, Elizabeth Krell, and  Lois
iKing.  o  Thespians Have Fun  An interesting feature of the Thespian 
meeting Wednesday evening,  was the reading by Edward Jansen  of sketches
from the play "Dear  Brutus." Personal highlights in the  life of J. M.
Barrie were given by  Vesta Larson. Phyllis Johnson sang  two Scotch songs.
 Plans for taking part in the program  at the Homecoming luncheon  were
decided upon.  o  Ruckmick to Speak  Mr. Ruckmick of the Industrial  Arts
Department of the school, will  speak at the special meeting of the 
vocational and industrial arts teachers  on Saturday morning, at the W.  E.
A. Convention at Seattle.  Mr. Ruckmick will speak on "Why  is Industrial
Art?"  J o  College Club Initiates  Plans for the College Club party  to be
given tonight in the little  gym have been completed.  Harold Keeney,
chairman of the  entertainment committee promises  plenty fun for all.  The
tickets for the dance to be  given in November will be on sale  soon. 
Luncheon Is Given  President and Mrs. C. H. Fisher  and Miss Kathleen
Skalley were the  guests at the first Sunday evening  buffet lunch at Edens
Hall last Sunday,  between 5:30 and 7 o'clock.  This luncheon is the first
of several  that have been planned.  ROAST GIVEN TO  HONOR AMY DANLAN  In
honor of the birthday anniversary  of Amy Danlan, several Edens  Hall girls
held a steak roast at the  Rocks last Saturday.  Those present were Miss
Florence  E. Johnson, Orlena Moore, Bernice  Marvin, Inez Ebert, Blanche
McLaugh.  lin, Myfanny Jones, Olga Kristoffer-son,  and the honor guest. 
DANCING CLASS WILL  MEET NEXT TUESDAY  ,- The Social Dancing Class will
meet  for the first time on Tuesday, November  2,,in the big gym, from 7 
o'clock to 8 oclock. Mrs. Tischer  will conduct the class and the cost 
will be $3 for eight lessons, or $1.50  for four lessons.  ;' All those who
are interested are  urged to come to the: first meeting.  If Enough are
interested an advanced  Class will be formed to meet on the  same days,
from 8 o'clock, to 9 o'clock.  ;'::'  imwBnrinnmmHDBia^^ 
intimnnimimnaiiinmimro  We Hear THat  Mildred Botta spent the week-end  at
her home in Blaine.  Nellie Wade and Mica Hall were  at their homes in
Marysville over  the week-end.  Bertha Karlson a i d Dorothy Goodman  spent
the week-end in Mount  Vernon.  Ruth Anderson spent the week-end  at her.
home in Lynden.  Ida Lewis visited her parents, of  Blaine, over the
week-end.  Dagney Gustaf son spent the weekend  at her home in Seattle.
•  Evelyn Bennett of Viking Manor  spent Sunday visiting friends in
Seattle.  Evelyn Small spent the week-end  at her home in Everett.  The
girls of Davis Hall enjoyed a  fudge party on Saturday night.  Will Teeter
Wiggins please favor  us by rendering her favorite selection  "Oh Beautiful
Shell?"  Jeanne Knowlton and Mary Ness  entertained at a dinner party at 
Dokken Hall, Wednesday evening,  Otober 20.  Girls from Engers Hall who
went  home last week-end are: Elizabeth  Jones, Frances Mullens, Dora
Pier-son  and Kathryn blander.  Ray Lesher, Vera Kleinleu, and  several
friends spent a pleasant Sunday  exploring the foothills of Mt.  Baker. 
Irene Kendler spent the week-end  at her home in Seattle  Miss Amelia
Turner will be the  house-guest of Madeline Brown in  Seattle this
week-end.  Zeno Katterle, a former student  is working in Entiat, Wash. He
is  Planning on entering W. S. C. next  semester.  Mr. Dokken entertained
the girls  of Dokken Hall at a lovel dinner on  Tuesday evening, October
19.  Nina Anderson, Delma Isaacson  and Margaret Mitchell spent the 
week-end at their homes in Stan-wood.  W. A. A. INITIATION TO  BE SPOOKY
AFFAIR  From all reports the W. A. A. nutation  Saturday night will be a
very  mysterious affair. New members are  in danger of many weird pranks as
 the Hallowe'en idea will be carried  out. Fifty -girls have passed the 
entrance of the club.  Committee in charge has planned  an interesting
program. Old and new  members are urged to be present.  Be on time at 7:30
in the big gym.  Don't miss the fun.  WOMEN'S LEAGUE TEA  GIVEN WEDNESDAY 
One of the most delightful affairs  of the quarter was the Women's  League
tea last Wednesday afternoon  from \3 to 5, in the club rooms  of Edens
Hall.  The tea served as a get-together  for all women students. A pleasant
 program arranged by Mary Margaret  Doyle consisted of:  Piano Solo Vera
Ginnette  Vocal Solo Phyllis Johnson  Reading Willena Barnhart  Dance, "The
Three Graces" Chopin  Verta Templeton  Vesta Larsen  Irma Littler  Those in
the receiving line were:  Miss Jones, Miss Skalley, and Es-telle 
Martinsen.  New Normal Song.  Not Enough Parties and Too Many  Gals.  A
reunion of, the Normal Alumni  and former students was held at  Meeve's
Cafeteria, Thursday noon.  Miss Olive Edens, president of the  Alumni
Association, presided at the  meeting. President Fisher addressed  the
gathering.  Miss George, formerly head of the  training school, and now
connected  with.. Seattle  lt; public schools, was  present.  Theodore
Cederberg, Margaret  Burke, and Desmond Fulp'have been  named on the alumni
committee to  assist the faculty committee to arrange  for the Homecoming
banquet  to be held Saturday evening at Edens  Hall.  Many of the members
of the faculty  who attended the annual teachers  'meeting were present. 
Mary Kennard spent the week-end  with her friend, Robbie Gaddis, of 
Anacortes.  Eva Botts and Ruth Anderson  were at their homes in Ferndale
over  the week-end.  Allie Rucker spent the week-end  at her home in Bay
View.  Saturday morning, Hulda Stroebel  entertained her parents at her
home  in Bellingham.  Loma Sumner and Madeline Goodman  spent the week-end
at their  home in Everett.  Mrs. McCallum was hostess at a  Hallowe'en
party, Friday night in  honor of the girls living at her home.  „ The
main features- of the evening  were games and fortune telling.  Saturday
night the inmates of  Powell hall enjoyed as the main features  of their
party, two mock weddings.  Bear claws and soda pop  were served as
refreshments. Everyone  was exposed to a hilarious time.  Mamie Clark spent
Saturday at  Livingston Beach with Mr. and Mrs.  Sciberd of Mt. Vernon. 
Janet McKenzie spent her last  week-end in Seattle and Sumner.  WOMEN'S
LEAGUE  HAVE INTERESTING  ASSEMBLY FRIDAY  An interesting feature of the 
Women's League assembly last Friday  was the manner in which the  members
of the league council showed  to its audience the work of various 
committee's.  Two of the most original stunts  were presented by the
fellowship and  social committees, of which Irene  Shagel and Estelle
Martinsen are  chairmen. The fellowship committee  depicted a railway
station with  a lonely little Freshman arriving,  there being met by
members of that  committee and being brought to the  Normal school.  The
social committee put on a  small tea, bringing to the girls the  idea of
their work in putting on  teas, and all social functions that  the league
sponsors.  Ignorance Is Bliss.  Frosh: "Why is the library empty  on jazzy
nights?"  Soph: "You'll learn."  Get Your  Vita mine 8  at the  NORMAL 
GROCERY  Phone 104  W.A. A. GIRLS GIVE  SERVICE TO SCHOOL  Help With Ticket
Sale and Usher  for "Dear Brutus," Also Active  in Red Cross Work.  The W.
A. A. girls were in charge  of the sale of tickets for "Dear Brutus"  on
the landing Wednesday and  Thursday. This is just one of a  number of ways
in which the girls  are of service. The A. A. U. W.  have asked the girls
to usher for  the play and ovver fifteen girls have  volunteered their
services. The girls  are always eager to help when called  upon.  It was
largely W A. A. girls who  responded to President Fisher's call  to help in
the recent Red Cross Drive.  Over twenty were ready at 8 o'clock  to begin
work, and the girls sold all  during the day.  The W. A. A. girls
have'charge of  ushering in the regular assemblies  and are the ones who
deliver the programs.  The club is made up of girls  who are dependable and
eager to  help their school.  o —  BRIDGE PARTY GIVEN  SATURDAY
AFTERNOON  3E  S  Can you imagine:  - Barbara Allen leading a choir  Thelma
Butler missing Rec hour.  * » * *  Olive Hardan on the turnup squad. 
» » » «  Maggie McCay as a house mother.  •
• • * * # • #  Helen Crawford 'as a prima dona.  * »
» *.  George Allez flunking out.  Mary Stephens with a sweeping  beat.
 * # ». *  Dean Edmonson as ,a school teacher.  » # * *  Reginald
McKee acting natural.  * » # #  Hank Durr without a girl.  Kenneth 
class.  Smith going to Bible  Testimony  "I was troubled for years with 
asthma," stated Ezra Hawkins, well  known Concrete farmer, until I was 
asked by a friend to try Chief Rip  Hansen's Indian herbs. After giving 
this wonderful remedy several  months' trial I find I can at least  pitch
my favorite game of barnyard  golf with nary a whiz.  Signed Ezra H.
Hawkins.  Concrete, Wash.  o —  Big Hearted Bill.  Evelyne Lysons and
Neva Rupel M i s s Williams: "Bill, will you loan  were hostesses at a
delightful bridge m e y°u r history book for a moment,  party last
Saturday afternoon in the  drawing room at Edens Hall. Bright  autumn
leaves decorated the fire  place and window sills. Clever Hallowe'en 
decorations were used on the  luncheon tables. Erna PPPPP