Primary tabs

1927_0114



     ----------

     

Weekly Messenger - 1927 January 14 - Page 1



     ----------

     

CARLSANDBURG  € O M E S H E R E }  TOMORROW NICiMT  BIBLE I N
S T I T U TE  S C H E D U L E D FOR  T H U R S D A ^ S t J N D A Y  V Q U X
X V I — N O . 14 WASHINGTONESTATE NORMAL S C H O O L , B E U ^ G H A
M ; WASHINGTON Friday, January 14, 1927  SCRIBES CLUB TO PUBLISH A  E  "The
Red Arrow" is Proposed Name for the New Publication;  Something should be
done to relieve  the congestion in the halls  caused by the line of
freshmen waiting  to pay their dues.  There is a scholarship committee ....
 Which everyone should know  / / you care to become acquainted,  Just let
your school work go.  CURIOUS PACTS '"*.:••'•  If you
sleep on the left side of the,  bed, then the left side is the right  side,
and the right side is the wrong  side, so if you get in the right side  you
are on the wrong side, because  yeu should be on the left side, which  is
the right side, and it is,the right  side which is left, aa the left side
is  the right side.  - » » * » •  If the miserable
hound who stole  Joe Hermsen's marbles doesn't return  them it will go hard
with him.  Poor Joe is heart-broken.  » * * * • *  SECOND HAND
DEFT.  The examinations, which will be  hell under the supervision of Mr. 
Miller, will begin promptly at ten  o'clock.  '—ROLLA (Mo) TIMES  . *
. • . * » »  WATCH THE SKIES!!  If they are cloudy it will
rain; if  they aren't cloudy it will rain anyway.  Heughan, "Scotland's
incomparable  actor-singer," will be in Bellingham,  January 19th and 20th,
at 8:15 p. m.,  at .the Normal auditorium. The two  programs will be
entirely different:  Public prices will be $1.50 and $1.00,  plus tax.
Student prices will be 50  cents.  . Mr. Heughan is not coming here  under
the auspices of the Normal.  Due to an opening in the  dates between
Vancouver and Seattle  Bellingham will be favored by  this artist whom the
critics claim to  be the wprld's greatest basso.  The Chicago Tribune says:
"William  Heughan, he of the kilts, appeared  at Kimball hall in full
control  of what I honestly believe is .the  finest bass voice in the
world".  Famous Lecturer  WiH Speak Here  on January 20th  SCHOOL PROMISED 
APPROPRIATE FUNDS  Hartley Thanks the Institutions  for Approval and
Co-operation  Shown During Administration.  —See what  little girl. 
Starmak did for this  BATTLED IN BOND.  or  The Villain's Victory  Two of
the boys got into a little  argument the other day.  Percy said that it was
wrong to  drink. He ordered a bottle of sas-parilla  to prove his point. 
Bill thought that water was good  enough for the milkman to distribute, 
but he couldn't figure out any other  use for.it.  Percy .retaliated by
showing that  Washington never could have crossed  the Delaware and
discovered America  if it "hadn't been for water.  Bill came right back and
said that  Washington didn't go across on the  water at all. He went on
an^ice  cake to get away from the bloodhounds.  Percy was almost stumped.
But he  said that liquor had ruined many  great men that could otherwise
have  been of service to their country. Look  at Volstead. •  Bill
showed how resourceful be was  at that critical moment. He blew his  breath
in Percy's face and yelled:  "Do you believe that?"  Percy was so dizzy
that he had to  sit down. He said he wouldn't believe  it if it was written
in the Bible.  That nearly settled the argument.  But Percy began J;o
recover from the  whiskey fumes and he was as brave  as a lion. "You know
that Widdy  Linkum is corrupting the morals of  the women in our country
with her  bootleg liquor'! he shouted.  .Bill said that he wasn't any
friend  of Widdy's. He claimed that you  couldn't prove anything by women 
anyhow, because they think the- truth  In Governor Hartley's address to 
the Senate at Olympia, January 11,  he thanks the heads of institutions  of
higher learning for their approval  and co-operation with the
administration.  He promises that the schools of  higher learning shall be
appropriated  enough funds for the most pressing  building needs and normal
expansion.  Mr. Hartley's sole idea is to get  the most for the dollars
spent. He  firmly believes that no matter how  poor a child is, he must
have an education.  Each school of higher learning  should have a special
appropriation  according to Mr. Hartley, thereby  abolishing much of the
present  rivalry.  ALL-SCHOOL MIXER  TO BE HELD JAN. 19  Men's Club and
Women's League  Sponsor Informal at Edens Hall.  "Musical Program Main
Feature.  An all-school get-together informal  is being sponsored jointly
by the  Men's Club and the Woman's  League which will be held on Wednesday,
 January 19 at Edens Hall.  The Women's League t program and  appointees of
the president of the  Men's Club are preparing a program  of music for the
evening. Two surprise  numbers are also projected. As  usual, refreshments
will be served.  The two clubs engineering the movement  are extending a
cordial invitation  to all students in the Normal  and to the Normal
faculty.  On the afternoon of January 20,  we will meet and be entertained
by  one of the most popular lecturers  on the American platform:  Tom
Skeyhill, a soldier, a  poet, a -world traveler, a student of  literature,
political economy, and  world affairs. He is an Australian  boy who was
blinded in the Turkish  campaign and lived in total darkness  for three
years, recovering his sight  in 1919 through the miraculous work  of a
Washington specialist.  Traveled Extensively.  Since recovering his sight,
he has  visited every European country except  Portugal. In 1919 he
attended  the Paris Peace Conference and immediately  afterwards, appeared
for  the first time as a professional lecturer.  In 1920 he made his way
into  Soviet Russia to study Bolshevism,  at first hand. His return from
that  country was very thrilling.  Visits Europe in 1922.  In 1922,
Skeyhill was again in Europe.  He attended the Geneva Con-,  ference,
visited the Near East, and  studied post-war conditions in practically  all
of the European countries.  He returned in January, 1925, from  a
three-month's tour in Italy, where  he studied Fascism. He was in Italy  at
the time of an attempted assassination  of Mussolini, and- witnessed  the
tremendous reaction in favor of  the great Italian leader, following  the
attempt at taking his life.  Has Written Extensively.  Some of Skeyhill's
subjects are:  "Mussolini and the Black Shirts";  "The New Elizabethans";
"The Trojan  Way"; "A Young Man Looks at  His World." Mr. Skeyhill's
appearance  heref 'all be a big eyent.  '-^Or—° -.  Ralph Huff:
"Oh, mama, look at  that man's white pants!"  Mother: "Those aren't pants,
those  are flannels, dear." • gt;•'..  Ralph H: "But. mamiha,
father's  are red." - ' -  Perhaps we are too busy doing important  things
to even stop and  think of such insignificant things as  the beauty and
welfare of our «cam-pus  and school. In spite of it all and  whether
we appreciate it or not, our  campus is being improved and made 
attractive. The work which was  started last spring is now being completed.
 Large trees and bushes have  been planted and rearranged..  Tree is
Valuable.  The large, black locust tree, which  was placed on the southwest
corner  of the campus is considered a valuable  tree. The California
redwood,  which was recently placed in front of  Edens Hall, is the only
one of its  kind in this city.  Flowers to be Planted.  Plans are being
made to have many  different kinds of flowers planted  which will bloom
from early spring  until late fall. This will add much to  the beauty of
our campus.  Walk to be Constructed.  A broken-scotch-ashly walk will be 
made over the mound in front of the  school. Underground sprinklers are  to
be set in and this will eliminate  the hose which is in use now.  The work
on the Campus is under  the direction of Geo. A. Dack. Mr.  Dack said that
with the location of  our school and its advantages our  campus could be
made one of the  most attractive in the country.  o  Control Favors the
Project and Promises Support;  Magazine Is Devoted to Literary Composition
of Students.  CARL SANDBURG,  Famous American poet, who will  lecture in
the Auditorium tomorrow  Night at 8 : 0 0 o'clock.  Carl Sandburg to 
Appear in Normal  School Auditorium  FRIDAY—Jan. 10  Meeting of
Scribes Club, Room 205,  8:00 p.m.  FRIDAY—Jan. 14.  Bible Institute
continues through  Sunday.  SATURDAY—Jan. 15.  Carl Sandburg,
lecturer, Normal  auditorium, 8 o'clock.  TUESDAY-Jan. 18.  Recital, John
Sundsten, violinist,  and Walter Sundsten, pianist, to  appear in assembly.
 J. W. Zellrier, lecturer, Normal auditorium,  8:15.  THURSDAY—Jan.
20.  Tom SkeyhiU, lecturer.  Special assembly in afternoon. 
FRIDAY—Jan; 2L  Student assembly,11 -o'clock.. - / 
SATURDAY—Jan. 22. .••;.,-. :•;•-'  U. of \V.
Frosh vW. Viking, in  Whatcom gym.  Carl Sandburg, one of our most_
interesting  contemporary writers will  appear in the Normal school
auditorium,  tomorrow evening at 8:00 p. m.  Sandburg is a native of
Illinois, and  after graduating from college, became  a hobo. He wandered
at large  for some time and learned much  about his fellow men.  He Writes
for Fun.  Mr. Sandburg's - literary efforts  have not been for mercenary
reasons.  He writes because he loves his work.  Therefore his work is free
from outside  influence. Carl Sandburg is  rated by critics as one of
America's  best contemporary poets. He is very  much in demand on the
platform, and  lately has been giving the public  many literary treats with
his lectures.  His appearance here is looked for-'  ward to by townspeople
as well as  Normal students. ,  Y.W.G.A.T0 HOLD  ITS BIBLE INSTITUTE  Mrs.
J. Addison Campbell^and Dr.  Georgia Saddler to Speak at  Meetings. All
Students Invited.  The Y. W. C. A. of the Bellingham  Normal will hold its
Eighteenth Annual  Bible Institute this week. Mrs.  J. Addison Campbell and
Dr. Georgia  Saddler will be the speakers. The  first meeting will be at
four* o'clock  on Thursday. Other meetings are as  follows: Friday at four
o'clock; Saturday  at two o'clock, and Sunday at  three o'clock. All
meetings will be  held in room 308.  Friday evening at 7:45 o'clock, Dr. 
Sattler will give a lecture on ".The  Bible in the Light of Recent
Discoveries."  - • .,  All students, whether members of  the Y. W. C.
A. or not, are invited  to be present.  JUN!0R-SENI0R CLUB  HAS LUNCHEON
MEET  The Junior Senior class organization  met for the first club luncheon
 of the year at Edens hall last Wednesday.  Only a small per cent of the
upper  classmen were present but many  plans for the year were discussed. 
The club luncheon is to be a. regular  feature, scheduled for Wednesday 
noon of alternating weeks. An added  attraction, will be the regular
programs,  in which "outsiders" as well  as members, will participate. 
—;.' . .: "Q^—:• — • ..  SUPPLIES RECEIVED 
Normal Instructor Carries All  Kinds of Magazine; It's His Hobby  SUNDSTEN
TO APPEAR  (Continued on Page Four)  ».• John Sundsten, who has
completed  a tour of Norway as pianist with the  Pacific Chorus has
returned to his  work at the Boyd Wells studios, Seattle.  His" brother,'
Walter, a talented  violinist, is also an instrutor.  with Boyd Wells. Both
of these mu-  "rsicjans will be with us in assembly  %'* I next Tuesday,
January 18th. •'•-:'"  (By Phyllis Westover)  What would you
think if a professor  came to class with a copy of  "Love Stories" •
magazine in one hand,  "True Romance" in the 



     ----------

     

Weekly Messenger - 1927 January 14 - Page 2



     ----------

     

^r'Vy^^Jvg|^igj^- -ac.v--'': •!'• •  i^bli8h^dl.by
Students' Association of;State Norihal School,  ^Entered in the Postoffice
at Bellingham, Washington, as second class matter.  / V;,V.'-; •
MILLER   SUTHERLEN PRINTING -CO.,. Printers.  Subscription rate by mail,*
$1.50 per year, in advance; single copies 5 cents;.  ^ : ^ Advertising
Rates on Application. v ' -  , ; . . Address all communications, other than
news items, to The. Business Manager  of the Weekly Messenger, Bellingham,
Washington. " :•  SVERRE ARESTAD. ...  VERNON ZACHRISON...  ROBERT
FISHER;..:....- ...  JESSIE WHITTEN.  BRYAN HANKINS. ..:.... .  RUTH
STURMAN...............  GLADYS BURTON....;  HERBERT E. FOWLER;.. 
..:.*....':.'...:: „_ .........:.............Ed"tor-'in-Chief  . ;.
Associate Editor  _.— Sport Editor  ..„...;.;.„..._.
;...Society Editor  .'. ...;; ...Business Manager  :......... .....Training
School  .; .Women's- Sport Associate  .....^...........Faculty Advisor 
Chester Chatfield  Victorio A. , Velasco  Jessie Wait  STAFF . ' •
• • • - ' . . • " - . .  Theo Norby Helene Wright 
Gladys Burton Phyllis Westover  Maiioh Qu'esenburg  Sarah Goodman  Joseph
Jones  REPORTERS  Andrew McCall  Tony Mustacich  Ellsworth Lutr.Iey Edna
Wise  June Wetherell  Mark Jarrett  Robert Wagner  Vernon Zachrison 
EDITORIAL COUNCIL  Jessie Whitten Robert Fisher  Ruth Sturman  "; N OW IS T
H E T I M E T O IMPROVE T H E KLIPSUN!  If you review last year's Klipsun
with a critical attitude, you will  readily see that there is splendid
opportunity for improvement in composition.  Some of the written English in
the Klipsun is, to say the least,  abominable. ^  We cannot lay this fault
at the feet of the Editor. It is the club  members and heads of
organizations who have neglected their duties.  This year, we are getting
off to an early start. Get out of this mental  coma, this diabolical state
of mind. See that you do your bit in making  this a bigger, and better year
for the Klipsun. _  HIGHER SALARIES FOR TEACHERS  "Will teachers ever be
paid a salary that^will be a just compensation  for their toils? Dr. James
E. Russell, who retires on next June 30 as  Dean of Teacher's College,
Columbia University, after more than  twenty-five years of continuous
service, is skeptical.' He makes clear in  His annual report why it is
difficult for teachers to secure better pay.  After clearly pointing out
that no other professional school has so many  serious and complex
questions confronting it as has a Normal School, he  says:  "The schools of
law, medicine, and engineering deal with young  students . . who have had
no professional experience. Their aim  is to give their students the
necessary equipment for reaching the first  round of the professional
ladder. The next steps, and many thereafter,  are taken under the personal
supervision, of a master . . . The normal  schools for. teachers deal with
novices as do the schools of law,  medicine, and engineering. Their aim is
to equip their students for  professional service in teaching, but in the
teaching profession there is  no provision for apprentice-training under
the eye of a master. The  young teacher must stand alone from his first day
in service; he works,  behind closed doors and with children who are
obliged to accept his  ministrations whether they are benefitted or not . .
. Years afterward  these same pupils render their judgment of a teacher's
worth when  they are called upon to vote for a revision of a teachers'
salary scale.  He is a rare citizen who, remembering the faults of his own
teachers, can  nevertheless give approval to the theory that better pay
will bring better  teachers, and that better teaching is worth increasingly
better support."  '••: \^' '-:'.':-"• -:''fiy\
"VIC-•.".;.;h::- •..:':  Colored Music.  ."The following group
is fa~ contrast  of colored music," said the man who  introduced thef
number in the musical  program at the assembly Tuesday"  morning. Can
you''blame anybody  if he immediately opened his  ears and . strengthened
his imagination  to get aii idea of 'the possible  different colors of a
something that,  is heard rather than perceived? There  were a number in.
the assembly who  did. But, alas! the music was not  of an y_ of those
familiar hues we find  on. the painter's canvas but it was  the music of
the Negroes. Had. the  speaker alluded to it as black music,  at would have
been more effective.  Watch. Your Step  The writer believes in fast work, 
well done, provided there is-no harm  resulting from it. The mad rush to 
the doors of "the assembly* with supernormal  velocity when the audience is
 dismissed a-few minutes late, has for  some time attracted my attention.
It  would have been all right, as it affords  an indoor sport during these
rainy  and dreary days, but if one would  take into, consideration those
among  us who are by nature rather diminutive  in their, physiological,
make-up,  one would but come to sympathize  with them when they are
unthought-fully  brushed aside by more husky  co-eds.  Some day there ought
to be organized  in every co-educational institution  a football team of
the fair  sex... They could prove to be good  tacklers and half-backs.  v ,
To ^follow irjf  gt;theii- study of the  cohstitutidnof ::the IJnited .
States;  and"- the steps necessary for become  'rig ancAmerican citizen'the
eighth  grade pupils with their student  teachers visited the
naturalization  court which was in "session last week.  Following the visit
a round table  discussion was held, in which both  the pupils.and student
teachers voiced  their impressions regarding the attitude  of the
applicants, questions used  by'the judge, and the general atmosphere  of
the court, after which each  pupil was given an opportunity to  summarize,
in a brief statement, the  reasons why-the trip was worth  while. ,  Using
this summary as a basis for  a unit of work in English, each pupil  wrote a
paragraph including both the  trip and the discussion  Many interesting'.(
points were  brought out in these papers, for the  children had discovered
that the constitution  was _simple and interesting  rather than a hard, dry
documents  They were also brought to the realization  that the foreigners
applying  for. citizenship know more about the  constitution than Americans
do. They  developed a feeling of sympathy for  the foreigners,, and noted
that the  attitude toward the Nordic applicants;  )yas morej f avorable
than";that  toward the7-Southern Europeans.  ; They were impressed with the
dignity  of the court proceedings, and by  the facts that the. judge
insisted on  accurate answers. They found that  among^the most important
points in  becoming a citizen, was the ^necessity.  of having a good moral
character  and believing [m .the principles  set forth by the constitution.
 In speaking to the people who received  their papers, - Judge Neterer 
brought out what it means to be a  citizen of the United States. He
explained  that the responsibility of the  nation rested upon its citizens.
He  also stressed the idea that the con-  ! stitu'tion is short and easily
read and  every citizen should be familiar with  it.' . . : • •
• ' ' ' . * • " ' ' • . VV-'-'  The sharing and
exchanging of impressions  and experiences was not  only the greatest
benefit derived by  the group as a whole, but it also  furnished an
excellent opprtunity for  the application of the participation  idea as set
forth by Miller _ of Wisconsin  Another direct result was bringing  the
spirit of co-operation and sym-patli  one step further into the .classroom.
 -  H H W a M H M ^ ^ C ; ; •*-? „  Battle Creek Sanitarium 
Electric Light Baths  • Are Unsurpassed in
Relieving':••••;.%-  "Flu*, Colds andLa Grippe 
SPECIAL RATES  To Normal Students  South Wing Hotel Leopoild  Phone for
Appointment  TOimmrnioniinninnnrnimimiiiiiiiiiiiinHiiimniinmiiim^  Student
Opinion  iHraraHiiiiuiiraiiHiinmniimiiimiuiiiiiiiiiinnminiiuiinniiM  Keep
off the grass, between Edens Hall and High street, you fiendish  breakers
of campus etiquette.  Who said that student teaching was the most
disagreeable task for the  embryo teacher?  "- If students would read Louis
Untermeyer and Carl" Sandburg for a  while and lay off the ."TRUE ROMANCES"
the amount of suicides in the  United States would greatly decrease.  It
Would be nice if the girls in Edens Hall would allow themselves to  be
influenced by the men in regard to table etiquette.  E D E N S HALL GIRLS 
H A V E PAJAMA PARTY  : A gay frolic was enjoyed in the reception  room by
the girls residing in  .Edens Hall, Tuesday evening, January  11, for the
initiation of the new  girls. A clever program of stunts and  readings was
given by the girli and  refreBhmentai wer$i served.  Notice has come of the
marriage of  jVIiss Edith Jackson, of Portland,  -and Mr. Donald I*-.
Niles, of Wash-ougal,  Washington, Friday, December  31, fat; Portland.
Mrs. JJilea g^adta-  *te lt;lfrom^ ^tfNonnal at $he winter  ;^uarter^jp^ 
gt; 20; '. "^ne young couple  wU) make their b^nie in Washougal.  w. A. A.
MEMBERS  HOLD FIRST MEET  Fpmia Wakin presided at the first  meeting of the
W. A. A. for this  quarter last Wednesday. .'•. The test  



     ----------

     

Weekly Messenger - 1927 January 14 - Page 3



     ----------

     

WASmNGTONBTATn MOBILE SCmO  WT|W«IIH  nnnuani  •uintet
Eveniiig  Hie Low Down  BY NORBY  Where, Oh! where were all the Normal 
School students, faculty members,  and yell leaders last Saturday night? 
There's one place they were not, and  that place was Whatcom High School, 
where" the Vikings opened their basketball  season by engaging theLynden 
Zebras.for competition.  No! The Intra-Mural games are  not rough. It is
only unrefined basketball  that the boys are playing.  * • * •
»  Assistant Coach Keeney has been  on the sick list for a few days.
He  recovered just in time for the Viking  and Zebra game last Saturday
evening.  * * » «  Ray Odell went on a basket scoring  melee and
annexed a total of 20  points. His overhead shots underneath  the basket
proved too accurate  for the'Lynden guards.  "Zeke" McClurken is another
one of  these All-Stars, hailing" from Richmond  Beach. If he can make 13 
points in a game, without cracking  a smile, as Tommy Marsden, another 
Star hailing from the same hick  town can do, Zeke will hold up the 
banners of that town.  VIKINGS WIN FAST  MIX FROM LYNDEN  ZEBRAJX^STARS 
Ray Odell Was~Big Show/Annexing  a Total of 2 0 Points, to  Cop High Point
Honors.  MANY PARTICIPATE  IN WINTER SPORTS  Any Girl Passing Life Saving
Tests  is Eligible for Life Saving Corps.  Basketball, Volleyball Popular. 
SCORE w 13-10 AT HALF  Thirty Girls Hike  to Natural Dry  Dock and Vicinity
 Although Vikings Do Not Display  Mid-Season Form, Promises are  for a
Winning Team.  Last Saturday afternoon, 30 girls  took the car to the end
of the South  Bellingham line and from there, hiked  out to Natural Dry
Dock, taking the  trail over hill to the point.  This trip is one of the
most beauti.-1 °"ce came with only a few minutes  Coach Carver's
varsity hoop squad  opened the 1927 season in fine form  by defeating the
fast Lynden Zebras  32-24 Saturday evening in the  Whatcom gym. Ray Odell,
flashy for-ward,  lead the Vikings to victory,  playing a wonderful floor
game and  accounting for twenty of his team's  total.  On the whole, the
contest was well-played,  but the Lynden boys slipped  up several times on
easy set-ups. The  chief Normal weakness seemed to be  letting the.
opposition through the  (Ttfense for short shots too often.  Odell Opens
Scoring.  Odell opened the scoring with a  clever goal from the field in
the first  minute. He followed soon after with  another, making it 4-0. The
But-termakers  then commenced activities  with their slow-but-sure
percentage  game. Shagren looped two in a row  to tie the score at 4 all,
then Axling  contributed a shot from .the middle  of the floor to put the
Lyndenites  in the lead for the first and only  time during the game. " 
Jensen evened it with one of his  characteristic overhead loop-shots,  then
the Vikings shot into the lead,  liolding their position until half time, 
with a 13-10 lead.  With Odell continuing on his rampage  the Vikings
gradually increased  their lead, and won handily. Only  once during the
second half did the  Zebras really threaten—and that  Red Cross Life
Saving Tests in  swimming have been successfully  passed by the following
girls: Phyllis  Crabill Blanche Hamilton, Edna  Runden, , Madeline
Bpsshard, and  Eileen Galloway.  The hours from 3 to 4 and from 4  to 5 on
Friday of every other week  have been scheduled for swimming at  the Y. W.
tank. The first meeting  will be held January 21.  Life Saving Corps
Sought.  Any girl who has passed the senior  or junior life saving test is
asked  to report to Miss Weythman in the  P. E. office as soon as possible.
The  purpose is to organize a Life Saving  Corps.  Basketball practice is
progressing  nicely and the schedule for Intra-  Mural games will be
announced soon.  Miss Weythman reports 26 girls  turning out for her
Tuesday, Thursday  section of basketball with Phyl-lis„  Crabill as
manager.  In Miss Kellers basketball sections  there are 22 signed up for
the Tuesday,  Wednesday turnout at 3 o'clock,  and 39 have signed for the
Monday,  Wednesday section at 4 o'clock.  Volleyball practice continues,
there  being 29 enrolled for this sport.  o- lt;  VARSITY SOU AD TO  PLAY
STRONG B.C.  MEN AT WHATCOM  New Westminster Squad Rated as  One of Fastest
in West; Has  Conquered Best Canadian Teams  GROCERYMEN WIN  FROM SUPER
TEAM  With the Exception of McClurken,  the Supers Make Poorest Showing  of
the Season on Wednesday.  GAME IS A T 6:45  Normal Outfit is in Good
Condition  for Season's Hardest Contest, but  is Doped to Go Down to
Defeat.  ful short hikes "in this" vicinity, as  the trail follows.the
Sound for several  miles.  The beautiful day, the interesting  trail, the
congenial .companions and  the eats, all combined to make the  trip a very
delightful one.  ————o —  W. A. A. Girls to 
Climb Chuckanut  Saturday morning January 15, all  those interested in
hiking to the top  of Chuckanut will meet in front of  the main building at
8:15 sharp. If  the day is clear a very fine view may  be obtained from the
top of the  mountain, and this is considered one  of the* best short trips
on the  schedule. The party will be back by  lunch time. ;.
:'"•':'V:r gt;-.~'  to go, when they rallied to make the  score
29-24. A short period of stalling;  a foul shot followed by a field  goal,
and the contest was over.  While not exhibiting mid-season  form, the
Vikings played a steady  and unfaltering game, giving great  promise of a
successful year.  Jensen, the new center, accounted  for eight points, but
such genuine  hard luck contributed to keeping his  score down.  Roland
Shagren, guard, led the  Zebra scoring with 13 markers.  Summary  Normal 32
Lynden 24  Odell 20 F Meurer. 2  Keplinger ..F...„ B. Einie 7  Jensen
8 ......C. Henry  Isaacson G. Shagren 13  Benson ; G. *....., Axling 2 
Substitutions^-Normal: Stickney 2  for Isaacson, Harper 2 for Keplinger, 
Thorsen for Jensen, Jensen for Harper,  Isaacson for Stickney..  Supers to
Play  Baker Lumber Co.  Next \Yednesday evening, the Normal  Super-Varsity
will take on the  Baker Lumber company quintet/ in a  basketball game to be
played onthe  Y. M. C. A. floor.  The Lumbermen, who thus far have  to win
their first game, ate preparing  for a comeback. They have obtained  the
services of several former  High School stars, among whom are  Judy
Davidson and Harry Pike, former  Whatcom men.  The starting lineup for the
Supers  will be chosen from the following  men: Hawkings, Ernest
iKeplinger,  Don Stickney, Estill, McClurken,  Burke, and Schunneman. 
Playing against the strongest opponent  encountered by a Bellingham  team
for many years, the • Viking  Varsity hoopsters encounter the New 
Westminster Adanacs tomorrow (Saturday)  evening, at 6:45, hi the  Whatcom
High gymnasium.  In this, the second game of the  Normal season, local fans
will see in  action one of the best semi-pro teams  in the West, a team
that has won  many honors. Coach Carver has been  pointing his- men for
this mix-up,  but the best hoped for is to hold the  opposition to a, low
score.  The Adanacs are of a- caliber  rarel seen in action the members of 
the team having played together for  four years. Each year the Canadians 
gained B. C. honors—moving up from  Junior, to Intermediate, to
Senior B,  and finally, Senior A competition.  Last year, after winning the
B. C.  



     ----------

     

Weekly Messenger - 1927 January 14 - Page 4



     ----------

     

^fyS^M-^Vp^.r^.^,,  ^ 3 H I N  lt; £ ^ ^  D A N C I N G GLASS U
N D ER  A U S P I C E S O F SCHOOL  Club Drafts Plans for Present  Quarter.
June Wetherell Heads  v AssemWy Program Committee.  * The Philos held their
first regular  meeting of-the winter quarter on  Thursday January-6. The
following  officers' were elected: President,  Alice Lingley; vice
president, Pearl  Bartruff; secretary-treasurer, Mary  M. Doyle; reporter,
Tillie Thordar-  '. son. '  A motion for a Klipsun cut was  carried. Plans
were discussed for a  Philo basketball team. The club now  possesses one
basketball trophy, and  hopes to continue successful. Asa  Sherwood was
named chairman of a  committee for a stunt for the Viking  Vbdvil, and-
June Wetherell heads a  second committee to arrange for the  Philo assembly
program on Februa  r y ' s .  The Social Committee is working  on plans for
a dinner-dance at the  Hotel Leopold, which will occur on  January 29. This
is the big social  event'of the quarter, and air mem-bers  are eagerly
anticipating it. A  definite outline for future programs  was prepared. The
club plans to  take up the study of various foreign  peoples, including the
"Russians,  Spanish, Chinese, American Indian,  And Oriental Indians. The
studies  will come under five headings: (1)  The life of the people; (2)
Their literature  (none dramatic); (3) Drama;  (4) Art; (5) Music.  The
club then adjourned to~ the  evening's program, which was furnished  by the
new officers. A special  meeting will be held Thursday,  January* 13, for
try-outs for membership.  o-  Y.W.C. A. INVITES  ALL GIRLS TO JOIN 
Activities of This. Club has been  Continuius and Helpful Ever  Since the
First Year.  Under the auspices of the/Bellingham  Normal a new class in
ballroom  dancing will be conducted in  the big gym, on the evenings of 
Tuesday and.Thursday from seven to  eight o'clock. The course will consist 
of eight lessons,, which will set the  debutantes back two dollars and
fifty  oents. Four lessons will cost one  dollar and a half.  If enough are
interested an advanced  class will be organized, which  will meet on the
same night as the  beginning class, at eight o'clock. Mrs.  Tischer,
dancing teacher last quarter,  will instruct the classes. •- - -  Big
Wind  (Continued from Page One)  House Notes  Girls Entertain.  Last Sunday
morning, Grace Phillips  and Thelma Butler entertained  at a, breakfast
party. The guests included  Miss Johnson, Bernice Marvin,  and Inez Ebert. 
They Were Elected.  At their first meeting \oi this quarter,  the girls cff
More's Hall elected  Clara Heggen for president and Evelyn  Peterson for
social chairman.  After the meeting, Viola Searing entertained  with a few
clever stories.  The Y. W. C. A. was organized  .during the first year of
this school  and has had continuous life ever  since. It is affiliated with
the National  Y. W. C. A. and the World's  Christian Student Association.
Thru  the efforts of the Y. W., the Bellingham  Normal has had
representatives  in the last three great International  Student Volunteer
Conventions. It  has represented this school in many  conferences and
councils in the Northwest  during thse years.  The Y. W. was the first
organization  to bring students together, and  although some of its
functions were  taken up by the Student Association  ^and others later by
the Women's  League, it finds still an opportunity  for service, such as
occasions for social  life especially for personal  friendships, and
development of leadership  in its organization. The two  most unique events
of the Y. W. year  are the Bible Institute in January,  and the sunrise
Easter service on Se-home  Hill.  The Association will be glad to  "
receive anyone as a member to whom  this program makes an appeal and  give
her something to do. Come with  us and* we will do each other good.  Yoes
Hall Yoes.  At their house meeting, Wednesday  evening, the girls of Yoes'
Hall chose  Alma Stewart for -president, and  Tillie Thordarson for social
chairman  and reporter for this quarter.  On the same evening, an election 
was held at the Bachelor Box. Margaret  Sordilards was elected presi-j 
dent, and Blanche Hamilton, social  chairman. New girls at the Bachelor 
Box are: Edythe Vaughn and  Ethel .Neholson.  Lifers Have Hot Time.  At the
first regular business meeting  of the Rural Life Club for the  winter
quarter, Miss Keller was  unanimously- elected club sponsor for  the year.
A mysterious initiation for  new members was planned, after  which Mrs.
Berg led a discussion on  parliamentary drill.  A house meeting was held at
Nichols  Hall last Wednesday evening.  Bertha Hayton was re-elected
president,  and Grace Neeley, social chairman.  Plans for a Valentine party
 were discussed.  After the meeting adjourned, Mrs  Nichols served
refreshments.  is an unknown quantity in an equation'to  be solved by
lying.  Percy said it was plain slander;  women never try to get at the
truth  by any method. .  "Do you mean to intimate that I  would slander a
member of the hopeless  sex 1" screeched Bill.  I t looked as if there
might be some  of the finer points of augmentation  with a chair
demonstrated, but Percy  solved the problem with his usual  diplomacy. He
said that he would  never think of insulting a gentleman.  This took the
fire out of Bill's eyes  and he decided for the Bake of his social 
standing in the bootleggers' union,  that he hadn't been insulted. He  said
he would accept the apology and  overlook any such little mistakes  that
Percy might make, because  Percy probably didn't know any better.  But he
didn't know the kind of  stuff Percy was made of. His ancestors  had been
so blue blooded that  they called themselves the Kentucky  Bourbons without
being interrupted.  He stood up and told Bill that he  would wash the words
down his  mouth with blood.  Bill thought that this was an invitation  to
drink, so he ordered a  gin ricky.  When Perc saw how coolly Bill  took the
"challenge he began to reconsider.  After some meditation, he  decided that
he might as well go  home.  Bill got up just then to drink a  toast to
Percy and Percy was so  scared he left through the fronjb window  without
even saying good-bye.  So that ended the argument.  BOOKS IS HELPFUL  Many
Scenic Spotsp^Ete HUMOR^ ;  ; _ ; * *•,_••• . ^
'• ^ CHOSES ELEVENS  Visited by Students -^  Students Interested in
Reading  for Aid in Teaching Problems  Will Find Library Beneficial. 
Week-end  SCRIBES CLUB TO  PUBLISH MAGAZINE  (Continued from Page One)  The
Cedars.  The following offiers were elected  at the Cedars for the winter
quarter:  President, Isa Jones; social  chairman, Norma Johnson; reporter, 
Cora May Squire. Miss Gertrude  Flanagan spent the week-end visiting  in
Nooksack.  COSTUMES MADE BY  'DRAMATIC ART CLASS  The Dramatic Arts .103
class, under  Miss Dewey, is making the stage  settings and costumes for a
training  school program to be given January  18. The settings and costumes
are all  to be oriental and give the background  for one of the stories
from  Arabian Nights to be told by Miss  Dixon. On the stage with her will 
be 14 of the training school children  in oriental costumes;  GWINNETT HALL
 Hazel Jewett spent the week-end  at home in Stan wood.  • Albert E.
Beshears from Seattle  visited  gt;Iary Fratnik, Sunday.  A pajama party
was held Saturday  night at Gwinnett hall. Dancing was  the main feature of
the evening.  Those present were: Rossie Burns,  ^Betty Taylor* Julia Gray,
Mary Frat-fhik^  Margaret Smith, and Marguerite  ^Zwe'ifei..'-...:.o-.;
,.•;..:.':•  lt;'•':--••:• ;•':, 
gt;: .:;-i-.! -•.  SOCIAL  AND  PERSONALS  Miss Olive Edens, of the
English  department, will give a talk at the  University Club of Vancouver,
B. C,  Tuesday, February the 8th, on the  subject of "Modern Dx-ama." Aa a 
guest of the English Department she  will also visit the University of 
British Columbia.  Miss Mary Campbell, class of 1915*  who is home on
furlough from India,  after five years of service under the  Chiistian
Church Board, will speak  in the pulpit of the Christian Church  of this
city next Sunday morning.  Elinora. Hobbs, Elizabeth Eaton,  Violet
Holstein, Mabel Nelson, from  Seattle, will visit in Bellingham this 
week-end and attend the Bible Institute.  PPPPP