Primary tabs

1931_0220




     ----------

     

Northwest Viking - 1931 February 20 - Page 1



     ----------

     

DEBATE WITH WEBER  |HER|tFEiFii^;:25f W^^^m/^i^immm  lvX
gt;ttX50C^ttOJ;V9 WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL m^Qbl^BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON
Friday, February 20, 1931  THE OXFORD VOICE 
--•''••pOET'/PESTS / /;  ';-•;. " W A Z Z I S : ^ ,
; //i'^-'-'  •'•'• •: TE DIARY ; \ v  By D. C. A. 
^Diction—pronunciation is continually  an issue with us out here in 
the West. Every other day we hear  someone lamenting over the fact  that
"those Westenahs will nevah  learn to pronounce' theyah wuds  correctly."
Thank the powers that  be, we never will adopt the standards  of that
whining one.  : It is true, we speak hurriedly and  K? slur our words but
then we've got so  much to say and then too here in  the West our auditors
can grasp,our  meaning the first time. Easterners,  Bostonians and
Oxfordians are always  elevating their brows at the  Western mode of
speaking. Hmmph!  I think it is high time we turned on  the
mispronunciation going on  abroad. F. H. Vizetelly says, "Mis 
pronunciation abroad is due largely  to the influence of the people of 
Oxford, who have steadily debased  the coinage of English speech with 
emasculated voices and exaggerated  idiosyncrasies. They cannot ask  you to
dinner; they ask you to 'din-nan'.  They do not come to a lecture;  they
come to a lectchah'.  They believe in 'cultchah', and instead  of saying
'Oh, no',' they say,  'Oonoo' or 'AW naw', or even *Ow  how'.  The Oxford
standard of speech  t§^.Jut^»^ been flung at us. .Why 
shouia^lffibje? We have a standard  ' lt;rf speech fli^Pe, which in my
humble  judgment is.^penor to the stilted  standard of jijWrh-^f i
gt;W^Jmmae^ or.  Mayfair in the English capitbl. The  old Oxford voice is
dying out, for  * even the English themselves term it  "the abominable
Oxford voice."  Certainly we have difficulties of en-nunciation  to
overcome but, we  won't add more erroneous pronunciations  bycopying the
Oxford pro^  nunciation.  , " -—MV.S.N.S.  DEVELOPMENT OF DANCING IS 
ILLUSTRATED IN NUMBERS BY  FOREIGN BORN PERFORMER.  DANCES ARE COSTUMED  A
former Normalite scribbler, upon  reading my cblyum, said: "Oy 
Yoi—you have ruint Normalite by  putting poetry therein!" Well, V. V.
 V., I'm just that kind of a p e s t -  Ac!^ es ist shade!'  I've seen many
a light-headed vac-cuous  pest,  But a newspaper poet heals all the  rest. 
There's nothing too tragic; at any  old time  He will pounce on an item so
long  as 'twill rhyme.  Some man lights his gas and neglects  to come back,
 And this maniac scribbles a twq-verse  wisecrack.  A groom beats his bride
when he  • eats her first meal,,--  And a poem appears that's a real 
•slapstick reel.  A driver who's lighted, meets an  auto that's not 
And ay verse runs the "funnys" a  race that is hot.  You just can't escape
though you  go to your doom  For he sees that word rhymes with  a funny one
"boom",  We'll wait 0 this pest bids this  •life a farewell,  Then
he^ll likely go chuckling for  that rhymes With H-—I.  /V':  gt;'".:
'/ W.S.N.S. ::'  . Anotherfoiroer Nonhalite writer—  said to ine,
"Where is 'Ye Profs  Diary'? It seems that that item  was a treasured
addition and space-filler  for this colyum—so ye Prof  has consented
to turn in a little  -more':copy.. \\-':-''^."; ;,::' -•- 
^:J^ckortynge^tew- thee abuv artycal  o t o myspreanhnnseeashun, thee pee- 
^l^afar riot' dooing rite;, by 'awt la^-i  lidfe styudense ollweighs utter
wyth  Miss Sali Lobel Roumania's celebrated  actress-danseuse, will make 
her first appearance in Bellingham  in the local auditorium Thursday 
evening, February 26, at 8 o'clock.  She has spent the last three seasons 
in London and was proclaimed  as the "queen of the dance" and  "wonder
dancer of Roumania."  Her program will consist mainly  of numbers that
illustrate the development  of dancing; it is titled  by her as "Dancing
Down the Ages."  For each dance' she makes a change  in costume. Such
illustrative dances  are the Egyptian "Ceremonial"  dance, Greek "Mourning
Dance,"  Greek "Nymph Dance," Roman "War  Dance," "Anitra's Tanx," "Le
Pigeon,"  Roumanian "Gypsy Dance."  and others.  Miss Lobel was born in
Roumania,  in the city of Vasliu. She has never  attended school, but was
brought  up under secluded tutorship and in  opposition to her parents'
wishes  she took up dancing and acting. After  the German occupation of a
part  of Roumania. Sali ran away from  home and, after many privations, 
often haying little to eat, she met  with success in London and- later  in
Paris on the close of the World  War.  Tickets for Miss Lobel's program 
-spiE,be-available.rfox-50 cents and  students will be admitted on their 
activity tickets.  INFORMAL CANCELED  Cinclerella ancl Her  GQC^ 
At^Komen's Informal  Waving her. magic wand over the  ball room of;the
Leopold Hotel, the  fairy godmother of the Cinderella  story, on February
28, will transform  the place into a palace, this time  creating .a scene
for the amusement  of the "Cinderellas" of our modern  day and age; namely,
the members  of the Women's League.  These are but a few of the many 
surprises that will take place. On  the stroke of twelve a large clock 
will chime put the magic hour. At  that time the dance will be over and 
all the "Princes" will escort their respective  "Cinderellas" home.  .Those
on the program committee  are: Lovia Weiger, Bertha Hunt,  and Anne
Berkebile.'* On the program  committee were: Alice Cow-gill,  and Katherine
Laube. On the  faculty dance committee were:  Marge Moore, Inez Payne, and
Mary  Gordon.  o ——  H. B. Smith Leads  Symphony Concert 
DEBATERSWIN FROM  WOMEN'S NEGATIVE  VISITING SPEAKERS ARE NEAR  END OF TWO
WEEK TOUR OF  PACD7IC COAST SCHOOLS.  STROTHERS IS JUDGE  FIFTEEN SEATTLE
ORCHESTRA  MEN WILL LEND MUCH ZEST.  TOO FEW GIRLS SUPPORT  EDENS HALL
INSIDE DANCE.  The Edens Hall Informal scheduled  for February 27 has been
canceled  because not enough girls'sign-ed  up to go. A minimum of forty 
girls must indicate that they will  attend in order to give an inside 
informal. As only twenty-six girls  showed any intention of backing the 
affair, it has been called off.  Since the outside informal is. only  for
girls going to the Normal school  who do not live in the dormitory,  the
girls of Edens Hall cannot attend  the informal on February 28.  May 16 is
the date set for the  spring dance and plans already are  being made to
make it a success.  . -—o -^  ELLENSBURG NEWS  The Wildcats will end
their  successful .'.basketball season Wednesday  night, February 18, when 
they play C. P. S., a team they have  already beaten once this year.  .'
— — - o '  Under the leadership of H. B.  Smith, the Bellingham
Symphony  Orchestra will play it's second concert  this season in the
American  theater. The concert will begin at  8 o'clock next Tuesday
evening.  Fifteen men from the Seattle  Symphony .Orchestra will play with 
the orchestra,, and among these  there wiilv;be a quartet of French  horns.
. .-•;//-' .*;'":"•"•'"'. -"/;: '":'-••' 
Tickets, are now on sale for 50  cents and can be procured from any  member
of the Symphony. Student  activity tickets will admit Normal  school
students to the concert.  H. B. Smith states that the orchestra  has, been
working very diligently  and.that he expects this will  be a better concert
than the Symphony  has ever given before. The  program follows:  Overture
"Der Freischutz"  ...Z... '. Weber  "Finlandia" — Sibelius  "Valse
Triste" Sibelius  Overture "Martha" Flotow  Intermission  Overture "Egmont"
.......... Beethoven  "Peer Gynt Suite" No. 1... Grieg  "Marche Slav" ,~.
Tschaikowsky  , o—  NURSE NOTES  The following people have- been 
bsent during this past week because  of the "flu": Harold Shelton, Margaret
 Jacob, Charles Dowell, and  Virginia Dinkel.  CALENDAR  FRIDAY, Feb.
20—  4 to 5 p. m., Rec hour.  8:15 p. m., W. A. A. dance in  the big
gym.  SATURDAY, Feb. 21—  9 a; m., hike to, Lookout  mountain;
leaving from the  campus.  Thespian banquet at the Umbrella.  Vanadis Bragi
banquet at  Chuckanut Shell.  TUESDAY, Feb. 24—  11 a. m., regular
assembly;  Wood Wind quintet.  gt;  ; 4 p. m., intramural baskets  ball
play-off.':'•'•  8 p. m., Bellingham Little  Symphony concert
at the  American, theater.  WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25--. '/-f  ; 81 p. m., debate
between Web-je^  .THURSDAY, ;• F*b^:?fr—' i ^ £ £ 
v^w/jdariseui^  t^/iurit/y-'^^  vil a; m.,yitudehtiassemb^.  Social Science
Club  Elects New Officers;  Keeler Presents Bill  Although the final
decision was  not in their favor. Normal women  debaters strongly upheld
the negative  of a debate held with the  Washington State college, Tuesday,
 afternoon in the auditorium.  Local debaters were: Miss Bessie  Taylor and
Miss Lois Thompson,  while the State College team was  represented by Miss
Helen Telford  and Miss Evelyn Nobach. Miss Winnie  Spieseke, faculty
member, served  as chairman.  The current question, "Resolved,  that Ghandi
has been a benefit to  India," was probably -the biggest  drawing card for
the large representation  which turned out. Another  interesting feature of
the argumentation  was the cross examination  method which was practiced.
This  system which allows one member of  each team to cross examine the
opposing  speaker is comparatively  new, having first been introduced in 
Whitman college, at Walla Walla.  It requires the debate participants  to
be thoroughly versed on then-sub  ject and also affords more interest,  for
the audience.  The judge, Charles Strother, of  the Speech department.
University  of Washington, briefly and accurately  summed up the points
contributed  by each squad and also the  commendable" qualities used in
their  presentation. '.* The Normal team  was coached by James Carrell, of 
the Speech department, and the  W. S. C. squad was trained by W.  H. Veach.
.  The State college squad, which  also includes Delora Weber and  Irene
Harms, has for the past two  weeks been on a tour of the Northwest, 
meeting the leading collegs of  this section. This tour will come to  a
termination following their next  contest with the University of 
Washington.  Tuesday's "debate was the first  contest for V Normal debaters
this  season.  ———o-  GIVE DRAMATIC FARCE  -*  Dawson
Hales and Robert K. Marchel, ijohoreprese)^ Weber  College, of Ogden, Utah;
These visitors, who are on a nationwide  tour, will meet the Viking team
here next week.  MEN FROM WEBER COLLEGE  ; rWILL/:/ MEET NORMAL HERE'  THIS
COMING WED  WINDESHEIM JUDGED  Psychology Talk  To Be Given Soon  RUCKMICK
FROM IOWA STATE  TO LECTURE ON EMOTIONS.  "THANK YOU, DOCTOR/MS PRODUCED 
IN ASSEMBLY.  Monday evening at 8 o'clock the  Social. Science Club held
its regular  meeting in the Blue Room at Edens  Hall. Election of officers
was the  main business of the evening.  The following will hold offices
this  quarter: Albert Brown, president;  Alice Roley, vice president, and
El_  linor Brandtvs secretary and treasurer.  _ • •'',, ./.' 
The 'dates of the meetings were  changed from the first and third  Mondays
to the second and fourth  Mondays-so as not to conflictt with  the5
DramaClub meeting dates.  Miss:Delia Keeler presented the  Showalter bill,
which is known as  Bill N lt;K 62 in the senate, prepared  by Dr. ;N. D.




     ----------

     

Northwest Viking - 1931 February 20 - Page 2



     ----------

     

IflttBllS^^  ^t gt;f]  lit  gt;£  ¥m 
;?;§jijMl»KihM^ month of September,; by the Associated 
;;Jsttijaen^Wi^ington;;Sfate;^  ^i^'Entiredririi'the: Postoffice at
Bellingham, Washington, as second class matter by  :,firtue;;bftlile act
of: March- 3,: I879.; - v'••\Y'!Y/YY;..- •;$;-;,.:.v--;:'
gt;:'  ^RHnt^^ National Bank Bldg. 
.'•^';••;"IJdlB^ciiipitidn^ advance.''Advertisingrates on
application.  National;Advertising Representatives:
Litteli-Murray-Barrihtll, Mars Advertising,and  Y:Yviii-'SoY;,£Y.Cc.^
City.- . • ;:,•' gt;•':';  :;'Addres*:v^ii^cb
municati6hSj other: than'news items,- to1 the Business Manager of 
''c:[---^M0?i''}0:;:"fr' //'Northwest Viking, Bellingham, Washington Y,
•  the  ' / R c f^  Telephone Private Branch... 
-"^^:%5"%^at-/l:-...:^:„....,.„... 
.i„..:......„l„....„.Editor  .^Business Manager 
......Associate'' Editor  ..........Society Editor  .............Copy
Reader   gt;:.....„.„.;......:.„.;...3i8o 
....:....;......:......„.:..3036  rice m 
;;';:-:^r:;^.':«--::^:\ V_;-:; ....;•- ;SPECIAL,;STAFF  ,I gt;i
gt;!py Anderson Ellinor Anderson Jack Qreaves, Arden Benthein  ^' j
^HelenSullivan Hazel Lehman  ••)-^: :^^: ' ; - ' . - ' ' : - :
' : \ REPORTERS  E y e ^ A i t m a n , Doris Philippi, Edith Jenkins, Roger
Chapman, Bruce  : ; ; ^ Haggard, \  1;^; ' jGerda Jensen, Lucile Jordan,,
Roger Blpmberg,  : , A G A I N T H E S T U D E N T O F F I C I A L BREACH 
During the last school year, several battles have sprung up here on the 
Coast over the question as to the right of the student editor to have full 
sway and final decree in the matter of what is to be published regardless 
of the attitude taken. .  ^ITie definite arguments have all been settled in
some manner or other,  but the question and principle involved is" still a
burning one and far from  ' -oiitr':-"--"  Recently the editor of the
University of Washington "Columns" was  scored heavily for the type of
matter used in that magazine, and now the  bitterest of all the troubles
cited this year, has broken loose at the University  of British Columbia. 
The Canadian government has set down a ruling that was apparently 
unfavorable with most of the students there at the college, but after an 
interview the editor of the "Ubyssey" was absolutely forbidden to make  any
editorial criticism of the government, faculty or school officials.  lt; 
The forbiddence was disregarded and an editorial was printed that from  all
appearances expressed the opinion held by a great number of the students. 
Meetings were held, pledges and statements made, and the editor sus-  ,
pended from school by the President for a period of two weeks.  : With the
editor went the publication. His support from the staff, departments,  and
many student officials was quite strong and practically unbroken.  They
claim that unless he is reinstated the publication will remain  in the
doldrums.  On the back of a large pamphlet-program, announcing summer and 
special courses to be offered at the " U " , a "post declaration" edition 
Was published. It carries copies of letters from the president, statements 
i from students, and what the editor's future plans are. A large boxed off 
square: on: the special edition, was entitled " I n Memoriam" and was
dedicated  to the past memory of free speech. It carried'the inscription at
the  bottom, "She leaves us woebegone, forlorn, and puzzled. Free speech 
is dead and Alma Mater muzzled'.  Whether Ronald Grantham was holding up a
principle for the time  being and for those who follow him in his position,
as to the right of  giving the students the straight facts and comments
from the editor on  matters that are of vital interest to the student body,
is a question. No  doubt the president is justified in his stand following
the fact that he had  set down a definite ban on any such comment. Both, it
seems, have  points in their favor and against them or this
mis-understanding on the  same question would not be so frequent in the
various schools.  The one big point lies with, "Shall a school press be
allowed the full  swing given the independent daily papers of the country?'
 •ofY(tfae Y;Bby';:a^^  the? gyrnnasiiini tonight iat, P 8:15.  The
dance will/be; similar to the 'one  given! last quarter which was such  a
success.. •••^;'^:,:..:
gt;:;v:-•'':•.••.  gt;V/-'. '•••
;';';  " JThe: dance will be called "Hard  Times" and all decorations will
be  carried out in this motif, The club  wishes to'extend-a'cordial
invitation  to all, women of the-school to a t tend  in costume arid have
a, good  time. The ever popular "all girls"  orchestra will be on hand to
put  out its brand of peppy music.  The committees have been selected  and
are: Refreshments, Nina  Johansen; dance, Betty Pearson;  publicity, Vera
Waham; decoration,  Mary Tarbox; niusic, Marion Grieve;  clean-up,. Elva
Pilquist.  -''.— —o— -.,.-•'  Seattle Symphony To 
Play for Students  %£%.!:  SCHQPi^l }mm  ART^;^A|SOiTAKES* "^BJPK vto;
 Students will be„ entertained, in  the assembly Tuesday, February
24,  by the Woodwind players of the  Seattle Symphony. Members of t he 
quintet are: Merrigioli, flute; Davis,  oboe; Oeconomacos, clarinet; Pauly,
 bassoon; and Leonhardt, French  horn.  The program is:  Quintet
v.i.„..„ .....Beethoven  Pastorale ........Rierne 
Musette—clarinet, oboe, bassoon.  Quinet ..Heim  o  STUDENTS WILL
HIKE  TO LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN  Meeting at Baughman's corner a t  9 o'clock
tomorrow morning Mr.  Bond and a group of students plan  to take a hike to
Lookout mountain.  They will start from a point near.  Lake Samish and will
proceed to  the top of t he mountain. Once on  top they will be able to
enjoy their  lunches and hot coffee.  Mr. Bond said: "Lookout mountain  is
one of the three points of  observation used when the Blaine  quadrant was
laid out. The other  two places were Sehome and Mt.  Constitution."  LOCAL
L A D SUCCUMBS  T O BOGEY O F F R I D AY  For the I-Told~You-So boys that
make a habit of doping each game  put ahead of time by using the
comparative score system a big surprise  Was handed down after Saturday
night's game here.  ,; The Frosh had previously taken the Vikings by a 5 1
-point margin but  returned home Sunday with but a 10-point lead for the
score refrigerator.  Scores often mean little, Cheney took Bellingham one
game but lost  the second. -The Frosh won by a great margin in a Bellingham
game,  and then lost to the Cheney team right after the Viking-Savage
contest.  And so goes the dope.  George Dack Judges  School Yard Contest 
With. Mrs. C. X. Larrabee and  , George A Dack as guests of honor,  ;' the
school yards of the Meridian  Iconsolidated district will be judged  ; !
• on. May. 6 for their campus- beauty,  i;.:;^{^:sMcmditxg''.to t h e
"school yard beau-  ?':;:? ^tfication achievement test." Mr.  '0~':: :\
iDack, {who is the head gardener'here  "' l••
'•*i*$!;?'school^: is: now working bnJ ;the  /f'*%l^pia^'lifpr'v each
of - t he - 'six;''grade  :$: ischools; and; t h e high s c h ^  |l:;^:i;i
^;wiu inspect each at t h e end^of  ;'fp|i^;ttie- ^lUeyen^ntvtest/;'^.:
.'.••.,."•  ';; £:;;j||:   •'^il^f^  : j '
£ £ $ ; $ ^ ^ :;selectkm::pi  S;#jf f jfc^tre,^^
sl^^,VlaAvn^;;wa|ias,; ••  $;[  garden, terrace, porch boxes,
urns,  



     ----------

     

Northwest Viking - 1931 February 20 - Page 3



     ----------

     

., :,,:.v»,ua..»Minini run — t ^ W I I I J B ^ W E 
.,~^  fr!M  -1);^Hi:"^teyel?yott} gt;v"sB^ii ',. t h a t 
/;«jpife#Bas^  ^^l^Y^^i^^^!^*:;:*^!^*. stepping put ^ ^ 
somebody^/else's;^giii. It L happjened  ^ " p j i ^ /Joe, who was .
playjb^Ior-  /ward•? for the Philips iip.a rplay-off  game 'f against
/ t h e / . Tliespians,; w^  icloseiy checked by ^ Mc^U, Thesr  pian guard.
In one fof ,the many  ^scrambles for the ball, Al seems to  : ?bjaye;
gotten his elbow in direct con--;:  tact with Joe's right eye.
Result—•  a nipe colorful eye for Mr^ Baxter.  !CAMPBELL;IS S
MR  wmwm *w§  III  '':;';;yerhbn\''/Iieatha. thinks "Twee?'  Chandler
has been getting too much  publicity, and that he (the dove) has  been left
out in the rain. Here's a  ; 'tip:-, :Show the boys what a good  -skater
you are and. all of your worries  will be over.  Some of the people around
school  seem to think that the Vikings were  off and not playing up to
standard  in their game with the U. of W.  Frosh last week. It wasn't
anything  of the sort in our opinion.  Carver's men played a Wonderful 
defensive game, but had hard luck  on them shots. The Vikings Were  flaying
a team that is rated much  higher than themselves. The game  featured close
checking by both  teams and this helped keep the score  low.  Somebody said
that they saw Occie  Thorsen putting four Valentines into  the Valentine
box the other day.  That looks bad. And here I thought  all of,the time
that Occie was going  to be a bachelor.  Colin Campbell, Men's Club flash, 
secured a place for himself in the  Hall of Fame as far as intramural 
basketball is concerned when he sent  a long, long shot through the hoop 
that spelled defeat for the Thespians,  in the second half play-off for
first  place. The score was tied at 18 all  ..^jgithv. but a few seconds to
play  when Campbell got the ball way  back in the Thespians' territory and 
let it go for a perfect basket, and  with that shot the Men's Club earned 
the right to play the Philos for  the intramural basketball championship. 
.  The Vikings will have a rest this  week-end prior to their last road 
trip, which will take them down to  St. Martins and Centralia, where  they
will play return games with  each of these schools. The follow^  ing week
the Carverites will wind up  the season in a game with the College  of
Puget Sound on Saturday,  March 7.  The Marine Ways of the Class  A City
League took one on the nose  from the Blaine town team and lost  their
chances to represent this city  in the Amateur Independent Basketball 
tournament to be held in Seattle  a few weeks from now.  Going into the
eighth week of the  foul shootoing contest, Jim Rork  and George
Woitulewicz are tied  with converting 134 out of a possible  175 foul
shots. Myron Chandler  is third with 128. Bob Carboheau  is fourth with 105
out of" 150 attempts.  Bob has not taken his  free throws for a seventh
week yet.  The standings for the four leaders  looks like this:  ...
;.:•'.., . RAJ ._, F.C. F.M. Pet.  Rork :..;.,.....: 175 134 41 .765 
Woitulewicz 175 134 41 ;765  Chandler .... 175 128 47 .731  Carboneau.. 150
105 45 .700  Bill Van Over, coach at Friday Harbor,  was able to take his
teani to  the district basketball tournament  now going oh in Mount Vernon,
as  .result of a close game victory over  the Maple Falls team of Whatcom 
county. Mr. Van,Over is a graduate  of this school.  Class B city
basketball will be over  next week with either the Y^ M. C.  A. or the
Bostrom Service team as  / t h e 1930-31- champion.:. -111656: two  week
and the winner of two out of  ; ithree games wUI be awarded the  title. Two
games will be played next  /liWeek and if necessary a third will  be played
the following week. The  ;i;:first/Ijanie/will; be played Tuesday  '! and
the:secondon Wednesday evening.^  ^ T^  the title last year and are the
favorites  to cop the banner again this  By making seven points in the last
 two ahdJahalf minutes of play the  Men's Club nosed o u t t h e Thespians 
18 to 20, in,-;a -close, tussle Wednes-day  afternoon in the small gym.  I
Campbell,,- t h e Men's club flash,  was the star*of the day, and it was 
his basket in the last five and a  half seconds of • play; that put
.the  game on ice for the Men's club.  Both Teams Cautious  Both teams
played a cautious  game for the first period and due to  close checking
there was quite a  few fouls made by both sides. The  score stood seven to
six at the end  of the first half in favor of the  Men's club.  Second Half
Faster  When the two teams came out for  the second stanza they started 
things of f with a bang. The Thespians  crept into the lead and held  it
until about four and a half minutes  before the end of the game,  when
Campbell was put into t he  line-up.  Campbell sank a long shot after  he
was in the game six seconds and  immediately followed this with a  foul
shot and then kept up the good  work by swishing one in from the 
sidelines. The Thespians tried to  stop him but the game that they  played
with the Philos the night  before was beginning to tell on them  and they
just could not seem to tag  the flashy Men's club forward.  Walters, the
Thespian center,  held Jones down to two points and  made four tallies
himself. Hutchins  was the high point. man for the  losers with eight
points, while Iver-son  and Campbell shared scoring  honors with seven
points apiece for  the winners.  Was Three Cornered Tie  This year's
intramural tournament  ended with three teams, the  Men's club, Thespians
and Philos  tied for first place. To determine  the champions of both the
first  half, the three teams mentioned had  to play each other until two
teams  were eliminated. To make the matter  worse, the Philos were the
winners  of the first half and were also  tied with the other two teams for
 the second half.  If the Philos won from the Thespians  and the Men's club
the tournament  would be over, as they were  the winners of the first half,
but it  seemed that such a solution could  not be agreed on as the
Thespians  downed the Philos in their first encounter  of the playoff. Then
the  Men's club and the Thespians played  and the Men's club eliminated the
 Thespians. Now, the race is between  the Men's club and the Philos, and 
anybody's guess is as good as anybody'  else's and the teams are evenly 
matched and the team-that gets  the break will probably win the  game,
although this writer is going  to bet his dessert on the Men's club. 
Line-up for the main game:  Thespians 18— Men's Club 20— 
/::The/' P / ' - A / ' R downed; :tae/'?faper  yareity;'inf 'a/clpse
;coirtest^/ gaine  last Wednesday evening at/ttie;(Y.:  iiyL/c/:A/''rei^ 
;;ciar^  Super Varsity -with eight points* to  his credit; while Flowers
folWed  close upion his: heels w i t h ^ p o i n t s ;  Hoiked o r t h e
P.; A. R, m^de a b r i^  lianCspuHiii the second half which  resulted in
twelve^;;poiits/'^tbV'/his  credit. ^'v-/•••'.' gt;.
/'-"v ; gt;'-'•/-•; ;V"\  Supers (25)— P.A.F.-r(31) 
Campbell, 3 .::.F...... . 12 Neikel  Flowers 6 ,.-. .JR...... :..'... .; 6
Wilson  Clark 8 - . .C :„ 8 Leach  Skotheim 2 ..G ..... .•:..
Hanson  Nyberg2 .... .G.....: ...:.. 3 Jenkins  Subs: "Sheltbn (2) for
Supers;  Winterburn (2) for P. A. F.  Referee: Jewell.  . — —
— o—  VIKINGS JOURNEY  SOUTH NEXT WEEK  RETURN GAMES. ON TAP
WITH  ST. MARTINS AND CENTRALIA.  TEAM IN GOQ£ gt; FORM  Collier
......F. Thorp  Hutchins 8 .'. F 4 Stearns  Walters 4 --C ,. 2 Jones 
McNeil 1 ...........„...G Atkinson  Stoddard 3 G..:......,...... 7
Iverson  Carter 2 .....;...Sub .. 7 Campbell  o :  THESPIANS WIN IN  EXTRA
CANTO GAME  St. Martin's and Centralia Junior  college are next on the
slate for an  invasion by Coach Sam Carver and  his fighting Viking crew.
These  games are slated for the 27th and  28th of this month, respectively.
 The Carverites have defeated both  teams in previous encounters but  both
games were on the Viking's  home floor. It is needless to say  that the
Rangers and the Central-ians  will be tough meat at home.  St. Martin's
will, be met Friday  night and then the team jumps over  to Centralia and
meets Coach Rair-don's  warriors, the following night.  The Rangers and
Centralia are of  about even strength as shown by  their recent; game in
which St.  Martin's won by two points.  The Vikings should be in top 
strength for the trip. Every man is  able and in..suit for t he practice 
sessions. Dixon has fully recovered  and Skotheim is rapidly : rounding 
into the form that put him on:the  regular line-up during the frst part  of
the season. - Clark, is showing up  well in scrimmage. Clark started  the
Frosh game and .made a good  showing in his first game in a Viking 
uniform.- - -  Centralia Strong  Ogle ahdJWaitrak will give their 
opponents plenty of trouble. These  two Rangers looked like basketball 
players in the last mix. Koski and  Gelatt looked best for Centralia. 
Coach -Rairdon of Centralia will  have his men on edge for the Vikings. 
Twice this year his teams  have met Coach Carver's men and  both times they
have gone home on  the short end of the score. This  time they will do
their best to reverse  the order. Rairdon played  under Carver at the
Normal several  years ago.  There is a strong but good-natured  rivalry
between the two with  Carver in the lead.  The basketball season is on its 
last legs. This trip and one more  game with C. P. S. is all that regains 
on the calendar. College of  Puget Sound comes here" for the  final game,
March 7.  — o —  PHILOS LOSE WHEN CARTER  SHOOTS WINNING
BASKET.  Winning the first game of the  intramural playoff the Thespians 
defeated a strong Philo quintet 26-  23 in the small gym, Tuesday!  Both
the Philos' and the Thespians'  playing was featured by ah  air-tight
defense and a lightning offense.  When either team did break  through the
opposing defense, shots  hailed, on the backboards from all  angles; but
not very many of the  attempted, shots seemed to like the  idea of dropping
through the basket.  The Thespians proved to be very  weak on their -short
shotsand "should  lmye put the game on ice;if even  a! small per gt; cent;
of t h e i r attempts  'had.d^pppedi-ttooi^  • The Thespians held
ri12-9 lead at  half :'time//-/-: ;.'• / : . ^ / / - /-i-V;-. / * % :
/ : / • / /  /PyerTanxiety/ oh/ t h e part of both'; 
;$an^;:;resiu^d:::.m:/a  p ^ - f p j j ^^  Stoddard ail going via the foul
route!  pians finally proved to be the downfall  of t he Philos. A foul
shot attempted  after the game had ended  nearly wrecked the winners'
hopes,  but it dropped outside the hoop.  ! With but thirty 



     ----------

     

Northwest Viking - 1931 February 20 - Page 4



     ----------

     

fEgt' M%- j!!i% 'tSSjfei  RwlpVi^liig basl^tball; game last 
Sati^B^iiight, thfe sophomore class  ^ftods^led l i t s j Winter garter
social  p r ^ ^ j W i t o a successful Valentine  p a ^ ^ T h e scene was
set in the big  \iv;i^^H^chihs was general chair-nianis  Hutictains!i was
assisted by  toviar Weiger^ enterteinment; Lu-cile  :Mohring, decorations;
Betty  Smith;; refreshments; Ann Berkebile,  invitations; and Kermit Smith,
 cleanup.;  ; B ^ ^ 'for" the  p ty were: Mr. and Mrs. C. H.  Pisherj-Miss
Adele Jones, Mr. and  Mrs.; "W gt;: J: Marquis, Mr. and Mrs.  E. A. Bond,
Mr. and Mrs. V. H.  Hoppe, and Mr. and Mrs. H. C.  Ruckmick.  Bob Tew's
band played for the  dance from a platform novelly decorated  and centered
in the gym, an  idea hew in party creations.  A feature dance of the "Four
Live  Hearts" was rendered by Jane Pola-chek;  Ami Lee Lipscomb, Phyllis 
Roberts, and Betty Pearson.  yy^f - . ^ - ^ o — — ..  HILLCREST
HAS  BUSINESS MEETING  ^business meeting was called by  t h l president,
Genevieve Axelson, on  Wednesday, February 18. Plans were  made to hold
another party for St.  Patrick's day.  After the meeting, the girls
presented  "Ma" Moore, house mother,  with a box of candy. A social  hour
ended the meeting.  "• —r-r—O-—:  GIRLS, HAVE 
GUESTS  M.E. Harmon, of Seattle, and  Paul Delariey, of Spokane, were the 
guests of Isabel Learned and Vel-ma  Selle, Wednesday evening.  VISITS AT 
RAG AN HALL  Doris Sakshaug of Lynden was the  week-end guest of Greta
Price, at  Ragan Hall.  • • • - • • _ . ; o 
WAHL ENTERTAINS  GUESTS  June Eresk, Alice Lovos, Frances  Glenn arid Sadie
Peterson were entertained  at luncheon Saturday, by  Mrs. Chloris Fisher
Wahi.  • ' —— -o  SISTERS GO TO  BOTHEL./riv •  Rae
and Mary Beardslee spent the  week-end at their home in Bothel.  . o—
 SPEND TIME  AT SHUKSAN  Alice- Swalling accompanied her  aunt, "Mrs.
Munson, to "Shuksan  cabin on Saturday and spent the remainder  of the
week-end at the  Munson home in South Bellingham. 
.:;;•'•::—__—_o-—-——  WRIGHT UP
FROM  SEATTLE  Miss Violet Wright of Seattle will  be the guest of Julia
Olseene of En-   er hall this week-end.  ,::'^f'' : ..''.' /•, 0 -
•  ABOUT MOLLER  HOUSE  Kathryn Jensen^ of Auburn, is  visiting
Dorothy and Sadie Mar-golis.  She will remain Here for two  weeks. Miss
Jensen graduated from  this institution in December. She  will enter the
School of Education  at the University next quarter.  :^;;::j;}',, •.
; — — -O- -7—  BERNICE ANDERSON  HAS GUEST ,  Miss Oiive
Mae of Seattle, a student  of the University of Washington,  was a week-end
guest of Miss  Bernice Andersen.  '•'•;: ' ' . . :
0-7——— ,  SUMMER HOME  IS SCENE"';''/  ^ ^ Scott
entertained  the following girls at her summer  hpme. on Lummi Island oyer
the  ^weekrend: Miss Frances Dewey,  ^Mary Schafer, and Lois Fisher.  ^ffv
^fo'-.V, '' ; ..',;....;', 6. ";;V-..—:-' '.  i»|ws:;LEADS
gt;:;.Vvv,/ gt;:  |im[B»URv ;•'•'  ||p Hgiris ;;6fvDavis'
Hall gave the  fii^illi^e^prbgram; consisted of a';  ^ a ^ : ^ o \ b ^ K a
^ e e n Cooper,; a;  | ^ i i | s ^ r i ^ t l % n d l f a t Weis, and. a 
Ipla^jsofe^by Mrs. !b. H. Kshen The  : decorations were in accord with St. 
the  NAOMLPHIPPS ;  IS;; VISITED''-7; :;"^';;i-/';":.V  Mr. W. H. Vaughan
of Kent was  a guest-of Miss Naomi Phipps last  week-end.: V 
••^'-..;'"''-; ''"':.'•':•.. .'-' .0 ." • ; /
" . ' '-:'[  GORDON TO .  .BREMERTON  Misses Blanche Gordon and HU-dur 
^Anderson spent the week-end  with friends in Bremerton and Seattle. 
•'•'.•
'••••'•"=;••• '..  •
: . ' • ' • ' . - ' — 0 ' ."'.. v"
••••' .  MANYJOURNET  HOME' :,:;:"v;  The following
girls spent the  week-end at their respective homes,  Miss Cecilia
Abraharoson, Lake  Stevens; Bernice Finley, Everett;  Ada Morford and Edith
Anderson,  Carnation; and Hildur Johanson,  Lawrence.  '
••• _ — : o—— -  GOES TO  SEATTLE HOME 
Miss Florence Comozzi visited her  home in Seattle last week-end.  —:
-O— — • ••  IVA GOSS  AT FRIENDS  Miss Iva
Lee Goss spent the  week-end at the home of her friend,  Miss Blanche
Davenport, of Laurel.  ——o ..  MR AND MRS. HARVEY  VISITS
DAUGHTER  On Sunday, February 15, Elsie  Harvey entertained her father and 
mother, Mr. and Mrs. George Har-v.  ey, "of Elma, Wash,  " ° '  HAS
VALENTINE  LUNCHEON  Elsie Harvey, Jewell Briselden and  Ernestine
Archibald entertained  Helen Bessey at a valentine luncheon  on Saturday. 
o  HOUSE OFFICERS  MEET  A meeting of all house mothers  and house
presidents was held in  the Women's League room last Tuesday  afternoon at
4 o'clock.  —°  THREE TAKE TRIP  TO SEATTLE  Lillian Anderson,
Esther Torrence,  and Eleanor Brandt, three Edwards  Hall residents, spent
the Valentine  week-end in Seattle. Miss Anderson  went there to visit
friends, while the  other two members of the party live  in Seattle. 
—: o—:——  WOMEN'S LEAGUE  GIVES TEA  .. The program
committee of the  Women's League sponsored the regular  Wednesday afternoon
tea in the  league room last Wednesday. Pauline  Larkin, chairman of the
committee,  poured, and Rachel Beardsley, Dorothy  Knuppenburg, and Hazel
Lehman  assisted.  SCHOOL CHILDREN  TAKE TOUR  Nellie Parker, student
teacher at  the Columbia school, accompanied  her fifth grade pupils to the
fire  station Friday, February 13. An hour  was spent looking over the
station  and asking questions concerning the  problem of fire prevention.
The  children were very much interested  in finding out if they could do
anything  to help in the reduction of  the fire menace.  —o :  LEHMAN
IN  OLYMPIA  Hazel Leliman spent the week-,  end at her home in Olympia. "
"*  Edith Jensen of Enumclaw spent  the week-end at Edens Hall visiting 
her sisters.  •— 6 —'  KANGLEY OFFERS  LETTER COURSE 
Miss,Lucy Kangley continued with  her courses, for all the students who 
cared to learn more about application  letters. This meeting was held  in
room 120 at 7:30 arid was sponsored  by the Tri-C Club. Every  quarter Miss
Kangley gives these  courses.--: . '':::•;•. ••'i. 
PpSjfl-R^SHOP  •:::;^^-:FASHK gt;NABiiE7:-^v-;-  1312-B Cikh?^  ^Near
American T^  Hscusses  On Mbnday evening, February 1$  the Drama club its
regular inetmeg.  John
Jairies,'••[••j?re^^i':;:Oi'"i}^::'pr'-; 
ganization brought the problem of  a party^before the club. It was decided 
that it was too late to have  a party; this quarter Papere cpn-taining 
requiremente for pins were  distributed among the members. -  After the
business meting, Mary  Macbonaid gave a reading. A play,  "The Third
Angle'', was. given by  Charles Gerold, playing the part of  Jerrold;
Virginia Howell, represent^  ihg Anne and Alice Iddins who took  the part
of Clarabelle.  ' — T — 0^ : — .•  JAP SONGS
FEATURED  ORIENTAL MUSIC AND SLIDES  OF INSTRUMENTS SHOWN.  A Japanese
musical program which  included the showing of lantern  slides of Japanese
musical instruments  as well as the playing and  singing of compositions
from that  country featured the training school  assembly this morning. 
The Oriental entertainment was  the outgrowth* of an intensive study  in
connection with social science  which the. fourth grade has been  making on
Japan, its people and fine  arts.  Two Japanese songs were sung by 
students at the assembly.and an authentic  * Japanese composition was 
played to illustrate the decided difference  in Oriental music and West^ 
ern music. One of the pupils told  why the selections sound queer to  us,
explaining the different scale  and musical instruments used by the 
Orientals. An Oriental composition  of Tschaikowski's illustrating the 
spirit of Japanese music was also  played.  Erickson Speaks  In addition to
this program, lantern  slides of the crude and limited  Japanese, musical
instruments were  also showri.  The music of Japan is, however,  just one
phase of the study which  fourth .graders have been making  about that
country. The students  took a special interest in Japan recently  when Miss
Erickson, technique  teacher, gave them an interesting  talk on her trip to
the Orient. She  told of the beliefs, dress, and customs  of the people, in
addition to a  general description of. the country,  showing numerous
pictures of interesting  places she visited during her  trip. The former
traveler also answered  many questions asked by the  students.  A varied
exhibition of the country  is now being prepared by the graders,  which
will include dolls, shoes,  boats, photographs, creative pictures,  and
several books and poems of  Japan.  aCPENNEYCQ  1309-1311 Cornwall Ave. 
"Where Savings Are Greatest"  ALL KINDS  Decorative Material  Tally Cards,
Place Cards,  Napkins, Seals, Etc., for  Washington's Birthday and  Other
Patriotic Occasions  UNION  PRINTING CO.  1421 Cornwall Ave. Phone 1264 
Not Only Viking  ^Boosters  But We Are Viking Suppliers  :of D. A M.
Athletic   gt;:;::::";^::EquIpnaeiit...  (Continued fforii Page One)  ness
•- college, and^hev has; also ac-^  quired the art gt;ol: dairy
manufacturing.  '••:' ••"•.':' ':-"•
• -'•••.•'•':•'"•." .-PPPPP