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1931_0227




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Northwest Viking - 1931 February 27 - Page 1



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VOL. XXX-^NO. 20 WASHINGTON S T A T E NORMAI^S(*HjO0k B E L L I N G
H A M / W A S M^ Friday, February 27, 1931  BY ffl  TOMORROW AT THECRYSi
BALLROOM  LARGE CLOCK TO CHIME AT  FATEFUL HOUR 0 gt;F TWELVE  WARNING
MERRY DANCERS.  BELLMAN CHAIRMAN  Following the Women's league Informal 
tomorrow evening, the last  big dance affair of the quarter will  be
crossed off the social calendar.  An air of expectancy awaits tomorrow 
night since the dance given in  the form of a Cinderella ball will 
certainly be a novel idea.  ••'•: After each dance a
large clock  will chime out the rapidly departing  minutes until the
fateful hour of  "twelve. At the time this same  clock will solenmly toll
the hour so  eyentfully in the story of Cinderella:  This modern version of
the  famous dance will have just as  much charm and mystery as the one 
told of in the story books.  DEAN ISSUES NEW  ATTENDANCE RULES  NUMBER OF
CUTS ALLOWED  STUDENTS IS REDUCED.  CONCESSIONS FEW  Silver Programs  Dance
programs of silver slippers  and the general atmosphere of the  /ball wil
lend the right amount of  imagination to make the party interesting.  Those
on the program committee  are: Iiovia Weiger, Bertha Hunt, and 
A^5ie";'B"efkebile. On the program  committee- are: Alice Cowgill, and 
Katherine Laube. On the faculty  .committee were: Marge Moore,  Inez Payne,
and Mary Gordon.  The patronesses and patrons for  the dance are: Mr. and
Mrs. C. H.  ; Fisher, Mr. and Mrs. V. H. Hoppe,  Mr. and Mrs. H. V.
Masters, Mr. E.  'J. Arntzen, and Miss A. M lt; Jones.  O : '• . 
SALI LOBEL DANCES  PROGRAM ILLUSTRATES THE  DEVELOPMENT OF DANCING.  Last
Thursday evening Sali Lobel,  celebrated Roumanian dancer and  actress,
made her first appearance  hi Bellingham in the Normal school  auditorium. 
Label was very well received and  her dances were quite unique and 
somewhat different from what the  spectators have bee naccustomed to.  This
year marks Miss Lobel's first  trip to the United States after having 
spent three seasons in London,  rwhere she gained a tremendously  favorable
reputation as an interpretative  dancer.  : Ber program, "Dancing Down the 
Ages/' was arranged by herself and  shows exquisite taste. "  Reports
received from the Dean's  office concerning attendance regulations  show a
decrease in the number  of cuts permitted to a student.  These revised
attendance rules were  adopted February 17, 1931, and went  into effect
immediately.  All students are required to -attend  the regular assembly
with the  following exceptions  1. Students carrying fewer than  twelve
credits.  2. Upper division students of this  school.  3. Students working
for the Normal  school during the assembly  period.  4. Students excused by
the Director  of the Training school because  .of conflict with practice
teaching.  (The director of the training school  shall report these cases
directly to  the Dean's office. " -  Exemptions Few  Students entitled to
exemption  from assembly attendance,' with the  exception of those excused
because  of practice teaching, shall report  to-the secretary to the Dean
and be  excused from attendance, or suffer  the regular penalty from
absence  from assembly.  , Students not exempted from attendance  at
assembly and who fail  to attend or who are absent as often  as six times
without acceptable  excuse shall have one credit, deducted  from their
current program. No  penalty in excess of loss of one  credit shall be
inflicted for absence  from assembly during any one quarter.  Former
Deductions  The former regulations concerning  cuts deducted one hour of
credit  for a total of fifteen absences from  all classes deducted two
hours of  credit for a total of 25 absences from  all classes and deducted
one hour  of credit for each additional ten  hours of absence.  Although
the new rules are not so  very different from the old ones  they do bring
down the total cuts  considerably. The regulations now  deduct one credit
for each six absences  from any one course and  deduct one -credit at the
end of  each quarter for each ten absences  from all classes.  Drama Lead 
Elsie O'Donnell, who plays  the part of Mrs. Judith Anderson,  the "goody"
wife of  Anthony Anderson, the Presbyterian  minister.  BOARD DISCUSSES 
KLIPSUN FINANCES  AND TREE PLAQUE  ANNUAL MANAGER MAY CALL  F O R OTHER P R
I N T I N G BIDS  BEFORE LETTING CONTRACT.  MEMORIAL AUTHORIZED  Symphony
Group  Gives Concert  ADDITIONAL FD7TEEN SEATTLE  MEN HELP ORCHESTRA. 
Secure Moral Victory as Wandering  WEALTH BROUGHT TO FORENSIC FANS~ '  H i
S i i *  : . r Silence f$l golden!'JFhus, ac-  ^eording :toth 6  Jufiduals
of last nighfs debate  . - audience went -home with their poc-  : ke
brimmmgaoerWith thai golden  #??^^^^^^^-; - n u w i e the; journey  ;f
tf?*he school on t h e hill in the hopes  gpf hearing a pood forensic
contest,  ;;/the| undent;was disaRp(^tirig\ • To  : ^ | ! * ^ w ^ 
£ s | « e c h / e ^ a;  g i ^ s e i i d . ^ the :1^  | | t ) ^
£ A U ; : - h^  .that when summed upconstitutes a  Last Tuesday
evening,': underv -the  direction of 1E. B. Smith, the Bellingham  Symphony
Orchestra played  its second concert of this season in  the American
theater.  The personnel of the orchestra  consisted not only of Bellingham 
people, but of fifteen members of  the Seattle Symphony as well.  The
executive committee for the  concert was managed by Mrs. C. B.  Harter and
consisted of William  Gardiner, Lyman Judson, C. C. Up-shall,  Mrs. C. X.
Larrabee, Charles  Larrabee, and C. H. Fisher.  John R. Williams was
concert master  and Ethel Boynton was assistant  concert master.  The stage
was decorated with blue  curtains and, together with the  beautiful dresses
and black suits of  the Symphony members, made an  attractive appearance. 
Program  The program was as follows:  A long discussion concerning the 
finances of the -Klipsun featured  the meeting of the Board of Control 
last Tuesday night.  Suzanne Waters and David Morse,  editor and
business-manager, respectively,  met with the board and gave  a report of
the present financial  condition. Even though the Klipsun  will have fewer
pages than origin^  ally planned, the printing bid of the  Union Printing
Company is larger  than expected. As the Klipsun has  no contract they may
call for outside  bids unless a satisfactory agreement  can be made. 
Gordon W. Leen, former business  manager of The Viking, presented  his
final report, which was'for the  month of December. Jack Greaves,  present
manager, presented his report  for January, and both were  accepted.  Rec
Hour Visitors  Again discussing the Rec hour  problem, the Board proposed
and  passed a resolution that a "liberal  and benevolent construction of
rules  be stipulated for people who have  attended this school, and- that
all  who have riot attended school here  be graciously prevented from
attending  Rec hour." No committee was  appointed to draw up these rules. 
Arthur Gravrock gave his report  concerning the plaque to be placed  at the
memorial tree for school war  veterans. "For $100 a plaque may  be obtained
which will contain the  names of all veterans, while for $25  a plaque can
be "purchased which  will be a fitting memorial and contain  a suitable
inscription." The  Devil's Disciple  Thad: Ellis is the "DeoiTs  Disciple"
in the Shaw play  of that name that is being presented  by the Normal Drama
 Club next week.  BIRD LOVER TO GIVE  NOTED WESTERN NATURALIST  TO SHOW
FIVE REEL FDLM.  Green Pastures  Is Presented  MAUD SHEERER, WELL KNOWN 
HERE, READS NEGRO PLAY.  Symphonic Poem "Finlandia"  .:. Sibelius  Valse
Triste Sibelius  Overture "Martha" .:. Flotow  Intermission  Overture
"Egmont" .v . . . Beethoven  "Peer Gynt" Suite No. 1 Grieg  1. Morning  2.
Death of Ase  3. Anitra's Dance  4. In the Hall of the Mountain  King 
Marche Slave Tschaikowsky  '• O : —  INTRAMURAL SERVUS , 
(Continued on~Page Four)  • _ _ _ _Q __  SOPHOMORES MEET  CAPS AND
GOWNS DISCUSSED  FOR THE JUNE GRADUATION.  : grange of schools covered from
Maine  had niiade; -all arrangements ; ^  debate some time ago, arid the
local  debate organization holds signed  contracts, s t a t i n g : /^ 
debate was to ibevheldlhere on the  25th irf February; No stipulations  in
the contract call for any penalties  in case of non-arrival and thus  other
than a breach;of school etiquette,  the, contract is in no way  binding.:
,:;.:- ';y': ^f'J:':.::^: •;  The stage was aU setfor theam-fest 
W^dneSday night. AIT lodging;  and eattiiig arrarigehiente had/;been  made
tor•••^'.^it^'i^^r.y^;^  ^hq,;|pn/^;(n^^  / IDuej;
to£ attest ^minute^cha^^iri  able to make the trip from Seattle,-  In
the servus-ball game of last  Thursday, team II, Harris, captain,  defeated
team I, Meredith, captain,  with a score of 15-6. There will be  four more
games in the intramural  schedule before the class, teams ;are 
piek^/ih*ft!^ •  RAZrTD; CONTRACT LET  The Sophomores were scheduled 
to hold a meeting this morning in  the assembly hall during the period 
usually used for school assemblies.  Discussion was expected on whether  or
not the Sophomores will wear  caps and gowns at their graduation  exercises
next June. The faculty  voted against this at their last meeting.  A
committee was appointed to  "A woman of magnetic personality,  Miss Maud
Sheerer casts a spell  over her audience, taking them with  her to the
theaters of the world and  presenting to their eyes the best of  modern
drama in her own fascinating  manner."  This quotation, taken from the Tar 
coma Times, describes the way Miss  Sheerer captivated the members of  the
assembry Monday, February 23;  with her reading of "Green Pastures." 
Partly Given  Although there was not time for  the entire play to be given,
the  reading was interesting, nevertheless.  "Green Pastures'' is a play 
concerning the negro's religious point  of view, extremely amusing in
parts,  but also disclosing the seriousness  with which the negro looks at
his  religion.  Offering the Lord a 10-cent "see-gar"  and having the Lord
dressed  in a swallow-tailed coat are elements  which seem to be somewhat
new in  thinking of religion, but they add a  characteristic turn to the
negro  p l a y - ' Many Visits /  Miss Sheerer has been to the Normal  a
number of times before and  is not a stranger to a great many  of the
students.  She held the chair of voice and  classic literature in Lelarid
Powers  PICTURES ARE UNUSUAL  .school for five years, and is also  pick out
samples of graduation an- d i r e c t o r o f t h e School of Drama and 
nouncements and will present these | S u m m e r W o r k s h o p 6f the
Theater  S|C lt;«^|pedJ^p^^r|^  Bids will soon be called for and 
/the. contract'-let for the wrecking  and removing the wreckage of Reynold^
 Hall, v  This building, as well as the property  ;:it s t a n d s ^ ^ ^ ^
m ^ i ^ n ^ j^  j N c r m a l ;^  building the beauty j o f f a^  as
^elFlas the beauty^ of the Jfltoary^  ^Reynolds Hal^was buUtl^George 
^eroral-'^y rsvii^^  Jenldns EfaU as a^-g^^  house. 
gt;-•—••.  samples for the approval of the  class.
" . '  A discussion took place on whether  or not the Sophomores care to 
hold their annual picnic in unison  with the Freshmen.  __—__o- 
Plans Made for Trip  To Sinclair Island  A special 



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Northwest Viking - 1931 February 27 - Page 2



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Formerly The Weeklj Messenger—Fonnded 1899  % ^ S $ ^ 1 ^ # ^
^ of September by -the'''Associated 
;;H^,;:t^:!V^Stode^s^^ghingt6n.StateNormal; Bellingham;; v •..,;.
gt;.;, ' -••'. : ' h - ':'•. ."•..-" 
v;^%;'"''!S\^?*t»ejiy»n::.the':;;Postoffice'.at- Bellinghanii
Washington, as second class, matter by  ^:?i- Si^'$^^ lt;-:^\ ct.?t-^?T^ 3,
1879. '-.-. u;..\.'.,:. ..'•",/ ,••'•': 0 gt;:y .-.
!•- .  ! ^ ^ ? ^ i b y ft? Miller   Sutherlen Printing Company,
Bellingham National Bank BIdg.  • ^ ^ ^ " ' ^ ^ • ' ' ^ ^ P c r
year, in advance. Advertising rates on application.  SPECULATION 
••VpBl'ALLAH:':'? ':  :-::'TELEVISlbN^v 
:t»i.^E.:-DiAiftY.:;.'::  By;I gt;;.:C.::Ai:. 
^•iJP^i^dyertising Representatives: Litteil-Murray-Barnhill, Mars
Advertising, and  '/r;--'S^.r'W^Collegiate Special, Advertising;Agency, of
New York City. '  iAddresi;"aIl;.communications,mother than news items, to
the Business Manager of the  'fe:i-;*n£ift-';'H;' ••
Northwest Viking, Bellingham, Washington '".''  7 ' : B o # . ; } p u 4 T E
R f e^  R O G ^ ; CHAPMAN...........  BDEU^;;SIJI^IVEN..........„ 
r^ptipne Private Branch;.....  •;Aii^i:6.^k:/:at::-;i.'Jii^^_i 
........:...........„ ............Editor  ..........Business: Manager
 ;.. —Associate Editor  .........................Society Editor 
.....„......„............:.C6py Reader 
.....:.„.......„.... .......„........T.3180 
...„..............„......3036  •SPECIAL-STAFF WRITERS' 
Dolly Anderson Ellinor Anderson Jack Greaves Arden Benthein 
.^•:;-?v; r'^'?;•:- Helen Sullivan v Hazel Lehman  REPORTERS 
Evelyh Altman, Doris Philippi, Edith Jenkins, Roger Chapman, Bruce  Babble,
Stuart Presk, Alice Iddins, R. E. Gunn, Fred Haggard,  Gerda Jensen, Lucile
Jordan, Roger Blomberg,  Jimmy Stoddard, Virgil Griffin, Alton Lindsley. 
INEXCUSABLE  Wednesday night the Weber College debate team failed to arrive
 for its S C H E D U L E D debate with the Viking speakers.  ;: We say
SCHEDULED, for both the Weber and Bellingham officials  hold signed
contracts stating that the debate was to be held on  that date.  In the
case of teams traveling long distances at~a time to make appearances, 
there is a chance that they will be unable to make connections.  However,
in the case of a school that makes a specific feature each  year of sending
debaters all over the continent, they are on to the ropes  and know enough
to keep their dates straight. If by an accident they do  not appear, it is
possible for them to make communication in time to declare  just what
happened. When they remain silent altogether, then  " they are to be
blamed, and blamed heavily.1  .'Last year, on the night that they spoke
here they likewise had a  signed agreement that they would appear for
another debate at  the same time. Yet in that case it was another school
left holding the  , prdverbial bag.  When a school sends out people for
advertisement and impression,  they can soon lose all favor for themselves
by such unethical maneuverings.  As far-as we are concerned, we want to
have nothing more to do with  such administration of road trips, in debate
or any other line of conf lictj  as this Utah outfit puts up; ?  _ _ O
• ! ~  ..'- Professor Baker Brownell's contemporary speech class, at
North-  . western, is confronted with the proven problem as to why skirts
grow  shorter with good times, and longer in the depression period. 
Possibly the falling off on goods sales caused by short skirts helps  bring
on the depression?  • , o  GETTING BETTER  A "liberal and benevolent
construction of rules" for all those who  have attended this school at some
time or other, and have left in good  faith with the institution, is to be
adopted by the Board of Control as an  aftermath to their recent Rec Hour
legislation.  We feel that this is a big step ahead in solving what we
admit is a  large and precarious problem as if* has been placed before the
Board. We  are all for this recent motion as a sequel to those of several
weeks past,  and feel that it will greatly strengthen efforts to make Rec
Hours con-trolable.  .-•*-•  The Northwest Viking took a
decided stand on the ruling in the  February 6 editorials, under the title
"Possess the Buckskin." At the time  it ^stood that only graduates were to
be alumni classified, and thereby  through unusual circumstances those who
have attended and are worthy  could .be denied admission.  The Board later
expressed themselves as willing to make new motions  for the better at any
time good ones were presented, either from  them or from the outside. We
offered no suggestions, but are quite satisfied  over the recently adopted
measure.  Things have not gone so well lately, and former Normalites have 
not gained the inner walls, while strangers and some having no school  :
connections have jumped the gap. Quite unfair and lost to purposeful 
legislation, so we heave a sigh of relief.  • Articles have it that
eight o'clock classes at the University of  Rochester have been
discontinued in some cases on account of too many  . students arriving in
tuxedoes.  - ? It would be nice to get out of "eighters" that way here, but
we all  lack the necessary funds to hire tuxedoes and, consequently, must
walk  :to. class.each morning.  •" • — — : —O
: : — . . .  . V / •.;' THE CLASS PAYS  Those in charge of the
Sophomore Valentine Dance were allowed  to put the usual maximum amount of
spangles on the big gym maple.  Some student or group of persons sneaked in
a considerable amount of  ''slicker,*' and thus it was tracked all over the
building. It was necessary  for the class to add the cost of touching up
the halls and) the refinishing  of the gym surface to their already large
group of bills. On top of this  a valuable punch bowl was broken by someone
not connected with the  . affair, and this cost was likewise heaped on. All
in all, things placed  a heavy load on the class for the one party.  : The
first-case cited is the worst of the two. In a way, students  . can't be
blamed for wishing a perfect floor on which to dance, but rules  are made
for a purpose, and by taking things into their own hands these  people
worked a lot of {rouble on the dance throwers. It reeks with  utter
disregard for-those that must take on the responsibility, a decidedly 
large one, of working out such a dance so that the student body may  ;
enjoy; a social. favor. .  B jIt isnaturally too bad that the same floor
must be used for women's  ; pj^ical; education programs during the week
arid serve as a dancing  ifc^datiqn on week-end days. Last year it was
worked put to the best  .•advantage for the, two forces by good
co-operation on the part of the  |;;-^apcers;"and; sponsors.-'r  :
:'• lt;:•. ';.;• '";'.'•  •^•i^S^Ts^^^r
Jthings havenot been so even, and as the classes must  ?^|ii^^^e/dances
have been; held back by extra applications of a wax  ^that^r^ents slipping.
: If this could be realized, all would profit;  The cost of a Symphony
Orchestra  performance is estimated to be  about $8Q0. AS Mr. Smith1, the
conductor,  announced (in response to  an encore) last.. Tuesday., evening,
 the concert came out oh the losing  end by about $500 in general
figures...  One hundred dollars in admission  from the "student body plus 
approximately $200 from Bellingham  music lovers makes about $300 in 
payment of the concert and nets  about a five hundred dollar loss.  What is
the matter with the people  of this city that they cannot  support a
Bellingham orchestra? Is  it because pocket books are stretched  to the
breaking point now? Is it  because Bellingham people have no  ear f3r
music? Has "canned'' music  come to take the place of actual  tones of an
orchestra?  It is generally known that the  majority of the Bellingham
public  is in comfortable circumstances, and  perhaps it is because of the
fine  radios they can afford that they  have become lethargic, sluggish, in
 different, drowsy, and simply refuse  to attend and support our concerts. 
Maybe our advertising campaigns  are not extensive enough. Perhaps  the
people don't know about' our  concerts. Here's another possibility; 
—if Mr. Smith should change his  name to Haeraldotus
Smythiniski—  forget to cut his hair for about a  year—lose
control of the English  language and demand about a thou  sand dollars for
bis services—-then  perhaps the citizens would support  them.  What
to do? What to do? Any  suggestions? Student opinions welcomed. 
—W.S.N.S.—  "Poems are made by fools like  me"—but this
week, though I've  tried,. I can find words that rhyme  but they don't make
sense, and When  they do make sense, they don't  rhyme. But, golly, you try
to make  a "pome" when you've a couple of  term papers due, plus a month's 
reading in a history course, plus  half a dozen other ungodly things 
—and—Oh, Allah!  —W.S.N.S.—  Television broadcasts
with sound  accompaniment are fast becoming  a part of our daily equipment.
Estimating  there are 10,000 sight receiving  sets in the United States,
the  De Forest Radio Company announces  broadcasting of a daily television 
program over Station W2XCD at  Passaic, N. J. The program is sent  three
times daily, with a ninety-minute  period beginning at 9 p. m.  E. S. T.
Features to be broadcast  this week included pictures of life  in the
desert, hunting bears in Alabama,  a cab ride in the Twentieth  Century
Limited, mandolin and  piano recital, a boxing match and a  symphony
orchestra concert. It  seems as though the East were commercializing 
television pretty fast.  I wonder how soon it will be popularized  here? 
—W.S.N.S.—  YE DIARY  Ytt 



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Northwest Viking - 1931 February 27 - Page 3



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Ellensburg has entered a team in  ihe"Independent Basketball
tournament  in Seattle. The team is made 
:'v^.^of;:.fimrinic^-^WU^cal:-stars; all of  'Whom are familiar; to local
fans.  With• the completion of. the Ellens-burg  Normal school
basketball  schedule at an early date it was  possible to add a few of this
season's  stars to a n already strong team.  The late additions to the team
were  Haney, McPhee, and Bailey, all  flashes of this year's squad.'  The
old cry thai football is  hard on the participants* grades was  squelched
by KnuteR.och.ne in a  talk before some U. of W. students  this last week.
Rockne said thai  when the men were out on the field  kicking the football
around in the  afternoon they had to slay in at  night and study. But when
they  had their afternoons off they Would  fool away their time and at
night  they would be out studying the  moon with one of the opposite sex. 
He also stated that the players'  grades were belter during the season 
than they were in the off-season.  I t 's pretty early to give any summary 
of the basketball season yet,  but it won't hurt to review it a  little. To
start with, the Vikings  opened the season with a win from  the Centralia
Junior college, followed  by another win from the strong  St. Martins five.
Then came the  eastern road trip with the Vikings  dropping games to the*
Ellensburg  Wildcats and to Cheney. They  won one game on the trip and that
 was a non-conference game with the  St. Michael's quintet of Yakima.  They
came home and got ready  for another trip: this time they  went down to
Seattle, where they  lost a one-sided game to the U. of  W. Prosh. The next
night they won  a close game from C. P. S.  Their next games were at home, 
where they lost games to Ellensburg  and the University Freshmen,  and took
a fast game from the  Cheney Savages.  Now they are on their way to mix 
*with~"the"'Centralia Junior College  and St. Martins. Wins from both  of
these teams will help make the  season more of a success. The Vikings  will
end their basketball season  against the College of Puget  Sound on March
1.  The Class B city hoop playoff  has been forced to "go the limit of 
three games as a result of the Y.  M. C. A. win over the Bostrom five  in
the second game of the series  by the score of 34 to 24 last Wednesday 
night. The gas boys took the  first game by the score of 36 to 25  on
Tuesday. In each game there  has been an outstanding point getter...  The
first night Bliss of Bos-trom's  garnered 15 points to be  high point
scorer of the evening.  Wednesday night Woitulewicz, guard  for'the Y,
scored 16 points to lead  in scoring for the bame. Next Tuesday  the final
game of the series will  be played at 8 o'clock and the winner  will
receive the large trophy  presented by the Harming- Hardware  of this city.
 It's going to be kind of bad for  the women this week-end when  the
Outside girl's informal takes  place with the stars and flashes  away
fighting for their alma mammy  on the basketball court. Maybe  some men
should be imported for  the dance?  Over at W. S. C, Line Coach  Buck
Bailey has introduced a new  game which he hopes to train his  football men
the art of passing and  receiving a ball until it becomes a  second nature
with them. The game  is sort of a.cross between basketball  and football,
hence the name "cross-ball"  The game is played with, ten  men on each
side. Their object is  to pass the football through a hoop  about three
feet in diameter placed  upon a yard high support at each  end of the
80-yard field. The goals  are protected by an eight-foot semi  circle
marking the limits to which a  player may approach.  ^ Play starts at
center with an  pui-6f-bounds play by the team  winning the toss. A player
may  take five steps forward, after which  he must either try for the hoop
or  pass laterally. The receiver of a  lateral pass may make one forward 
pass. A dropped; ball or a pass  knocks down 'gives the ball to the 
defensive side. In case of a held  j^all the^offensive side takes the ball 
/and starts:,; pjay  gt;wUh an out of  TAKE TWO STRAIGHT GAMES  FROM MEN'S
CLUB IN TWO  GAME INTRAMURAL SERIES.  RACE ENDED  The stalwart sons of ihe
Philo  Club, who have been kings in the  intramural basketball tournaments 
for several seasons past, are today  boasting another championship pennant.
 By virtue of a 23-16 win over the  Men's Club, the Philos have again 
proven their superiority in the inter-  club games. This game terminated  a
two game series for the pennant,  the Philos taking the first  match 19-28.
 The Philos, playing at their best,  proved to be packing too strong a 
scoring punch for the smaller Men's  Club quintet. On the other hand,  the
Club were unable to get organized  and as a result put forth a  rather poor
effort to down the  Philos.  Club Start Fast  Starting out at a fast pace,
the  Club rolled up a four point lead before  the Philos could find the
basket.  After the Philos hit their stride  the Club lead was •
immediately  wiped out.  At the end of the first period the  champions held
a 6-4 margin. In  the first half of the second period  the Philos continued
their scoring  spree and jumped into a 12-4 lead.  The Club finally found
the net,  however, and crept up to within  two points of the Philos.  From
this point the winners began  to play very cautious ball and  held a seven
point lead when the  big game ended.  Game Rough  Many fouls were committed
during  the fracas. The Club were the  greatest offenders, with Campbell, 
Jones and Thorpe retiring to the  bench via that route. Moe was the  only
offender for the Philos.  There was no outstanding star of  the game.
Stearns was high point  man for the game, with nine markers.  Wilder and
Thompson led the  winners, with seven each.  I n the first, game, the
Philos  downed the Men's Club "in a slow  game last Tuesday, 28-19.  The
Club was unable to flash as  it has in the games previous to this  and as a
result went down in defeat.  Their playing was slow and  listless and they
seemed to be unable  to do anything with the ball  after they got their
hands on it.  Only a few lucky shots kept them  within striking distance. 
Play Cautiously  The Philos, although playing a  cautious and careful game,
showed  signs of not enough practice.  Colin Campbell and Jones were  the
sparkplugs of the Club offense,  rolling in seven and six points,
respectively.  Moe starred for the winners  with nine, Baxter following 
with seven.  Philos— Men's Club—  Thompson 4 F 7 C. Campbell 
Baxter 7. F 2 Thorpe  Moe 9 C 6 Jones  Wilder 4 G Iverson  Bushby 4 G
Adkinson  Subs: Club, Stearns (4).  The Thespian Girls', and Outside 
Girls' teams are tied for first place  in the intramural games at the pres^
 ent date, with a tota}. of three games  played and having won all three 
for each .team. Should the teams  play at the same speed they are  hitting
now, a special game will be  called to decide the title, as the dope  seems
to point to them as possible  winners for first place.  All teams, with'
the exception of  the Vanadis Bragi team, have played  three games each;
The scores to  date are as follows: Team one,  won 2, lost 1; team two, won
2, lost  1; team three, won 1, lost 2; team  four, won 0, lost 3; Edens
Hall, won  1, lost 2.  ADVANCED CLASS STARTS  IN NATURAL DANCING  Growing
out of thg interest in  dancing shown by women of the  natural dancing
classes, a group in  advanced dancing has been functioning  since the
beginning of the  quarter, under the coaching of Miss  Mildred Jewell.  The
groups working tentatively  toward a dance recital. Some are  developing
solo dances.  I t is hoped that some of the more  outstanding folk dance
students will  be able to present a group including  Russian, Scandinavian,
and Spanish  dances.  VARSITY PLAYERS TO MEET  RANGERS AT LACEY; AND 
CENTRALIA JUNIOR COLLEGE.  EXPECT CLOSE GAME  "Y" TANK IS SCENE OF  WOMEN'S
SWIM MEET  Team. I defeated Team II in the  women's intramural swimming
meet  held at the Y, W. C. A. last Thursday  with a score of 8-5 points for
 all events. .The swimming showed  good form and afforded some exciting 
moments for the gallery. Miss  Marjory -Horton, coachV expects some  good
results from the second year  people who are on the squads to  make up a
strong team for later  competion.  Golf Is New Sport  On Viking Program 
Golf is the new sport that will be  installed in the Viking curriculum 
this spring. The team will, be  coached by Sam Carver and will  compete
with the other normals although  Cheney has not said definitely  whether
she will shoot golf  with or not.  The team will be chosen by ladder 
competition and will start as  soon as the weather permits. There  will be
three players on the team,  and it has not been determined yet  as to the
awards that the players  will receive, although it is thought  that they
will receive minor "W's".  Coach Carver loaded his varsity  basketball team
in cars this morning  and swung down towards the  south for their last road
trip of the  season, which includes a game tonight  with St. Martins
College and  one tomorrow night with Centralia  Junior College.  All hands
are in fine fettle for  the oncoming battles. Probably  never before during
the present season  has the team been in better  physical condition.
Skotheim is the  only member on the dubious list and  he is rapidly
recovering from his recent  siege of flu.  Coach Carver plans on getting to
 Seattle early enough for lunch. The  team will loosen up its joints and 
take to the cars for the last lap of  the first day's trip. They will get 
to Lacey in plenty of time to rest  for the game with the Rangers tonight. 
Second Meeting  This game at tiacey will be the  second meeting of the
Vikings and  the Rangers this season. The first  game ended in favor of the
Vikings.  St. Martins will be harder to beat  at home. They have one of the
best  teams in this part of the state, on  paper. Fuller and Wiatrak are
good  enough as individual players to play  on anybody's team. If St.
Martins  are clicking they will be hard chewing  for the Carveirtes. On the
other  hand, if the Vikings are playing ball  as they can play, they should
come  out ahead.  Tomorrow night's game with the  Centralia. team should be
almost a  replica of the St. Martins affair. St.  Martins and Centralia are
of about  even strength and both play a hard,  driving game. Koski and
Gelatt  are the towers of strength for the  Centralians. Playing with the
driving  personality of Coach Rairdon  behind them, the Centralia team is 
bound to be hard to beat. Rairdon  does not neglect the finer points of 
the game, but he does insist on  fight and drive. He can be depended  upon
to have his boys on edge.  Buy Your Art Supplies  At Our Store  A 



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Northwest Viking - 1931 February 27 - Page 4



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HHHirdJFimei Dance  feM^SttB^S^ were lungs,  ^ ;6 
'"'SHai^TimeVdance, held l ^ t fW-  '•"'; 0 ^ ^ ^ ^ ' ^ B k - Gysn.
'••:•/_•• •:; •';  0^TiiB]
faculty were guests, dressed  ' ^ some very amusing costumes to  :"
/;_;:V;;^t^l^?bccasion. ."•.;• .'•';! gt; v::\"f'-'^ 
00:--yQ^ lt;^;tn highlights of the evear  ^ingfwas thefine music furnished 
gM^by-the popular "all girls" 6r-  3**iestri organized last quarter froin 
::?$f%Lvk.ftalent. Their peppy dance  ; pishes kept everyone on their -
toes  V'v:,:;'::A3^^;  ::«^e^vwening/'-;The personel  0:;S o£;
the orchestra were: Marian  ^C^^|few!S;;uke,-;aiid leader; Esther Ped-rs 
«reoh, piano; Lucille Jordan and  V ^ and Phylis  Bresnan, xlyphohe. 
•;•,"-•'•'••..000:,'1 '=::- ," ' "
[p':"/.;' . ;  '•;:_ '• :---/;FlM gt;M COLLETT gt;: , / 
•/'•.COURT..' -••".  :-:~'\;Alice Lloyd and Alva
Breitenstein  , ^ visited relatives in Vancouver Sat- 
';••'"/"• iwSay-vand: Smiday:-:;;.".' • 
r/.;:;^:-i^0';;W''iilness, Irene Langdbn has  gone to her home in Puyallup
for  a few days.  ' Marie Thompson's -sister, Edith,  and a. friend, Byrle
HoughY visited  - with her during the past week. 
'^'•-•:,':—: o _... "  DINKEL HAS  DINNER GUESTS 
Virginia Dinkel had Wyona:Hen-nings"  and Isabel Learned as her dinner 
guests Friday evening.  • • ' . . ' • ' • ." -
— • o —  MARY CURRY  AT RAGAN  Miss Mary Curry of
Ferndale was  the weekTend guest of Evelyn Alt-man  at Ragan Hall over the
weekend.  o • '  BIRTHDAY PARTY  FEATURED  Tuesday evening the girls
at Ragan  Hall gave Pearl Urmey a delightful  surprise party in honor of 
her birthday. A ^social hour was  enjoyed, which was followed by a 
delicious luncheon and at which  time the guest of honor was the  recipient
of many gifts and good  Wishes. Those present were: Hazel  Meeks, Inez
Payne, Velma Selle,  Evelyn Altaian, Greta Price, Isabel  Learned; Virginia
Dinkel, Pearl Urmey^.  Wyona, Hennihgs, and Mrs.  Ragari, the house mother.
 ...V . : — o—;  ARNOLD SPENDS  WEEK-END HERE  Miss Joyce
Arnold, a former Bel-  Iingham student, spent this last  week-end visiting
at Barton Hall.  "Miss Arnold was up for the annual  : Thespian banquet and
returned to  : school in Seattle Sunday.  '''-,-%v
y\.~1-''•'•.•'• - . ,.'„..,..  lt;y— 
•;'.- -^f ' yELMA.;MASON .  t HERE MONDAY  '. 00 -Velma Mason, a
graduate of Bel-  _'.,/lhighiihi, Normalrwho is now teaching  hi the Bryant
school in Seattle,  spent-Monday in town as the guest  0. of Pearl Urmey
and Aurilla Scheyer.  •'•••/v:..; ' - . - '—
— - O — _•  VERA NOLLEE  7.^::; TO: P U Y A L L U P ' ' ,
 - ' ' Vera Nollie spent the week-end  at her home in Puyallup.  :'
••:.-.'•:[
•"-'•••••'• ." • —
— — O :—•—• -  NORMALITE VISITOR 
•;;-'; AT COUSIN'S  • Camilla Nelson was a dinner guest  , , v
6 f her cousin, Mrs. M. E. Threlkeld,  ;;; at Maplewood avenue, on Thursday
 ':••;••:• evening. ^ - • :;- •
'•  •0K- •••'- "
•—?———°-  ?••'?': MOUNT
VERNON v ':  DESTINATION OF STROEBEL  Elizabeth Strbebel spent the week-end
 with her parents in Mount Vernon.  ". ";•  '.—
—o—-—-—  MRS. DORA DOWELL  | VISITS AT MAPLE GROVE 
i00" Mrs. Dora Dowell was a visitor  0y0'-:,of Winifred Klaus on Saturday. 
W0S00- -• -': •"•"' .'6—"- - 
^••^.fCANADIAN: PEOPLE":  S g ^ ^ S ^ ' C A l W P U S . './,/. 
%^)^yfikr? and Mrs. N. J. Larsen of  f-^|r J}yM^uver,B.C., visited Camilla 
tiM'0:: ^felsoirj Saitoday^f^Emcon.^ j ^ ^ .  "^fifM0W:^'^(y00yy:
'•• llr0'''0li  ^^^^^an^}0^0^Xr:: 00  ?f0$:-i^zffi sail 
spe^vthe week-  FORMER ART TEACHER  AT NORMAL ; '•";.;' gt;'.;:;,
:^V•  Mr.; and Mrs. Frederick' Abbott  were visitors in Bellingham
during  the past two weeks. Mrs. Abbott  will no doubt be remembered by 
the faculty as the former Miss Ada  Hogle, head of the Art Department  of
this school for many years; She  is also the author of "Blue and  White,"
one of our well known school  songs..  , _ _ o——-—
• ' • • ••  ALUMNI PREXY  ON CAMPUS  Mr.
Kenneth Selby, president of  the Alumni Association; was a visitor  on the
campus Saturday.  • ''.,; . o  FACULTY MEMBER  ENTERTAINS  Dr. and
Mrs. H. V. Masters entertained  -.-a- number of their friends  at a dinner
party at the Mount  Baker Tea Room last Friday evening.  There were eight
couples present,  including Mr. and Mrs. Masters.  o  WDLLIAMS VISIT 
DAUGHTER  Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Williams and  daughter Minnie visited Bessie
Mae  Williams at Edens Hall Saturday.  '-.,. • o —  '':-
••-.••.': . . • i  GARNET GALVIN  SPENT
WEEK-END  Miss Garnet Galvin spent the  week-end with Edith Anderson. 
o———-  TEA SERVED IN  LEAGUE ROOM  Tea and cookies were
served in  the Women's League room, Wednesday,  February 25, by Iola Grew, 
chairman; Alice Lo'vas, Nellie Cox,  Cathleen Hill, Phyllis Lamoreaux, 
Alice Cowgill, and Louise Oberleit-ner.  o  TO WEEK-END  WITH HELEN McNEIL 
Miss Jennie Berg leaves February  25 for Marysville, where she will  spend
the week-end with Helen  McNeill.  o —  DRUSE TO MAKE  OBSERVATION
TRD?  Several days next week, Miss M.  C. Druse will take a trip to
Seattle,-  where she will go around to some of  the grade schools and high
schools  of the city to see what the various  classes are doing in art. 
She will also visit the Art department  of the University of Washington. 
Misss Druse will give to a  Women's club interested in art a  talk on
design : and color in hand  loom weaving.  O- r  HOWARD CAMPBELL  JOURNEYS
HOME  Howard Campbell spent the week--  end at the home of his parents in 
Selleck,. Washington.  . - . ' . . • :—o  MILDRED FRANZ  VISITS
PARENTS  MiSs Mildred Franz of Barton's  Hall went to her home at Aloha, 
Washington, over the week-end.  "- -r- 0- : :  LIKNESS HERE  Mrs. Likness
of Lawrence was, a  guest of Miss Hildur Johanson's on^  Saturday.  •
• - : 0  MILDRED FRANZ  VISITS HOME  Mildred Franz spent the weekend 
at her home in Aberdeen. .  • — : — — O — ; 
LOVAS-SWALLING *  ENTERTAIN  Alice Lovos and Alice Swallihg  entertained
Esther Davies and Martha  Rumbaugh' at dinner: Friday  evening..  the 
HOSIE1RYSHQP  FASHIONABLE  :'v-:PpPULAR':PltiCES: 0 0  1312-BCOTnwall
Avenue  : Near American Theater  general theme, of religion; always a 
subject of controversy in Shaw. ?uri-tanical  faith in this drama hardens 
intcv niere convention. The Devil's  Disciple (played by Thad Ellis), for 
all his deviltry "and irreligious utterances,  is the only one among a 
crowd of canting sinner who has a  spark of diviner fire about' him. He 
proves that, in spite of a wretched  upbringing as the black sheep of  the
family, he has the stuff in him  that makes him a man for "a' that  and a'
that" ••]-••  Portrays Burgoyne  A surprisingly
fine study is that  of Pastor Anderson, the Presbyterian  preacher in the
little town of Web-sterville.  Anderson starts as the  conventional type,
but develops in  the play_uhtil he becomes a robust,  dashing figure at the
close. The  part of Anderson is portrayed by  John James.  The play is
especially noteworthy  for the interesting portrait it con-;  tains of
^General Burgoyne, soldier,  playwright, arid wit of the late  eighteenth
century. Shaw's handling  of Burgoyne is strictly within  the authority
history gives him. This  part, taken by Marshall Bacon, adds  greatly to
the interest of the closing  scenes.  In referring to Burgoyne, Shaw  makes
the following remarks: "General  John Burgoyne, who is presented  in this
play for the first time  on $he English stage, is not a conventional  stage
soldier, but as faithful  a portrait as it is in the nature  of stage
portraits to be.  Disliked Revolution  "It is only within quite recent 
years that any general recognition  has become possible for the feeling 
that led Burgoyne, a professed enemy  of oppression in India and elsewhere,
 to accept his American command  when so many other officers  threw up
their commissions rather  than serve in a civil war against  the colonies.
He sympathized with  the colonists; but when they proposed  as a remedy the
disruption  of the empire, he regarded that as  a step backward in
civilization.  "It will never be possible to prove  that the government of
the victor  has been better for mankind than  the government of the
vanquished  would have been. It is true that the  victors have no doubt on
the point,-  but to the dramatist, that certainty  of theirs is only part
of the human  comedy."  rogram  Tuesdayi^sseml  ''r DeUghthig'^ttxei;
hearts; • of • music  lovers, '^e\:W lt;^wiod'r4u^^t
gt;';''wjb^pse  members are all solo players in the  PPPPP