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Northwest Viking - 1931 July 3 - Page 1



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^'ZpOiifi:  -JT  VOL. XXX—NO. 37 WAgHTNCTON STATE NORMAL
SCHOOL, BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON Friday; July 3, 1931  VICTORIA TRIP IS
ASSURED  SMELL  PERSONALITY  FAME  GLEE CLUB  By Max Stewart  BOARD W W  F 
NEW REQUISITION SYSTEM  PLANNED FOR DEPARTMENTS  UNDER BOARD SUPERVISION. 
Just how much does your nose  know?  The air of a closed room at Colgate 
University was sprayed with an  unknown substance... Students were 
permitted to sniff. This process was  repeated several times. Jasmine, 
heliotrope, lily of the valley, and  other pleasing odors were identified. 
I n each case only plain distilled  water was used as a spray. Maybe  they
'ad a cold in the 'ed.  oooOooo  In his last report, President  James
Rowland Angell, of Yale,  writesS  "Amid the varied currents which  have
been flowing through our  Yale life in recent years, none is  more
significant than that which  has brought with it the rediscovery  of
personality as a basic and indispensable  element in education."  With your
permission, Dr. Miller—  That sounds "human and humane."  oooOooo 
"The undergraduates are against  the House plan because the American  youth
is against anything that  is new. He is the most intrenched  of all
conservatives."  And we thought our colleges and  universities were hot
beds of Bolr-shevism  and unrest.  oooOooo  Three weeks and June are gone 
—forever. In the halls, in class  rooms, on the campus, and at table,
 We hear "I wish it were over," "I  Just cant wait until . . . .".. Why 
this inane desire for weeks, months,  years to pass? They will pass, and 
in passing, they will leave gray  hairs, wrinkles, and — memories. 
Maybe we've reached the age of  senility, but whether we're being  bored by
a dry lecture or sit silently  out on Sunset watching the sun  paint
pictures as. it sinks behind the  islands, we're jealous of each fleeting 
second.  oooOooo  FUTDLITY OF FAME!  No one has claimed the body of  the
man whose tombstone reads:  "John Gwinn, United States navy,  born 1791,
died at Palerno, Sicily,  September, 1849, while in command  of United
States frigate Constitution."  oooOooo  Dean Marquis calls it
"Friday-itis."  Dr. Miller—"Week-end slump."  Our roommate calls it
"love,"; but  Ye serious-minded colymist has  no time for such things. 
oooOooo  Have you hyperkinesia; bothered  by continual and intense activity
 of mind and body; usually a desire  to be continually going places and 
doing things! If so, you're a "go-ygetter,"  and We hope you get it. 
oooOooo "  And we think you should read  John Dewey's
"Individualism—Old  and New," but please don't ask for  it 'till we
finish our report for Dr.  Miller.  oooOooo  We confess our tastes are ple-
 . beian and low. We don't even like  oUves. No vain visions of the Social 
Register beset our dreams* We  had hopes once. Our' five-quarter  exposure,
some years back, to ap-  S preciation of the better things—even 
^straight programs of "opuses"—  'was"laMng" Then came our  ^M/pinter
hibernations out Aohert the  ^train begins, andihevein^^  PICNIC PLANNED 
The Board of Control adopted the  summer quarter budget at its meeting 
Tuesday night in the Student  association offices. Sivert Skotheim  was
unable to attend the meeting,  but all the other members, including  those
just elected, were there.  President C. H. Fisher was an additional  person
present, on account  of the apportioning of money.  Surprise Factor  A
surprise factor was brought up  in this connection, and that is a  change
in the system of requisitions  for all expenditures of departments 
supervised by the Board.  This new system will necessitate  the procuring
of these from the  business office and then having  them signed by the
president of the  association or signed for him by  the secretary of the
board. President  Fisher had this new method  adopted so that the Board
would  have a better check on expenditures  and would be able to keep
activities  closer to a budget in the end. A  check will then be made
periodically  so that none will be drawing over  the allotted amounts for
the particular  quarter.  Official Policy  It has always been official
policy  to try and keep the various departments  strictly within their
financial  limits as budgeted, but from time  to time they have run over.
At the  present, with the existing conditions  as they are, it will be even
more  imperative that no additional funds  are drawn upon.  It was decided
to have Rec hour  l a s t . night, so that the students  going out of town
for the holidays  would still be able to enjoy the  dance. Zeke McClurken
was dele-  TEXTBOdKS DISPLAYED  BY REPRESENTATIVE  OF LYONS, CARNAHAN 
During the past week, Mr. W. G.  Hummel, representative of Lyons   
Carnahan, publishers, of Chicago  and New York, has displayed on the  main
landing the various publications  of his company.  Full Line  Mr. Hummel
stated that Lyons    Carnahan publish a full line of all  grade and high
shool textbooks.  They also issue supplementary  textbooks and have a good
line of  supplementary reading. They have  recently put out a work book on 
American history for the upper  grades.  GRADERS GIVE ACTS  FOR PATRIOTIC
PART  EIGHTH GRADE DONATES THE  MAIN PORTION OF ASSEMBLY  (Continued on
Page Two)  o  LOCAL MUSIC IN PLAY  SMITH WORKING ON CHORUS  FOR LOCAL
PASSION DRAMA.  ?§1£$|'^^^ .;;s  "You expect big things of the 
Fassnahts of Freiburg, Germany.  You were not disappointed," says  the
Boston Evening Amerian, referring  to the Freiburg Passion Play,  which
will be given at the American  Theater of this city, August 2, 4 and  5,
under the auspices and sponsorship  of the Normal school.  Given
Periodically  In 1264 the inhabitants of Freiburg,  (Baden), Germany, first
presented  the Passion Play, and they  have given it periodically in
Freiburg  since that time, as well as in  nearly every city in Europe.  The
original German company is  on its first American tour featuring  Adolf
Fassnacht, the world's greatest  Christus portrayer; and in keeping  with
the general policy of ob*  taming the best available talent f oi  its
program of entertainment, the  Normal authorities have secured the  August
booking of this famous company.  •-''  Normal Music  The Normal will
furnish the music,  both chorus and orchestral, to  accompany the play. 
Plans were first made for holding  the play out of doors. Later it was 
decided to hold the play at the  American, theater^ toi insure that 
possible f a t t i e r v condttiqnsv; Would  not interfere with the
performance.  A patriotic assembly was held  by the Training school this 
morning. In keeping with the  spirit of the occasion, patriotic  songs will
be sung, the first being  "America, the. Beautiful."  The Eighth grade is
responsible  for the most important part of the  program which will be
concerned  with the feeling—past,, present, and  future—of the
American -people concerning  the Fourth of July.  Questions Asked  What was
the attitude of the  colonists after they had set themselves  free from
their mother country,  England? Was there bitterness  toward her, mingled
with their joy  at being free? How has the feeling  of the American people
changed in  regard to England? Is there any  change in the spirit with
which we  celebrate the birth of our country?  The Eighth grade will
interpret the  answers which they have found in  their study of these
questions. They  have as their authorities such famous  men as Theodore
Roosevelt and  Woodrow Wilson.  Two Elements  In their history and social
science  work they have discovered that  there are two elements entering
into  the celebration of this day. One is  the. play or festive spirit
manifested  in the shooting of firecrackers, the  beating of drums, and the
firing of  guns. The other is a more serious  side—the realization of
the beginnings  of our country and what  this has meant to the world.  At
the conclusion of this part of  the program, the. Boy Scouts will  lead the
salute to the flag and the  assembly will close by singing the  "Star
Spangled Banner."  -o  President Fisher and  Dr. Miller Honored  By Wide
Recognition  SUPERINTENDENT OF  PUBLIC INSTRUCTION  DELIVERS ADDRESS  N. D.
SHOWALTER, HEAD OF  STATE DEPARTMENT, MAKES  FIRST APPEARANCE HERE. 
DISCUSSES SUCCESS  Making his first official appearance  at this Normal,
State Superintendent  of Public Instruction N. D.  Showalter addressed the
student  body in the assembly yesterday at^ reaching Bellingham at about 
11 o'clock.  Discusses Phases  In his speech, he discussed the  various
phases of modern life which  make this age the "most marvelous"  that
history has ever known. He  mentioned a few outstanding characters  who
personify the "spirit of  the age;" refering to Knute Rock-ne's  philosophy
of success through  co-operation; Charles Lindberg's  courage and
determiantion; and  Thomas A. Edison's application.  "Prosperity is not
just around the  corner, but around several corners,"  Mr. Showalter
stated, and it will  come only through adjusting ourselves  to conditions
as they actually  exist nationally and internationally.  o  TALLCOTT TO
READ  DRAMA JULY TENTH  ART SCHOOL DEAN TO GIVE  "DEATH TAKES A HOLIDAY." 
Rollo Anson Tallcott, dean of Williams  School of Expression and  Dramatic
Art in New York, will read  Walter Farris' famous play, "Death  Takes a
Holiday," in one of the  promising assemblies the Normal  offers, on July
10.  The play "Death Takes a Holiday,"  in itself was sufficiently
successful  to have a long run 'in New  York.  Nationally Known  The name
of Rollo Anson Tallcott  is nationally known. For twenty  years as teacher,
author, and director  of dramatics, he has held responsible  positions in
four widely-known  instirution; namely, Hiram  College, Valparaiso
University, Butler  University, and the Williams  School of Expression and
-Dramatic  Art.  During his work of teaching, Mr.  Tallcott has become
skilled in the  art of play-reading, or presentation  through suggestive
characterization  only, of the best dramatic compositions  of the period. +
 Helped by Teachers  With the help of such recognized  CHUCKANUT CLIMBED
'•":  BY STUDENTS DURING  REGULAR EVENING TRIP  Fif/ty students
participated last  Tuesday night in the climb up  Chuckanut Mountain, which
was  the second of this summer's series  of evening hikes.  Long Hike 
«* The hike was the longest, though  not the most difficult, of any
yet  taken; and the weather permitted  an excellent view of Mount Baker 
and the islands of the bay.  Lunch was eaten at the top of  the mountain,
and after twenty  minutes' rest the party descended,  9  o'clock.  o—
; .  BIOLOGISTS STUDY  SAMISH ISLAND HERON  YOUNG HERONS FALLEN FROM  NEST,
CAN RESIST CAPTURE.  TRIP PJ^T ISLANDS  TO CANADIAN CITY  OF  PASSAGE AND
MEAL WILL  COST STUDENTS $2.50, BUT  CLOSE TO 400 MUST SIGN.  Of pride to
Normal students is  the. recognition given to President  D. H. Fisher and
Dr. I. E. Miller,  i n ' t h e Sunday edition of the Bellingham  Herald. It
calls attention  to thi? 1930-31 edition of Who's  Who in America, in which
President  Fisher is known as an educator and  normal school president, and
Dr.  Miller as a psychologist and educational  author.  Few Win  This honor
is one few people may  ever hope to win. The chances are  less than 1 in
every 4,000, which  is the 



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Northwest Viking - 1931 July 3 - Page 2



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$fcS s i^li^fi*  ';,vvVtif JOr'Sii'V" ':SS'!$!'A'';i'£' 
^IfplPl-'II^P^ipi^!'®^  ^l®ll^^§^Pi!^W^W^^w^  M^HINCTOW^ 
Formerly The Weekly Messenger—Founded 18f»  Publithed evkry
Friday except during the month of September, by the Associated  Students,
Washington State Normal, Bellinghan.  Entered in the Postofnce at
Bellingham, Washington, as second class matter by  virtue of the act of
March 3. 1879. /  Printed by the Miller   Sutherlen Printing Company,
Bellingham National Bank Bldg.  Subscription rate by mail, $1.50 per year,
in advance. Advertising rates on application.  National Advertising
Representatives: Littell-Murray-Barnhill, Mars Advertising, and  Collegiate
Special Advertising Agency, of New York City.  Address all communications,
other than news items, to the Business Manager of the  Northwest Viking,
Bellingham, Washington  BOB WALTERS..  JACK GREAVES.  ..Editor  ..Business
Manager  CSHSHSnSHHHB^  By MARK JARRETT  HHSZ25HCKHHHB  REAL GOOD WILL  The
students and faculty as a whole seemed to greatly appreciate the  recent
Glee club program, from two saints. The first from its actual  high class
entertainment value, and the second from the friendly atmosphere  and
spirit of good will created by the performers.  Everyone took extreme
interest in the entire outlay, and have discussed  it favorably in more
instances than the writer has heard assemblies remarked  about in some
time. In fact, we might say that on the whole this body  was idolized and
we can state no reason why there should not be such a  feeling on the part
of the Bellingham school people.  These boys and their leaders deserve
every bit of praise that they received—  if for nothing else, they
should have it for friendliness and gen-tlemanliness.  Youth in agroup is
admired by elders,and youth more than  people at any other age, provided
that they show themselves to be clean  cut, agreeable, appreciative,
friendly, and many of the other things that  we put forth as constructive.
These young men did all that.  We hope that Bellingham Normal was equally
distinguished to them,  and that it was fifty percent responsible for the
attitude of "make-your-self-  at-home" that they seemed either to spread or
to take advantage of;  and we hope it was a little of both.  Few of us are
ready to take our programs, of the high class nature that  they are, in
evening colthes, with knowledge of the background of music,  and with that
boring atmosphere of restraint and aloofness built up around  us.  It is
possible to give the students fine entertainment, seasoned with that  old
standby "pep;" and when it is done, it is appreciated. We compliment  the
Milwaukee singers and feel that they are certainly creating neat
impressions  about their school by traveling with the attitude that they
have.  Such work is not going for naught.  Press reports from Seattle
announce Pelagius Williams, local history  instructor, as newly elected
vice-president of the Washington Society for  Mental Hygiene.  Professor
Williams has been diligently engaged for some time in  social work, both
locally and throughout the state, and we are glad to  see his efforts
recognized.  o  We laugh with the Cheney editor who remarked last week on a
sign  in that town reading "June Bride Sale."  A SUMMER ANNUAL  With
interest we note the report that Cheney Normal has elected an  editor for
the Arrow, a summer annual at that institution. It is the "summer  annual"
that interests us, for it is something a little different from  what we are
used to or what we expect to see in Washington Normal  schools. ..  We
think that if such a thing is possible in that institution, it is certainly
 a clever plan. We would say that there are two things pointing strongly 
toward the possibility of the project. One of them is the ease with which 
they will be able to finance it, and the other is the spirit and
organization  about school that will make a ready welcome for it.  It would
be a little awkward to put extra fees on the students here this  summer to
pay for an annual, after the registration total has been forced  skyward to
take care of the difficulties brought about by budget cuts.  Then, too,
there are not the clubs, athletics, graduates, and so on, to  put that air
of tradition and souvenir value on it in Bellingham. We  note that east of
the mountains, various clubs and organizations are having  pictures taken
and placed in the Arrow, while the graduates are having  meetings' and
getting all lined up for the publication.  We do not know the exact
situation at the inland institution, but we  sense that a different type of
school project is needed there in the sum-time.  For instance, our island
cruises and Victoria trip and our easy  access to amusements of all sorts
leave much less time to the students for  the customary extra-curricular
activity.  In other words, as is always the case in Coast towns in summer,
interest  is divided among so many individual recreations that the
community  affairs is not always necessary. At any rate we wish the Savages
success  with their publication.  You see, folks, we have been  switching
from the teacher's viewpoint  to the student's attitude until  we hardly
know how to act on this  page. After a year fit teaching, one  can't be
mean to the teachers; and  after a year of school, one can't be  mean
enough.  *^ * *  Old grads, returning to give  dear old Alma the once over,
 will rejoice to see the weather-beaten  but kindly phiz of the 
overstuffed cinnamon bear labeled  Ursus Americana, once  ridden bareback
for several  hours by one Keppler, on a-memorable  day in the late 
twenties. The patient brute  keeps his (or her) lonely vigil  in the case
near the Viking office.  Friends will be happy to  know that the poor
creature has  at last in some unknown manner  succeeded in moving its  nose
from the proximity of the  little sk k that flaunted its  tail so brazenly
in the face of  Ursus during the earlier portion  of the decade.  * * * 
But, Boppa, I wandda May add  see how they stuff addihals.  * * *  Well,
Henry is my real name, but  I've been Horace ever since I came  to school."
 *—o—*  'MEMBER THE TIME THE BIOLOGY  LAB BLEW UP AND IT 
RAINED CATS AND DOGS FOR  AN HOUR?  WHACHA GONNAGET FORYER  ROOMMATE? 
DUNNO AINTHADNO OFFER-YET.  Oh, dear me, no, Mrs. V-an  Ousenblossom, I am
quite certain  there is no one buried under those  numerals in the walk. 
COME, SYLVESTER; PLEASE  SPIT OUT YOUR GUM TILL RECESS.  The Bureau of
Fisheries have released the information that the popular  belief of eating
oysters only during the months with "R" in them, is all  fallacy.  That is
certainy going to take a lot of glory away from the old-timers  who are so
ready with advice on such matters.  Do you mind the wind?  No, go right
ahead.  OH, DEAR ME! I WONDER,  AM I FIT TO STUDY LATE?  *—o—* 
"Who are you talking back to?"  glorped the cop.  "A darn smart guy,"
yammered  the paranoiac.  * o *  NO, I CAN'T BUY A COOKBOOK  TONIGHT, BUT
YOU JUST WAIT  HERE UNTIL MISS WILSON  COMES OUT.  *^-0—*  COME, NOW,
ALARIC, WON'T  YOU PLEASE SPIT OUT YOUR  GUM UNTIL RECESS? 
*—o—*  They shuddered when I set down  the piano. Little did
they know  that I had achieved complete mastery  of the mighty pianoforte. 
With an agile twist of the wrist, I  brought the magnificent instrument 
under control, my foot on its clavicle  chord and one hand full of octaves.
 With a deft sweep of the  other hand I removed the chromatic  scale and
laid it on the mantle.  Twice more my hand unerringly  sought out the
vulnerable portions  of the subdued monster,  emerging with all the keys up
to  "C" which I dexteriously dealt  around the table.  My friends broke
into thunderous  applesauce, which I accepted with  becoming modesty. I
escaped as  they clambered on my knee for a  bed-time story.  You, too, can
astound crowds of  sophisticated music lovers. No treble  at all. Merely
send twenty-five  cents for my free booklet.  *—o—* '  "FLIT"
IS AN UGLY WORD,  SAID DR. MORE CREAM.  Even though we are a member of 
that upper four per cent class,  which is supposed to be above  hoboing and
free lancing, we are  neither a colyumist nor a reported  We just take the
role of one of  these here odd-job, jack-of-all-trade'.  men that will
never get anyi-where  in this world. We're plan}-  ning to be an editor
someday. ]  • * * * ,!j  Which reminds us that, evei  though Rome was
not built in a  day, we have copied off a test in  twenty-two and one-half
minutes.  (Naval observatory time, with no  sailors present.)  * * *  Here
at Normal we "crab" be'  cause of the high cost of Klipsuns,  and then
remark on the "cheapness"  of cloth against leather covers.  (Imitation
leather at that.)  * * *  No, Freshman, we never wear  cords to our dances
at the Leopold  "But I thought you said that it  was an informal, kind
sir."  * * *  Say, sugg-jester, we remember  when they ran "Now or Bever" 
tagged on the class cutting student,  some six or seven years ago.  * * * 
This is the second morning in a  row Ithajfr the pa(wer mower has 
disturbed us from 8:05 to 8:51  sleep.  . * * *  No truth in the rumor
floating  about (not it didn't sink), that the  girls will be able to have
all the  "Espees" that they wish this summer.  Wotta (Kssappointment.  * *
*  - A guy I hate  Is Butinsky Row  He answers "Yes"  On all I know.  * * *
'."' i  I've changed my mind  'Bout this guy Row  He "Piped" on one 
•"'•"'• / didn't know; • ~  * * *  Yes, the
banisters are handy aids  to prevent falls, and to slide down  on when in a
hurry.  v - * *__* . ' '  The long, slow-progressing line i t  registration
has . finally ceased.  They have all moved over to the  tennis courts. 
(Continued from Page One) ,  set—was wahsed off.  oooOooo  And could
those boys from Milwaukee  sing? With programs on  a par, with Tuesday's,
there'll be no  need to take attendance.  oooOooo  Your pardon, Omar:  And
tho of wisdom We have  read and thought and spoke,  We were never deep in
anything  bui-^-smoke.  ;, ; .—o— r—• '  DR. WELLS
CONDUCTS  CLINIC FOR CHILDREN  (Continued from Page One)  Bellingham. About
fifteen are in  the Normal Training school.  Wells States  "This should be
especially valuable  for young children for it is in  the young child that
speech defects  are most easily corrected," stated  Mr. Wells.  o  Old
Time.Books Are  Displayed in Library  eai/v roi//L gt;  AMERIGA^N  Shoe
Repair Shop  1312 CORNWALL AVE.  Not Only Viking  Boosters  But We Are
Viking Suppttora  of D. ft M. AthUtie  : Equipment  Hanning  Hardware  1317
Commercial St.  No, Annie, those 



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Northwest Viking - 1931 July 3 - Page 3



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i i i i f i l ^ l i i i ^ i  iiiiftppit^  DOWN HUNNICUTT'S  NETTED
GEMS TO  TAKE CHAMPIONSHIP  SECOND HALF OF LEAGUE  WILL GET UNDER WAY NEXT 
WEEK, WITH SAME ENTRIES.  NO LOSSES  A long toss, in last night's game,  by
Gable in the overtime period netted  two" points and victory for Bob 
Walters' Purple Pansies over "Spud"  Hunnicutt's Netted Gems, and  thereby
winning the first half pennant  for the Pansies in the Men's  Intramural
Basketball league. The  final score was 27-25. In the fight  for the cellar
championship the  Cellerites lived up to their name by  dropping into last
place with  Nichol's outfit on the top of a 24-4  score.  Gems Take Lead 
The Netted Gems started off with  a couple of quick baskets from tip-off 
plays and it looked as though  they might start their usual rally  for
landslide scores, but the winners  soon settled down and tied the score 
when,, it reached the eight digit  mark. From then on neither team  enjoyed
a safe lead. At half time  the gold shirted lads of Hunnicutt's  were on
the long end of a 16-14  score.  The last half went by in much  the same
manner as the first with  the score on each side being close  together. Two
of the gentlemen  left the floor at this stage of the  game at the request
of referee  Gunn. Both expressed willingness  to use the "dukes'* if
necessary, but  the affair soon cooled down and  the game went on as
before.  Close Playing  Other than the fact that both  teams had large men,
and with the  play being close and fast, it became  a little rough at
times, but on the  whole it was a clean game and  many expressed opinions
that it was  one of the fastest intramural games  that they have seen for
some time.  The red-clad Pansjes were in  possession of a three-point lead 
with five minutes of the game left.  They were unable to hold it though 
and the score was at 25 all when  the main playing time ended.  After a
minute and a half of close  checking in the extra period, Johnny  Gable
tossed in his long one and  the Pansies manged to hold their  opponents
from further scores.  Two Score Heavily .  Thorsen and Walters were the two
 leading scorers of the afternoon. The  former getting 13 points and the 
latter 12. Skotheim was next with  7 points and Thorlackson followed  with
5.  This assures the Purple Pansies  of an entry in the championship 
series between the first and second  half winners. The second half will 
start Monday with the same schedule  as before, and if the present  champs
can continue undefeated,  they will emerge with a hands down  grip on the
mythical pennant/'  o  MANY IN RACE FOR  LEAD ON LADDERS  Competition is
keen among the  various aspirants for the top rung  in the Men's Ladder
sports. Names  appear in the various ladders in the  following order: 
Horseshoes—Johnson, George, Anson,  Keplinger, Pedersen, Cole,
Larson,  Greene, Trunbull, Reeves, Kors  born, Summers, Prendergast, and 
Dreeszen.  Summers Leads  Tennis—Summers, Gable, Bogen,  Cole, D.
Smith, Reeves, Prendergast,  Nichols, Brock, - Tegenfeldt,  Thompson,
Finley, Grimlund, Green  Bushby, Willard, Haeske, Keplinger,  Kirk, and
Large/  Handball — Thompson/ Brock,  Summers, Gunn, Skotheim, Reeves 
-•.':"••'•• Skotheim on^Top!;//: 
Golf-r-^otheimi W^lder^;Dingeir-  ;SOn^;Tl^  ;=P©ten^f Gura^
,^v^iDannifcirtt^  Ladder Tournaments  In Three Sports Are  Organized for
Women  Ladder tournaments are progressing  for the women. Actual play 
started Wednesday, and challenges  are beng made in rapid succession.  Miss
Ruth Weythman asks that  players leave their names and teter  phone numbers
on the ladders which  appear on the bulletin board in the  women's dressing
room, opposite  room 17, so that challenges may be  made more easily. 
Tennis Ladder  The tennis ladder appeared as  follows, Wednesday, July 1:
Mildred  Pecker, Hazel Chock, Alice Sand-gren,  Helen Howell, Marion
German,  Edna Mae McKelvey, Josephine  Sablocki, Carolyn Barron,  Margaret
Sheppard, Estell Rock,  Carol Howe, Ruth Davis, Rachel  Boyston, Elva
Pilquist, Arelene Jo-hanson,  and Beth Caley. Referees  may be chosen from
the following  list: Eloise Rankin, Helen Howell,  and Josephine Sablocki. 
The archery ladder was as follows:  Adelaide Dale, Elva Pilquist,  Virginia
Shields, Ann Carlson, Lota  Lawrence, Agnes Hokland, Winnie  DeWitt, Alma
Denver, Jessie Dunck-ley,  Hortense, Colberg, Helen Ney-lon,  Bertha
Scheibner, and Wilhel-mina  Schmidt.  Horseshoe Results  Horseshoe
enthusiasts were lined  up as follows: Elva Pilquist, Lillian  Nesheim,
Eloise Rankin, Ann Carlson,  Ruth Davis, Emile Lackey, El-eanora  Jensen,
Irma Lackey, Kath-erine  Osborn, Virginia Wennzelbur-ger,  Hazel Kenoyer,
and Hazel Whit-ford.  Tournament rules appeared in  last week's Viking, and
also are  posted on the P. E. bulletin board,  opposite room 17.  NORMAL
LETTERM AN  IN P.-l. MARATHON  NORMAN BRIGHT TO TRY FOR  HONORS IN RUN
TOMORROW.  INTRAMURAL CAME  FROM CELLARITES  GEMS TAKE LEAD IN MONDAY 
NIGHT TOURNEY; SIDEWINDERS  CLOSE GAME TUESDAY.  DREESZEN LEADS  To those
who have been in school  during the past three years, or those  who have
kept in touch with the  Normal athletic activities during  that time,
Norman Bright needs no  introduction; but to some of the  older students
who have been out of  touch with the school for some time,  he probably
appears to be, as they  pass him in the hall, just another  competitor for
one of the 12,000 positions  in the state.  In Seattle Race  If you have
noticed him as he  swings around the track on Waldo  field each evening in
training for  the P. I. Marathon held in Seattle  tomorrow, you can not but
realize  that he is thoroughly at home. One  needs be no coach to observe
the  form he displays.  "Norm" holds the Tri-Normal record  for the mile,
stepping it this  spring in 4:32.9 minutes. His best  time on the mile was
made against  the Y. M. C. A. of Vancouver, B. C,  4:25.4.  Praises Carver 
Bright knew practically nothing  of racing when he came to Belling-ham, 
and he modestly gives Coach  Sam Carver most of the credit for  his
achievements. He won all of  his twelve starts this year.  Norman's home is
in Chehalis.  He will teach next year at Pearson,  in Kitsap county. He
plans to continue  his studies at Stanford Uiu gt;;  versity. next summer. 
The student body wishes Norman  the best of luck in his race tomorrow.  . '
• '«  o-  BELLINGHAM HERALD :  WILL PICTURE FIRST;  GRADE WORK
SUNDAY  By the score of 67-12, the Purple  Pansies defeated the Cellarites
in  this week's first game of the Men's  Intramural Basketball league. At 
half time the Pansies were well in  the lead. Skotheim, Comfort, and  Gable
did most of the scoring for  the victors.  Purple Pansies 67 Cellarites 12 
Gable 17 P Peterson  Comfort 18 P. 5 Cornett  Walters 9 G 3 Haveland 
Thmpson 3 G B. Gallanger  Skotheim 20 G 2 George  Substitutions: 
Pansies—Iverson.  Callarites almost upset the dope. The  Johnson,
Tegenfeldt, and Smith.  o  The Netted Gems humbled the  Sidewinders to the
tune of 52-12  in Monday's second game. The  count was 12-6, in favor of
the  Gems, at the end of the first half.  In the second half, the Gems 
found their stride and ran up a  total of 40 points, with Dreeszen, 
Thorson, and Thorlackson doing  most of the scoring.  McClurken, the
shooting threat  of the losers, was unable to find  the basket during the
game.  The score:  Netted Gems 52 Sidewinders 12  Thorlakson 8 P McClurken 
Dreeszen 23 ;.F. 4 Cole  Thorson 12 .........,..C 4 Smith  Van Over 4 G
Studebaker  Smith 4 G 2 Weber  Substitutions:  Netted Gems—Hunnicutt.
 Sidewinders—Shaffer 2.  The Purple Pansies added the  scalp of
Nichols' team to their list  of trophies Tuesday night by the  score of
41-21. While the Pansies  were doped to win, the Nicholites  kept them on
their toes until the  last whistle blew.  Purple Pansies 41 Nicholites 21 
Gable 1 P. 2 Stewart  Comfort 14 P. 7 Nichol  Comfort 14 ..P. 7 Nichols 
Howick :..C 1 Rumery  Iverson ........G T.~. 5 Bolton  Skotheim 8 Gr 5
Busby  Substitutions:  Pansies — Moe 8, Walters 2,  Thompson 8. 
Nicholites—Greene 1.  "Granny" Thorlakson substituted  fo r Coach
Gunn as referee Tuesday.  In Tuesday's second game, the  Cellarites almost
upset the dope. The  Sidewinders managed to eke out a  four-point margin of
victory, final  score being 16-12. The game was  the most exciting affair
staged in  the league to date.  Sidewinders 16 Cellarites 12  Cole 6 P. 5
Cornett  McClurken 2 P. George  Studebaker ...C Haveland  Webber G 1
Gallenger  Shaffer 4 G 2 Micnelson  Substitutions: 
Sidewinders—Campbell 4.  Cellarites—Johnson, Tegenfeldt 2, 
Larson, Finley, Smith.  Excluding last night's games, individual  scoring
standings in the  Men's Intramural Basketball league,  are as follows: 
Dreeszen 65.  Comfort 40.  McClurken 36.  Skotheim 34.  Thorlakson 29. 
;£V Thorson 22.  -•- Gable 21.  Thotnpsbn^ Awiarcled  Athleti^
Sweater  Lois Thompson, active during her  attendance here in the W. A. A.,
 was presented a sweater by that organization  in the assembly this 
morning.  A sweater is awarded to any ^irl  who has been a member of seven 
first teams, and who, in addition,  has 300 points to her credit, the 
points being awarded according to  the W. A. A. point system These 
additional points are earned by  swimming, hiking, extra hours of  play,
taking part in intramural activities,  etc.  Miss Thompson has been a
member  of the first team in the following  sports: hockey, service-ball,
soccer  (two quarters), and. baseball  (two quarters). She was manager  of
basketball during last winter  ter quarter, which is counted the  same as a
first team position.  A sweater also was presented to  Lorena Burke this
week. However,  since she is not. attending now, it  was sent to her home. 
o  GOLF  Due to the large number of students  registering for the golf
course,  it has been necessary to split the  11 o'clock class.  As a result
there are now classes  in golf at eleven, twelve, and three  o'clock every
Wednesday and Thursday.  The classes consist for the  greater part of
beginners, although  a great many are somewhat familiar  with the game.  o 
SAGEBRUSH PICNIC  The Sagebrush club held its first  summer outing at
Rainbow Beach,  Lake Samish, last night.  Club members are those who have 
taught in the sagebrush country of  SOPRANO TO APPEAR  NAN DYBDAHL WIIK TO
GIVE  CONCERT NEXT ASSEMBLY.  Mrs. Nan Dybbahl. Wiik, lyric-soprano,  will
entertain the students in  next Tuesday's assembly with a  group of old
English, Spanish, and  Italian melodies. She will be accompanied  by Miss
Edith Strange,  local pianist.  Is Norwegian  A Norwegian by birth, Mrs.
Wiik  has studied in Osla, Norway, and  Milan, Italy; and has done
extensive  concert work in Europe. She  first appeared in America in 1925, 
as Nan Dybdahl, soloist with the  University of Oslo Men's chorus,  which
toured here for three months.  At present she is making her home  in
Bellingham, having returned to  America two and a half years ago  as Mrs.
Wiik.  Many students will remember previous  recitals by Mrs. Wiik, as she 
gave two concerts at the Normal  school in 1920, shortly after taking 
residence in this country.  Art Students  Hagen   Hogberg'r  We Frame
Picture*  1410 CormwaU  eastern Washington, Oregon, Idaho,  and Montana,
although any other  students interested are eligible.  The  Northwestern 
National Bank  WE SOLICIT THE  NORMAL ACCOUNTS  JCPENNEYCQ  1309-1311
Cornwall Ave.  "Where Savinge Are Greatee*"  J0BJFWT!*6  Miller   Sutherlen
 Printing Co.  Cornwall and Holly  B. B. Furniture  Co.  COMPLETE HOME 
FURNISHINGS  Radio and Phonographs  Easy Payments  MORSE  HARDWARE  COMPANY
 Established ISM  DMTKDKrTOM OF  REACH  FOOTBALL  l«Bi  SUPPLIES 
Stale  EOiaoi lOEBOl [OBOl aoi  Work done in the First grade,  under the
direction of Miss Irene  Elliott, twill be pictured in next  Sunday's issue
of the Bellingham  Herald.  There also will be an article ex-i  plaining
the pictures and describing  the work done in t]to; grade/ ; This 
shc^cVjbe ^  FOUR MORE STUDENTS  HAVE LATELY SIGNED  PAPERS FOR SCHOOLS 
According to advice from the  Appointment bureau, several more  students
have recently signed contracts  for positions.  Elsie Grinton is to teach




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Northwest Viking - 1931 July 3 - Page 4



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ALLEN SISTERS EMPLOYED  * T LAKEvTAHOE  Marjorie and Ruth Allen, both 
graduates of this school, are employed  for the summer at Richardson's 
camp, a mountain resort at  Lake Tahoe, Cal.  Ruth has been attending the
University  of California' as a third-year  student during the past year, 
and has contracted to teach third  grade at Washougal, a town on the 
Columbia river near Vancouver,  Washington.  A third sister, Lucile, has
been  convalescing in a Los Angeles hospital  from a severe attack of
pneumonia.  She will spend the summer  with her aunt and uncle, Mr.  and
Mrs. Roy Allen, in Arizona. Lucile  also is a graduate of the Normal 
school.  o  HARDEN HOME  FOR WEEK-END  Rosemary Harden spent the weekend 
at her home in Seattle.  o  UDREY McFADDEN  GOES HOME  Audrey McFadden
spent the  week-end at her home in Seattle.  o  MARY HD3BS  ATTENDS MEETING
 Mary Hibbs left last Wednesday  to attend athe Rainbow convention  held at
Yakima, returning to Bellingham  Saturday. |  o  BARTON GIRLS  HAVE GUESTS 
Ruth Evans, Ora Smith, and  Mrs. Huttard were guests of Agnes  and Margaret
Barston Monday evening.  — o  MOTOR TO HOMES  FOR VISIT  Lucile
Fulton and Muni Lancaster  "motored to Seattle Friday evening  to spend the
week-end at their  homes.  o  DOROTHY PERRY  SEES PARENTS  Dorothy Perry
visited at her home  near Seattle over the week-end.  — o  GUEST OF 
MRS. LOVEGREN  ' Mrs. May Lovegren • had as a  house guest over the
week-end  Mrs. Alma Eardey, of Bremerton.  o  SEVERAL VISIT  IN TACOMA  '.
Violet Waech, Irene Larson,  Ruby Persohn, and Arthur Nelson  visited in
Tacoma last week-end.  o  ROSE RUTHERFORD  ENJOYS BLAINE TRIP  Rose
Rutherford spent the weekend  in Blaine as the guest of Les-  1 lie
Montfort. They drove^ to Vancouver,  B. C, on Saturday afternoon, 
returning that night.  /; o-  ALICE STAMEY  TO BURLINGTON  ': Alice Stamey
spent the week-end  ' in Burlington.  o  JOHNSON VISITS  WITH SISTER 
:• Helen Johnson visited her sister  in Mount Vernon over the
weekend.  o  VISIT STUDENT'S  SISTER IN B. C.  : Frances Wilmarth and Mary
Gordon  visited Mrs. V. K. Hall, Mary's  .sister, in Vancouver, B. C, over
the  •week-end. They were entertained  :• with a party and
picnic.  • '• o  MORGAN TO  EVERSON   gt; Gertrude Morgan went
to Ever-  ; son for the week-end. ,  u „ \  ^EVALYN FALLER }  STAKES
TRD? HOME \  •; Evalyn Faller went to her home  in East Stanwood for
the week-end.  • \  ; DUNCKLEY LUNCHES \  UWITH ALUMNI " '(  ? gt;
Jesse Dunckley spent thel week-  e n d visiting friends in Seattle. She  U
lunched Saturday noon withiTinka  ?-Oksendahl, an alumna of Belling-  ^ h
am Normal. Miss Oksendahl is  ^employed in Seattle at the present  ;time. t
 GOOD ENTERTAINS  SEVERAL FRIENDS  Miss Catherine Geri, a last quarter's 
graduate of this school, entertained  a number of her Normal  friends with
a beach party last  Sunday afternoon. After a very  delightful dinner the
girls engaged  in games, singing, and telling  stories. Among those present
were  the Misses Mathilda Barrick and  Mary Geri, Normal alumnae members; 
Rose Alvanick, honor guest;  Jean Barrick, Augusta Geri, and  Marie Snyder.
 0—: .  TAKE TRIP TO  MOUNT BAKER LODGE  Mrs. Edith Banner, Doris
Scher-er,  and Sam Buchanen spent last  Sunday at Mount Baker lodge.  o 
THREE ENTERTAINED  AT DINNER  Misses Jennie Waugh, Alma Eard-ley,  and La
Vita Smart were entertained  at dinner Sunday by Mrs.  May Lovegren.  o 
ALICE NELSON  NEAR HARMONY  Alice Nelson spent Sunday visiting,  her
parents at their home, near  Harmony.  ;TWO ACCOMPANY |  iAMAGELSON HOME \ 
I,- Raye Loudon and Verna Urmey  f accompanied Gladys Magelson ^to  s her
home in Stanwood, where, the  •Jweek-end was spent visiting Harofyi 
^Magelson. Mr. and Mrs. Magelsofi  ;ibotfa are former Normalites.  T)ORIS
ALLAN  GUEST OF COUSIN  Doris Allan, of Seattle, has been  the guest of her
cousin, Charlotte  Brigham, during the past week.  Miss Brigham, who is
secretary in  the Bureau of Research, and Miss  Allan, will take a vacation
trip during  the latter part of this week.  o  MACARTNEY SPEAKS  BEFORE
LOCAL UNIT  Dr. John Robertson Macartney,  pastor of the First Presbyterian
 church, spoke to the girls of the  Y. W. C. A. at the regular meeting 
held Thursday, June 25.  o  fflLLCREST PEOPLE  PICNIC SUNDAY  Several girls
from Hillcrest picnicked  at the Rocks, Sunday afternoon.  Motor-boating
was the chief  diversion of the afternoon.  . o  EGENSE SPENDS  TIME AT
CONWAY  Evelyn Egense spent the week-end  with relatives at Conway.  o 
FUDGE PARTY  ENJOYED AT HALL  The girls of Hillcrest enjoyed a  fudge party
last Monday evening.  Fortunes were told and songs sung  until late hour. 
o  MRS. MAY LOVEGREN  LUNCHES AT EDENS  Mrs. May Lovegren lunched yesterday
 with Miss Florence Johnson  and her mother at Edens hall.  o  Roger Reid
Improving  Rapidly at Hospital  Fpllowisg Accident  Friends of Roger Reid
will be interested  to hear that he is now rapidly  recovering, although he
is allowed  little company yet.  Reid is in the St. Joseph hospital, 
recovering from a punctured  lung, and minor injuries, incurred  when his
car wrecked about three  miles south of Bellingham on the  Chuckanut drive,
a week ago. last  Tuesday evening.  Reid has undergone two operations  to
remove clots of blood from  his lungs, which have hindered his  progress. 
He is not registered in'school this  quarter, but expects to return in  the
fall.  o—  PRES. FISHER AND DR.  MILLER IN WHO'S WHO  HelM riMsoMp 
And, Incidentally, S o ^ Who Are Not  "Dutch" Wilder, who has been  known
as the wildest member of a  Wilder family, was born in Blaine  an
indefinite number of years ago,  and stayed there through his grade  school
and high school years.  Early Nick Name  When asked to explain the reason 
for the name "Dutch", which he  had acquired, he said, with a particularly 
vague and almost mysterious  aspect, "That is a long story/"  He did not
proceed with any fluent  explanations either, except that the  name has
been his for the total  sum of twenty years, and that he  had acquired it
while in .the first  grade. (And here we find a tangible  clue as to the
gentleman's  age.)  "Dutch" is no mere amateur at  the teaching game for he
has taught  in four different schools for a  number of years. In all his
teaching  career he has had charge of the  athletics, and in three of the 
schools he has worked with high  school athletics.  Likes Golf  I t was
found that he is just another  golf addict (an evidently incurable  thing
which three-fourths  of the men in America are bothered  with) and that
much of his  spare time is spent with his golf  clubs.  Since every
inteligent man must  have a hobby, Mr. Wilder was, of  course, expected to
have one. He  thought only for a brief moment,  then. replied, "My hobby is
split  between reading the Saturday Evening  Post, playing golf, and
indulging  in quiet games of pinochle and  bridge!" And, if anyone can find
 a healthier hobby than this one,  let it be known!  And how about the
little blonde  girl at the switch-board? We fired  questions at her for
half an hour  and still aren't particularly well  versed as to her
mysterious past.  Age Doubtful  Her name is Orleane Fitcha, and  she was
born in Astoria, Ore.,  where she attended grade school'  and high school.
(She said that  she was born forty-nine years ago,  but there was a twinkle
in her eye,,  so we didn't ask her what cream  is used to keep that
school-girl complexion.)  Orleane has a hobby which  (strange factf) is not
golf, although  she does try her luck at that game  now and then, too. She
is quite interested  in swimming and has been  all her life.  Opinion Asked
 When asked for her opinion on  men, she said with dignity, "I have  none!
But if you'd make the question  singular—" then we noticed  the
little fraternity pin and avoided  asking any further questions on the 
vital subject!  Miss Fitcha. has a few likes and  dislikes, too. She said,
"I like to do  things that are out of the ordinary,  things that you can do
on the spur  of the moment! And I dislike-  Well! I dislike being
interviewed!"  (At which we shrunk considerably.)  Miss Fitcha declares
that she likes  spinach, which is perhaps a' bit unusual,  and that blue is
her favorite  color, although there is no particular  reason for her
choice.  She may have a touch of sentimentality,  also, for she loves music
 —be it jazz or classical, and anyone  can see that she spends many
patient  hours at the key-board!  Students Doing Work  In Clay Processes 
Miss Zeal Z. Wilson's Industrial  Art classes are doing some very
interesting  work.  Rural Student Work  The rural students are making a 
study of clay products and are  carrying out a number of clay processes; 
including coiling pottery by  hand, pressing with plaster of par-is  forms,
and pouring with clay slip  to make moulded forms. In connection  with this
work, they are  making their own plaster of paris  moulds and forms.  The
intermediate people are concentrating  on the study of records.  The making
of signature books,  with pages folded and numbered  before sewing; reports
on present  day commercial processes of making  books; printing newspapers;
and  other types of records, will be a  part of this study.  Making Study 
AH of these classes are making a  study of the manufacture of the 
commercial products which they are  using in the laboratory.  o  Camp
Crafters Do  Batik Dye Work  (Continued from Page One)  „..r,^,. 1:
£|s^a  Washington State legislature; J. J.  Donovan, civil engineer
and industrialist;  Lindley H. Hadley, United  States congressman; Ella
Higginson,  author and poet; and Ola J. Ordal,  past president of the
Pacific Lutheran  College.  The names from Northwest Washington  are H. H.
Mateson, short  story writer, of Olga, and Robert  Moran, former
shipbuilder, of Ror  sario, Orcas Island.  Batik and tye-dye work were the 
chief crafts taken up by the camp  craft class at Sinclair Island last 
week-end. Camp equipment such  as PPPPP