Primary tabs

1931_0710




     ----------

     

Northwest Viking - 1931 July 10 - Page 1



     ----------

     

VOL. XXX^NCX 38 WASHINGIITQN STATE .MORTAL
SgHO0L^BEt|yiN.GH^M.,WMB!N6TON Friday, July 1u gt; 1931  Normalite 
BYPRODUCT  ADS "'  A RECORD  If it gets any hotter, we'll borrow  a Bntform
from Saint Gbandi.  —W.S.N.S.—  An important byproduct of 
co-educational colleges Is weddings.  StStistfci show only one  divorce for
every seventy-five  of the marriages between nien  and women who meet in
coeducational  ihstitlitibri§. The cultural  background, the cdmffiOn 
interests^ loyalties, and memories  of young people who have  worked arid
played together,  provide an excellent foundation  for a happy home. We
have  become so accustomed to adverse  comment on co-education. that  it is
a pleasant surprise to l rn  that marriages for which it may  be held
responsible are, on the  whole, successful. Is there anything  in all thb
varied phases  of modern life which takes the  place of happiness in the
home?  Considering the usual ratio at  Normal schools, we think—well,
 we think.  —W.S.N.S.—  It would be much cooler sitting  under
the sprinkler down on the  campus.  —W.S.N.S.—  In Russia, they
do not bother  about examinations for admission  or promotion in school.
The latter  is based upon judgment of the collective  work of the group of
which  the individual is a member; Students  are trained lo ad
co-opefdtively and  collectively. John Dewey has said:  " . . i only in a
society based upon  the co-operative principle can the  ideals of
educational reformers be  adequately carried into operation."  We wonder
about it all, but—  —W.S.N.S.—  We wish we were sitting
in the  abide over on the knoll.  —W.S.N.S.—  Arid if you think
teaching is  a hard graft how, listen to this  advertisement from ah early 
colonial paper:  "Ran away: A servant man  who followed the occupation of 
school master; much given to  drinking and gambling."  In the good old days
of indentured  servants, school masters  brought a lower prce than 
weavers, tailors, and other tradesmen.  —W.S.N.S.—  Pardon us
while we wipe the  sweat from otfr brow.  —W.S.N.S.—  Speaking
of tidverii ntentsi did  you see the one that reads:  WANTED  25,000,000
Men and 25,000,000  Women to Say These Three  Words  .."BUSINESS IS
BETTER"..  Say them over and over—say  them to every person tjoii
meet.  Let these three words be your  greeting to everyone..  Page M. Coue
or Mary Baker  Eddy. By the poWer of suggestion—  —W.S.N.S.-^ 
Every day in every way it's getting  cooler and cooler! 
—W.S.N.S.—  Nicholas Grandjean taught school  at Souhesmes,
Prance, from 1821 to  1867. His son held the same position  from 186? to
1899. His grandson  followed, teaching from 1899 to  1925. C'est un record,
n'est-ce pas?  Ye-ah, and it's brie we're not Shooting  at. '
..-';••  —W.S.N.S,—  We took off our undershirt
this  morning.  —W.S.N.S.-^-  ^ We used to believe that old line, 
'The way 6f d man with a maid;"  but the years and our room mate  have
taught us that most of the  . ' * • " ' ••»»
•  lt;• •••in . way is maid. 
;•;,..;;:--Jw.s.N.i3^ -^/'J; :;;,;.,;:,.  And we're gonna take of f
bur socks  1  H I FOR FUTURE  Thirty Hikers Enjoy  Week-Ehd Ttip To  Mount
Constitution  NELLIE GOX REPORTS ON  ENSUING PICNiC WHILE SEVERAL  MOTIONS
ARE ADDED.  TRIP FURTHERED  (Qontinued on :Pt^;.T^6);  The Bbard bf
Cdtitroi held its regular  me ihg Wetoesifiy iiigfit in  the Student Assbci
tioh bffice  H.  C. Ruckmick was the only member  absent.  Cox Reports 
Nellie box repbrtea oil the picnic  to be held at Shore Acres next  Tuesday
Sfterribblt There were several  ntotiohs mMe thdt settled the  tiine,
piace, and those eligible to attend.  •  The Sivert Skotheim report
on a  "W" pin for Bill Osborne, owing to  additional services, wis
accepted.  Rec Hour  It was decided to have Rec hour  every Friday night
from eight tb  ten, exceptirig when other events  of. importance caused
conflicts. In  that case it was decided to lengtheri  the single hour
dances to an hour  arid a half.  Bond Reports  Sivert Skotheim was
appointed  to take charge of the Victoria trip  tickets. E. A. Bond
reported ori  Having secured the boat, and outlined  aspects of the trip. 
It was decided that any parents  in school can bring children under  six
free, and between six and twelve  for half price.  Three Officers  -
••• President Campbell brought- up"  the following
offices for the Board  to consider: editorships bf klipsuri,  Bluebbok, and
Homecoming book.  o  FORMER STUDENTS  IN FATAL ACCIDENT  Ben Hamilton,
former Normal student,  was instantly killed; Golda  Abel, his fiancee, was
serlbusly injured;  and ten other persons were'  badly hurt in an accident
on the  Pacific highway north bf the city,  Saturday night, July 4th, as
the  car in which Hamilton and Miss  Abel were returning from a baseball 
game became involved in ah  accident.  Beri graduated in 1929, having  been
sports editor of the Viking for  three quarters as well as business 
manager. He wrote the "Sports  Brief" column by "Ham"  nd also  the column
called "This Week a  Year Ago." Ben aisd made two letters  in athletics,
playing, , while at  Normal, football arid baseball, and  turning but for
track. He graduated  from Washington State College a  year ago and recently
signed a contract  to teach next fall in Anacortes.  Golda Abel, his
fiancee, was attending  Normal this summer quarter,  having graduated in
1929 also  and has taught for two years. She  is a popular student, and was
assistant  editor of the Klipsun in;  1929. She is recovering slowly in  a
local hospital.  Funeral services for Hamilton  were held Wednesday
afternoon at  the Aaron Light chapel in Mount  Vernon.  ;, What many hail
as the" finest hike  of the sufiffief took place last weekend  when
twenty-five students arid  faculty members; leav by Mr. Her^  heft
Ruckiriick, climbed tb the top  of Mount Constitution; Oh Orcas  Islahd. It
is agreed that 'top of  the world' is' ah Apt expression for  this
viewpoint Mount Baker;  Mount Rahier, the Olympics; flum-bers  of islands,
and much bf Whatcom  and Skagit counties were seen  clearly.  On Mohawk 
The three-hour trip from Bellingham  to the island was made on the  Mohawk.
The party disembarked  at Olga, where it was joined by  President and Mrs.
G. H. Fisher.  Though rather warm; the Hike  was a leisurely one. Mr. E. A.
Bond,  while protesting that he had never  before traveled the route,
managed  to forecast and point out interesting  features in a way which
caused his  listeners to take note.  Reached Crest Late  Reaching the crest
at 4:30 Saturday  afternoon the party experienced  a windy night. It i%
rumored  that Mr. Ruckmick was compelled  to cut certain persons out of the
 trees, into which they had been  blown and frozen.  Sunday morning the
party hiked  seven miles down to Crescent Beach,  and after lunching arid
swimming  there, rejoined the Mohawk at East  Sound for the return trip.
The boat  docked in Bellingham at 10:30 p.  m.  0 ; T—  HANDSAKER
SPEAKS  ON WAR PREVENTION  TALLCOTT DEAN OF  "DEATH TAKES A HOLIDAY" IS 
DRAMA ADAPTED FROM ALBERTO  CASEIXA SCRIPT*  ACTING  HISTORY CLASSES HEAR
OF  DISARMAMENT CONFERENCE.  A decidedly interesting assembly  was held
this morning when Roilo  Ahsbh Tallcbtt, deari of Williams  School of
Expression arid Dramatic  Art, in fthaca, N. Y., presented  his
interpretation of the drama,  "Death Takes a Holiday."  Adapted Play 
'Ipeath Takes a Holiday" was  adapted from Alberto Casella's  script by
Walter Ferris. The original  was written in rollicking comedy  style
popular in Italy, and after  many revisions reached its present  form.  The
play pictures Death as a  guest at ah itaiiari villa, where he  seeks to
enjoy the sensations of  flesh and bibod people. He seeks  also an
explanation of man's fear  of death. His host, who is aware  of the
identity bf his guest, is placed  in a very disturbing position.  Creates
Tenseness  By his own capacity of feeiing  for the1 dramatic, Mr. Tallcott
made  the tenseness of the resultant situation  real to his audience. His 
talent was appreciated.  Mr; J. J. Handsaker,. associate secretary  of the
National Council for  the Prevention of War, spoke Tuesday  morning to the
combined history  classes of Mr. James Bever  and Mr. Pelagius Williams on
the  abolition of war.  Mr. Handsaker states that the  world disarmament
conference to  be heid in 1932 is one of the critical  events this
generation will witness.  Should disarmament be effected,  it is his belief
that the tax burden  will be reduced, business will expand,  and fear of
war wiil be abolished.  Discussing the cost of the World  war, he said, it
has been estimated  the state bf Washington paid out in  the neighborhood
of $8,000,000 as  its share of the expenditures. For  generations citizens
must continue  to pay for this.  Last month Mr. Handsaker spoke  to
students of the school in assembly.  He is at present ,on his way  to
Denver, where the International  Educational council will be held  from
July 27 to August 2. Five  thousand delegates are expected to  attend the
council, among them  many of the leading educators of  the world.  ALUMNUS
IS MARRIED  FORMER STUDENT PRESIDENT  MARRIES DOROTHY POSTLE  CALENDAR 
FRIDAY—-July 10.  6 p; hi, ttec Hdtir.  SATURDAY—July U.  6 a.
m., Hike Up Church  Mountain.  MONDAY—July 13.  4 p. m., Intramural
Basketball  A  TUESDAY—July 14.  11 a. m., Regular Assehibly,  Mrs.
Arrigo Young, Lecture  on Iridia.  4* p: Ma Intramural Basketball 
WEDNESDAY—JUly 15.  7 a. m., All School Trip, to  Victoria. 
THURSfiAf^jiuiy 1C.  4 p. in., intf mural Basketball.  FRDDAY—July
17.  11 a. nL, Regular Assembly,  Lecture by Mr. Everhart  Young.  CLIMB
POSTPONED ON  ACCOUNT OF fcOAT TRIP  The climb up Mount Chuckanut,  which
was to have taken place on  July 14, wili be postponed until  some later
date^ according tb Mr.  E. A. Bond. The recreation committee  will be busy
completing arrangements  for the Victoria trip.1  *. ; o-—'• 
PLANS FOR PLAY ARE  NEARINGJMMPLETION  "TO THE LADiES^' WILL BE*  GIVEN
LATE THIS MONTH.  Caribdu Trail Trip  Taken by Teachers  Last week-end four
members of  the faculty; namely, Miss Adele M.  Jones, Miss Zeal Wilson,
Miss Bertha  Crawford, and Miss Sadie Fitzgerald,  motored up the Caribou
trail  ihtb Canada. .••'••...'.•',  They left
Bellingham oh Friday  evening and journeyed up past  Chilliwack, and Hope
to Alexandria,  returning home on Sunday evening.  During their stay they
visited at  Harrison Hot Springs. Stops were  made during the trip up at
Rest-more  IcKige, and, pn the return, at  POPULAR PLAY GIVEN  NATIONALLY
KNOWN ARTIST  PRESENTS SPHUTUAL PLAY.  '- "Green Pastures," the popular 
drama of Marcus Cook Connelly,  was presented in the form of a  heading in
the assembly of Friday,  JJiily 3, by Miss Cora Mel Patten,  nationally
known dramatic artist of  Los Angeles.  The play gives a very interesting 
picture of the modern spiritual aspect  of the negro people, it de-- 
perids upbri the Bible for most of its  material, taking 6Hapters from the 
Biblb and pbrtraymg the negro's  ihtbrpretatibh of the events told.  . The
excellence of the play itself  In addition to the fine presentatdoh  made
it interesting and 



     ----------

     

Northwest Viking - 1931 July 10 - Page 2



     ----------

     

ifitflfii  W^^^^M^^^SWW^M§^W^S^SiWS^WMmM '~wm :$lfr 11111 
WASr^CT §^  W W W ^ W ^ ^ f l ^  NOR:  Formerly The Weekly
Messenger—Founded 1899  Published e*tery Friday «xcept during
the month of September, by the Associated  Students, Washington State
Normal, Bellinghaw. .  Entered in the Postoffice at Bellingham, Washington,
as second class matter by  virtue of the act of March 3, 1879. ' .  Printed
by the Miller   Sutherlen Printing Company, Bellingham National Bank Bldg. 
Subscription rate by mail, $1.50 per year, in advance. Advertising rates on
application.  National Advertising Representatives:
Littell-Murray-BariihtlK Mars Advertising, and  Collegiate Special
Advertising Agency, of New York City.  Address all communications, other
than news items, to the Business Manager of the  Northwest Viking.
Bellingham, Washington  gt;.... •  BOB WALTERS..  JACK GREAVES.. 
„_Editar  ......Business Manager  Student O^Mon  VWWWWWJWSWW^WV 
About school one day with.his many friends—the next, just a memory 
to diem.  The feeling of regret about school is unusually intense for Ben
Hamilton,  whose life was suddenly sunffed out Saturday night.  Though
placed extremely high in the minds of all since the sudden 
happening—-his place is none higher than before. He always has been 
liked, and deserved it.  EXCURSION TO VICTORIA  This Victoria trip. It is
one marked with uniqueness; an event that  students of. interior schools
would turn out for as near to a hundred per  cent as possible, especially
in the heat of summer.  There are those that have previously made the trip
to Victoria in individual  parties, but there are features connected with a
school trip, that  cannot be duplicated. The*spirit of festivity will
naturally prevail with  so many going, while it will be great with a
spacious deck for dancing in  the evening with a five-piece orchestra "on
deck." There will be sightseeing  trips at quite nominal special rates, and
Victoria can produce the  spots of interest that will envelope the party of
Normalites.  . The fact of an en masse visit to the quaint city will
attract those that  went last year back to the same trip, and we note that
many of these are  the most interested in going.  There will be some that
will wish to go, but will be unable on account  of financial matters, and
yet it is brought to the students at an unusually  low figure due to the
large number expected.  If many fail to sign up, it will mean that the
Board will have to make  up the difference and possibly do away with such
an event at future  times. According to the interest being manifested, this
will hardly be  the fate of the trip, though.  Hie school is providing
leaders that know the conditions and who will  have everything planned out
to bring the best results to the students.  We sincerely advise all to go
that can possibly make the necessary arrangements.  CELEBRATING THE FOURTH 
It is easy to muse over the Fourth of July and think of the sentiment,  in
the present day individual mind, toward the early populace that gave  what
they did for our independence.  That tenderness toward those that fired
guns on the batde field reflects  in us each time we hear a firecracker
fired, or a torpedo thrown  by some child of ten or twenty-five.  Our
baseball games, foot races, lodge celebrations, ensembles at  beaches and
playgrounds, dances, auto tours, closed stores and factories,  all remind
us dearly of what we have turned out to honor and commemorate.  • The
flags on the front of automobiles or on the tops of flag poles  all have
that additional influence on the Fourth, leading thoughts to the  past. 
Not that we expect things to be different, nor do we ask for universal 
change, yet can we help getting a wee bit sarcastic when we accidentally 
stopped and thought of the recent Fourth of July in connection with the 
early days of the country.  We are told that education In, our 
institutions of learning fails to inr  duce students to think, which is no 
doubt true. Caught in the maelstrom  of progress and the ruthless-ness  of
competition, overwhelmed by  the responsibility of training for citizenship
 all the future hopes of the  world, engrossed with delving, into  the
profound mysteries ofo science,  theology, philosophy arid what not,  is it
any wonder that we lose our  identity as individuals?  But we do hear a
remark occasionally  which might indicate the  glimmer of a thought in the
realms  of consciousness: A student suggested  that as well as directing
efforts  and attention upon double  Rec hours and the trip to Victoria, 
something also might be done by  the student body toward securing order 
and attendance at assembly.  iNo one will deny that something  should be
done about! .assembly.  What is the matter with us? Would  we countenance
such disorder in our  own schoolrooms? With attendance  a matter of choice,
we owe our good  President nothing but the utmost  respect and. loyalty).
Whfen distinguished  guests are waiting behind  the curtain, why not
consider his  feelings, and for the sake of common  decency and the dignity
of our  profession stop the uproar when he  ascends the platform?' And
can't  we whisper during intermissions?  As for leaving during a program, 
how can anyone be so ungracious  and so discourteous as ip go. creaking 
down the stairs? If it adds  nothing to our own satisfaction and  peace of
mind, then let's put on  our good behavior |for President  Fisher. ' --,-
gt;• "•  Where are you, student body? The  double Rec hour and
the trip to  Victoria seem assured. That election  was a marvelous
demonstration  of well oiled machinery. We'll say  you can do it! Then why
can't we  stand unanimously behind President  Fisher in the support of
worthwhile  assembly programs? Well  filled halls and a half filled
auditorium  must be a disappointment  to him as well as to our guests. 
Come on, student body! Let's go  to assembly, and let's help to create  an
appreciative atmosphere. It is  really such a simple individual affair. 
Can't we all be there, and  can't we show our loyalty to our  president by
making him proud of  us? Let's go!  L. C.  PASSION PLAY TO BE  STUDENTS
FURNISH CHORUS  DIRECTED BY H. B. SMITH.  ; Seven centuries of tradition
and  development and 400 years of inheritance  are represented in the 
Freiburg Passion Play, of .Freiburg*  Baden, Germany, which will be pro-, 
duced at the American theater  \i-.  gust 3, 4, and 5. The beautiful 
chorus music will be furnished, by  Normal students under the dlrecr  tlon
of Harold B. Smith. The Pas-*  sion Play is on its first American^  tour. 
Christns Inherits Role TI  Adolf Fassnacht, who portrays the  Chrlstus
during His week of pas*j  sion* suffering, death, and triumph,  "man's  And
that awful accident—  Just another instance of  inhumanity to man." 
;:Had it happened to persons in no  {.way connected with this institution, 
to whom would it have meant   lt;«K gt;re than a line or so of print 
fa^tlly read and quickly forgotten?  j (Contto^frbrn pageOneX  tomorrow. 
—W.S.N.S.—  —W.S.NJ3.—  Ki"Charts covering
variations of  tamfalLqnd temperature over long  periods of time indicate
that the  'figure* tend to fun highef than  Overage for a period and then
low-fer lt;  for a while. That's what is  known as "runs of luck" in dice
or  Is the eighth Fassnacht in directf^rJs. Did Brisbane say: *'The  dice
of Cod are always loaded,"  and "So often the truth that is  stranger than
fiction is fiction?"  —W.S.N.S.—  And now we're gonna go eat
some  ice cream—we feel so blank.  The morning after—guess
weffl  put our shirt back on.  descent to portray the role. Since  1760 A.
D. the role has been jealously  guarded as a Fassnacht heritage,  each
successive generation  striving to improve itself, in the  part and bring a
deeper spiritual  and artistic significance to the presentation. 
Thirty-six Principals  Mr. Fassnacht is supported by a  company of
thirty-six principals,  members of the original German  company which,
eighteen months  ago, began the American tour. Many  of these have, in like
manner, inherited  their parts from preceding  generations.  Authentic
costumes of the ancient  Orient, elaborate lighting and scenic  effects,
and acting of rare power  make the Passion Play a colorful pageant  of
magnificent proportions.  Telling the age-old story of Jesus  simply and
sincerely, its theme carries  an appeal to all kinds and  classes of
people. a  Trained From Cradle  The Freiburg players themselves  are
neither sentimental Idealists nor  romantic wanderers. They are
professional  actors—professional in : lt;   sense that is but little
understood  In America. Behind them is a tra-!  ditlon of nearly 700 years.
Trained  from the cradle to their parts iri  the Passion Play, their
secular edfe-1  cation is made secondary to thec  great" roles which they
portray. Be-!  fore them is a lifetime to be spent  in the atmosphere of
their great  drama. Most of them'are scholars:'  Nearly all are highly
skilled musi-;  clans.  Big Responsibility :';fi  In assuming the role of
;the  "ChristuS" a man assumes ats trie  same time a great responsibH%.;  i
t-  BRING YOUBJ gt;  AMERICAN  Shoe Repair Shop  1312 CORNWALL AVE.  
gt;Jbt 0nly Viking  Boosters  Bat We Are Viking Supplier*  of D.   M.
Athletic  Equipment  Manning  Hardware  1S17 Commercial St.  Contributors' 
Column  B AUGHMAN'S \  COLLEGE  PHARMACY  In the days of 1770 in England,
it was a process of witchcraft for  women to use cosmetics. Whew, not so
good for superstitious men Normalites,  if they take any stock in the laws
and decrees of old.  And then there is that rare trait of unity in the
American people, that  urges such large numbers of them to go out on the
fourth of July and try  to obtain that "Indian complexion" in a day, and
then return and live  ii glory, comparing sunburn agony with the neighbor. 
With the unusual event of seventy airplanes in Bellingham, we  wouldn't be
surprised if the Nurse's office is swamped caring for Normalites  inflicted
with sunburned tonsils.  .—, o '  This came to us by unknown hands
this week:  DEAR EDITOR:  Please! Isn't there some way that we students
could make the  teachers and supervisors see the importance of making all
bibliographies  on paper not over eleven inches long, preferably ten_  and
one-half inches. These sizes will fit our note books and some of us  like
to keep our bibliographies with the notes for that subject.  The one thing
that makes our notes of future value is their  neatness and orderly
arrangement. Please help us to eliminate  ' these unweildly 13-and 14-inch
biblographles.  Yours truly,  AL.  Now, dear Faculty, we ask you, with our
future prestige as a moulder  of masses depending on your help. Think it
over.  WE LISTEN  No time for busy fingers  To dance up and down 



     ----------

     

Northwest Viking - 1931 July 10 - Page 3



     ----------

     

iifeTONMift  f0kmW  PWtfWVWVWflftftWVftftWWtfW  Pitcher's  Box  By
BOB COX  Ob* heck, take your choice!  Headline: "'Carver may use  Notre
Dame shift at Normal." Backed  by the tricks that Coach Carver  learned
this summer under Schiss-ler  at Corvallis, the Norsemen may  go a good way
towards the Tri-  Normal title. The Stanford system  that has served for
these many  years will go into the discard,  along with the habit of losing
games  to Cheney and Ellensburg. Maybe  the ghost pf Knute Bockne will 
help Carver to the championship.  Anyhow, men that were caught flat-footed 
behind the line last year can  practice getting caught in the middle  of a
shift for the new season.  Whtf pay good money for a  ticket to a
prizefight when you can  go to an intramural basket hall  game for nothing?
The referee  whistles and puis the ball in play;  he whistles again when he
sees that  the wounded are dragging themselves  into the corners to die.
Women  on the side lines faint and strong  men turn their heads* After the 
bodies are taken away, the game  goes on with a new batch of victims.  They
ought to put some sand  on the floor and throw in a handful  of swords. 
It's fun to watch the games of the  city tennis tonjrname^tt that are 
played on the Normal courts. Even  for the person who knows nothing  about
the game, watching these people  work and—shall we say perspire? 
—perspire in the hot sun makes  you satisfied to be a kibitzer. If 
only the onlookers could go without  shirts Just to be a tennis  player or
a gardener in this kind  of weather . . .  Speaking of going without
shirts,  by actual count there were 907  cases of sunburn after the 4th of 
July vacation was over. Loud were  the wails and many Were the groans  to
%be heard on the campus: "You  slap my back again, you big so and  so, and
I'll slap you into next  Week," and "By the way, will you  help me put on
this coat?"  According to the best dope on  hand, Paul Jessup is slated for
the  Olympic team in the discus event  if he doesn't break an arm before 
the events take place. His win in  the A. A. U. meet fairly cinches a 
place that was nearly certain. before.  Jessup won the discus toss  'with a
heave of less than 150 feet;  nearly twenty feet short of his best  effort
that won him a world championship^  Gjenung, Jessup's team  mate, won the
half-mile event in  time that gives him a boost for the  big meet^  o  Camp
Craft Class  Enjoys Open Picnic  The camp craft class, in charge  of Mss
Ruth Weythman, enjoyed a  meal in the open last evening, when  they
picnicked at the rocks south of  Bellingham.  Each girl brought something
to  cook over a camp fire to give her  practice in camp cookery. The girls 
also did some hand craft work such  as making utensils which can be  used
in cooking over a camp fire  For many of the girls, it was the  first time
they had done any outside  cooking which proved to be  quite a novelty. 
This trip was taken to benefit  especially those who missed the outing 
trip to Sinclair Island. However,  the picnic was well attended  by members
of the .class.  o  EXTENSION DEPT. HAS  HOLIDAY MATERIALS  It is announced
to teachers that  the Extension department has on  hand collections of
holiday material  useful mainly in primary and intermediate  grades. 
Important Holidays  This material, which is comprised  erf stories for all
important holidays  of the school year; was selected  by a class in English
17, three years  ago, and printed in convenient book  farm for;
distribution to students.  SHAFFER'S WIN FROM  PANSIES ON MONDAY  Although
not /necessarily a flashy  upset, Louis Shaffer's entry in the  Men's
Intramural Basketball league  pulled a surprise in defeating Wali  ters'
Pansies, first half champs, by  a 22-10 score, in a game played last 
Monday night. The second game  found Hunnicutt's Netted Gems taking  an
easy nod over Nichols' toss-ers,  35-14.  A Little Slow  The first game of.
the evening was  slightly inclined to be slow, with  each team taking about
an equal  amount of shots, with the winners  dropping the greater share in.
They  slowly piled up a }ead that ran 9-0,  with little of the half
remaining  to be played. Fouls committed gave  the Purple Pansies a chance
to convert  a few and they brought the  score to 11-4 at the end of the
first  half, but no field goals were scored  by the losers.  The second
half found things  running practically the same as before.  With the score
at 11-8 the  losing forces were reduced to four  men, and the latter part
of the half  was spent in much stalling on the  part of Shaffer's henchmen.
 McClurken Scores  McClurken had. his eye on the  basket and after dropping
in three  moderately long ones at the start  of the game, continued until
he had  scored a game total of 14. Walters  made all but three of his
team's  total, netting 7 points.  Nichols' team, in the second game,  got
to working well toward the latter  part of the game and was able  to make a
far better percentage of  shots. It was behind 16-4 at  the halfway mark,
but made ten in  the last half, while the "Spud  champs" shopped around
enough to  raise their total to 35.  Pansies— Shaffers—  Moe F
14 McClurken  Comfort 3 F 3 Cole  Walters 7 C..._ Studebaker  Thompson G 1
Weber  Skotheim G Shaffer  S 4 Swanson  S...'. Smith 
Referee—Thorlackson.  Gems— Nichols—  Thorlackson 12 ..F.
4 Nichols  Dreeszen 14 JP 6 Thomas  Thorsen 7 C Falkner  Van Over G 4
Bolton  Smith 2 G Shaeffer  Hunnicutt S  Referee—Walters. .  WATERS
AND CRAW WIN IN  CITY TENNIS TOURNAMENT  STRENGTHEN CLAIMS  NETTED GEMS
CONTINUE VIC-TORIOLS  AND HOLD LEAD.  The Cellarites held the Netted  Gems
to 20 points in last night's  game, while they managed to collect  three
baskets, for a total of 6  At the half the score stood 6-0 in  favor of,
the Gems. In the second  half they found the basket oftener  and the game
ended with the 20-6  score.  Smith and Thorsen, with eight  points each,
were high men for the  game.  This win places the Gems in the  lead for the
second division. Final  games will be played Monday and  Tuesday; and the
latter part of next  week a three game series will be  played between the
champions of  the two divisions.  Netted Gems 20 6 Cellarites  Thorlakson
4. F. Tegenfeldt  Smith 8 .F...... 2 Finley  Hunnicutt .C Johnson  Thorsen
8............G Mickelson  F. Gallanger. G...... Larson  Substittions:
Cellarites—George 2,  Haveland 2, B. Gallanger.  Netted Gems Defeat i
 Sidewinders During  First roune matches in the seventh  annual BellinghUm
city ten-,  nis tournament are coming along  ^rapidly and some sparkling
tennis  has already been manifested.  HIn| one of the finest exhibitions 
dfvtennis seen on a local tennis  court," Lary Carr; youthful tennis 
threat, stroked his way to victory  dtferj Henry Wu 8-6, 2-6, 7-5. The 
match was replete with brilliant  play) from start to finish, and the 
outcome was in doubt until the fin-afoppiht  was played.  vjcst'f' Five
Straight  ••v'Cirr started off impressively in  the; first set
running out five games  straight.: Wu came back strong,  however, and
matching stroke for  stroke tied Carr at 5-aU. Carr was  not to gt;be
stopped, however, and after  dropping the eleventh game,  came back to take
his service and  the next two games for the set.  In the second set Wu
tigheened  and carried it off 6-2.  Coming back in the third set,  Carr
trailed 5-3, and with point  match against him, unleashed a  baseline drive
that carried him  through the set and match.  Hannah, Thai and Berenstain, 
former Normal stars, all won their  opening tilts.  Light Defeated  In the
men's singles division, Joe  Hratz defeated John Light in a  brilliant
three-set match 5-7, 6-2,  6-2. After losing the first set, Hratz  came
back strong to win the next  two sets straight.  Hannah, former Normal
school  ace, had an easy time with Archibald,  winning handily in straight 
sets 6-0, 6-0. Hussey defeated M.  Orloff 6-3, 6-2, and Berenstain
eliminated  Kreiger 6-0, 8-6. Thai had  little.difficulty in his match with
 Young, winning 6-0, 6-0. Fisher  Won .by default from Daudelin, and  E
ughton took a forfeit from Stone.  n Several Defaults  ?kh ,the women's
singles, Johan-so|  i; defeated Simon 6-0, 6-2. In the  jutriGj division,
Haworth won by  deiau]t,from Blythe.  -In.a sparkling match, Light and  O
rr. .defeated Moy and Wu 6-0, 6-2,  in' the men's doubles division. Hratz 
akd Hedger entered the semi-final  rtfund when they took a default  frpin;
Daudelin and Locknart;  •; i Will Meet Olympians  •jihe
Bellingham Tennis club will  meetf/the Olympic Tennis club of  Seattle on
the Normal school courts  tbjis .Siunday, July 12, at 12 noon. 
Thue/.Olympic Tennis club boasts  s^m  of the strongest players in 
gjeattle, and a treat is in store  for -all tennis enthusiasts. A large 
crowd is expected to be on hand to  watch the tilts.  , All-first round
matches must be  played by Monday, July 13, says  Myer Thai, tournament
manager.  Other Results:  Other results:  C. Orloff defeated Lamb 6-3, 6-4.
 . Paul Grimes eliminated Pitt  Smith 6-2, 6-4.  Eveyln Craw and Suzanne
Waters  defeated Mary Fisher and Suzanne  Cissna 6-3, 4-6, 6-4.  Jim Rork
and Willie Houghton  defeated Hussey and Archibald 6-1,  6-2.  Purple
Pansies Bring  Cellarites to Knees  In Tuesday's Contest  The Purple
Pansies, first division  champions, had little difficulty in  humbling the
Cellarites in the sec-qhd;  game played Tuesday in the Lit-tyiefigym., 
Final score was 42-4. Wal-ie)  r^s and Gable each garnered 12  phfots for
the winners, while Cor-nie  jt and George divided the points  j gt;f jthe
Cellarites. Shaffer refereed  theiilshie.   gt;. lt;Pipple Pansies 42 2
Cellarites  ijomf ort 6 F. . Peterson  (Bible 12 JP 2 Cornett  Psalters 12
...C...... Finley  First Game Tuesday Wijotheim 6 G Mifceison  , I ^iMerson
6... ^...iG. B. Gallanger  j Substitutions:. Cellarites—-Larson,  In
the first game played Tuesday '0eorge 2, Johnson, Tegenfeldt, and  evening,
the Netted Gems defeated- "Smith.  the Sidewinders by the score of '; J
• [ "-• A:''.!Ji'.— •:  27-9. The game wast fast
and in-' W. A. A. members, past and  teresting. Thorsen was high point
-present, are, meeting around the  man for the winners. fireplace in the
cafeteria at the  dormitory every ^Wednesday noon.  Each- girl who-has been
'or is a  member of the W. A. A. is invited  to bring her tray and join the
 group. Chats and interesting discussions  take place, old acquaintances 
are renewed, and new ones  made:  Netted Gems 27 9 Sidewinders  Thorlakson
6... .. ...:. ..::::•..:L lt;:.„: Cole  Dreezen 5.. ..F.....
...... McClurken  Thorson 11... .C.,._. 2 Smith  VanOver 3 ..G.....
...........„3 Weber  Smith 2....... ..G..... .........4 Swanson 
Substitutions: Hunnicutt.  Referee: Walters.  Men's Intramural Basketball 
Purple Pahsiea-rFirst Half Winners  Second Half.  Teams—  Netted Gems
 Pansies ...„..:..  Nichols ..;. gt;.  Sidewinds;;  Cellarites ......
 W.  '37  2  1  1  0  Pet.  .1000  .667  .500  .333  .000  MEN'S SPORT
LADDER  DINGERSON TOPS GOLFERS;  SUMMERS IS TENNIS CHAMP.  Activity in the
men's ladder sports  is continuing at the lively pace set  during the early
weeks of the quarter.  Names are. exchanged on the  various rungs of the
ladders daily,  keeping the interest at a high pitch.  Dingerson Tops Golf 
Dingerson now tops the golf ladder,  wilh Wilder,. Skotheim, Hale, 
Thorsen, Thompson, Pederson,  Prendergast, Reeves, Gunn, Kirk,  Hunnicutt,
and Large following in  order.  Thompson is king of the handball  artists.
Brock, Summers, Gunn,  Reeves, and Skotheim are ever ready  to contest his
kingship.  Johnson holds the coveted position  on the horseshoes ladder,
With  George, Anson, Keplinger, Pedersen,  Cole, Larsonv Greene, Turnbull, 
Reeves, Korsborh, Summers, Prendergast,  and Dreezen a-gunnin' for  him. 
Summers' Still Leads  The tennis throne is at present  occupied by Summers,
but a long  list, striving to bring about his abdication,  bears the
following names:  Gable, Bogen, Reeves, Smith, Prendergast,  Nichols,
Brock, Tegenfeldt,  Thompson, Finley, Grimlund,  Greene, Bushby, Willard,
Haeske,  Keplinger, Kirk, Smith, Iverson,  Large, and Jones.  Weclhes  For
Men jand WbnSen  How many have:",; felt an urge to  make a name for
themselves? If  any, they are invited to turn out  for the play hour, 



     ----------

     

Northwest Viking - 1931 July 10 - Page 4



     ----------

     

I  lira?  NGHAM, iyffi~ir^:;^^^»jg ^  liPIIIliP  Normal^ Poet
Conclude Interview  MEMeERS 6 t SOCIETY  I ENJDV SALMON BAKE 
Hearty,laughter and many "Do  you remember?" questions were  heard from a
lively group around a  camp fire at Shore Acres last night,  ban it be?
Yes. It is the dignified  members of the Scholarship society  at play,
enjoying a salmon bake.  '';'-^_^^—-6'"'
'-•••• •  i w o VISIT S E A T T LE  F R I E N
D S  Mildred Leake and Raye Loudon  Spent tnei holidays visiting friend^ 
in Seattle. Miss Loudon visited at  the home of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence 
Kunkel.  ••;.- —-. O •'  OSBORNE AND BOWLES  GO
NORTH  Grayce Osborne and Winnifred  Bowles spent l t Saturday at
Vancouver,  B. O.  —6  RAOANS HOMES  ARRANGE PICNIC  A delightful
picnic was arrSngea'  by the girls of Ragahs homes who  remained in
Bellingham the Fourth  of July. The day was spent hiking  and swimming at
Whatcom Falls  park. Those taking part were:  Clara and Edna Ahl, Nellie
and  Elizabeth Herrold, Nellie and Nina  Barton, and Vema TJfmey'.  •
^ — -O-;  TWO AT HOMES  IN SEATTLE  Margaret Moore visited with her 
aunt in Seattle during the holidays.  Evelyn Elliot also spent the holidays
 in Seattle.  '• _ — . — o  RETURN FROM  ORCAS TRD? 
Charlotte Brigham and her cousin,  Doris Allan, returned Friday from  a
vacation spent at Waldheim, on  Otcas island. They motored to Vancouver, 
B. C, to spend the Fourth  of July.  o  SISTERS VISIT  IN SEATTLE  Velma
and Valda Holland visited  friends in Seattle last week-end.  o  LIBRARIAN
ON  VACATION  Miss Lillian George, cataloguer at  the library, left Tuesday
for her  cottage at Yachats, Ore., where she  will spend her vacation. 
.• — . — _ _ o - — .  WEYTHMAN V I S I TS  FORMER
INSTRUCTOR  Miss Ruth Weythman spent Tuesday  in Everett, visiting Mrs.
Elwood  Davis, formerly Miss Kathleen Skal-iey.  o  ORDAL VISITS 
INSTITUTION  Dorothy Ordal, who recently underwent  an operation for
appendicitis,  visited school last Tuesday.  ' r o  NOCULA HERE FROM 
OLYMPIA  Effie Nocula, who has been spending  her vacation in Olympia,
spent  the week-end with friends in Bellingham.  Miss Nocula intends to 
return to school in the fall  o —  DOBERS AND LONSDALE  GO HOME  Jean
Dobers and Sarah Lonsdale  visited at their homes in 'Anacortes  and
Richmond Beach, respectively.  O- :  VISITS HOME IN  TACOMA  Irene Larson
visited her home in  Tacoma during the holidays. While  in Tacoma, Miss
Larson motored  to Mount Rainier.  .—o .—  SPEND WEEK-END  AT
CHEHALIS  Doris Scherer and Sam Buchanan  spent the week-end at Miss
Scher-er's  home in Chehalis.  MYRTLE GARNES cfekPLJiviENfsctfV  With Bit
ctf Smart Versevl^.;-FiliM'  GUESTS AT SHORE  ACRES PICNIC  Wyona and
Edwina Hennings  Were guests of Alice Nelson on a  picnic held at Shore
Acres the  ifjburth of July.  \'. o  CAMPS AT BIG  LAKE  Evelyn Faller
spent the week-end  camping at Juniper Beach and Big  Lake.  o  REBECCA
APPLE AT  MARYSVDLLE  Rebecca Apple visited her parents  at Marysville
during the holidays.  o  MOTORS TO MOUNT  BAKER  Gladys Magelson motored to
 Mount Baker last week-end.  — o  MAY LOVEGREN  AT VASHON  Mrs. May
Lovegren visited her  mother at Burton, on Vashonlsand,  last week-end.  o 
THREE MOTOR TO  VANCOUVER  Ruby Persohn, La Vita Smart, and  Violet Waeche
motored to Vancouver,  B. c , last Saturday.  :—d  TWO VISIT AT 
LONGVIEW  Geraldine Duff and Jewel Rosen-swieg  spent the week-end at their
 homes in Longview.  — o  ROSE SPENDS WEEKEND  AT HOME  Katherine
Rose spent the weekend  visiting her parents at their  home in Lynden. 
—o  HARDEN CAMPS AT  SAMAMISH  Rosemary Harden camped with  friends
at Lake Samamish last weekend.  — o —  DEAN'S DAUGHTER  VISITS
HERE  Miss Jean Marquis, a former student  at the Normal school, and  past
editor of the Klipsun,has been  visiting here at the Normal. Miss  Marquis,
who is the daughter of  Dean W. J. Marquis, graduated this  year, with high
honors, from Stanford  University.; She is planning  Jo .return to
Stiiiii^^i^;':faU., .to  /:;^djric^|o*;i^  WITZEL HOUSE GUEST  OF BARTON 
Helen Witzel, of Colfax, Wash.,  has been the house guest of Agnes  Barton
during the past week.  . o  Thespian Club Picnic  Held at Lake Samish  A
picnic, held yesterday evening  at Rainbow Beach, on Lake Samish,  Under
the direction of Miss Suzanne  Waters, was the first of the summer  social
activities of the Thespian  6mb. About twenty people were  present,
including Miss Priscilla  Kinsman, pre-primary t r a i n i ng  teacher. 
Club Outstanding  This club, Which was one of the  outstanding student
Organizations  during the Winter quarter, plans to  continue its! work this
summer. A  week-end party is one of the events  on the program later in the
season.  At a recent meeting, the following  officers were elected for this
quarter:  president, Bert Cole; vice-president,  Edith Jenkins; secretary, 
Irene Larsen; treasurer, Carlyle  Jones; sergeant-at-arms, Harold  Smith. 
— o-  New students living at Davis Hall  this quarter are: Mabel
Nelson, Or-tha  Young, Helen Sherkles, Alma  Donnelly, Elsie Berglund,
Mildred  McDonald. Mae Tracey, Frances  Christensen, and Mary Schafer. 
o-—=  While looking frantically up and  down the halls of Alma Mater
in    desperate attempt to become inter-viewingly  "sociable with some" inr
 nocent bystander, we were attracted  by a lazy looking jrouth, wiib, fe 
were told, was the business manager  of the Northwest Viking.  We waylayed
him, and, a few  minutes later we sat him, struggling  and sputtering, in a
stiff-backed  chair and started questioning with  merciless rapidity. 
Poached Eggs  He told us thfit his name was  Jack Greaves and that he was
born  in Manitoba, Canada; adding  knowingly, "Where men are men,  and the
winters are darned cold!"  Then he went on in ft listless itiorio-tone,  "i
am English, my age* is 2tl  years arid 4 Months. I am tfe€,  white,
and unattached, and I cook  my own breakfast, which sorisists of  two
piached eggs on toast." He  stopped, quite out of breath.  "And your
hobby," we asked  kindly. He breathed deeply and then  said, "Why my hobby
is reading  books and writing poetry. I am also  interested in
photography."  Lends Bit  Mr. Greaves has been at Normal  for thirteen
quarters and he expects  to graduate at the end of the summer  with a
four-year, diploma. (The  Normal finding ho, other plausible  means of
riddance). His ambition  along with the 7,000 others, is to be  a
school-teacher, and likewise a  great man.  In parting, he handed us an
example  of his inspiring poetry, which  rari as follows: . ;;  What have I
done  That I should be, !|  Exhalted by p  Publicity? .'jf;  And we
smilngly tucked it amoifg  the scraps of our scraprbook.-;•:; i  "A
delightful town in a delightful  place blessed with a wonderful I n mate. 
1" is what Miss Myrtle Garhes  has to say of our fair city, n jp  Work in
East %.  Miss Carnes' work has been in the  East, chiefly in New York City,
iahd  she finds a great difference in many  tilings. "People in this part
of the  country do hot seem so rushed.  They have time to live. There is 
hot that tenseness in the atmosphere  which is found in New York."  "As a
teacher I can notice a difference  in the children. I have  handled,
children, both in California  and in tile East, but never have seen  each
poised, icaim youngsters as  those with whom I come in contact  in
Bellingham. I would say that  this is caused chiefly by the peaceful 
atmosphere arid beautiful surroundings  in which they: live."  Rain Lucky 
According to Miss Carries, we are  even lucky to have the rain. "Rain  is
conducive to study and rest. The  people of this town should be especially 
intellectual, and I can imagine  no place more ideal for a school.  With
its climate and location, Bellingham  should become one of the  leading
teacher-training centers in  the United States."  2-PIECE KNlf WttS  In
Pastel Colors  Only  $1,95  Here are some inexpensive, yet very good
looking knit suits that  will serve you most satisfactorily through the
sunimer. They're  of Durene cloth, a sturdy fabric that's 100 per cent
washable. The  slip-over jacket has short sleeves, and the!, skirts are
made with  yoke top and flare bottom1. We have them in sizes 14 to 20, in 
Pink, Gold, Blue, Nile or White.  Mt. Baker and Island  Air Trip Enjoyed
fey  3 Faculty Members  Erythrorhyotchos Is  Asked Many Queries  FROM THE 
VIKING  ONE YEAR AGO  Victor H. Hoppe directs and takes  leading role in
the Drama club summer  quarter play, "The Pigeon".  The Board of Coritrol
praises the  Klipsun, which made its appearance  last week.  in Tuesday's
assembly Evelyn  Craw was elected student represenr  tative to the Board of
Control.  Janies' McCleary and Lyle Summers  Were ejected last Friday. -  A
stage leaves the campus in the  morning, headed for Shuksan, PPPPP