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1932_0115




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Northwest Viking - 1932 January 15 - Page 1



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?0§  Bllf TOMORROW  •: ;. WtfWWWtfWWWVlWtflW  ...
.SESROM: 4 ,'TO!i::^||ll||f §|  £•  WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL
SCHOOL, BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON Friday, January I 5 ; ^ l $ | j|  Are You
Listening?  Women, Attention!  Soap Box Speaks  Ye Diary  By Virginia
Carver  I I II I " .*' *  HeDo, folks! Registration's over  and prosperity
is just around the  oorner! Speaking of prosperity—  lltow would a
lovely,., juicy., steak,  smothered in onions go—and a nice  _(Say!
who threw that piano?)  ..;.•. —- o — o — -  A
certain professor of Education  in this school thinks that nearly  every
one of the numerous radio  entertainers sound like sick calves  taking
their last breath before pass-ling  into the great beyond! We say  check to
the statement, and add a  double check for the Hawaiian  "singers" who
gargle and groan  ': through modern love songs accompanied  by what sounds
like a couple  ^ of cats. But, after all, it's civila-tiOn  and our meager
minds must  accept and like itl  ,-'•.'•;• 0 0  Gary
Cooper, famed Hollywood  actor, says the best way he knows  of getting rid
of the blues is to take  a long horseback ride. We tried  it, and this is
our statement—it  simply isn't logical! Why trade  some measley
little blues for a  flock of black and blues?  - o-—o  Varied and
weighty questions  arise—is a woman's place in the  home? Should she
get as much  pay as a man for equal work? WeB  r—quoting another
prof—yes,| and  no! Some people think that there's  not enough work
in the home for  them to do—but, on the other  hand, if they'd
discard ye famouse  -can-opener for a long white apron  and make some food
like "mother  used to make" perhaps a few of the  men would find that they
wouldn't  have to drink kraut juice for "that  tired feeling".  o o  ' A
lot of folks are committing  suicide! Prttty nice ending every-thing  for a
good long sleep! But,  on the other hand, you don't gel up  for breakfast,
either.  o-—o  ,-- Speaking of publicity — Japan  takes the
proverbial cake! Every  little move she makes—bing! Her  name is
plastered in big letters  somewhere on the upper region of  every newspaper
published. They're  shrewd people, too, these Japanese,  and inclined to be
a trifle dangerous  if not taken in the right way.  People are beginning to
think they  should be shaken well before breakfast  and put in a cool, dry
place for  a couple of generations. Then  again—lots of them would
give a  good old eye tooth to get a little  of their publicity for personal
use!  o o  Ghandi's in jail now, too, isn't  he? What a shame! We send our 
best regards and a couple of those  coy little sheets he wears, and we 
hope he'll be back at his spinning  before long!  ——o- o . 
What a lot of talk there's been  about Hoover lately, both pro and  con. We
heard some soap box elocutionist  raving about how much  better he could
do. We dare him  to roll up his sleeves and try! He'd  find it such hot
work that he'd wish  himself back on his little soap box.  That same man
made a statement  something like this, too." What we  need is another war.
There are too  many people!" And I suppose, in  the killing off process,
the bullets  and bombs and gas and cannon  balls would have lots of fun
dodging  him and. his! Using the popular  sldny expression, we murtner 
quietly, "Oh, yeah?"  .;•";;. '';• o ,.-'" p-—•
;.•'.•.;/',../  J. Rockefeller; the big dime and  nickel man,
is spending his winter  stiji Florida. - If Owe ;l»BJd^aB^ya^;"'an. 
amoimt of shekies ^  we'd spent a g o^  Requirements of Eligibility for 
Getting Sweater Awards  Was Discussed  CONSTITUTION CHANGED  A short
meeting of the Board of  Control will be held iate tnis afternoon,  after
rec hour to decide which  orchestra will play for the weekly  recreational
periods throughout the  quarter. This action was decided  upon at the
regular meeting of the  Board, Wednesday, Jan. Is.  Sivert Skotheim,
chairman of an  investigation committee, reported  at the Wednesday meeting
on the  advisability of changing the requirements  for eligibility in
obtaining  an athletic sweater award  so that they would be consistent 
with the participation requirements  as set by the State Normal Trustee's 
Board last spring.  Ruling Differs  The requirements as outlined in 
Article 3 Section 6 of the by-laws  of the Students' Association
constitution  of this school are: "That no  individual shall receive an
award  who has not completed at least  twelve hours of satisfactory work in
 the institution in the quarter in  which he has earned his sweater.  That
the student shall turn out for  each respective activity during  the entire
season unless excused by  the coach for some legitimate reason."  The
ruling of the trustees is  that only ten hours of satisfactory  work are to
be required in order to  participate.  •'•'•'•'*
Change Proposed' . r  Skotheim, after conferring with  Coach S. E. Carver
and President  C. H. Fisher on the subject, suggested  that a change, be
made in  the constitution. The Board of  Control favored the report and 
passed a motion tnat Skotheim's  suggested be presented to the  student
association as a whole, for  a vote at some future date.  It was further
decided that President  Colin Campbell appoint a  committee to investigate
any possible  changes in the constitution, as  it now stands, to make it
consistent  with the new state requirements  which make this school a
three-year  institution. The constitution  in its present form was written
to  (Continued on Page Two)  PLANS FOR WINTER  QUARTER DISCUSSED  W. A. A.
Officers, Chairman and  Advisers Meet Monday  Officers, sports chairmen,
and  advisers of the Women's Athletic  association met last Monday evening,
 January 11, at the home of  Miss Weythman for supper and discussion  of
the plans for winter  quarter activities.  Possibilities of sending a
delegate  to an athletic association conference  to be held in April in Los
 Angeles were discussed. The organization  is in favor of having a 
representative attend this conference.  . For the purpose of looking into 
the Los Angeles meeting further  Dorothw Top and Theona Flick  were, chosen
as a committee.  Plans for several social and special  activities were also
discussed  at the supper meeting. It was  suggested that a boys' and girls'
 dance be held on February 12. June  McLeod was appointed chairman of  this
and will appoint her own  committees at an early date.  Plans for an outing
to the meadows  in the snowwere; also-made.  Jan. 30 was chosen.-"as a
tentative  date, although .^^p':is;';^';:jqtdtfii:  todefijrdtev^^^^  take
a trip to the Viqueen lodge p  Stoclj^  fan. 27 Is New Date  Set for
Concert of  Symphony Orchestra  That the date of the Little Symphony 
concert will be changed to  Wednesday, January 27, from January  19, the
date previously set,  was announced by Harold B. Smith,  director.  This
change was made due to  conflicting dates. As some of the  members are from
the Seattle Symphony,  it was impossible to have it  a week from the
original date because  Seattle will hold its symphony  concert at that
time.  The program for the event is as  follows: Symphony in B minor, 
Schubert; overture, "Midsummer  Night's Dream," Mendelssohn; Ballet  Suite,
Gluck; Intermezzo from  "Naive," Delibes; Polonaise from  " B o r i s
Godounof," Moussorgsky;  Entr'acte from "Rosemunde," Schubert;  Aragonaise
from "Le-Cid,"  Massenet.  The program will begin at 8:20  and student
activity tickets will admit,  as was announced before.  Frosh Class Party 
Will Be "All Wet"  In Deep Sea Idea  The freshman class party to be  held
January 29 in the big gym is  expected to be a unique affair, with  a
selected committee working on a  "deep sea" idea. , Jack Burns' orchestra 
will play.  Bennerstrom Chairman  The party is being headed by the  general
chairman, Liilian Bennerstrom,  who is assisted i gt;y a general  committee
consisting of L o u i se  Armstrong, Naomi Watson, Mar-jbrie  Morris and
June Jevning.  Those on the decoration committee  are Verna Thomas, Eleanor
Fraser,  Joyce Pf ueller, Doris McElmon, Ro-sanne  Young, Grace Goddard,
Howard  Wasley, Stewart Blythe, Jimmy  Thompson and Bob Diehl. The  program
committee, Marjorie Morris  and Dorothy Fiala, and refreshment  committee,
June Jevning and  Jean McMillan.  Plans Approved  "Mr. Hoppe, our faculty
adviser,  is very much in favor of the plans  for the party," says Miss
Bennerstrom,  "and I believe enthusiasm  should be found among the class 
more than is shown concerning  usual class functions."  Sophomores who were
freshmen  last quarter will be given tickets to  the party because no party
was  held last quarter.  WOMEN ASSEMBLE  WITH PURPOSE OF  FORMING PEP CLUB 
Girls Given Opportunity to Sign  on Bulletin Board for  Membership to Club 
CLUB ADVISERS CHOSEN  (Editorial Comment; See Page 2)  With the purpose of
creating pep  and stimulating school spirit, a  group of girls have been
meeting to  organize a Pep Club.  Before the club can become an 
organization their constitution must  pass the faculty board of affairs.  A
committee of Elsie O'Donnell,  chairman, Ruth Neal, Mary Hibbs  and Naomi
Watson was elected to  draw up a constitution. This will  be submitted to
the girls for approval  before it goes to the board.  Horton Adviser  Miss
Margary Horton, swimming  instructor, was elected as adviser to  the club. 
All girls who are interested in  such an organization were given the 
opportunity to sign up on the bulletin  board. After today the membership 
will be closed for the rest  of this quarter.  Meetings Held  Two meetings
were held this  week. At the first meeting Miss  Mildred Tremain, secretary
to the  dean of women and now acting in  her place, explained to the girls
the  reason that a Pep club which was  started two years ago was a failure.
 A special meeting was held Wednesday  noon for the girls to decide  on
some issues to be in the constitution.  — o—  REC HOUR
ORCHESTRA  WILL COMPETE TODAY  Future Whitemans, Lombardos,  and Arnheims
will display their  wares during the Rec hour this.afternoon  in the
competitive tryout  to decide which orchestra will dispense  tantalizing
tunes and snappy  syncopation for the benefit of dancers  at the Rec hour
this quarter.  Every band that desires a chance  to tryout will be given an
allotted  time during the Rec hour from 4  to 5:30 this afternoon and at
the  conclusion of the dance the Board  of Control headed by Colin Campbell
 will make the selection.  Various Courses Organized For  Students
Interested In Music  Are there courses in Music of-A  fered to students of
this school  as mediums for individual musical  expression?  "Many courses
are organized for  the benefit of students interested  in almost every
phase of music according  to H. B. Smitn, director of  Music department. 
Through the medium of phonograph  records the student becomes  familiar
with works of the great  composers of the world. Compositions  of
Beethoven, Liszt, Grieg,  Bach, and some of the moderns, are  analyzed and
explained. The student  in Music Appreciation learns  to understand good
music. Not  only is he taught to know good music  when he hears it but to
discern  which is good and which poor.  Is there a school orchestra?
According  to Mr. Smith, there is no  such actual organization, but the 
students 



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Northwest Viking - 1932 January 15 - Page 2



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Sftlfe-i V^iff-  WA S H I N G T O N S T A T E N O K M ^ s"Xaiojf' Q
L . i B E M J N G H A M / W M H I N G T Q N  Formerly The Weekly
Messenger—Founded 1899  Published evfery Friday except during the
month of September, by the Associated  Students, Washington State Normal,
Bellingham.  Entered in the Postoffice at Bellingham, Washington, as second
class matter by  virtue of thte act of March 3, 1879.  Printed by the
Miller   Sutherlen Printing Company, Bellingham National Bank Bldg. 
Subscription rate by mail, $1.50 per year, in advance. Advertising rates on
application.  National Advertising Representatives:
Littell-Murray-Barnhill, Mars Advertising, and  • . . i Collegiate
Special Advertising Agency, of New. York City.  Address ail communications,
other than hews items, to the Business Manager of the  Northwest Viking,
Bellingham, Washington  tlOGER CHAPMAN ..  B O B WALTERS ........  V I R G
I N I A CARVER  JIMMIE STODDARD  EVELYN ALTMAN  NADINE MATTSON 
..............Editor  ...Business Mgr.  Assistant Editor  .... Sports
Editor  ......; Copy Editor  ... Society Editor  Jean Murray  SPECIAL STAFF
WRITERS  Irene Schagel Janet McArthur  Debby Altose Virginia George  . r
DEPARTMENT WRITERS  Women's Sports ....Helen Northen  Men's
Sports............... ^IjBill Sells  Terry Cook Iver Moe  Campus Life
— —.......June Welch  Einar Larson  REPORTERS  Naomi Watson
Arvid Griffen  Jack Sears Grace Goddard  Bruce Springford Dorothy Fiala 
Harriet Rickerson Marydel Conrad  Berridge Marsh Louise Marr  Pep
Club—Bravo!  Pep Band—Next?  Efforts are being made by a group
of women to organize a Pep club.  This is the first attempt in several
years to remedy the much discussed  lack of spirit in the school. If any
lasting amount of spirit and interest  comes from this venture, (and we
sincerely hope it does) it is proper that  it be the women who are
responsible.  Despite their scarcity in number, it has been the men of the
school  who have led in activities. The men have dominated in most school 
elections. They have placed men in positions with the responsibility of 
creating so-called "pep" and both sponsors and electors have failed in 
this responsibility. The women now have taken the initiative. The  leaders
in this movement have and deserve the hearty support of all who  have been
conscious of the deficiency of student enthusiasm.  With the inauguration
of the Pep club may we suggest a companion  organization? Would a pep band
be beneath the dignity of Bellingham  Normal? The Music department has
expressed its willingness to  co-operate with this suggestion A suggestion
to the Men's club In  addition to your other activities, why not try to
foster a musical organization  that would give pleasure to participants and
student audiences  alike . . •  A dream or reality? PEP CLUB A N D B
A N D LEAD 800  ENTHUSIASTIC STUDENTS IN BIG RALLY FOR "THE  WHITE A N D
BLUE",  The world marvels: Mussolini now has his own speeches  censored,
before they appear in print... He was formerly a  newspaper man, you know.
Why marvel?  ,ii€flBy|^iie .Schagei)^'.;.  Are Married Teachers 
Permanently Banned?  School teachers in the State of California will no
longer be asked  to resign should they marry, it is thought by legal
authorities. School  Boards in California towns as in many communities of
this state require  women teachers, who marry after a teaching contract has
been signed, to  give up their positions.  In a test case recently in a
small California town a woman teacher  'who married during the summer
vacation refused to resign when asked  \o do so by the school board and
reported regularly to her superintendent  ~for assignment. A search was
made of California court records and the  "decision reached that a
resignation request must not be made solely upon  '* die basis of the
marital status.  Although this "discrimination", as practiced in
Washington, may  make for more jobs for Normal graduates, a condition the
school desires,  still it does not make for permanent upbuilding of the
school systems of  the state- Women students of this school might well be
opposed to  married women in the schools but once thty stcure positions
their attitude  will undoubtedly change. And the change will not be from
purely  -selfish reasons either. They will realize the importance of
experience in  teaching and will also see. that being married or wanting to
be married  -makes no difference in die ability of a teacher.  By amassing
a 39-point total in  tthe first half, the flashy Viking  Manor five coasted
to an easy 63-  to-9 victory over the cellar champions,  the Kings, Tuesday
afternoon,  January 12.  The Manor five showed a well  balanced attack with
everyone taking  part in the scoring. Griffen  with 16 points and Gable
with 18  tallies, and Zwascha with 14 points  led the attack.  Loomis, tall
rangy lad from  Mount Baker high, featured the  play in the first half
until leaving  the game because of personal fouls.  The tall boy annexed 9
points during  his term of residence.  Victory in this game placed the 
Manor boys in second position in  the intramural league race and  should
give Co-Op a run for the  banner next half. Glopen at forward  was high for
the Kings with  four points.  Lineups  ] Viking Manor, 63 Kings, 9  Russia
is adopting a general system of morals for her adults, similar 1 Gable, 18
...F:.. :...Glopen, 4  Russia! Russia! Everyone's talking  about Russia. We
didn't know  a thing about Russia, so we decided  to find out what everyone
is  so excited about. We went to the  library in search of "anything on 
Russia". The first thing that fell  into Our hands was "New Russia's 
Primer—the story of the Five-Year  Plan." A little book with large 
print—Here is the whole thing in  a nut shell—What a break! 
"Hew Russia Primer," by M. Din,  is a story of how coal is mined, 
factories are run, machines are  handled. It is designed to enlight-en  the
young Soviet on subjects  that our children learn in their industrial 
geography. These things  are not new to our children, because  wherever
they go every day,  they see machines doing man's  work; these things are
new to  Soviet children for not many years  ago boatmen were still pulling
boats  up the Volga and singing their  plaintive tunes,' the while. -  This
Russian, M. Ilin, the author,  has caught the vision of this machine  age
and he thrills perhaps as  your grandfather and mine did  when they first
saw the steamboat  and heard about Eli Whitney's famous  cotton gin.  The
last chapter of this little  red book is very inspirational and  rings very
sincere. This author  has titled it, "New People". Even  the words
'peasant' and 'workman'  will pass away. Only the word 'laborer'  will
remain". And again he  says, "Socialism is no longer a  myth, a phantasy of
the mind. We  are building it." Yes, our friend  Ilin has a vision no doubt
but we  find ourselves asking what caused  this sudden Russian, flash ef
seeming  intelligence; who is back of  this all? What of Stalin?  We
finished the book and now  we don't know a thing about the  government, the
living conditions of  Soviet Russia.  Some folks say over there people  are
starving to death. Some people  aren't eating very regularly right  here in
America.  "But," we resolved, "ye're not  through with Russia yet."  Will
Durant says in his book,  "The Story of Philosophy," "When  we have learned
to reverence liberty  as well as wealth, we too shall  have our
Renaissance."  / / you are interested in this new  thought, we suggest that
you read,  "Equality", by Edward Bellamy.  _ o :—  Flashy Viking
Manor  Five Wins Easy Game  Over Cellar Champs  Speaking of costumes,
rather, speaking of color combinations,  or perhaps speaking, of
contraltos, anyway,-—/  '"'•' y0nttf^^rius:; :-:  Side
M|tl^K^hble  Various.members of the Dra-;  ma club getting all dramatic 
about "Liliom" — June Welch  giggling over a delayed sneeze  in
history class—Miss Horton,  heroine of the apple sauce  tragedy,
having rather a bad  time of it in gym work—Ned  Sandvig waiting
around all  evening at the "Mixer" just to  dance with a certain
blonde—  Library instruction . class becoming  terribly restless for 
some reason or 'hother—Bill  Buttles shivering in tjhte cold  wintry
blast while engaged in  polite confab with a femme on  yon campus—the
deah editor  grinning from auditory appendage  over a perfectly sizzling 
student opinion—Bid Sells, always  the courteous escort,  gallantly
letting Iola carry her  own books, but maybe she's a  suffragrettte —
Ing Ivei-son  blushing coyly upon being  asked for a dance by a certain 
admiring co-ed—Pauline Hammond  becoming intensely excited  over a
bunch of whatcha-macallits  and thingamajigs  appearing under the
microscope—  Posy Flowers, nose at a  45 degree angle, sporting that 
extra special new sweater of  his—a few more stripes and  he'll look
like a convict or the  commander of the Swiss navy.  NEW COURSE BEGUN  IN
MENTAL HYGIENE  Small Class is Enjoying Work  on Problem Children  £ub
Reporters Given  ,: !Tjr#0ipnal Thrills ^  Ghostly groans, sighs and
shrieks,  the rattle of bones and the raging  and hate-consumed screams of
disturbed,  long-dead Chinamen filled  the palpitating air at the
initiation  of the new members of the Viking  staff last night. All this
joined with  nervous masculine laughs and feminine  gasps created a
veritable pandemonium.  History Told  After hearing an extremely
interesting  story of Bellingham's ancient  history the cub reporters went 
stumbling down an old mine shaft,  only to see a gruesome spectacle. In  a
ghostly green light dead Chinamen  were splashing and gurgling  against the
sides of the tunnel.  Thinking that their persecutors  had relented, the
innocent children,  Naomi Watson, Jack Sears, Bruce  Springford, Harriet
Rickerson, Berridge  Marsh, Arvid Griffen, Grace  Goddard, Dorothy Fiala,
Marydel  Conrad and Louise Marr, looked  happily forward to the prospect of
 sitting on a mossy green log and  holding hands with somebody nice.  But
oh, what a disappointment!  Take journalism and find out.  Traditions Found
Out  They also became acquainted  with some of the traditions of the 
paper, including type lice and the  Viking cow? As an afterthought a 
little artificial dandruff was lt; distributed  here and there in the
appropriate  places. In fact, all  thoughts turned to Listerine in  large
quantities.  For compensation refreshments  of a peculiar color were handed
out.  o  ORCHESTRA FOR REC TO  BE CHOSEN BY BOARD  (Continued from Page
one)  Loomis, 9 ...  Decent conduct is not enforced by threats. A belief in
a god or a myth-1 Brewer 6...  ical picture of a'heaven or a hell do not
coerce the Russian, or the modern Zwascha, 14..  •lyotith to right
living any more than the school child of today is coerced by 
I'*Tb^;lliclK)ry:vStick,^  Harriette Perkins spent the week-end-  at her
home in Burlington and  vMMjorie Rpsser visited her sister in  tlLjfjate^ 
gt;','•.'.".:• gt;.'.  | f ^ M i * g s^  ett last Thursday
evening to attend  the wedding of her cousin, Ellen  Ellingson.  "The
Cedars" have elected Jewell  Briseldenhousepresident and Mel-anie  Eisner
social president for this  iquarter.;;.'• " i ; ^ .^ '^y^pM^iJiMrt 
F. Perringer, 3  ...C......L. Lovegren, 2  ...G. :......'. Gross 
...G......:.....H. Lovegren  Substitutions—Manor, Berg and  Sariff. 
Referee, Gunn.  ••-—, --o ••
•'';-'••'"•  Lucile Hall, who was formerly a 
member of Barton Hall, has returned  for the winter quarter, i  ;r'.;-V'.
• v,: • ^'^,^r-^H^^'-^V^v;vV^.rv.':  • •;
.Catherine •, HoIIis spent I "the \week-•  ,;end},at;^^^ 
Mental hygiene is a new course  offered by the school this quarter,  with
Dr. Miller as the instructor.  He has had considerable experience  teaching
this subject in Eastern  schools.  Mental hygiene deals primarily  with
problem children, the study of  their tendencies and the prevention  or 



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Northwest Viking - 1932 January 15 - Page 3



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fmw ¥   WASHINGTON STATE M ^ P§  Eleven 1  ^ five of
Jln^ty 8  Amid the rattle of t in automobile  parts and the honking of
horns,   gt; eleven girls were initiated into  Edens Hall Tuesday night at
the  quarterly pajama party.  Those impersonating motor vehicles  were
called before the sheriff  to be sentenced. The prosecuting  attorney
suggested that they be  given m^, g i m " m jail sentences but  they were
finally allowed to go free  except that at dinner Wednesday  all initiates
were required to eat  from their laps with the backs to  the table arid
wear their hair in  braids. Penalty for disobedience,  twenty spats from
one of the huskiest  paddle squads in years.  The initiation was followed
by  stunts put on by the girls on the  different floors. The climax of the 
evening came in the first floor  stunt when Margaret Jacob put on  her
hypnotism act. Refreshments  were served later from the filling  station in
the corner of the room.  The girls initiated were Betty  Doane, Peggy
Forrest, Reha Newman,  Leatha Dodge, Helen Jed-kland,  Helen Pybus, Louise
Rice,  Jerry Taylor, Virginia Hunt, Virginia  Hutchinson and P r a n c es 
Dewey.  The committee heads were Kath-rine  Evers, general chairman;
Florence  Dobbs, refreshments; Beth  McLeod, program, and Peggy Forrest, 
new girls.  o  Miss Burton Entertains  Miss Beatrice Burton, Normal  school
graduate, was hostess at a  hridge party last Saturday evening  at Talahi
House. The guests were:  Miss Prudence Wolf, a teacher in  the Bellingham
school system, and  the members of the house, Evelyn  Montgomery and Ruth
Hastings.  Waffle Supper Given  Mildred and Roberta Leake entertained  a
group of friends with a  waffle supper at Ragan House last  Friday evening.
The guests were:  Donna Aisted, Florence Laviolette,  Henny Lund and
Rebecca Apple.  . . . H a l l Holds Elections  Edens Hall elections were
held  Monday, January 4. The following  were elected to hold offices during
 the winter quarter: Marion Grieves,  social chairman; Borghild Kasper-son,
 secretary-treasurer, and Julia  Christenson, house reporter.  Ivah
Guernsey Is President  Terrace House held its first meeting  last Monday
evening to elect  officers. Ivah Guernsey was elected  president and
Winnifred Klaus social  secretary. The house rules  were explained to the
new girls,  who are Adeline VanHee, Ella Brei-land,  Beatrice Helsen and
Winnifred  Klaus.  Bridge Party Given  To Announce Co-op  Girl's Engagement
 Of interest to the Normal students  is the announcement of the  engagement
of Miss Eileen O'-  Rourke to Mr. Charles S. Paynton,  of Lynden. Miss
O'Rourke is a  member of the Co-op staff of the  school.  A cleverly
appointed bridge luncheon  was given Saturday afternoon  at Chuckanut
Shell. Designating  the places for 27 guests were  miniature newspaper as
favors,  within which was discovered the  news of the engament. Bridge 
prizes were awarded to Miss Mildred  Tremain, first; Miss Inez  Swanson,
Ace; and Mrs. Edith R.  Banner, consolation.  o  LOCAL HIGH SCHOOLS 
GRANTED "REC HOUR"  ._' e  Fashionable  Coed  JJfr  IN the afternoon a
young woman's  fancy wonderingly turns to  thoughts of what to wear on the 
quarterly round of luncheons, teas,  and informal affairs.  More Elaborate 
CONTRASTING with the tailored  sport and school dress, the afternoon  frock
can be more elaborate.  Darker skirts and bodices with  lace yokes are
often seen. They are  also styled with combinations of  colors. These
dresses are worn ten  inches from the floor.  The coat for afternoon should
 be semi-fitted, and fur-trimmed but  without a belt. Black is always 
favored. A hat should, be worn at  all times. Shoes with medium high  heels
are worn with sheerer hose.  Sunday Night Frock  p O R informal affairs the
Sunday  ^ night frocks are often used. These  are usually form fitting and
ankle  length. So as not to be too formal  they have cape or puff sleeves,
or  at least a suggestion of a sleeve.  Sport coats should never be worn 
with a Sunday night dress. Dress  coats or evening Wraps are appropriate. 
These can be worn with a  close fitting hat. The color should  be selected
to give the wearer the  best lines.  • o  W.A.A.Women Will  Tramp
Over Hill and  Dale on Lake Jaunt  Local high schools, Whatcom and 
Fairhaven, h a v e recently b e en  granted by the school board the 
privilege of holding dances under  the supervision of the schools. During 
each school semester will be  held a junior and senior prom and  one
• Friday matinee dance each  month.  Last year a previous petition of
 this nature was brought before the  school board and rejected. At that 
time only two cities in the state of  Washington prohibited dancing in 
their high schools^^The other.city,  was Spokane. A formal protest  against
the action of4 the-'local  board was entered immediately by  With a trip to
the Natural Dry  Docks members of the W. _\. A.  started out the hiking
season for  the winter quarter last Saturday  afternoon. Miss Lillian
George is  acting as leader again this quarter  and Ruth Neal as hike
manager.  The hike scheduled for tomorrow,  Saturday, January 16, is to
Toad  Lake. Girls who plan to attend  should take the Lake Whatcom car 
leaving town at 1:30. Girls may  either bring a token with which to  ride
back or they may hike the entire  distance into town.  Each week a notice
is placed on  the W. A. A. bulletn board on  which girls are urged to sign
before  Friday noon. Every girl in school  is invited to come, whether they
 have attended previous hikes or  not.  o  WONDER TEAM WINS  OVER VANADIS
BRAGI  tj^^^W^i,  Or i g i n a lSk e t c h e s ,AAd doorrfni ! Wa l l s 
Depicting P a r t y Themes  Dancing to the strains of Jack  Burn's
Collegian orchestra, Nor-malites  report to have spent a  very enjoyable
evening at the "leap  year" mixer last Friday evening,  January 8. 
Original sketches by some unknown  artist decorated the walls,  depicting
the theme of the evening.  Women's choice dances was one  of the most
popular modes of entertainment.  ManyN bashful youths  were to be seen
blushing as their  beloved awkwardly asked for the  "next one."  Patrons
and patronesses at the  event were: President and Mrs. C.  H. Fisher, Mr.
and Mrs. H. C. Ruck-mick,  Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Bond, Mr.  and Mrs. H. V.
Masters, Mr. and  Mrs. Pelagius Williams, Miss Mildred  Jewell,_Miss Lucy
Kangley,  Miss Nora Cummins and^Miss Mildred  Tremain.  Miss Lillian Lux
was the general  chairman of the very successful affair.  o  Some Changes
Made  In Sport's Schedule  For Women Athletes  3S£S  BLUE TRIANGLE
CLUB  is.  Twenty-two Fouls Are Committed  During Course of Game  Changes
have been made as to  the days for turnouts of the various  women's sports.
The sports offered  this quarter are badminton,  basketball and advanced
tap dancing.  Swimming and hiking are  sports offered all year 'round.  The
revised sports schedule is as  follows: Badminton- on Monday  and Wednesday
in the big gym,  tap dancing on Monday and Wednesday  in the small gym, and
basketball  on Tuesday and Thursday  in the big gym. Swimming is held  on
Thursday evening at the Y. W.  C. A. between 7 and 9 o'clock. All  other
sports are held at 4 o'clock,  with the exceptionof hiking, which  is every
Saturday at various hours.  Badminton is proving so popular  this quarter
that it has been necessary  to divide the participants into  two sections,
one meeting at 4  o'clock, the second starting practice  at 4:30.  o 
McBeath Is Leading  School Foul Shoot  Miss"'Piatt: to Speak on Orient at 
'"' Ne*t € H   ^ e e u h g ;;  The Blue Triangle Club planned  a very
interesting program for the  quarter at its regular meeting Wednesday  at
the Y. W. C. A. Plans  were made for the card party and  camp. Elizabeth
Korthauer, president,  announced the members who  are to serve on the
cabinet.  Girls Invited to Party  The girls of the school and their 
friends are invited to attend the  bridge party given by the Blue Triangle 
Club next Friday evening,  January 22, at 8 o'clock at the Y.  W. C. A. The
admission will be 25  cents.  The week-end of Washington's  birthday the
club girls are planning  on a.camping trip over on Lummi  island at the
club cabin. Within the  near future the girls plan a skiing  trip at Mount
Baker.  . Cabinet Appointed  Elizabeth Korthauer announced  the appointment
of the cabinet  of the club. The members are:  Eloise Rankin,
vice-president;  Donna Aisted, treasurer; Alice-Jean  Donaway, inter-club
council member;  Lorraine Shephard, program  committee; Louise Marr, s o c
i al  committee; Dorothy Montgomery,  publicity committee; Betty Pearson, 
membership committee; Eloise Rankin,  telephone squad, and Harriet 
Rickerson, reporter for the Beacon.  Advisory Board Members  Miss Linda
Countryman, Miss  Ruth Piatt, Miss Merry Pittman,  Miss Florence Johnson
and Mrs.  Dwight Smith are the members of  the advisory board, who help the
 girls carry on the club work. The  club girls and advisers plan to work 
out an international relations program.  Miss Ruth Piatt will be the 
leader of the first international  program. She will speak on the  Orient
at the regular meeting of  the club January 20.  Anyone interested in the
club is  invited to attend, the meetings,  which are held every Wednesday 
evening at the Y. W. C. A.  _____—o  JUNIOR VIKING SHOWS  CARTOONS AS
FEATURE  Juniors arid SS lt;en iors  Elect Ervin !le_tha  HI $ Prll_l$ei-
airVIeetllg  " iI_e junior-senior election was  held in the auditorium
Friday, January  8. Chuck Dowell acted as  president and Evelyn Elliot was 
secretary pro-tern. The candidates  were: President, ErVin Leatha and  Jack
Schaefer; .vice-president, Stanley  Smith, Marie Wessler; secretary,  Ed
Collier and Evelyn Elliot;  treasurer, Rachel Rouston and Eddie  Duyff; I.
C. C. representative,  Guy Bushby; adviser, Mr. Pelagius  Williams.  The
election was very close as  only seventeen votes were cast. The  winning
candidates were E r v in  J_eathea, president; Stanley Smith, 
vice-president; Evelyn Elliot, secretary;  Eddie Duyff, treasurer; Guy 
Bushby, I. C. C. representative, and  Mr. Williams, adviser..  :
°—: ~  Y. W. INSTITUTE MEETS  , Probably the roughest 



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Northwest Viking - 1932 January 15 - Page 4



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•-!J'diJJ.li ^*£^^iJ$^*{   A ' n S V ' a V . ' . W r ' A
W A W . V l  liiiiipipi  \  AVWWWWWWYVSHWWrtY  •;^:;|JW5h«tV a
great start the Viking  hqopsmen made in their first intercollegiate  game
of the season. They  were clicking, folks, and don't mistake  -it. lied by
McBeath; who  tossed everything but the scoreboard  through the mesh, the
Nor-malites  played their visitors off  theirv feet; and piled up an
impressive  37-20 score. K this squad, being  groomed by Coach Carver, can
improve  just a wee bit in some departments;  of the great sport/ they 
should make a great bid for Tri-  Normal honors this year. Our personal 
hunch is that the Wildcats  from Ellensburg are the only team  that will
hinder the Vikings in  their drive. ,  —st. martins tomorrow-  After
a vain three years' search  for something better than an average 
basketball team the Co-Op  leaders have finally made a lucky  strike on a
group of fellows who  may bring' home the bacon this  year for the
heretofore cellar kings.  Seven straight victories and the  first half
pennant of the intramural  basketball race is the record  hung up thus far
by the booksellers,  led by Coach "Curly" Gross.  —st. martins
tomorrow—  The second hfdf of the pennant  race opened last night and
play will  continue for several weeks. Our  only hope is that one team, the
 Kings preferably, will knock the  Co-Ops off their perch and make  ilhe
race a little more interesting.  )ut the way things look now the  iugs will
have little trouble in  letting the pack home.  \ —st. martins
tomorrow—  Following the game with St. Martin's,  tomorrow evening at
the  Whatcom gym, the Viking basket*  eers will pack their suits and jump 
over the mountains for a three-game  series in the land of sagebrush  and
jackrabbits. Wednesday  night they meet the strong Ellensburg  Wildcats.
The Wildcats have  played strong teams thus far. and  will force the
Vikings  lt;jto their utmost  in this game, the first of Tri-  Normal
competition. T h u r s d ay  night the Westerners tangle with  the Yakima
Junior College. Then  on Saturday night comes the second  Tri-Normal game
of the trip, this  with Cheney. It will be a hard trip  for the little band
of Vikings and  they'll be mighty glad to crawl into  their little trundle
Defls when they  get back home.  —st. martins tomorrow—  And by
the way, Itchie Toesys,  the world's greatest football predictor, 
forecasts a victory over the  Ranger^ tomorrow night and a win  over the
Yakima J. C. and Cheney  on the trip next week. Also the  Junior Varsity
will take the P. A.  P. quintet in the preliminary game  tomorrow night. 
-^t. martins tomorrow—  HERE AND THERE. . . .  That unexpected defeat
handed by  the Oregon $tqte College quintet  was a severe slap on the
usually  well-protected chin of *7/ec" Ed-mundson  and his Purple and Cold 
pets. . . . Ohio high schools will  insure their football players against 
injuries next year. . . . Viking track  hopes took a decided turn upward 
with the enrollment of Wall Schi-laty,  former Everett high track  flash. A
ten-flat effort is his best.  '—-fit. martins tomorrow—  ;
Temple, late of C. P. S. and a  consistent 175-foot javelin heaver,  is
also in school this quarter. . . .  More about the track boys next  week. .
. . W. S. C. fans seem to  think that their two representatives  in the
annual East-West game  were the main cogs in semi-halting  of the eastern
backs.—Aw, Nerts!  r-They didn't do any more than the  rest of the
fellows that played in  the big game.  —st. martins tomorrow— 
2 ^ . . '.  Nary a point was scored in ten and  one-half minutes in the
Bragi-  Wpnder game this week. . . . The  Bragifailed to score a field goal
 until twenty-seven minutes of the  game had elapsed. . . . Anacortes 
downed Sedro-Woolley, 53-3, hi a  game last week. . . . A 90-53 score  was
piled up by two teams in Seat-:  .•'|te.i;;S';;i:;5ni^'i^-oyer 5,000
players  participating in organized basketball  in Seattle. -:;.''.'.
Halbert, Co-.  ^'^^ /f gt;-;;;'"*._";' -i'-*^^'^.- '^;i??'E!**l*?' gt;/ ^':
*^«*it:--;^ B^Kraa^re^l;.': eighty;  ^:Si|S^!©|i^S^^^^
'"^'•'•r^t'-''0'-::HK'''' gt;:'^  IN A FAST MOVING  HARD FOUGHT
GAME  Caryer's Boys Show Up Fine in  Season's Opening Game;  Fans Hopeful 
CARLSON SCORES HIGH  smooth, steady  brand of basketball  plus an 
ever-threatening  scoring threat,  proved entirely  too much for the 
visiting Pacific  Lutheran college  quintet last Sat-urday  night and as a
result the  local Vikings are coveting their  first varsity scalp of the
1931 season  with a 37-20 win over the southern  team.  The Vikings were
never threatened  in the game and held a decisive  lead except for a few
moments  in the first quarter when the  Gladiators garnered five markers 
before the hill top marksmen hit  their stride. A 20-8 score favored  the
Vikings at half time.  McBeath Scores High  Clint McBeath, a former Whatcom
 and W. S. C. frosh star, was  the whole show in the offensive attack  of
the Carver coched team. He  chalked up a total of sixteen points  for his
evening's efforts. Aiding  very materially in the Normal victory  was Rork,
center, with five  markers; Wahl, forward, six points,  and Kienast, guard,
six points.  The beauty of the entire game  was the quick breaking of the
Vikings  on offense and the air-tight  nature of their defense when the 
visiting Parkland boys got their  hands on the oval. Exceptional  work was
done by the trio of  guards used by Coach Carver during  the course of the
melee. Kienast,  Johanseson and McNeil very effectively  checked the
Gladiator  guards to the small margin of six  points during the game. 
Vikings Look Good  The spectators present at the  affair got an eye-full of
what real  speed is on the basketball court.  "Red" Carlson, reputed to be
one  of the fastest football men in the  Northwest and who, single handed, 
trounced the Viking gridsters this  fall, was the shining star of the 
Gladiator attack. He bagged a total  of seven points but incidentally, 
missed enough shots to defeat two  teams." Although he exemplified 
chain-lightning in basketball shoes,  Carlson found it very difficult to 
bore through the Viking defense.  Hergot, Lutheran forward, ran him  a
close second with six markers.  Taking everything into consideration  the
fans were very well  pleased with the Varsity quintet  presented by Coach
Sam Carver.  Plenty of spark, combined with a  smooth, determined drive
gave the  Vikings plenty of color in this, their  first intercollegiate
game of the  season. With McNeil, Campbell,  Sherman and Flowers held in
reserve,  the Vikings should be able  to play all their games this season 
at top speed. The local five will  have a real chance to test their 
strength against the strong St.  Martin Rangers tomorrow evening  at the
Whatcom gym. Reports show  that the southern team will give  the Vikings a
much stiffer battle  than did the Lutherans last, week/  Good Season
Predicted  It can be very heartily said that  scarcely a fan left .the gym
after  the game last week who doesn't  predict an outstanding season for 
the Viking hoopsmen. This Viking  outfit has drive, fire, pep and  are
basketball-minded. In the Lutheran  game the visitors stepped out  and hung
up an early lead, but the  Vikings came back fast to roll up  an impressive
victory. Don't forget  that the Vikings engage St.  Martins college
tomorrow night in  a game that promises to hold as  much," if not more,
action than the  last contest staged by the local outfit.'  .;';• 
Line-ups for the Lutheran game:  P L C .  .... Hergot 6  '...:.....:.. Moe 
.... Mittori 3  Levinson 3  . Carlsb ri 7  '^JBut^tutiao^  ^m^m^Wla^rs for
}Haii; Jsherl  THE INTRAMURAL HOT  SHOTS  Halbert, Co-Op ..,.. 80  Griffen,
Manor .... 62  Gable* Manor 59  Kuske, Wonders .............. 58  Zwaschka,
Manor 57  Stearns, Men's 55  Johannes, Co-Op ..... 53  Harris, Co-Op ......
52  Jenson, Wonders 51  Singer, Men's 45  Collier, Thespians 40  Sinko,
Co-Op ..... 37  Larson, Bragi ..... 35  Glopen, Kings 31  McCarthy,
Thespians 30  The leading scorers of the  respective teams for the first 
half:  Vanadis Bragi Larson  Reynolds Hall Carr  Bangs and Cabbages Glopen 
Thespians _. Collier  Viking Manor Griffen  Men's Club Stearns  Wonders _
Kuske  JUNIOR VARSITY LOSE  GAME TO BOSTROM'S  Trailing at the half by a
score  of 13-7 the Bostroms quintet of the  Class B league staged a
comeback  and scored at 26-20 victory over the  Normal Junior Varsity
hoopsters  last Saturday at the Whatcom gym.  Bostrom's team, an entrant in
 the state basketball tournament to  be held in Seattle, was furnished 
with real competition by the Junior  Vikings but their last half scoring 
overcame the Jayvees' six-point lead  and gave them the game.  W. Bliss
accounted for 10 of the  Gas Pumpers' tallies, giving him  high point
honors, while Eacrett,  the Jayvee guard, sunk three field  goals for a
total of six points to  lead the Normalites.  Line-up:  Jayvee 20 Bostrom
26  Cook 2 F W. Bliss 10  Bond 2 F Haickel 2  Gissberg 4 C Moser 4 
Malmquist 3 G Clendenen 1  Eacrett 6 G. Barhhart  Substitutions— 
Jayvees: Harris 2 for Cook, Comfort  PPPPP