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1932_0226




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Northwest Viking - 1932 February 26 - Page 1



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ifiiStfisiPiSiii^  WASHINGTON" STATE NQRMAL SCHOOL.BEELINGHAM,
WASHINGTON  ;'-"'" " •••
-"•"-'-"•^•ils^^Si!'  '"" ~——gl  : , •;
.. ...... jl?ff  Friday, ^Febroary\^«g|;$^2^  ; GREETINGS  UP IN THE M
B  GOLF BUGS START  HELLO ARIZONA  By Virgiiiia Carver  *-*  • Hello,
folks!—We take our typewriter  in hand and put our noses to  the
grindstone after the brief vacation,  so to speakV It was a relief  to see
the family again—but it's  taken us the full four days to get  rested
up after th? quiet little rest  at home! And doesn't it seem nice  to be
the prodigal ,s°n returned  from "collitch", after spending all 
quarter being your room mate's  clothes rack, meal ticket, errand  boy and
potential rival in romance?  — - W . S . N . S .—  A recent
headline said, "He is a  friendly fellow, today's dollar-spend  him!" He
may be friendly,  bnt he passes us up like a dirty  shirt every time we get
near him!  And we can't understand it either—  —because we've
actually neared the  affection line with him. Maybe  he's a gentleman and
prefers  blondes!  —W.S.N.S.  The latest in residences seems to  to
run rather high! Skyscrapers  are coming into their own even for 
residential purposes! iThey are being  built of light steel and bricks. 
It's a good idea all right but it  would be so much easier to do a 
"fireman, save my child!" act from  two stories than from 200! Excuse  our
old fashioned ideas!  —W.S.N.S.-  Now is the time for all good men 
to start rummaging around in the  moth balls for ye olde golfe togs!  We
passed the course a couple .of  days ago and saw quite a little  gathering
of blue nosed enthusiasts  knocking the little pill gently  around the
green. Excuse us again  if we seem to find our exercises  jumping up and
down in front of a  fireplace—the wind's still a trifle  chilly for
short socks!  — W.S.N.S.  Something ought to be done!  What, with
weak looks and strong  coughs the ranks are growing thin  and wan. Maybe
we'll have to pack  up our little pills and mustard  plasters and see about
getting reduced  bus rates to Arizona!  o '•  We hear that John D.
Rockefeller  is very optimistic as to the economic  conditions., in., the..
United  States. And we ask you very humbly—  why shouldn't he be?
With his  millions we could even be optimistic  about Japan and China
(along  with Florida, the Riviera, Monte  Carlo and Reno).  —W.S.N.S.
 The University of Washington  students have started a little uprising 
against spoon fed educations!  They think they are ^getting big  enough now
to sit in at one of those  reddest of red lectures and pick the  good from
the bad! And why not?  After all—after a fellow has been  (Continued
on Page Three)  WILL BE AIRED  Student Ass'n. Will Meet Friday  . to
Discuss Revision of  the Constitution  BUSY SESSION ASSURED  Two-Piano
Ensemble  To Present Concert  as Tuesday Feature  Proposed changes and
amendments  to the constitution will be  presented to the members of the 
Students' Association at a regular  meeting in the assembly on Friday. 
March 4th. The series of changes,  according to President Colin Campbell, 
is intended, to make the constitution  consistent with the new  three-year
plan of the school.  In addition to the three changes  as proposed by the
Board of Control  and printed in this issue of  the Northwest Viking,
President  Campbell stated that three other  resolutions probably will be
brought  before the students next Friday.  These three tentative amendments
 have not taken definite form as  they lack action of. the Board of 
Control:- The Control body, however,  has a committee working on  these
suggested changes which probably  will be put in definite form by  March 2.
The probable resolutions  the Board at its next meting on  sion by the
Board of Control are:  1. That the name of the student  body be changed
from "Students'  Association of Washington State Normal  School" to
"Associated Students  of Washington State Normal  School" This change is a
result of  a suggestion by the Speech department.  According to a statement
by  Mr. V. H. Hoppe, the change will  prove much more satisfactory in  the.
advertising of all school activities.  He also pointed to the fact  that
the present name lends no dignity  to an institution of higher  learning. 
2. A change in the rules of election  of the president and vice president. 
With the present rules only  a plurality vote by one of the  nominees of
the group of candidates  is necessary to elect him. '* The  change probably
will include a primary  and general election. A disadvantage  of the
present system as  pointed out by President Campbell  is in the case of
several nominees  being up, the least popular man  may be elected, due to
the votes  being well divided among the popular  candidates.  3. The
amendment concerning  the sweater awards which was defeated  in the last
meeting by a  very small majority with a few  changes probably will be
submitted  to the students at the meeting  for reconsideration.  The
committee appointed by President  Campbell to work on the new  election
rules is as follows: Elsie  O'Donnell, chairman, Sivert Skot-heim,  Jimmie
Stoddard, Eddie  Duyff, Miss Nora Cummins, Mr.  Edward Arntzen. Mr. H. C.
Ruck-mick,  and Charles Dowell.  The committee hopes to formulate  a set of
rules including the primary  and general election which  also will
stimulate club interest.  Mrs. Dorothea Hopper Jackson  and Mr. John
Hopper, pianists, will  be presented in concert here, at 11  o'clock on
Tuesday, March 1.  The two-piano ensemble is expected  to form a most
attractive  program as both of the artists are  very accomplished
musicians, having  studied in European countries  as well as in many parts
of America.  Mr. Hopper appeared here last  quarter when he accompanied a
violinist  from the Cornish School of  Music in Seattle.  Unusual Program 
As students very seldom have the  opportunity to hear a two-piano ensemble 
in concert this program  should be vry interesting as well as 
entertaining. This will be the first  time, a program of this type has 
been offered here for some time.  Formerly of Cornish School  Mr. Hopper,
who was formerly  connected with the Cornish School  of Music, has acted as
soloist with  several orchestras, including the  Seattle Symphony
orchestra, under  the direction of Karl Krueger.  . Q_ __  UPPER CLASS
LEADS  PATRIOTIC PROGRAM  Washington Bicentennial Assembly  Held Tuesday
Morning  WKfKGS HOSTS TO  C. P. S. L OW  TOMORROW NIGHT  Normal Squad Hopes
to Avenge  Early Season Defeat  by Methodists  Lighthouse Idea to  Be Theme
of Edens  Hall Dance Tonight  CO-OPS IN PRELIMINARY  A George Washington
bicentennial  program which was under the  auspices of the Junior-Senior
class  and under the leadership of Stanley  Smith, was .given in last
Tuesday's  assembly, Feb. 23.  To start the program off right  the student
body united in the singing  of "America". It was led by  B. Smith, who was
accom-by  Jack Schaeffer at the  Students' Association Constitution 
Changes of Election Requirements  SECTION 3. (Item e) to Read as Follows:
The, Board of Control  shall grant leave of absence to the Vice President
or Representative  on the Board for the summer quarter only when so 
requested. The office of Vice President shall be filled temporarily  by the
Senior Representative in service. In case there  is no Senior
Representative a temporary Vice President shall  be elected. Vacancies in
the office of Representative, shall be  f illed_at an election held at the
end of the.spring quarter.  SECTION 3. (Item a) to Read as FoUows: The
President and  Vice President shall be elected at the beginning of the
winter  quarter, the President toi serve a full etrm of four  quarters
without a leave of absence.  SECTION 4 to Bead as Follows: (a) To be
eligible for election as  President or Vice President a candidate must be a
student  who has had a t least four quarters of resident work at the 
Washington State Normal School of Bellingham Wash., must  carry at least
twelve; credit hours of work and must be approved  by the S c r u r i a r
s^  (b) Candidates;'Ior; Representative must have had a t least  two
quarters resUent work at the Washington Stafe Normal  School of BelUngham,
Wash., be approved by the Scholarship  Committee of the ^actotgtiiujid;
:«ii^./at;;,;ijeart-^^el^B  .credit
jbiSprtxnB^^ot'/^P(FO«*.-^'vvv:v^^
gt;^:^^"T;-:';;^v-^"A—:.:.!r-'^My^ •-'y\iy  Harold  panied 
piano.  Address Given  The speaker of the assembly was  Mr. Walter B.
Whitcomb, who has  been a member of the Board of  Trustees of this school
for many  years. In his talk he gave a brief  resume of Washington's life
and in  closing he said, "It is not what  Washington gained in school but 
what he got at home that started  the development of his strong and  rugged
character."  Following this, Miss Evelyn Montgomery  sang a song "Trees",
and  James Butler read "Washington's  Farewell to the Army". The assembly 
then adjourned to the campus,  where the tree planting exercises  took
place.  Leatha Dedicates Tree  , Erwin Leatha, president of the  Junior
class, performed the dedication  of the tree. In this dedication  he said,
"The nation and the name  of George Washington are inseparr  able." He
continued saying, "Every  tribute to Washington is a direct  tribute to
patriotism."  In response, Mr. Pelagius Williams  gave a short speech in
which  he said that education, like a tree,  must be firmly embedded in the
 field of knowledge to give off great  results. To close the program,
Preston  A. Wright gave a reading, "The  Heart of a Tree", by Henry Bunner,
 and president of the student body,  Colin Campbell, planted.the tree. 
_—,—o —i  GROUP OF STUDENTS  MEET WITH HOPPER  It will be
a spirited Viking machine  that takes the floor against  the College of
Puget Sound tomorrow  night at 8:30 on the Whatcom  High gym floor. The
Blue and  White need the scalps of the invaders  to make the season a
success.  C. P. S. Strong  The College men will be hard to  handle because
they, too, will be  under severe pressure to win. They  have once turned
the Vikings back  this season 42-33 and will be out  to prove that it
wasn't an accident.  Coach Ray Sandberg has a pair  of guards in Gagnon and
McVey  who will give the Normal forwards  a troublesome evening. Carlson, 
forward, was the big scoring threat  in the previous encounter; he will  be
watched Saturday.  Vikings Improve  McBeath and Rork came through  with
high class basketball on the  recent victorious road trip. If they  will
continue the revival they will  give C. P. S. plenty of defense  work. 
When these teams are thrown into  action it promises to be interesting. 
The type of basketball the  Vikings played on the trip will press  C. P. S.
to the limit if they will win.  Rork's Last Game  Saturday's game probably
will be  Rork's last basketball game for the  Normal. This always sets the
stage  for a good performance.  In a preliminary which promises  to be good
the champion Co-op  "Thugs" will take on a team from  Everett. Little is
known of this  team but they have a good record.  "Curly" Gross, manager of
the  "Thugs", has utmost confidence in  his champions coming through for 
him in their last game.  A lighthouse sending its bright  gleam over the
room will dominate  the scene at the Edens Hall Informal,  to be given 



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Northwest Viking - 1932 February 26 - Page 2



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^^^^^^^i^^^^HlPPSPli  SI m  MBi tsM  W ^ J I N ^  ]m§A 
^:(soFprae^ ;  Published:every-Friday: except during the month
of-Septem-belr*:  by '^^:^:^U|^iilte^.j
lt;5todehts;^'Washingtimv'State.^NorInal  ^School,^Bellingham; ;'
'•:-. :'~';.-. ...  'Entered in the Postoffice at Bellingham,
Washington, as  second class matter by virtue of the act «f March 3,
1879.  - . - . ' ' •  lt; • - • • - - - - •
• • • - ••• - • •-•
• •• ;•' • •- -; ; I ; ; ; , . .  ;
Printed, by the Miller   Sutherlen Printing Company,. Bellingham  National
Bank Building.  Subscription rate: by mail, $1.50 per year,7 in advance.
Advertising  rates on application. ' ..  National Advertising
Representatives;  bill, Mars Advertising, and Collegiate  Agency, of New
York City. ,  Littell-Murray-Barh-  Special Advertising  •Address all
communications,-:other"- than news items, to the  Business Manager of the
Northwest Viking, Bellingham, Wash.  , Telephones 3180  ROGER CHAPMAN  BOB
WALTERS .........  VIRGINIA CARVER :  JTMMIE STODDARD 
„„.„..... .....Editor  ...... Business Mgr. 
......Assistant Editor  Sports Editor  DEPARTMENT WRITERS  Copy Editors,
Evelyn Altaian, Jack Sears  ,v •- Society, Nadine Mattson  Women's
Sports, Helen Northen  Men's Sports, Bill. Sells, Iver Moe, Terry Cook 
Campus Life, June Welch, Einar Larson  SPECIAL STAFF WRITERS  Jean Murray
Irene Schagel Janet McArthur  Debby Altose Virginia George  REPORTERS 
Naomi Watson, Arvid Griffen, Jack Sears, Grace God-dard,  Bruce Springford,
Dorothy Fiala, Harriet  Rickerson, Marydel Conrad, Berridge Marsh  IMS AND 
SPIRATIONS  N EFFORT to formulate the aims, purpose,  and functions of the
NORTHWEST VIKING was  recently begun by the editorial staff.  TO P L A N
how the VIKING can best serve and  best represent this school has been our
aim. Many  suggestions have been made by faculty and students  and have
been considered by the staff. President  Fisher has met twice with the
entire staff and discussed  with them various aspects of the school
newspaper.  A study of'the purposes of a student newspaper  has been
prepared by the Research bureau of  this school.  AS A FURTHER aid to
determining what  function a paper can have in a teacher training school, 
President Fisher has taken with him on his Eastern  trip representative
issues of this year's Vikings and he  will compare them with papers of
other educational  institutions and at the same time investigate school 
newspaper management in the outstanding teacher  training schools in the
East.  A V A R I E T Y OF IDEAS has arisen from our  disussion, prominent
among them the realization of  the peculiar position of the NORTHWEST
VIKING.  In the first place, the VlKlNG is prepared for readers  of an
intelligence quotient far above that of the average  newspaper reader; in
the second place, we  cannot duplicate the work of ordinary colleges
because  .ous is a specialized institution and outstanding in its  T H E
EDITORIAL STAFF of the VIKING  has tried continually to maintain a high
standard of  journalism and is always receptive to new ideas and  to
suggestions for betterment.  OUR FUNCTION in this school can only be to 
serve the interests of the school. Doubtless with sufficient  interest and
effort the student newspaper can  •become one of the most important
constructive elements  in the institution. It performs a service that 
cannot be duplicated.  WE, ON T H E VIKING STAFF, realize our  opportunity
and responsibility. We have reached a  point in our progress where we need
no longer follow  or copy. We must now take the initiative. We must 
progress and build. We must have ideas and ideals.  We think this school
offers us an opportunity for  great accomplishment. We want to publish a
paper  that will appeal to the largest and best element in our  student
body, that will serve students, faculty and administration  to the greatest
degree, and that Bellingham  Normal will be glad to claim as her own
creation.  . o w AR ALWAYS  ELCOME  S  WliilM-This,  world that we are
lioin in  Is surely hard to beat.  You get a thorn with every rose,  But
ain't the roses sweet?  Yep, it's a great old world after all, folb.  *___*
* *  After weeks of uninterrupted brain breaking study  they throw i na
lovely holiday—and—on a Monday,  too. What a nreaKi What a
weak!  And—all because George Washington chopped down  that cherry
tree! ,  Yep, it's a great life.  * * *. _*  Methinks there's something
fishy to this cherry  tree business—maybe a new principle in
education or  something—teaching children to, tell the truth by 
lying to them. Doesn't seem quite right, but that's  life, T guess, and a
great life it is!  * * * *  Speaking of George Washington as the father of 
Our country,—that was before a few Wall Street  bankers grabbed it
all for themselves.  # * * *  It's against all common sense rules to
mention the  depression—but common sense is the most uncommon  thing
in the world so—Long years ago I learned this  little recipe for
success in getting things.  * * * *  "It's wanting a thing hard enough and
keeping at  it long enough."  Well, everyone seems to be following that
recipe in  regard to the depression so we ought to have a real  successful
one bye and bye.  * * * *  "'Nuff of that, it's still a great life!"  *
• * *  Then we get sentimental, look out the window,  see the sun
shining on the blue waters of the bay,  see the fresh green coloring of all
nature's handiwork,  hear a bird chirping in the distance. It all makes  us
forget all about Japan, China, Ghandi, starvation,  school—and makes
us think of sprmg. And—incidentally,  vacation!  # * *__ *  IT'S A
GREAT LIFE, DON'T YA THINK?  * *__ * *  Yep, an optimist is a stude who
says, "Only three  short weeks till spring vacation!"  A pessimist is a
stude who answers, "Yeh, but  think of all the term papers and exams before
vacation!"  What ya goin' ta do with a guy like that, we ask  you?  Oh,
doesn't matter—it's still a great life.  * * * *  And then—the
pencil broke, the pen went dry, the  typewriter wouldn't type, the printed
wouldn't print,  the brain wouldn't work,*so, sorry folks, we had to  quit.
 o »  (By Irene Schagel)  And a ship went out to sea—-— 
Gently she pulled away from the  quay—then, with her valiant head 
held high and turned seaward, she  went steadily put and away, leaving  the
harbor with its rotting piles, its  gulls and barnacles to dream.  A friend
of ours said, "Give  us more of mountains and roses  and not so much of
depression  and Russia".  o o——  Which set us to thinking that 
perhaps there aren't enough roses  and mountains in folks' lives and 
that's what is the matter.  o—-o  But a beggar can only look at  rose
glass and pewter.  -—o—-o  Grace Finlay ..:..—
—Feb. 27  Nellie Cox „; Feb. 27  Charlotte Crocker .Feb. 27 
Bob Hall .:.;.. .......: -Fbe. 27  Grace Goddard . ...........Feb. 28 
Margery MacPhersoh ....Mar. 1  Martha Kieski ............Mar. 2  Francis
Dewey. ......Mar. 2  Mary Curry .:...:..,...... Mar. 4  Marjorie Goss
....:.:....—.Mar. 4  f  *  •  FQi oiYMPS*LYFUNb  (Continued
from Page One)  Most folks hate to think or ever  to try. If ye can express
things for  them all cut and dried and thought  out they enjoy us but as
soon as we  ask them to think—well, they just  can't! 
——o——o——  They are the same folks who
read  the things that are talked of—see  the shows that are discussed
and  who attend a certain church because  Mrs. Van-Zilch-Bilt goes  there. 
o o—  ....The  beg"ms  "ought  Dr. Gowen Gives  Lecture on China 
Wednesday Night  Applications'Requested  The president instructed the
secretary  to post a~ notice concerning  applications' for/the offices of
Editor  of the Northwest Viking, Business  Manager of the Viking, and 
Secretary to the Board of Control.  The notice appears on the bulletin 
boards  A committee under Elsie O'Don-nell  is making the plans for the 
Board of Control's quarterly banquet.  This banquet probably will  be held
in the Bellingham Hotel on  March 12.  The announcement that the Rec  hour
this week will be from 4:00  o'clock to 5:30 p. m., closed the  meeting. 
"WkMW Sarin* Ar« l  ** - •;  Northwestern  National Bank  .;"'
ieHbt^;iWaA;v;7;  WE SOLICIT TOE  NORMAL AOCX5UNTS  HEN an election
campaign is conducted  in Ireland, headlines usually announce, "IRISH  SHED
BLOOD." Such is the fervor to which  patriotic Irish work themselves over
campaign issues.  Murder is not recommended, but nevertheless, democratic 
government might function more effectively if  more real, constructive
interest were shown in po-  .jitical issues, candidates, and government in
general.  BEHEADING THE  UDGET  RITISH COLUMBIA legislators have taken  the
stand of starting at the top in curtailing-education  expenses. The
University, of British Columbia has  had a 5 0 per cent reduction in her
appropriations for  -the year. The Canadian province intends to maintain 
primary and elementary schools at their present  level if economically
possible, and level budget reduction  legislation at school of higher
education. AI-  ; though a regrettable move, fair-minded educators seem  to
regard it as just discrimination.  On The Campus Side  Of The Keyhole 
Helen Richardson staring dreamily out of history  class window at the
comings and goings  down on the campus* ***Everybody in the Viking.. 
office deserting bridge games, typing and gab-fests  to rush to the windows
and watch Dr. Up-shall  come up the front steps****Clem Russell  able to be
bag ad sghool afder and oberation ond  his nodse****Pat Allan and his gang
hailing and  getting a ride down the hill from a nice lady in  a big
car****The Jaws of all the higher ups  dropping noticeably at the question
put to the  lecturer last Friday by the training school prod-  .;:y-G:sh!
*s**Elaine Lowland, the very little   gt;; wit".! a system all her own,
putting 'em into  the basket one after another in gym class**** 
-.:.-.:• 2'J Johnson, da beeg stood, lugging a brief-  7--' lt; f
learning around****Faith Rath fondly  surveying her latest work of
art—a jungle  scene with red monkeys, in various states of  seeming
dyspepsia and melancholia****Gordon  Leen, one time big-shot of the Viking
office,  contemplating a come-back just to give the girls  a
treat****Kathleen Todd, local "Helen Wills",  giving the ol' racket a
workout among the February  breezes****Leona May Knight and Leonard 
Carroll, the perfect pair, almost just about  busted up for eleven hours,
forty-three minutes,  and five seconds, by actual count (their own, not 
ours)****Deah Roger, back on the driver's seat  again, albeit a bit pale
around the gills and somewhat  



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Northwest Viking - 1932 February 26 - Page 3



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lll^S^PSI®^^ii^^|P?lis  tt^HINCTQN STVVr  NORMAL SCHOOL. BELONG
 clb  (sBf  Vanadis  ragi to  \ Sponsor Party at  Edens Clubroom  l
Edei^Jtoll^club:*66m is to be the  rscene of the, .Vanadis Bragi party, 
March 5; at 7:30 p. mi. . Initiation  ceremonies are -to. be held in
connection  with the. party.  \ Winnifred Klaus, wrio is general  chairman
of the party, has appointed  committees to take care of the  various parts
of the program. The  committee are: refreshments, Margaret  Jacobs,
chairman, Ruth Neal,  Helen Shipley, and Julia Mahncke;  initiation,
Richard Stearns, chairman,  and Merydel Conrad; entertainment,  .Rachel.
Royston, chairman,  Evelyn Mlibtt, George Mc-  Meen, and Marydel Conrad;
finance,  Ruby McAllister, chairman, and  KatherineMcDonald.  Those who are
to be initiated are  Howard Cleary, Guy Bushby, Henry  Gallenger, Helen
Watts, Dorothy  Jackson, Mary Rogers, Harriette  Perkins, and Genevieve
Peters.  '.'•' /-•"—~—~°~7~'  EDENSHALL  Comes
and Goes  Those from Edens Hall who  spent the week-end in Seattle are: 
.Evelyn Smith, Dolly Malterner,  )Florence Strom, Virginia Hunt,  Katherine
Cronin, Lorinda Ward,  Kathrine Evers, Lucy Hunington,  Maxine Fawcett,
Cracey Carmi-chel,  Helen Johnson, Dorothy  Myhre, Mayme Macintosh, Lucille
 Croxton, . Helen Watts, Isahelle  Morrison, Shirley Palmer, Florence 
Dobbs, Mildred Kelly, Grace Mc-  Bain, Margaret McLeod, Violet  Riendeau,
Mary Rogers, Winnie  DeWitt, Martha Henker, Frances  Dewey, Lois Reynolds,
Kathleen  Todd.; and Beatrice Storey.  Mary Tarbox went to Sumner  for
Washington's birthday.  Maxine Clyde spent her vacation  in Onolaska.  Ruby
McAllister wtnt to Long-view  for the week-end.  Helen Porter visited her
parents  in Rbsario.  Lillian Lux took a trip to Mt.  Rainier during her
vacation.  Hazel Kellestrom Went to Auburn.  Louise Minter and Peggy Nelson
 were in Tacdma during vaca-  \ iion.  Ethel Page spent  in Everett.  the
week-end  her  the  Helen Klumb visited with  roommate, Peggy Davis, at 
Davis home in Burlington.  Bessie Williams visited friends  in Friday
Harbor.  Emily Dow and Marian Todd  visited in Seattle together.  Vaughn
Howell spent the week-  end in Snohomish.  Florence Hany visited in
Everett.  - ; -. .  Helen Lundherg, Jean Davis,  Helen Richardson, Peggy
Forrest,  Nina Johansen, Elva Pilquist, Louise  Rice, Helen Jecklin, Leatha
 . Dodge also visited in Seattle.  Doris Jurgensen entertained her  mother,
Mrs. M. B. Jurgensen and  : sister Florence of Seattle over the  Week-end. 
6  Students Join Skiiers  i Dorothy Price and Cathryn Ros-  ; enquist left
Friday evening for Ta-  • coma where they joined a skiing  ;: party
of .about. fifty. From there  •they went to Mt. Rainier, where  they
spent an enjoyable week-end.  :-j Mrs. Neal Stoddard, of Whidby  Island,
visited last week with her  ^sister, Vivian Barrett, at Cpllett  .-Court. 
Miss Merle Reader, of Seattle,  :;was a house guest at Collett,Court  last
week.  Miss Ruth blsen, of Everett,  spent the holidays as a guest of 
Vivian Barrett at Collett Court. ;••  '* Wilma McNeil spent the
week-  Butler Directe Play  Given by Drama Club  In Morning Assembly  The
fo'castle of a ship, hard  boiled sailors and all that, go to  make up the
setting of the Drama  club's presentation at today's assembly.  The play,
"Bound East for  Cardiff", is directed by James Butler,  president of the
Drama club.  The cast is as follows: Driscoll,  Marshall Bacon; Cocky,
Clinton  'Gross; Yank. James Butler; Davis,  Drury Fox; Scotty, Lloyd
Rasmus-sen;  Olson, A. E. Charlesworth;  Paul, Jack. Knuppenburg; Smitty, 
Vernon.. Leatha; Ivan,. Paul Jackson;  The, Captain," Richard Stearns;  The
Mate, Anthony Gross.  A unique feature of the play is  that it is entirely
devoid of the  beautiful heroine; in fact it has an  all male cast from the
Drama club.  The scenery for the play is by the  members of the cast.  This
play will be presented next  week at the Theatre Guild, according  to a
statement from Mr. Hoppe»  Drama club adviser.  Students Visit Home 
Bessie Taylor, Estelle Rock, Evelyn  Dunbar, Marjory Allen, Charlotte 
Crocker, Margaret McLeod,  and Lillian Anderson spent the  week-end at
their homes in Seattle.  Emma Fladebo visited her parents  in Mount Vernon
last weekend.  Jeanne Ferguson and Margaret  Crow spent the week-end in
Snohomish  at their homes.  Camilla Nelson visited her home  in Ferndale. 
Eva Jordan of Oakland, Cal., who  is a former member of El Nido  lodge,
visited the house last week.  Marian Baila spent the week-end  at her home
in Aberdeen.  Les Williams visited in Seattle  over the week-end. 
Geraldine Duff spent the weekend  at her home in Longview.  Mr. and Mrs.
Franz of Aberdeen  spent the week-end at Barton Hall  with their daughter,
Mildred.  Agnes Lund spent the week-end  in Auburn.  Margaret O'Neil
visited at Barton  Hall last week, going to Arlington  as the guest of
Catherine Hollis for  the week-end.  Katherine Lund visited her home  in
Lynden over the week-end.  Gertrude Hankamp spent the  week-end in Bothel,
as the guest  of Ernestine Richardson, a former  student.  Martha and Emma
Van Hee, of  Port Orchard, visited with their  sister, Adeline Van Hee and
Ella  Breiland last week-end.  Eileen Taylor spent the week-end  at her
home in Sedro-Woolley.  . Beatrice Jensen V^ited her home  iri Ferndale
last week-end.  * * - •  Ivan Guernsey visited her home  at Clear
Lake.; ,  DR. FOSTER HONORED  Dr. W. T. Foster was entertained  at a
luncheon given for him by the  Faculty Forum in the club room at  Edens
Hall., Griday, Feb. 19. Other  guests were Mr. and Mrs. Charles  English
/Test is  To Be Given All  Entering Students  It has been decided that a
test  in English composition should be  added to the battery of tests 
which are required of all students  who enter the Normal. This decision 
was reached after a thorough  study of the problem by the English 
department, „.the Training  school and the bureau of Research. 
Course Not Required  There is now no course in English  composition
required of the  students. As a consequence a number  of persons graduate
and go out  to teach with ability in the field of  English composition
which is considerably  below that which the Normal  feels should be
required. For  several years all entering students  have been required to
take a test  in the field of English usage.  This test is more nearly a
measure  . of the students' ability to recognize  correct forms and to
proof  read material which is already  written. It. is. not a test to
measure  the students' ability to compose  material. The new test which is 
required is. a.highly valid measure  of a students', ability in English 
composition.. -.;{!  First.Tests Given  On Tuesday, March 1, at 4 o'clock 
all students who are not yet clear  in the English usage test will be 
required to take this new test. This  includes special students as well as 
those enrolled in some one of the  regular curricula. Students who  have
transferred to Bellingham  Normal from some other college or  university
are not required to take  this test.  On the basis of the scores made  on
this test some students will be  urged to enroll in the no credit  course
"Corrective English". This  course is especially designed to aid  students
in the quality of their  written English. In the future,  standards will be
set which must be  attained by students before beginning  their work in the
Training  school.  BIBLE CLASS ON WED.  A Bible class is being conducted 
every Wednesday at 4 o'clock in  room 208 by Mrs. George McL.  Miller,
under the auspices of the  Y. W. C. A. The class is making a  study of the
Old Testament and is  now discussing Exodus.  This class is not only for Y.
W.  C. A. members but for anyone who  is interested is invited to come. 
Pres. Ross Campbell, of Sterling  College in Kansas, who has 



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Northwest Viking - 1932 February 26 - Page 4



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vtfl^i^i^ft^sTCT  Jdhannes* Free Throw Ties Game; 
••:-:S^:^--'i^i:,'-:'.McBealh-:.I^cl»';;  CARVER VICTORY
SWEET  E A V I L Y laden  with spoils, the  Carver; - coached  Vikings
returned  triumphant to  their lair Sunday,  following a  very successful 
two-game series  with the Pacific  Lutheran College  and St. Martins,, in
their annual  trip to the Southern schools. Al-though  forced to their
utmost to  topple the favored Gladiators of  Tacoma, the Vikings showed
unexpected  strength in eking out a one-point  victory over the strong
Rangers  from St. Martins College.  Bangers Take Lead  Playing on their own
floor, the  Rangers were doped to drop the  visiting Vikings by a
comfortable  margin as the Vikings were only  able to run up a four-point
margin  over the Rangers in the first game  of the home-and-home series
early  this season. But the Laceyites  failed to take into consideration 
the extensive drilling the Vikings  have been undergoing for the past  few
weeks and the adoption of new  plays to their offensive attack.  Sibillia,
husky Ranger forward  and football star of last quarter,  successfully led
the Rangers in their  seemingly desperate first half spurt  in an effort to
roll up a safe lead.  Coupled with Haggerty, his running  mate, Sibillia
circled the hoop for  ten points in the first period. Haggerty,  not to be
outdone, equaled his  partner's efforts with ten points and  helped the
Rangers roll up an impressive  28-17 lead at half time.  Vikings Rally 
What Coach Carver told his pets  behind the closed doors of the  dressing
rooms will never be known,  but his words must have served as  a pleasing
tonic for the men, as  they went out and quickly erased  the big lead of
the Rangers. Wahl,  diminutive but flashy forward, was  sent into the fray
and his shooting  efforts plus the dead-eye attempts  of Sherman, McBeath
and Rork  quickly pulled the Vikings within  striking distance of the
high-striding  men of Lacey.  During the second half the visitors 
outscored the collegians 29 to  13. As the game progressed, and  time grew
shorter and shorter, the  Vikings slowly pulled up until, with  but six
minutes to go, they were  within one point of the lead. The  game then
see-sawed back and forth  with neither team getting the upper  hand. 
Johannes Ties Score  Then, with but twenty seconds to  go, Johannes tossed
in a free throw  to tie the score at 38-all. A five-minute  over-time
period followed  immediately with the score crawling  upwards at a snail's
pace,, with  neither team getting more than one  poin^ lead.  The game was
actually won by  Sherman, fiery Viking guard, who  sunk a beautiful shot,
with but seconds  remaining to play, to give the  Vikuigs the upper hand,
and what  was eventually victory, which the  Bellingham men deserved to
have.  The lineups:  Vikings— Rangers—  McBeath 10 P .'.
Haggerty 14  Johannes 9 ...F Sibillia 13  Rork 12 C "Taylor 8  Sherman 6
.....G Morin 2  Johanesen 1 .. G. Hill  Substitutions:  i
Bellingham—Wahl 8 for Johannes/;',  \ S t . Martin's, Fox 2 for
Morin; La-zarivich  8 for Taylor.  GIRLS START TOURNEY  Last Wednesday,
Feb. 24, W. A.  A. members started their class tournaments  in badminton,
which will  be continued until March 9. Both  single 'and double, matches
are being  played off.  Beginning on March 9, winners of  the class
tournament, both singles  and dcvbles, wiU p ^ /.the  '^"il/^fnp^i^i^^P^^
:'••••; y,1-••;-.;• -Vo-.". 
Completing their most successful andsatisfactory road trip ?f the  season,
Coach Carver and his Viking crew returned home last week-end  following
victories over the Pacific Lutheran College at Tacoma, and  St. Martins
College at Lacey.  The Gladiatorj game at Tacoma was a humdinger, to say
the least.  Dopesters had it that the visitors from Bellingham would take
the short  end of the score, but mere dopesters meant nothing for the
tought-from-being-  beatenVikings. This 39-35'Victory compiled by the
Normal  quintet was outstanding because of the small gym the northerners
had to  play in.-The low-ceilinged, small sized court made it extremely
difficult  for the Vikings to hit their stride.  Loggers Tomorrow
Nite——  From all reports, the St. Martins-  Viking game was one
of the finest  seen in that section this year. And  the score indicates
that a terrific  battle must have been waged between  these perpetual
athletic enemies.  An exact replica of the  Cheney game was depicted when,
in  the final half-minute of play, Johannes  converted a foul shot to tie 
the score, at 38-all. In the five-minute  overtime that followed, the 
score, point by pouu, crept higher  and higher with Sherman finally 
swishing the nets for a field goal  that placed the Vikings in the lead 
46-45. The final gun sounded with  the score resting at that point. Rork 
led the scoring in this game with  12 markers, McBeath followed with  t ea 
Loggers Tomorrow Nite  Some time ago, in the dear, dim  days of last Spring
quarter, one  Norman Bright was making track  history for Bellingham Normal
and  Tri-Normal record books. He left  school last spring and lille Was 
heard, of him or his 880 and mile  running prowess. As you remember,  he
holds the local field record  of 2:02 in the 880, and 4:25.2 in  the mile.
A short time ago rumor  had it that he was back in training  with his eye
on the near-approaching  Olympic games this summer.  There was nothing to
substantiate  this rumor until early this  week the story appeared in the
U.  W. Daily that he was a participant  in an early season time trial held
by  Coach Edmunetson... He placed a  close third in a 4:36 mile. This 
reports should warm the cockles of  all Viking track supporters and  make
them feel that they too are  sharing in these great games that  are coming
this summer. Not that  Norm will make the grade, but, if  he shows just
one-tenth the grit and  stamina displayed last year on  Waldo, he'll give
any runner a  mighty stiff jaunt.  Loggers Tomorrow Nite  We see where the
Gross Thugs  are "stepping out", so to speak, following  their triumphant
completion  of the intramural basketball race.  Tomorrow night, just before
the  Viking-College of Puget Sound fracas,  the Co-op aggregation will  sap
the maple with an independent  team from Everett. Little is known  about
the visitors and therefore no  predictions will be made. But we do  think
that the Thugs will find a  little more trouble when they come  to roaming
the large Whatcom court  after waltzing around the local  "little gym". 
Loggers Tomorrow Nite——  Hats off to Clint McBeath, Varsity 
forward flash, who.." has., just  completed his 250 foul heaves in  the
foul-shooting contest, sunk 209,  and walked away with top honors  in the
contest... Jimmy Rork, last  year winner, ended up in second position  with
192, and Myron Chandler  tossed himself into third place  with 186
completed tries.  ——Loggers Tomorrow Nite  All right, you
future baseball  neophytes, get the old hams toughened  and be ready for
"Pop" Gunn's  initial call early in Spring quarter.  And for you fellows
who ndo't crave  the hard-ball league ana would  rather enter the
intramural soft-ball  league, just speak to the coaches  or to yours truly.
Also the ladder  tournaments will soon be started  in horseshoes, golf,
tennis and  handball, so be prepared to enter  one of the tourneys. 
Loggers Tomorrow Nite  And, in closing for this week,  we wish to announce
that "Bop"  Gunn s eight o'clock; P^E. classy  which meets Tuesdays and
ThuTSr  days, does hereby challenge Sam  Carver and his one o'clock P. E. 
class to a two or three game basketball  series.  -i—-Loggers
Tomorrow Nite——'"  ....See you^ at the d P.! S . - V U^  game
tomorrow nite: at the Whatcom  gym/ This is the final game of 
.the^:Masdiii^:.:;:,;;^  * — ' • = — -—  Intramural
Hot-Shots for the  1931-32 Season  Gable, Manor 120  Griff en, Manor 116 
Halbert, Co-op 114  Loomis, Manor 90  Zwaschka, Manor 89  Stearns, Men's 87
 Kuske, Wonders 75  Harris, Co-op 73  Jensen, Wonders 71  Collier,
Thespians 71  McCarthy, Thespians 66  Hammett, Bragi 65  Johannes, f!n-np
61  Sinko, Co-op 59  Stoddard, Thespians 56  Marsh, Fire Hall 56  Larson,
Bragi 50  HILLTOPPERS BEAT  PACIFIC LUTHERANS  IN SECOND BATTLE  Lead
See-Saws Back and Forth  Throughout the Entire  Hectic Contest  MOE,
COLLEGIANS' STAR  For the second time this season,  Sam Carver's basketeers
defeated  the Pacific Lutheran College. The  score this time was 39 to 35,
and the  game was played on the Collegian's  floor Friday, Feb. 19. Earlier
this  year the Vikings played host to  them and gave them a 37 to 20 
drubbing.  The game last Friday was everything  the score indicates. The
lead  see-sawed back and forth throughout  the entire game with the
Lutherans  within tieing distance when  the gun ended the engagement.  Home
Towners Take Lead  The Tacomans started out with a  bang and ran up a
nine-point lead  before the Vikings began to click.  Moe, diminutive
forward, was caus^  ing Carver's guards' a lot of worry,  who were unable
to cope with  his fast breaking. Moe turned in a  very creditable
performance, scoring  fifteen points in the course of  the evening.  Th
Vikings began to find their  scoring eye after about the first ten  minutes
of play, and before the half  they were leading 21 to 17. Clint  McBeath
scored eight points this  half, while Rork, center, dropped  in three field
goals.  Vikings Increase Lead  Starting the second half, the Nor-malites 
increased their lead to 11  points, and started to slow down,  when Moe
again started clicking  and scored nine points in quick succession,  thus
pulling his team within  four points of the fast slipping Vikings. 
Johanesen, guard, was forced  to leave the game on personal in  this half: 
Carlson, Lutheran guard, was the  only other one who could seem to  find
the hoop for the Collegians.  Carlson scored eight points, but had  his
hands full watching McBeath.  Irving Wahl, Viking PPPPP