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1932_0318




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Northwest Viking - 1932 March 18 - Page 1



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r gt;-v  i.f2r-i ^ALlft'.v-  K:fci4#$S7 lt;*  VOL. X X X f c N O .
23 W A S H I N G T O N S T A T E NORMAL SCHOOL, BELLINGHAM, W A S H I N G T
ON Friday, $ a n * 1 8 ^ $ $ 2 '£  — *  iifiiiie 
CONGRATULATIONS—C/LST  i •",..• i^^FASHION DICTATES'-:. 
XXKLLEGIATE KJ^^fPE^  ;i5P LQNG, EVERYBODY! ••*  By Virginia
Carver  Hello, fellow sufferers! Our opinion  is that anyone who can carry 
on even sparsely intelligent conversation  this week ts absolutely a 
genips. p a r s is strangely littered  with Psychology, history, essays, 
and poetry. And the tests, my dear  —they are made in such a way as
to  bring out the exact but perhaps em-harrassing  amount of mentality 
you've hidden away Oh, well!  •"."" W.S.N.S.  BEGINS MONDAY,  MORNING
OF 28"  Sociology, Industrial "Arts, and  Typing Will Not Meet  First Day 
F A C U L T Y D E A N R E T U R NS  Men s Club Sponsors  A ction Against
Year-  Book Fees Each Year  Those persons who missed seeing  "Liiiom'':. ,
may indeed consider  themselves unfortunate. The casting  was excellent and
the acting so  well done. that it surprised many.  And as for the
story—it left a funny  feeling in the pit of the abdomen  and an
unsuppressable desire to  whistle, "Look out, here comes the  d Police!"
Imagine an amateur  production sporting a theme song.  W.S.N.S.—  The
saddest words  Of peri or tongue  Are, "Remember, dear—  You're still
quite young".  : —W.S.N.S.-  ....This anti-hoard drive makes us 
chortle in suppressed glee. Those  who have no money to speak of are 
preaching the crime of hoarding it,  and those who have a lot of money  (if
there are such rare creatures  left. We wonder—because we forgot  our
lunch and tried several  prospects) are quietly laying it  away in
grandpa's striped sock until'  better times approach. Is'nt it futile? 
——W.S.N.S.  Dame fashion demands that Milady  wear little veils
to cover her  comely features... Well venture to  say that it will be
difficult for her  to remain coy' and blow her nose  at the same time. 
— W.S.N.S.  Roll on, thou heartless, cold examinations,  roll-  Ten
thousand, students curse o'er  thee in vain!  And when they gel the grades
and  take the toll—  It reads from left to right—"She  goes
insane!"  ——W.S.N.S. —  Someone suggested that we should 
take up a bit of good old free verse  in this day and age when no one  ever
pays for anything anyway. Not  a bad idea—eh, what?  W.S.N.S. 
....You read the article about the lad  who was kidnapped ten years ago  by
group of people who spoke and  wrote a strange language, didn't  you? Right
out of our own little  mind we figured—if the kidnappers  involved
wore racoon coats, it's a  cinch, they were a bunch of ex-col-iegians 
whose papas had neglected  to extend ye monthly check.  (Any member of a
college faculty  can verify the part about the  strange writing and
speaking!)  ——W.S.N;S.—-—  Ah! Will wonders never
cease?  America's women have adopted  the garb of poor Gnandi for  lingerie
purposes! Everything,  even the grotesque safety pin  as a clasp, has been
taken literally  from the patient goat herd-erfe  costume. Perhaps itffcs a
 good thing that our friend, Al  .Capone, is at leisure in the  sanctity of
the pen. At least he's  safe from the ever prying, ever  investigating
American female  public! 
•;•;'•'!,'——W.S.N.S.-4—  Lives of
Campbells oft remind us  InpurjJ^pnnalonthehill  They deport *md leave
behind them  , . Shoes^a mile long to gt; fill!  • =r ' - ' I ^ T - ^
S ^ S . ^ - - ^ '••';•'•••'  W^|^%: : ^
i n m i ^ ; s ; f ^ 6 r i e ' '8  feet, either. Ejr fact, we're ui a 
btyiqiiet throwbag mood! We  mean that our prexy is good;  and it you'.-are
in doubt—ask the  student body!  Adios, fond public!- It pains us 
greatly to lay d^nm Normalite for  the last time—but,., perhaps,.,
this  being an inteUectual school, it's for  the best.;.j.-fj^^ac  ;
pfingjvaa^^  next " '-•--*-•  Beginning at 4 p. m. Friday, 
March 18, the annual spring vacation  enjoyed by the Normal school,  will
extend until Monday morning,  March 28, at 8 a. m., at,which time  classes
and registration will resume.  There have been no changes over  the printed
matter as it appears in  the spring schedule and those students  registered
will report to their  classes on Monday in regular order  with the
following exceptions: Sociology  4 at 8 o'clock, industrial arts  60c at 10
o'clock, and typing at 8  o'clock, will not meet on Monday!  Absences are
to be reported from  the first day the class meets. Students  should attend
classes as soon  as they have determined upon their  schedules, excepting,
where it is necessary  to meet definite appointments  with advisers. 
Classes Meet Temporarily  The following classes will meet  temporarily on
Monday as here indicated  instead of in their regular  places of meeting as
indicated in  the schedule: T. T. 7a with Pragst  at 9 o'clock in room 239;
political  science 103 with Cummins at 9 in  the auditorium; history 60c
with  Cummins at 1 o'clock in room 119;  history 60a with Cummins" in room 
120; T. T. 108 with Trent in room  144, and history 135 with Cummins  at 11
o'clock in room 105.  New students will register on  Monday, March 28,
entering freshmen  reporting directly to room 120  and transfer students
reporting to  Dean Bever's office. Those students  who have already
registered and  made arrangements to pay their  fees on Monday, March 28,
are  warned not to omit to do so as they  will otherwise be required to pay
a  dollar a day for each day they are  late. Students who have changes  to
make in their programs are requested  to delay doing so until  Wednesday,
March 30.  Faculty Members Return  Among those of the faculty who  will
return for the spring quarter  are: President C. H. Fisher, who is 
expected back from his research  studies in the East some time during  the
next week; Miss Adele M.  Jones, dean of women, who has  been on a trip in
the East and who  is expected back some time early  next week, and Dean
James Bever,  who has been studying at the University  of Arizona and who
will return  early in the quarter to resume '  his advisory duties and his
class in  sociology.  Miss Nora B. Cummins, who has  been acting dean
during the winter  quarter, will again take up her  classes in political
science, contemporary  European history and grade  school history for the
spring quarter.  After sponsoring the .posting of a  petition with the
hopes of amending  the present condition of compulsory  purchasing of the
school's annual  yearbook, "The Klipsun," the Men's  Club will submit the
proposal to the  Student Body for signing' in the  near future.  Immediate
action was voted for  in the recent club meeting, with the  hopes that the
fee of $3 couid be  abolished from the tuition of spring  quarter. Numerous
suggestions were  made concerning the future buying  of the yearbook, but
it was decided  to submit the matter before the  whole Student Body.  It
was stressed in the meeting by  Roy Abbott, president, the importance  of
complete co-operation in  the paying of the quarterly dues.  Jimmie
Stoddard read the financial  report of the club and Aubrey  Lundberg, dance
chairman, gave a  report showing: that the club had  failed to raise money
enough to pay  expenses on the last dance.  _ _  lt;  gt; _  W. A.
A,DELEGATES  WILL LEAVE SOON  Grue, Flick, and Weythman Head  for
California City  'CARROUSELS'AND  CLOWNS WILL BE  THEME AT MIXER  Vaughn
Howell Has Charge  Sport Dance Held in  Big Gymnasium  of  AFFAIR HELD
APRIL 1  Iola Grue and Theona Flick, accompanied  by Miss Ruth Weythman, 
will leave Bellingham Friday,  March 25, to attend the conference  of the
American Athletic Association  to be held in Los Angeles, Cal.,  from April
7 to 9.  Many to Attend  These two students were recently  chosen by the W.
A. A. council to  represent the association at the annual  meeting in
Southern California.  Delegates from colleges and  universities throughout
the country  will attend the sessions.  To Visit Schools  The three
delegates will have  plenty of time on the drive down  South to visit
various schools and  colleges on their way down. They  will have short
visits in all the important  cities, and will stop at many  points, of
interest along the way.  The representatives will send an  interesting
account of their first  few days' experiences for the next  issue of The
Viking, which will  come out April 8. They will keep  this paper informed
of their activities  and impressions until their return  to school about
the thirteenth  of April.  •—o —  Clowns and carrousels
will prevail  at the spring mixer, which will  feature a circus idea. This
all-school  social affair, of which Vaughn  Howell is general chairman,
will be a  sport dance neic Aprn 1 in the big  gymnasium.  Jack Burn's
orchestra will furnish  the music for the dancers while the  circus idea in
itseif will furnish  much amusement for the students.  Decorations Planned 
Louise Armstrong, who has charge  of decorating the gymnasium, is assisted 
by Lillian Bennerstrom, Joyce  PfueUer, Roy Hollingsworth, Robert  Diehl,
Howard Wasley, Stewart  Blythe, Dorothy Fiala and James  Thompson.  As a
circus is not much fun without  "eats," Helen Richardson and  Dorothy
Christianson will plan refreshments  for the crowd. Dorothy  Knuppenberg is
in charge of the  entertainment, while Jeaneva Moore  has charge of the
invitations and  is the faculty hostess.  Students Guarded  So that the
little "children"' will  not be trampled underfoot by the  elephants, it
has been arranged for  many adult members to be present.  The patrons and
patronesses for  the evening are: President and Mrs.  C. H. Fisher, Miss
Adele Jones, Miss  Charlotte B. Richardson, Miss Florence  Johnson, Mr. and
Mrs. V. H.  Hoppe, Mr. and Mrs. H. V. Masters,  Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Bond,
Mr. and  Mrs. H. C. Ruckmick and Mr. Edward  Arntzen  :—o  SPRING
HEAVY ON  SOCIAL FUNCTIONS  Kochanski Program  Heard Last Monday  by Lovers
of Music  A very large audience of students  and music lovers of the
Bellingham  public enjoyed the delightful concert  of Paul Kochanski,
Polish violinist,  on last MOnday evening.  Kochanski was born in the same 
country that gave Chopin and Pad-erewski  to the world. He has studied  in
many of the most noted music  conservatories throughout the  world and has
given many concerts  in France, Germany, Russia, Spain  and Egypt. 
Kochanski came to Bellingham  under the auspices of the Women's  Music Club
and the Bellingham  State Normal School, as a feature  of the musical
artists course.  COLIN CAMPBELL  The Student's Association president, 
Colin Campbell,' who leaves  Normal after serving almost his  complete term
of office.  Student Body President -.;Le.iyiiag-.:  Bellingham at End of
{'.::. lt;-  This. Quarter".:/'-.  T E R M E X P I R E S SOON;  STUDENT
ELECTION SCHEDULE  IS OUTLINED IN DETAIL  The new system of nominating and
electing students to positions in the  school government is outlined below
so that students will understand the  exact procedure in the process of
electing new officers next quarter.  1.  GRADUATE GETS DEGREE  Henry Patey,
a graduate of Normal,  is soon to get the Ph.D. degree  at the Columbia
University. He is  now teaching part time in the New  York school of fine
and applied  



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Northwest Viking - 1932 March 18 - Page 2



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 l;*WiiN08$s$  0 i l P i ^ P S f i f S S i i i ^ ^ i i i ^ l l  ^ A
^ I ^ G T ^  :fc-.?..:\.-.S*  yy gt;;|f$Mmeffi;ftfe WeeMy
Messenger—Founded 1399  Published every Friday except during the
month of • Septem-r^-  cbK^e/Associated Students, Washington State"
Normal  School, Bellingham,: '  Entered in the Postoffice at Bellingham,
Washington, as  second class matter by virtue of the act of March 3, 1879. 
v ic. :•"•::"• ".- -—-——
——;—;—-——  Printed.by the jWiller  
Sutherlen Printing Company, Bellingham  National Bank Building. 
Subscription rate by mail, $1,50 per year, in advance. Adver-tising  rates
on application.  National Advertising Representatives: Littell-Murray-Barn-
 ^MrnJtta^Si Advertising, and•-Collegiate Special Advertising 
Agency, of. New York City.  Address all communications, other than news
items, to the  Business Manager of the Northwest Viking, Bellingham, Wash. 
Telephone 3180  ROGER CHAPMAN ........................ ..
............Editor  BOB WALTERS ...Business Mgr.  FAREWELL TO A PRESIDENT 
TTie Viking joins with the entire student'body in  wishing the best of luck
to Colin Campbell, who retires  as student body president at the end of
this  quarter. Campbell has proved a most capable and  efficient leader and
one whom the students have been  proud to have as their representative. The
responsibility  of this office falls into capable hands however,  in the
person of Nellie Cox, vice president, who will  conduct the Student's
Association through the difficult  business' of elections within the next
few weeks.  Jf.  "SNIPE" SEARS, ALIAS FIRE HALL GUS  :\..;;  t
ffi?s#%ffiffftag :«ili^ gt;ro®» lt;ii4  '•E.\M*'   L
L. M.  t .01. fi m ..•«»  •^_-»  gt;.t'v gt;
». _1I,:..  "'% KLIPSUN? YES OR NO  THE QUESTION of the fairness of
charging a  compulsory fee of three dollars for the Klipsun when 
registering for Spring quarter, has been raised by the  Men's club, which
proposes to take definite action  regarding the matter.  IF BELLINGHAM
NORMAL wants an annual,  if the majority of students are willing to spend 
three dollars a year for the Klipsun, then this fee  MUST BE COMPULSORY.
Fairness or no  fairness, that fact remains.  A SOMEWHAT better system of
collecting the  three dollars might be to levy a fee of one dollar each 
quarter. Spreading it out over the entire year  would make it easier for
the regularly enrolled student.  A-system of this type would bring as much
or  more revenue for the support of the publication, yet  might meet with
less objections.  BEFORE any action is.taken by any group of  students they
should first. endeavor to find out what  die majority opinion is regarding
the continuation of  an annual. The Klipsun is just as much an integral 
part of this school as are the Viking or assembly programs  for which the
students are charged compulsory  5 fees. If a majority of the student body
want a school  annual there is no justification in making the sub 
scription to it optional.  Not to criticize the Men's club was this
position  taken but simply to attempt to justify the existence of  the
school annual as an indispensable part of school  life. The Men's club is
indeed to be praised for  bringing up many worthwhile and constructive
sug-t  gestions.  o  SPLENDID DRAMA  PRODUCTION  An extraordinary drama
staged in a delightful  fashion, was the impression left by the
presentation of .  the Drama club production "Liliom".' A large but  well
chosen and character conscious cast share honors  with Mr. V. H. Hoppe for
this most outstanding  dramatic production.  —:-o  AMERICAN YOUTH AND
 FREEDOM  "AMERICAN YOUTH has the good fortune  ; not to have its outlook
troubled by outworn traditions—"  was the parting salute to the
United States  by Dr. Albert Einstein as he sailed for his home.  THAT THE
FREEDOM of American youth  should be evident to a visiting scientist is
something  we can well be proud of. We immediately wonder,  however, with
whom are his comparisons made. Are  we" really freer from traditions than
the youth of other  lands? If we are, our tactful sympathy goes out to 
citizens of a country who are more bound than we to  retrogression by the
inhibitions of tradition.  THINK, if you will, of the obsolete traditions
we  find on every side. Yet We accept them because it  is so hard to buck
anything with such a footing as our  national Puritanic traditions. We
acquiesce not because  we agree but because we are too steeped in the 
atmosphere of social taboo to really display any of  '-• that highly
prized "intestinal fortitude."  OUR EDUCATION has taught us to prize and 
respect the figures in history who were individualists |  yet we raise our
lusty voices in a "yes! yes!" anthem  to the praise of this "hero" and in
doing so show none  of the spirit that made this individualist the inan he 
Was-  IF THE American youth would revolt against  tradition, not in a
physical sense, but in an intellectual  way, we might qualify for some of
the Einstein  good fortune A little more introspection as to our  motives/
a little less heed as to what so and so does,  and a little thinking
crosswise the grain would mentally  enlarge us all  THE EXAMPLE of last
Friday's assembly exemplified  the average student's gullibility. The
manner  in which certain measures were "railroaded"  through, (not but what
we favored their adoption)  showed the utter lack of comprehension of the
average  collegian. Boo's one minute and applause the next  showed the
complete lack of control and inability to  think except in terms of the
"show" being offered.  A FEW individuals sufficiently clever; and knowing 
the complete credulousness of the "mob" could  ',' gt;^have- sold the
entire student body's proverbial birthright  for a subscription to "Hooey"
(for. the school  '. ; library. •• gt;•'•]"''''-
/"'".'.  i;; ; \ ^fetnJkiiig similarity is seen in the lives of I v an
Kreu-  ^ ^ ^ ^ I ' a n d v j G ^ o r g e . Eastman; both suicides, both
niui-  L^w^i|fcli^Ui5CMii ir€*ir,auri^^'l^fiv^rjachelors,-] gt;.Much
mpyalji;ing gt;  ;?;:.^^ivbe'done;/•;'''0:'% .. , ' K ^ : ' - '
V;-;'.\.VA'--:'/;'  | | | IT - -— " ~ '" *"  TO THE STUDENTS (You
little honeys): This pile  of prattle will conclude a series of
journalistic debauch-eries  that have been published in this space
throughout  the Winter quarter. Let the lessons gained from  the
brainstorms of our talented pencil pushers help  you in the future. May we
suggest that you go through  previous issues of the Northwest Viking, clip
all of  these columns, and paste them face down on your  bedroom floor.
After referring to them every ten or  fifteen years you will be able to
appreciate good literature  like the Congressional Record and the Sears   
Roebuck catalog.  1 got 15 hours of A  The following "Pome" was relayed by
special dog-sled  to the Viking Office by our Garden Street correspondent. 
"Woice" 1 y  Mary had a little goat.  It smelled like the Dickens - '. ' 
Her father sold it to the Dorm  And it was served as chickens.  "Woice" 2 
Mary had a little goat.  It. smelled awful—Phew!  Her father sold it
to the Dorm  And it Was served as stew.  — How Many?  A certain
naturalist can name, from memory,  thousands of insects that inhabit the
earth.  I wonder if he includes in his list the specie that  puts salt in
the sugar bowls in restaurants.  I got 10 hours of A and 5 of B-School 
gossips report that Gracey Carmichael, the  tomboy of Edens Nunnery, will
forsake school at the  conclusion of this quarter to enter the restaurant 
business. A special reporter, detailed to gather facts  in regard to this
report, issued a statement to the  effect that Gracey is quite a "HASH
SLINGER".  — How Many?  SONGS OF THE DAY  Call your favorite radio
station^and request the  following syncopated "symfunnies".  THE
MINERALOGIST'S SONG—I tried to  "steel" her "silver" but she "lead"
me to a  "copper".  THE HINDU SONG—(dedicated to Mr. John 
Warliker)—Hindu Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia.  THE BIGAMIST 
Chance.  1 got S hours of A and 10 of B  With so many rules and regulations
now in force  in the school will be only a matter of time until  B. S. N.
S. will allot students, numbers and stripes.  ——-How Many ? 
Says Sinko.the Kitchen Cynic, "A bacteria is the  back door to a
Cafeteria."  1 got IS hours of C  .And then there was the Scotchman who
wouldn't  use the telephone because he had to give the operator  the
number.  How Many ?  PUZZLE  If two heads are better than one, why is it
that a  hammer is only equipped with one?  Note: Send answer to the Editor
and receive two  free chances on a furlined cuspidor, to be raffled off 
some Thursday, next year.  1 got IS hours of D •  (By Irene Schagel) 
"The game fish swims up stream,"  someone quoted to us the other day.  We
love to watch the game fish  struggling against turbulent currents  to head
up the river.. Farther and  farther up the river's course, from  the dirty,
muddy mouth to clear,  pure, cool, blue waters in the mountains.  He's
alive,' he's growing, and  he's a game fish.  /of^Bellamy's  in 
SONG—Just One More  An important announcement comes from the
railroads  to the effect that Freight rates will be lowered.  This brings
great applause from Normal students who  planned on going home Spring
vacation.  How Many?  Well, soaks, I mean folks, this just about starts the
 commencement of the beginning of the end of the  finish of this column,
and we wish you all  (CHECK ONE):  How Many?  —A merry Xmas  —A
happy birthday  —A wonderful vacation  —A slight hangover 
—A pleasant voyage  —A pain in the neck  • 1 flunked 
FINIS  THE END  CARBOLIC ACID  . o  And we ask ourselves, "Are we  swimming
up stream? Or are we  just floating downward with the  current and the
suckers to the  muddy sluggish river mouth, where  nets await the likes of
us; nets of  smug content that entangle us so  securely that we can never
free ourselves."  And after that we will be  buried for we have died
already.  The suckers will not care, for  they have never been alive. They
.  have never fought the current  to swim up stream and get the  feel of
cool, fresh water in their  gills. The sucker is dead already  but, "The
game fish swims  up stream!"  We've met so many people who  have been
caught in those nets.  Those nets 



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Northwest Viking - 1932 March 18 - Page 3



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W£5HW^^  ,.^(»*« lt;*»^«fra£'i(
gt;H*.Av  gt; •••£^' /.  lt;2?sNi'- lt; 
•••t' K.  Reporters Gr^^  Mob Heroically to Bring News 
^©f Gcxrgeous Show to Readers  I NewJVIodels Displayed in  I
^Leopold's Crystal  | JiT- Ballroom  i_ ' • ^ - -. .. •.. 
Dorothy Fiala  p Blindly groping our way out of a  j crowded tea room, our
heads whirl-  | ing^with visions of gorgeous gowns  j-and' beautiful
ladies, we try to ap-  | pear* nonchalant .and compose our-  | -selves for
the business of reviewing  \ the spring style show for you.  j Sponsored by
Guild  \ The Crystal ballroom, of the Ho-  •. itel Leopolds-was
attractively deco-rated  in spring colors. Luncheon  was servedBaf 1|30 at
individual tables,  and. ty the music of Jack  Burn's orchestra, the,
modeling began  shortly after. The Chancel  . Guild, of St. .Paul's
Episcopal church  presents this program for the women  of BeUihgham each
spring and  ' fall." Sirs. Elizabeth Wells was in  charge and announced
each model  as she appeared. The models walked  the full length of the room
on a  Tunway, a diversion from the usual  procedure of walking among the 
tables.  The first part of the program was  devoted to children's clothes
from  ':_ kindergarten., to. high school. Next  appeared the high school
girls in  , spectator sports wear. The college  co-eds modeled sport,
afternoon and  ; eveiiing: frocks. Lastly, matronly  styles were shown. 
Clothes Described  I The hats, most all woven straws,  wefe worn tipped
well over the right  ......eye. .Snappy chapeaus, with quills  —as a
predominating decorative feature,  worn with much smartness,  vseenied to
be most popular.  ^ . A ' h ew angle in coats was the military1  cape,
effect. They were severely  plain.about the heck,with a  straight line
effect or throw scarf.  tf3p^he sportswear was the gayest,  showing all the
brightest colors cf  *ihe?r rainbow. Unusual contrasts in  --colors were
shown, the outstanding  feature being tricolor (red, white  and'blue), in
keeping with the idea  off the bicentennial. Spectator out-fits  were
longer than the regular  5 sportswear. The high necklines were  most
attractive.  'z*. /*[•''';: After Five Frocks Fitted  '•-''"The
after-five frocks and evening  gowns^.were form-fitting to the knee  i
-ywith,-full flares to the floor. The  i. dresses have.either' sleeves of a
 unjque cut or short bolero jackets  \ The outstanding favorite in hose 
• seems, to be the. small mesh which  * .isjSQrn with everything from
sport  to-evening. Beige colors should be  ." "worn with pastel shades,
otherwise  stockings should match the shoes  Sport shoes are a combination
of  black and white or brown and  white. Something new are the ankle  ties.
T-strap sandals, with cutwdrk  on the toes and very low on the  sides can
be worn with every type  of dress. Evening slippers are the  same color of
the gown or. tinted to  match the trimming Heels are  lower than previously
worn.  Accessories  ••'.-"•••• m
accessories/ the ~ gloves, shoes  .. And purse, should, match.. With light 
. beige, .^iar^-brown accessories are  used.-GlbveS"-are of the wrist
gauntlet  type, ^dhfething new features  the fabric gjpve worn with a
double  fold at- the wrist; Animal decora-   gt; tions are used as
novelties. Very  f little jewelry is worn, bracelets be-f  ing the most
numerous, and are  | worn to match the colors of the  ! outfit. . Gay
colored scarves a.e  j worn attached to most dresses. ,  j ,y The
predominating colors are  '——British green, brigade blue, and 
jr^u Chinese re(i- Knit suits are proving  ** ** *inost popular for sport
wear and  J^ lace for afternoon and .evening.   gt; Very few pleats are
shown, most   gt; v skirts being gored, and having the  y new high waist
line. Naval. and mil-  ** itary cuts are the smartest for day-  ** , time
wear. -.  »,/,  gt; Merchants Co-operate ' gt;:;;  ;£ ' The
merchants of Bellingham  V* who graciously supplied the outfits   gt; are:
J. B.;Wahl gt; Newton's, Martinr  son's, Edna Rae. AUsky, ;the; Betty 
• lt;;" Jean Shop and Hilton's. Not to ap-  ^ pear prejudiced we
sincerely believe  that the Normal girls made most attractive  models. They
were: Irene  v Armstrong, Janet Dodson, Alice  '.,. Livesey, Marjory
Morris, Evelyn  Montgomery, Joyce Pfueller and  Betty Watts. Marjory
Morris, as  •'Miss ^Uingham,'? was; the bride in  Viking Scribblers 
Plan House Party  On Mt. Chuckanut  Viking staff scribblers and their  pals
will, gather at the home of  H e l e n Sullivan, . on Chuckanut  mountain,
for a week-end house  party, April 2; and 3.  After lunch, Saturday, April
2,  the group will leave from Normal  school in cars. According to plans 
they will climb the mountain in the  afternoon. A weiner roast is slated 
for the evening's entertainment for  everyone, cards for those who prefer 
the state of repose, and dancing  for all not having stampeded the  hills
and dales earlier in the day.  Chaperones for the party are Mr.  and Mrs.
Frank Burnet, Mr. and  Mrs. Walter Sutherlen, Mr. and  Mrs. Arthur Miller,
and Mrs. Sullivan,  mother of, the hostess.. June  Welch is general
chairman of the  affair; Jimmie Stoddard, in charge  of transportation;
Irene Schagel,  invitations; Marydel Conrad, refreshments;  Virginia
George, meals;  Arvid Griff en, cleanup; and Virginia  Carver,
entertainment.  o  Valkyries Planning  Get-together Party  for Spring
Quarter  Valkyrie Club is making plans for  a get-together party on April 8
in  the big gym. "Good organization is  expected for this party which
promises  to furnish plenty or fun for all  members," says Elsie O'Donnell,
 president of the club.  Annette Austin, as chairman, with  Marian Baila,
Gerry Fitzgerald,  Clara Johnson, Dorothy Knuppen-berg,  Mayme Mcintosh,
Harriet  Rickersoh and Naomi Watson working  as a committee, are arranging 
for the party.  Entertainment will'feature dancing,  bridge and cootie.  .
This will be the first social event  of the Valkyrie organization. The 
president announces that plenty of  work and play will be done by the  club
.spring quarter in boosting  baseball and track. *  o  Margaret MacLeod
Entertains  Dinner guests of Margaret MacLeod  at Edens Hall last evening 
were Helen Jensen and Irene  Houghton. Other members of the  group
included. Mary Rogers, Viola  Riendeau, Erma \ Manke, Louisa  Morissey and
Alma Anderson. St.  Patrick's day was featured in the  decorative scheme. 
* * * *  Roberta Leake, of Ragan Hall,  entertained at dinner Sunday in 
honor of Henny Lund, Sidney Dar-rah  and Florence Laviolette.  * * * * 
Navarra Hennings was the guest  of Norma' Lasco at her home in  Seattle
last Sunday.  * * * *  Freddie Billingsley s p e n t the  week-end in Mount
Vernon visiting  relatives. -  Former Students Visit  Effie Nocula and
Lovia Wiever, of  Seattle, who are former members of  Barton Hall, spent
the week-end at  the hall. Miss Wiever returned to  Seattle Sunday and Miss
Nocula is  spending this week in the city.  * * • » • *
• ' • ' ,  Nancy Waters spent the week-end  at the home of her
parents in Seattle.  * * * *  Rebecca. Apple visited at her home  in
Marysville last week-end. ;,  . __o —  the wedding procession, which
was  the closing feature of the show.  gt;  . We're willing to wager that
ho  girl could watch this beautiful procession  of clothes without a
delirious  desire to possess at least half  of them. v  -And we've come to
the conclusion  th t if "ladies of the press." are  invited to such
delightful luncheons  and afternoon entertainments, that  the life of a
Viking reporter isn't  so bad after all; r.:'^ .:-; gt;;'!:;':i. 
Spring^'l^^GiYOT  A t C ^  On Sunday NigKt  Flowers and candlelight created
a  festive atmosphere at the spring  tea held at Edens Hall, Sunday,  March
13, at 5:30 o'clock. All the  members of the faculty and business  office
staff were invited to attend.  The program.' included solos by  Elmira
Gaither, "My itove Is a  Swallow" and "Ah, If. the Silver  Moon Were Mine."
She was accompanied  by Elma Ward. Chaun-cey  Griffith played two numbers, 
"On the Wings of Song," by Men-delssohn-  Litz, and "Waltz in E  Minor," by
Chopin. Robert Bekin  sang "The Conqueror," by Koonbs,  and "Christ; the
Saviour Lives  Again," by Tfacey. He was accompanied  at the piano by Ethel
Page  and Frank Forstrom played the violin  obligato. Two violin numbers by
 Emily Bentley Dow concluded the  program. Her numbers were "A  Melody," by
Charles Dawes, and  "Lohdondery Air", by Treisler. She  was accompanied by
Ethel Page.  The dining;'room of the hall was  transformed by: the-
effective use of  flowers and candles. Those on the.  decoration'; gt; 
conlmittee were Helen  Hutala, -chairman; gt;^ Louise Rice,  Lota Lawrence,
Inez Williams, Dolly  Malterner and Mayme Mcintosh.  Hostesses for the tea
were appointed  by'Hefen Edgar, house president,  and Twrittfcn'
invitations were  sent to all faculty members. The  invitation committee
was composed  of Ruth Neal, chairman; Genevieve  Peters, Ruby McAllister,
Margaret  Jacobs, Marydel Conrad, Bernadette  McCleary, Margaret Hendricks,
Lucille  Croxton and Evelyn Lingg.  o  EDENS HAS DINNER  ST. PATRICK'S DAY 
St. Patrick's day Edens Hall went  Irish and celebrated by giving a St. 
Patrick's dinner. Special decorations  and Irish songs were features  of
• the evening., rThe dinner , was  given for the students who
regularly  eat at the dorm and was the last  sociar event of the quarter. 
Committees were: Decoration,  Maxine Clyde, Isabelle Morrison^  Margaret
Jorgensen, Alma Anderson,  Emma Beuhler and Doris Jorgensen;  songs, Helen
Johnson, Barbara  Bolshanin and Beatrice Storey.  —o  ENTERTAIN
WARLIKER  A faculty luncheon was served in  honor of Jehan Warliker Tuesday
 noon in the Edens Hall clubroom.  Prince,^Warliker spoke further on  the
situ.ationjin^India and faculty  members;;, were., privileged to ask 
questions,, .It.: gt;was, reported one of  the ,mos.t; interesting, of the
series of  luncheons given this year for assembly,  speakers.
:;;--,.;••.  A dinner party to honor Pat Allan  on his
birthday'is being given this  evening by^Wihnifred Nolte at her  home.
'Trie rs1£ Patrick's idea will  be carrild:6u£ Twelve guests have
 been 'invited?'  = ' • • • ' * * * *  Miss Mildred
Tremain plans to  spend spring vacation in Tacoma'  visiting friends and
relatives. Miss  Tremain was in Seattle last weekend  for the auto show. 
Notp^Pmmq Club  Plajys Befdre Group  - of Guild Followers  On Last
Wednesday evening the  Normal Drama Club presented a  one-act play, "Bound
East, for Cardiff,"  at the. Theatre Guild Playhouse  before a large
audience of  Guild members.  The play was directed by James  Butler, who
also took part in the  cast. A unique feature of the play  was that it was
entirely devoid of  the beautiful heroine, in fact had  an all-male cast
from the Drama  club.  Excellent Cast  The cast was as follows: Driscoll, 
Marshall Bacon; Cocky, Clinton  Gross; Yank, James Butler; Davis,  Drury
Fox; Scotty, Lloyd Rasmus-sen;  Olson, A. E. Charlesworth;  Paul, Jack
Knuppenburg; Smitty,  Vernon Leatha; Ivan, Paul Jackson;  the captain,
Richard Stearns;  the mate, Anthony Gross.  Ship Setting  The fo'castle of
a ship, hardboiled  sailors and all that made up the  setting of the
presentation, with all  the scenery for the play, was made  by the cast.
The same play was  given a short time ago in the assembly  with the same
cast taking  part.  EMILY DOW ACCORDED  HEARING BY KOCHANSKI  



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Northwest Viking - 1932 March 18 - Page 4



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^ ^ M ^ ; ~ ' ~ ~ ^  Defeat "Tuesday^5Tornadoes" by:  v! Score of 33
to 20  ,.«j;^i.;.?.:.- •:.. lt;.irk "';M;";;;';\
.:'iv;;•• . ^ 7 ;  The "Blue Mondays," wHo are the  proud
holders of a victory over the  morning gym class, increased their 
Standing* in the .win column last  Tuesday by defeating the "Tuesday 
Tornadoes" in a scrappy basketball  game. After the final smoke of ba|- 
tle had cleared, the score was made  out to be 33 to "20. ;••, 
The highlight of the fracas was  the sensational, scoring; of .Kuske,  Blue
Monday guards who was unstoppable.  In the first half he kept  the ball
going through the net so  consistently that the opponents  were helpless.
Kuske Scored sixteen  points in the first half, as his team  led, 22 to 4. 
The Tornadoes came back in the  second half in the form of a hurricane  and
outscored their opponents,  16 to-11,-'but the lead that they had  to
overtake was just thirteen points  too large. In the second half, Johannes 
for Tornadoes held the spotlight  by swishing in eight points.  Lineups 
Tornados, 20 Mondays, 33  Dobler, 6... .P.. Delancey  Collier.... P
Halbert, 7  Johannes, 9 C Bekcen  Stiger, 1.... :-.-G Larsen, 4  Brill, 2
..'„' G. Kuske, 20  Subs—Thornadoes, Becken (2) B.  M. Iverson
(2).  o —  Pop Gunn Posts His  Regular Questions  On Baseball Theory 
In opening our column for this week we wish to announce to all our 
faithful reailers, if any, that this is the final column that will appear
this  year under the above caption. Yep,' it's a fact, but We feel that
it's about  time for someone else to take a crack at sports editing and
column Writing.  We have thoroughly enjoyed our sojourn as sports editor
for the  past three quarters and hope that those who have-had patience
enough  to read our weekly offerings have been satisfied with what we were
able  to brew during the weeks. Oh, yes, we also have another important 
reason for leaving the back page. Ye Boss, Chapman, has appointed us 
associated editor of the paper and we're going to work on Nbrmalite  next
quarter.  ..,-.,..'• --.T -W.S.RS.—  Bruce Springford, Iver
Moe, Bill Sells, Arvid Griffen and Terry Cook  will carry on next quarter
and you're going to like their copy.  -W.S.N.S.-  ? gt;A-CAN  YOU PASS THIS
TEST?  1. Should the base runner's  coach try to rattle the
opposing'pitcher?  2. May the catcher hit in  any position on the hitting 
order?  3. Does the pitcher get  credit for the put-out when he  strikes
out a batter?  4. Does a fielder's choice  mean a fly ball that two
fielders  have an equal chance of  fielding?  ' 5. Must second base be
occupied  by a base runner before  an infield fly retires the hitter?  \ 6.
Is it possible to work the  double steal with runners on  second and third?
 7. Does an infield fly retire  the batter or the baserunner?  8. When
putting on the  squeeze play may the batter  select any ball he chooses to 
bunt?  9. Must there be two base-runners  for the delayed steal?  10.
Should the batter take  ' his • position in the forward  part of the
hitters' box for  fast ball pitching?  11. Does the double steal  mean that
one baserunner  steals two bases in succession?  12. Which team has the 
choice of innings at bat?  13. If the ball is juggled  can the out be made
before  the ball is securely held?  flim Davis, the jumpiest jumper of high
hurdles ever to,park at the  Normal school, is slowly rounding into shape
for another highly successful  season. Short periods of setting-up
exercises have constituted his daily  workouts, but Davis says that already
the dormant muscles in the backs  of his legs are slowly developing and
taking on that necessary drive for  the high hurdles. Jim holds the high 
'i», lt;E\ — «= gt;——£F*\ hurdle
Tri-Normal record and he  should lower both his record and  the present
mark in the lows. We  are very certain that he would have  accomplished
this fact last year,  ;-'i he fell o* the last hurdle in the  big meet and
failed to place. Many  other track and field, luminaries are turning out at
present and will be in  great fettle when the warm breath of Spring
officially opens the season.  W.S.N.S.  Iver Moe, that man-mountain of
bodily perfection, is seriously contemplating  giving the iron platter a
whirl this season. Iver, as you know,  is probably the greatest prep school
discus heaver ever turned out by this  state. Hailing from Anacortes, he
captured the state meet twice and  journeyed to the interscholastic meet at
Chicago several times. He is  capable of tossing the Grecian platter well
nigh unto 140 feet, which is  quite a stretch of terra firma, says we. 
W.S.N.S.  COMPANIES I AND K  OF NATIONAL GUARDS  INSPECTED AND PAID  Major
John R. Copeland, of the  United States army, inspected companies  I and K,
Washington national  guard, of Bellingham, in their  annual federal
inspection last Tuesday  night, March 15.  This was one of a series of
inspections  that are held during the  year to get the companies in shape 
for their summer encampment at  Port Murray.  y During the course of the
inspection  different commissioned and  non-commissioned o f f i c e r s
were  called upon to do some duties which  we.(detailed by the major. Some 
of the officers called upon ^  Lieutenant Sterling MacPhail, Corporals 
Jack Mallahan, Jimmy Rork,  Gilbert Reeder, Fritz Harris, BUI  ColUer and
Bruce Springford. Among  the details that were assigned to  these men were:
Recruit instruc-  ;tioh; cbmpany^ in-  Btruction, military courtesy, care
of  :;'^ttie:;:.;bo^v^  0 * i ^ ^ ^ ^ squad  t^wium^ ?-••.;
gt;;; •.:;'  Everett Emery, the hardest driver that ever smashed a
Viking ball over  the net, will be out in full force for the tennis team
this Spring. 'Way  back in 1930 Emery paired up with Rork to cop the
Tri-Normal pennant.  Rork has been noted for bis slow, deliberate and
consistent style of play.  This type of racket wielding, coupled with
Emery's slashing, driving,  devil-may-care style of procedure, made this
pair much feared on Viking  courts.  W.S.N.S.  Will there never be an end
to the track and field material that Coach  Hec Edmundson at the University
of Washington is going to dig out of  the sticks and make into world
champions? For the last six or eight years  Edmundson has always had one or
more outstanding world contenders on  his squad. During the past few years
we can remember a few of them.  Jimmy Charteris was one of the Inest 880
men ever turned out by the  Coast. He always allowed his opponent to get a
big lead on him and then  outsprint" them in the final quarter mile. Then
came Kiser, the great  miler; and with him Jessup Brix, Anderson, world
premier hurdler,  Pendleton, Sellers and Hartley.  W.S.N.S. -  Therefore,
it Was with no little anxiety that sport fans looked toWrads  Washington
and wondered what "Hec" would turn out after losing this  pack of Huskies
who placed second  in the Intercollegiates in '29. Well,  the old wizard of
the U coaching  staff has again pulled an "out of  nowhere" trick and has
produced  several stars of the first rank. Don  Arthaud has already
cleared. 12  feet, six inches in practice and Was  slopped at that height
by the coach. No gt; telling where he will end. Chick  Garrett, high
hurdler, has topped the 80-yard high hurdles in 10 flat—  Steve
Anderson s is only 9, 8. Newt Harrell, two-miler, stepped his  favorite
jaunt in 9:46.2. Negley England,, former Anacortes star, is  heaving the
discus around 140 feet. And Captain Eddie Cenugg has  stepped the 880 in 1
:59.4 already this season and will do better.  WINS COAST TITLE  Win Over
Monmouth Normal  Gives Boys Championship  Coach Leo Nickelson's Ellensburg 
Wildcats swept a clean path to the  Pacific coast championship of Normal 
schools and junior colleges and  walked triumphantly up that path  on
Tuesday after they had defeated  Monmouth Normal, pride of Oregon  for the
second time in as many  days. The Ellensburg boys completely  outclassed
the Oregon boys  to win, 50 to 25. Monday evening's  battle was more even,
the Wildcats  winning, 36 to 30.  Different System  Using much different
tactics than  they used here in Bellingham  against the local Normal, they
used  a fast breaking style of play combined  with numerous block forma-: 
tions. Monmouth dribbled the ball  constantly and depended oh long  shots
for their points.  With Sutphin and Case playing  the. leading roles the
Washington  boys piled up a 22-to-ll lead by  halftime. Doug Haney, lanky
Wildcat  center, featured in the second  half play in which the Ellensburg 
team doubled their score again  while holding the Oregon men to  just half
of their point total.  Ellensburg won the tri-Normal  championship over
Cheney and Bellingham,  and looking for new fields  to conquer, took on the
Monmouth  boys, much to their liking.  TRACK MEN STILL  DOING GYM WORK 
Prospects Are Good for Showing  in Tri-Normal Meet  As- the" golf season^
wil gt; soon? be;  with us,, the Northwest -Viking by  special perroispbii
rof the copyright,  owners has secured the services of  Johnny Bones, I
iriean Jibby Bones,  should be Bobby Jones, to write an  article on "How to
Play Golluf in  Three Easy . Lessons." This story  was procured at a very
great expense  to the editor and will appear  in no other publication. 
-W.S.N.S.-  Incidentally, the Washington Athletic club is holding its
annual meet  tomorrow evening, with the U. of W. and one of the feature
races of the  evening will take place when Norm Bright tangles with Ken
Rhuddy over  the mile distance... Brich ran Rhuddy into the ground with a
4:28 mile,  two weeks ago, but Rhuddy did 4:24 early this week. It should
be a  great race.  W.S.N.S.  Buck Loomis, chunky twlrler who is seeking
action on Pop Gunn's  nine this Spring, has shown tremendous potentialities
thus far in his  workouts this quarter. Control plus a fair amount of
curves are his  standbys and he will undoubtedly see plenty of action in
the games next  quarter. Brewer, a newcomer from W. S. C. and a letterman
on the  Viking grid team of last quarter, is also rapidly rounding into
shape. With  these fellows and letter winners Leatha and Iverson, the head
mentor  should feel secure as to his moundsmen for the coming season. More 
than likly more pitchers will turn up as the season progresses.  -W.S.N.S.-
 And this little squib is dedicated to Frosh trackmen. Every PPPPP