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Northwest Viking - 1932 June 3 - Page 1



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flltlSS  ^ 30C%I4-NO. 23, WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL,
BELLINGHAM/WASHINGTON Friday, June % 1932  WINS BY POPULAR MAJORITY  Emyln
Jones Is Elected Secretary S c h o l a r s h i p C l ip  "t- to Board for
Summer  Quarter  AWARE) PINS DISCUSSED  VRoger Chapman, editor of the 
Northwest Viking tor the past three  quarters, was re-elected head of the 
Normal publication for summer  quarter, 1932,. at a meeting of the  Board
of Control yesterday afternoon.  He was opposjed by Nick  Bond; ''  Bob
Waters was re-elected business  manager for the summer session.  Waters was
unopposed.  To occupy the position of secretary  to the Board of Control
for the  following quarter will be Emyln  "Dayey" Jones. He is succeeding 
Ing iverson who is retiring after  serving for three successive quarters. 
He was opposed by Howard Mickel-son.-  Drama Pins  A discussion was also
held concerning  W pin awards to various  clubs. A move was made and
seconded  that the Drama club be allowed  five pins per year to be  awarded
according to a new point  system formulated by the Drama  club;;  - o  to
be Presented  to Frosh Winner  McEImon Holds Record of Year  for Scholastic
Rating  * - •*  Normalite  THE LAST CLASS  SLINKS INTO  OBLIVION 
O.K. G.W.L.  All of us at Bellingham Normal  are placing another milestone.
Reviewing  the fall, winter, and spring  quarters of the college year is no
 easy-itask, hence no job for the  columnist. However, for one who  has
survived four years of such life,  there is an inhibited tendency to 
spread on things a bit, forcing the  reader to put his mind in the shape 
of a shoyel to be carried away with  the specks of accumulation,—if
you  follow!  —W.S.N.S.-  No; il is the privilege of one who  has
witnessed, the evolution, of students  coming, going, failing, and 
succeeding within and without the  institution to eulogize somewhat. It  is
fitting that the Viking spirit  should influence and guide the following 
few words which are Writ-  Jen to call forth a voluntary strain  of
appreciation on the part of the  graduate and'others who feel that  they
are integral members of Bellingham  Normal, and who are  caught under the
spell of this shore-landi-  Sfagay. It is the voice of traditionitself 
that speaks.  -..••_ ——W.S.N.S.  Today is
practically the last day  for scores of graduating students  whofrom the
morrow will turn their  faces toward other fields in life—  tho^ of
teaching, those of the world  of affairs, and those of domestic 
life-^siich as the life that awaits,  may b£ Though the school
envir-onm^^  will be shifted, memories  andyideals never change. 
^^SlKy"'V": W.BN.S.r—-•—"'  '•:MJ^]^eiW7ii^d Blue" 
\h^^0^lif^^emories;'of the grads  ii i^  beiW$4ifa up through quarters of 
give-and-take philosophy.  •;• J f V ^ ^ hading  Jmmstratioh
arid in scho*  As a part of the class day exercises  on Wednesday, June 8,
Doris  McEImon will be presented with the  scholarship cup by Vernon
Leatha,  president of the sophomore class.  Doris McEImon wins the right to
 hold this cup for one year and have  her name engraved upon it by 
achieving the highest scholastic rating  of the freshman class for this 
year.  This custom was established by  the freshman class of 1930 to
encourage  new students to work for  higher educational ratings. The first 
'award was made in 1931 to Wilfred  Gunderson, who was the first person  to
have his name engraved upon  this cup. The point system, is used  in
determining the winner of the  cup. From thirty-two hours work  for the two
quarters the winner  made a total of 131 points.  The runners-up in the
contest  were: - Frederick Knapman, Janet  McArthur, Virginia George and 
Munford Orloff. The committee to  select the winner is composed of the 
dean of the school, president and  adviser of the Scholarship Society  and
the president and adviser of the  sophomore class.  "Cradle Song", Drama 
Club Production, Is  an Outstanding Play  (By Naomi Watson)  One of the
most outstanding presentations  that the Drama club has  given was "Cradle
Song", by G.  Martinez Sierra. Because of its romantic  setting and unusual
situation,  rt will be remembered for its  affect on human emotions. An
enthusiastic  audience saw the play on  the nights of May 25 and May 26. 
Virginia Hunt, characterizing a  Catholic, Sister Joanna of the Cross,  is
being congratulated on her work.  Her part showed the woman's universal 
mother love in spite of vows  that a nun must take.  The Prioress, Billie
Mills, characterizing  the Mother Superior in a  convent of nuns, played
her part with  naturalness and finish. Because of  her successful change
from her own  personality to that of her role, she"  may be said to have
done outstanding  work. Virginia George, as the  Vicaress, lent humor to
the play in  a characteristic way.  Richard Albert, in a difficult role, 
did well as the young and nervous  lover. "The doctor, James Butler,  -may
be called the male lead and was  well liked in his character.  The lovable
but humored child,  reared in a convent, was indeed  well portrayed.
Dorothy Ritchie  played this role. To her capable  acting is due much of
the poignancy  of the scene where the nuns are  forced to return to the
world then-beloved  child.  Perhaps the most praise may be  given to Mr.
Victor H. Hoppe for  his directing of this successful presentation.  The
public does not always  realize the efforts which a director  is forced to
put forth but it  is no doubt worth it when plays are  as successful as
"The Cradle Song''.  DICKY LEAVES HOME  FOR EAST. JUNE 20  Leaves in
Plus-fours, Plus Hanky,  Plus Shoes and Plus  Normal Annual  FINANCED BY
VALKYRIE  On June 20 Dick Albert will leave  his home in Everett, eastward
bound,  bearing a Klipsun for Mr. Hoover.  He is to be dressed in
plus-fours,  plus handkerchief, plus shoes, plus  colored glasses, plus a
twenty-pound  pack. First going south to Portland,  he will take the
Lincoln highway  east, passing through Denver, Colo.,  Salt Lake City,
Utah, Omaha, Neb.,  Chicago, 111., and then to Washington.  Upon presenting
the Klipsun  to Mr. Hoover, Dick intends to say:  "Mr. Hoover, could you
please tell  me wherein'ell the corner is just  around which prosperity is
lurking?"  Valkyrie Sponsors Trip  The trip is sponsored by the  Northwest
Viking and the Valkyrie  Club is helping to finance the expedition  by the
sale of tickets to the  football show, "The Huddle," to be  shown tonight
and tomorrow night  at the Mount Baker theater. Naomi  Watson is in charge
of the tickets.  Tickets will be sold this noon on the  main landing for 35
cents a crack.  All. members of the Valkyrie Club  have tickets to sell. 
$20 Needed  Dick is in high- spirits for the trip  for which he will need
about $20. It  is hoped that this amount will be  cleared by the sale of
tickets to the  theater.  He expects to hitch-hike all the  way, spending
no money at' all for  transportation. Food, he estimates,  will cost him
about $2.50 a week.  The first part of September will see  him home,
preparing to return to  school fall quarter.  NO DRY STATISTICS  GIVEN IN
PAMPHLET  "State School Statistics Since Statehood"  Gives Facts 
Statistics are usually dry things  but here are a few nice juicy ones  that
may surprise you. Did you  know that $118.34 was the total expenditure  per
public school pupil in  the State of Washington for the  year 1931 as
compared with the  magnificent sum of $300 which is  spent on each Normal
student in  the vain endeavor to pound a little  knowledge in.  This fact,
together with a number  Of others equally. surprising is disclosed  in the
pamphlet, "State  School • Statistics Since Statehood"  (how's that
for a good hith if you  lithp?) which has recently been received  in the
president's office. This  survey is a financial and statistical  history of
the public schools of  Washington from 1890 to 1931.  Enrollment Decreased 
There were 55,964 school children  in the census of 1890 and 346,422 in 
the census of 1931. The number of  elementary school children enrolled  for
1931 was 252,306, which was a  decided decrease from the number  enrolled
in 1927 when the registration  seems to have been at its  peak, with
258,141 listed. The elementary  school enrollment for 1890  was 55,644. 
High school enrollment on the  other jhand displays a steady and  almost
remarkable growth from 1890  when 320 were registered to 1931  when the
census was 90,508.  -. . High
Percentage•••--...;'••;  According to
President O. tt  Fisher, Washington, with 26.13 per  cent, has one of the
highest of high  (Continued oh Page Two)  ALUMNI DAY STARTS  COMMENCEMENT
FUN  Baccalaureate Services Held Sunday  and Commencement on  Thursday,
June 9.  STONE LAID WEDNESDAY  What promises to be one of the  finest
commencement programs arranged  in years will start off with  Alumni day
tomorrow morning and  end with the commencement exercises  on Thursday,
June 9.  The Alumni banquet and dance at  the Leopold scheduled for 6 p. m.
 will wind up Alumni day activities.  Miss Orleane Fitcha, who had charge 
of the ticket sale, reports a large  number of reservations for this
affair,  especially from the alumni.  Baccalaureate Services  Baccalaureate
services are to be  held in the auditorium Sunday, June  5, at 3:30 p. m.,
with Rev. L. Wendell  Fifield delivering the sermon.  Rev. Dwight Smith is
to offer the  invocation and prayer. Emily Dow  will play Ave Maria,
accompanied by  Ethel Page.  Features of the class day assembly  at 10
o'clock Wednesday morning,  June 8, are as follows: Presentation  of the
scholoarship cup to the freshman  class by Vernon Leatha, president  of the
sophomore class. The  main address of the day vail be delivered  by
President C. H. Fisher.  Clayton Baldrey, Margaret "Wheeler,  John Lensrud
and James Butler are  to stage a one-act play, "'A Leap  Year Bride." 
Stone Will Be Laid  Laying of the 1932 memorial stone  will take place at 8
o'clock Wednesday  evening. At this time Vernon  Leatha will present the
traditional  Key and Book to Henry Lowe, president  of the freshman class.
At 9  p. m. the faculty will receive graduates  and their parents and
friends  at the reception room in Edens Hall.  M. Lyle Spencer, president
of the  University of Washington, has been  s e c u r e d as the
commencement  speaker. The commencement exercises  are to take place June 9
at 10  a. m. in the auditorium. Dr. W. D.  Kirkpatrick, chairman of the
board  of trustees, will present the diplomas.  Rev. R. L. Peterson is to
give  both the invocation and the benediction.  Five Are on Committee  All
sophomore class activities are  in charge of E. A. Bond, Elsie  O'Donnell
and Vernon Leatha, assisted  by Thelma Shorkley and Jean  Morse. ' x  o _ 
- " ^ - » — m • i||  CALENDAR  SATURDAY—June
4—Alumni I  Day.  8 a. m.-12:30 p. m.—Women's  Field Day.  1 p.
m., W. A. A. Sports  Luncheon at Edens Hall.  6 p. m., Alumni Banquet and 
Dance at Crystal Ball Room,  old Hotel.  SUNDAY—June 5.  3:30 p. m.,
Baccalaureate Services  in Normal Auditorium;  Sermon by Rev. L.  L.
Wendell Fifield.  WEDNESDAY—June 8—Class  Day.  10 a. m.,
Assembly Program  by Graduates.  8:15 p. m., Placing of Class  Numerals on
Normal Campus.  :;  9 p. m.. Faculty Reception to  Graduates, their Parents
 and Friends.  THURSDAY—June 9.  10 a. m., 



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Northwest Viking - 1932 June 3 - Page 2



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Formerly The Weekly BtoMnijei^^Win^f^ V®**•'-'•
••  Published every Friday except during the;/monjfeof^Steptemj
 ber by the Associated Students, Washington State^ formal  School,
Bellingham, • :."•-' •,-',.' : • . - - • ." 
Entered in tlie Postoffice at Bellingham, Washington, as  second class
matter by virtue of the act of March 3, l«/V.  Printed by the Miller  
Sutherlea Printing Company, Bellingham  National Bank Building. 
Subscription rate by mail, $1.50 per year, in advance. Advertising  rates
on application.  National Advertising Representatives:
Littell-Murray-Barn-hill,  Mars Advertising, and Collegiate Special
Advertising  Agency, of New York City. . . _  Address all communications,
other than news items; to the  Business Manager of the Northwest Viking,
Bellingham, Wash.  Telephone 3180 ^^  ROGER CHAPMAN .Editor  JTMMIE
STODDARD ...Associate Editor  VIRGINIA CARVER .Assistant Editor  BOB
WATERS- Business Manager  WILLIAM FISHER .....Circulation Manager  DAVID
MORSE...... ,»• -Advertising Manager  DEPARTMENT EDITORS  Sports
Editor, Arvid Griff en; Copy Editor, June Welch;  Desk Editor, Jacqueline
James; Society Editor, Dorothy  Piala; Women's Sports,, Helen Northen; 
Literary Editor, Janet McArthur  SPECIAL STAFF WRITERS  Irene Schagel,
Debby Altose, Virginia George, Gordon  Leen, Bob Walters, Einar Larson,
Marydel Conrad,  Naomi Watson, Evelyn Altman, Jean Murray  Pat Allen, Bruce
Kibble  REPORTERS  Iver Moe, Terry Cook, Bruce Springford, Bill Sells, 
Harriet Rickerson, Alice Wampler, Kathryn Berkeley,  Huston Dow, Lorraine
Risdall, Lorinda Ward, Gladyce  Kopperdahl, Julius Dornblut, Ervin Leatha, 
Elaine Sutherlen  T^HINGTQN STATE ^  SsiMUSIIN-  (By George)  I asked
Vernie Leatha from whence came the fuzz  on his cheek the other morning and
his big brother  came back with the rejoinder, "Oh, you know, pur  harsh
manly beards simply tear the towels to pieces!"  "And last scene of all in
this strange eventful history  is second childishness and mere oblivion,
sans  teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything"—poor  old
Preston Wright went to the show without his  glasses Sunday night and had
to have his friend,  Jackie Knuppenburg, read the talkies to him.  Oh the
frailty of the M. Todd woman—"I will not  go to the hospital with
you, I will not go for a walk  and I will not offer any explanation!"
—And "ittle  Dimmie Toddard" wonders why!  There were "Percy"
Zwaschka and Arvie Griffen  slumbering peacefully through.last Tuesday's
folk  song recital. Well, it was more than I could do, at  that, with all
the disturbance emanating from behind  the footlights.  (Continued ftpm
Ps^ipa^  lastic attainment. And We have benefitted  spiritually. We leave
Bellingham  not only technically trained  for the job of
instructing—but, better  still, for the job of life with a  liberal
arts foundation. Indeed, this  latter mentioned "foundation" will  be
augmented by and serve as a  footing for a fuller opportunity in  schools
devoted to specific professional  work—-the true university. 
-W.S.N.S.  Jean Murray, Vera Esleby and Jacqueline James  played
cradle-snatchers Monday and entertained some  high school boys. "It might
have been all right if  they hadn't been such perfect asses," wails Jean.
Yes,  m'dear, but aren't they all?  'OOTBALL REMAINS,  INANCED—HOW? 
FOLLOWING the results of the vote on football  yesterday, many persons no
doubt will be interested in  learning the editorial reaction of the Viking.
 T H E TWO questions the Viking has been primarily  interested in have
been, to quote from an editorial  in the May 2 0 issue, "Could
intercollegiate  football in a college and town of this size be made a 
real asset to the students and the school if more money  were spent? Or,
would it be better to adopt a complete  intramural program and benefit more
students."  T H E CHIEF aim of the Viking was to raise the  question and
this it has most successfully done. We  have been most pleased with the way
the students  have responded to the problem and expressed their  opinions
pro and con. The procedure used in allowing  an open forum for discussion
and then referring  the question to a popular vote could not be improved 
upon.  WITH T H E DECISION that football is to remain  we now must meet the
problem of how much  we can spend on it; how much the women of the  school
will receive for their athletic program, and how  we are to raise the $2228
which we will need for intercollegiate  football if we are to maintain it
at the  same level as last year.  THE MAJORITY of those interested have
expressed  their opinion, some openly, and others have  successfully ridden
the ience by calling it an evil  compensated by pleasure. Now we must all
buckle  down and co-operate with the Board of Control as  they make
adjustments of activities to meet the budget.  ANOTHER NOTE that marks a
desirable trend  was the growth of interest of the women students. We  are
reminded of a student association election of several  years ago when the
women students became conscious  of their strength, became organized and in
the  election placed all their candidates in office including  Then there
is the Carroll chap, of course, who is  having the usual bust-up with the
one and only and  is going in for wine, women and song in a big way.  'Next
to deaf and dumb ones, we liked our chap-erones  best," chortle the
participants in the Klipsun  picnic—"they all had to leave about an
hour after  things got going good."  This being my last
spurt—Somebody murmurs,  "Parting is such sweet sorrow—" and I
come back in  the vernacular with "Oh, yeah!"—I s'pose I.should say 
a few words in leaving but my eyes are filled with  tears, my throat with
sobs, and my mouth with a gag  and so I can only holler with a stifled
cry—GOODBYE—  GOODBYE.  Lagpl^arpet Idea p^$  OS jfraining
SchpoJ p  kssem ratti  the student body president.  LARGE POSTERS were used
at that time bearing  the black heading at the top "Shall 100 Rule  1000?"
and a cartoon showing an elephant representing  women votes, cowering at
the sight of a mouse,  the men's votes. The side comment was, "If the 
elephant only 'knew his strength." The girl who was  elected president at
this time, Daisy Howard, is now  county superintendent of schools near
Flint, Michigan.  FAREWELL AND  ELICITATIONS  A SCHOOLYEAR draws to a close
and we  part to go our separate ways. Many of us will not  return to this
school, others will return in the fall, and  some will remain during the
summer. Wherever we  go we will be separated and acquaintances of the year 
will become dim, yet there will remain the memory of  many happy hours
spent in the atmosphere of Bellingham  Normal.  THE VIKING adds its
farewell to the many  others that will be said this next week. We have
enjoyed  working with and for the Associated Students  during the past
three quarters and have endeavored to  verve the best interests of the
greatest number at all  Club activities have had their  place in
contributing to the lives  of the "many- score". Intramural  athletics have
had their place, too,  in the school life of the majority,  while a few of
us were able to compete  for varsity honors. These two  branches of
athletics have been as  well cared for as the trunk of intellectual 
growth; consequently they  have flourished. How well rounded  our school
life has been! There is  included even workshops for the  handling of
materials, tools, but—  our advancement in this industrial  realm has
been measured by our  gleanings of that phase of educa  tional philosophy
which our instruc  tors have opened unto us. Passing,  we found four great
walls housing  the wondrous recorded findings of  the. ages. A few ounces
for digestion,  but there were tons for stimulation.  Ours has been a life
of constant  exposure to the inspirational. ..Yes,  these two or three
years have made  greater changes in our lives than  would have been made by
a more  ordinary environment. Nevertheless,  the ordinary? the homely, have
been  made clearer to us so we might  assist in imparting not so much 
knowledge as understanding in the  minds of the growing and even the  less
fortunate.  W.S.N.S.  Aside from athletic, intellectual,  and. spiritual
enrichments there has  stood our social life. Truly has  recreation become
idle menace for  many in the world as it is, yet how  true it is that
recreation has been the  source of retaliation for many of us  who are to
somehow influence the  world as it is to be.  The Class of 1932 wants to 
come back to its Alma Mater in future  years to find many changes in 
ideas, improvements and readjustments  in the organization of this  school
in relation to the other higher  institutions of the state; but, this 
class sincerely wishes to find the  same old Viking spirit and traditions 
which have been passed onto  us by our thousands of Alumni.  W.S.N.S.  We
can predict an addition of  teacher training to bring elementary  and high
school work under a com  mon yoke. There will be an enlargement  of the
present campus.  Changes in points of view are gradually  being affected
already—particularly,  the germ of internationalism  has found a
breeding place  within these halls.  • Summing all, may we expect to 
.find higher standards for the pro-  Each member of the eighth grade 
graduating class of the Training  School is taking an active part in  a
program to be presented on Tues^  day, June 7, at 9 o'clock in the 
auditorium. The presentation will  consist of a group of nine short 
dramatization based on the magic  carpet idea. The plays have been 
produced by the girls and boys from  stories and longer plays studied in 
the English classes, Drama Club and  Literary Club of the training school. 
Those graduating are: Gladys Ax-ling,  Margaret Boyd, Margaret Jane  Bruff,
Betty Burnet, Zealand CJars-well,  Jack Carver, Vivian Clarke,  Tommy Day,
Billy Jim Dee, Jack  De Muth, Paul Dennis, Marion Eg-berg,  Lorraine Ellis,
Edith Farlow,  Billy Gardiner, Arlie Genther, Louise  Hansen, David
Jenkins, Ethel  Kent, Allen Knight, Jean Larrabee,  Myrtle McCarger, Howard
Murray,  Le Roy Peterson, Billy Sherwood,  Janet Thorne, Betty Thorson,
Patty  Wallace, Jean Wellington and Jack  Whitmore.  o  DRY  I f o l V E N
I N ^ A M P ^ L f e T,  f^pontimied from P^e'Ohe)  fession or vocation of
teaching. In  limiting this field it is necessary to  break the ground for
training in  other professional and liberal fields.  We are far-sighted
enough to believe  that Bellingham Normal will  become a great educational
center  for other lines of work as well as for  teacher training.  W.S.N.S.
 What better expression can be  carried by the heart of a Viking  than:
"Learning truths 



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Northwest Viking - 1932 June 3 - Page 3



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iiliSliilipil^lSi^lSiS!  WM W^HIr#TON^$^^  ^olds Final  Pest Today 
Station V-I-K-I-N-G announcing  frqm the Bellingham hotel, where  t h e
annual banquet of the staff is  in full swing. Ahem—the noise you 
hear in the background is not static,  ladies and gentlemen, merely the 
.;iast despairing gurgle of soup as it  ^tragically disappears. It is
Friday  rnight, June 3, and this thing has  been going on since 7 o'clock,
so we  have put up a calendar in the hope  t h a t we can accurately time
the  'speeches. Toastmaster Chapman has  just called on the second speaker.
 He is up—no he hesitates—a door  knob shaves his left
ear—he is down  —and he is up again. Wait just a  minute,
folks, and we'll tell you his  i^me__ahHhh, he is none other than  bur
inimitable prexy. It now gives  me great pleasure to t u r n the microphone
 over to President Fisher.  Zzzzzzzzz! (Half hour later, applause).  The
next number on our  program will be given by that little  .girl with the
accordioon. Dot Knup-penberg.  Step right up here to the  microphone,
Dorothy. " Now folks—  are you listening? And so on far, far  into
the night.  After the speeches are said, musical  numbers are given and
funny  stories are told, the staff members  will trip lightly to the music 
coming by direct wire from KVOS  until Dean Jones' curfew rings and  then
they will up and away to their  respectful — I m e a n respected
— I  mean separate homes. Incidentally,  folks, the reason for this
banquet is  that a few stout-hearted members  Of the staff have survived
three  quarters of work and are getting  their pins.  O. K., Bellingham! 
Officers on Trip to i   gt; Rocks, Tuess, May 31  Initiation and election
of officers  of the Alkisiah Club was carried  out on an outing to the
Rocks, Tuesday,  May 31. The new members and  old members left school about
4  o'clock and hiked to the place of  meeting.  The newly elected officers
are:  Virginia Hutchinson, president; Ma-rydel  Conrad, vice-president; Dot
 Fiala, secretary; Martha Shudshift,  treasurer; Margaret Wheeler,
reporter.  After the initiates were given a  dip into the bay the girls
roasted  weiners rolled in dough, coffee and  strawberries and cream.  "The
club activities will be resumed  in the fall," states the acting 
president, Gerda Jensen.  -o .—  Beach Party Given  at Lake Whatcom 
AnhtialmhBnm  '^y; of H^rM^lA$ A.  • gt;:j4^lMM!- lt;y  A beach party
for a group of Normal  and university students was  given at Janet Dodson's
home at  Lake Whatcom Saturday evening,  May 28. A number of those included
 in the party were Alice Livesey,  Betty Watts, Marjorie Morris, Janet 
Dodson, Charles Halbert, Tom Sti-ger,  Allan McNeill, Bill Malmquist  and
guests from the University of  Washington.  STUDENTS' MOTHERS  VISIT IN
BELLINGHAM  Carrying out a unique Indian idea,  the W. A. A. alumni banquet
will  climax the organization's annual  field day, to be held tomorrow,
June  4, on Waldo field. The luncheon is  to be held in the Edens Hall
dining  room at 1 o'clock.  Starting out at 8 o'clock in the  morning, the
various sports the girls  have been participating in this quarter  will be
demonstrated.  Six Sports Demonstrated  A fast speedball game between  the
frosh and soph teams, archery  shooting by the best of the archers,  a few
double tennis matches, a class  baseball game and handball tournament  are
to be the features of the  morning games.  Price General Chairman  Dorothy
Price is general chairman  for all field day activities. Marydel  Conrad
has charge of the programs,  which Violet Strandberg is in charge  of the
morning games.  Acting as general chairman of the  banquet is Janet Borges,
assisted by  Elva Pilquist, who has charge of  toasts, and Marydel Conrad,
in  charge of decorations.  Awards Presented  A delightful program has been
 planned for the banquet, toasts will  be given, awards will be presented, 
members of all star and class teams  and the new president of the
association,  Violet Strandberg, will be  presented to the girls.  Alumni
of the school will be  guests of honor at this Indian banquet.  All girls
planning to attend  must sign on the W. A. A. bulletin  board by Friday
noon.  ^ Oinim  Swimming, tennis, croquet, cards,  pool, dancing and most
important,  the eats, were a few items which  the Klipsun staff enjoyed on
their  outing to Loganita Lodge, Lummi  Island.  The menu read: Fried
chicken,  new potatoes and peas, fruit salad,  hot rolls and strawberries
on ice  cream. The Klipsun staff and their  guests were about forty. They
left  in Russ Nyberg's bus, expecting to  catch the 5o'clock ferry to the
island  arriving at Loganita at 6:30..  Faculty chaperones were Miss  Lucy
Kangley, Miss Hazel Breakey  and Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Ruckmick.  Cathleen
Hill and Charles Dowell  planned the picnic.  The opinion was expressed
that  the site chosen for the picnic was  one of the loveliest in the
proximity  of Bellingham.  Normalites Are Given  Audience With Visiting 
Raja-rana from India  1 - ; ; , , . T  gt; '','  ' gt;''!i!l!t";/i,i:'-:-'J
 jcj?£.£ig:;:' ^Featuring - •''.*•' • "*  .;
|3% Ney^fast lt;pM^°' **  In MeshHosiery for GraHiiafesfc ! 
Reasonably Priced  $0? 'if*'  W-X  1312 Cornwall Ave.  Near American
Theater  MRS. R. A. OBERLATZ  Phone 115491  Officers Elected in  I.RC.
Meeting Wed.  Election of officers was the main  item of business of a
short meeting  of the International Relations Club  held in the Edens Hall
club room  Wednesday, June 1.  A short program was held consisting  of
talks on international  problems by Maxine Nielson, Julius  Dornblut, Lloyd
Rasmussen and  Robert Delaney.  Marjorie AUen spent the.b.oMay  at her home
in Seattle. .x ,g  Katherine Rose, visited at her  home in Lynden during
the past  week-end. •'"••: -''"''• :;;;'-'-
;.•'• gt;':w •  Mr. and Mrs. F. A gt; Fran*, bit Aber-'; 
deen, visited their daughter,- Mildred,  over the week-end/ '
••'! :* v - ^  Marian Baila, visited friends -'-ins.  Edison
during t h i week-end?? 'ff^-'  Catherine ^HolBssp*n4-thel ,hoia»y  at
Vancouver) Bv G.'*-' /'••'* •-' gt; ' ^A  Lovia
Weiger,-6T gt;Seattle;*. aJ'former  member of Barton Hall, visited Mrs. 
Barton during the week-end.  Leopold Hotel Scene  of Birthday Banquet  The
annual" birthday banquet of  the Bellingham Business and Professional 
Women's Club was given  Tuesday evening, May' 31. Miss  Emily Kneubuhl,
national executive  secretary, the honor guest, was introduced  by Miss
Nora Cummins.  Miss Kneubuhl and Miss Cummins  " were in school together at
the University  of Minnesota. The banquet  ^as held in the Rainbow room of 
the-Leopold hotel.  Having returned from her month's  vacation, Miss
Kathleen O'Malley  will resume her former work in the  nurse's office. 
There have been several mothers  visiting their daughters in Bellingham 
this week, according to Miss  Mary Neall, of the health department.  Mrs.
Gill, mother of Dona  Gill, from Lebanon, Ore., will stay  with her
daughter until the end of  this quarter, at 1715 High street.  Mrs. Von
Hoena also will spend the  week-end with her daughter, Elizabeth  Von
Hoena.  Miss Marion Grieve, of Port Orchard,  underwent an appendicitis 
operation Sunday. She is at the St.  Joseph's hospital and at the present 
time is getting along well.  o  Lovegren Entertains  With Buffet Supper 
STUDENTS WIN CONTEST  Elmira Gaither, soprano, and  Robert Becken, tenor,
won the local  Atwater Kent Radio audition contest  held over K-V-O-S at 9
a. m.,  Saturday, May 28. Both are students  of the Normal school  . o 
Lila Bloomeen was in Vancouver,  B. C, for the holiday.  Sutherlens Will
Travel  Orcas Island Draws  Holiday Vacationers  -- Orcas Island was a
favorite place  for vacationers over the week-end  and Memorial day. A,
number of  members of the faculty had cottages  at Olga. Among these were 
Mr. and Mrs. Marquis, Mr. and Mrs.  'Ruckmick, Mr. and Mrs. Hoppe and  Miss
Adele Jones and Dr. and Mrs.  Masters.  Vancouver Popular  with Normal
People  Mrs. May Lovegren entertained  with a delightful buffet supper
Sunday,  May 29. Her home was decorated  with flowers in pastel shades. 
Candles were used as an added effect.  Miss Anne Pauling assisted  with the
serving. Those included in  the party were Miss Augusta Pragst  and mother,
Miss Anna Beiswenger  and sister, Rose, Miss Wilma Trent  and sister, Mrs.
Shumate, from St.  Louis, Miss Nora 



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Northwest Viking - 1932 June 3 - Page 4



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 gt;BO  WASHINGTON STATE NOMM HG^  G R I F F EN  13 QP0RTQ  1$:  A
couple of Viking athletes, one a  thin-clad track-ace, the other a  wary
diamond follower, gave the  fans plenty of'tlirills over the weekend.  ,'
gt;  Walt Schlilaty showed his worth  last Friday in the preliminary
contests  to the Northwest Olympic trials  at the U. of IV., when he
qualified'for  the 100-meler event in the  main trials on Saturday. From 
thence he qualified for the semifinals  to be held at Long Beach, 
Cal.iOnJuly\and2.  Viking Ace Bests Many in Race  for Finals at Long Beach
-  RUNS 100 IN 10.7  Competes with Men from Idaho,  Montana, Washington 
and Oregon  The other Viking: who "did well by  himself" was "Franny"
Francisco.  Playing for the Belltngham Tulips  against the Vancouver
Arrows,  "Franny" came through in great  form when he doled out a double to
 score two men in the second frame  and repeated his hitting ability in 
the seventh when he swatted the  pill for another double and scored  on the
next hit. The Tulips won, 3-2.  Charles Fisher, son of President  Fisher,
recently won second place in  the Northwest district tennis singles  at
Mount Vernoa "Chuck" plays  for the Fairhaven Grizzlies and  looks plenty
good as a racket wield-er.  He played Murphy, of Everett,  for the title
and lost the match,  6-3, 6-2. Another Grizzly ace, Bill  Hussey, placed
third in the meet.  Hussey is the son of Mrs. Ruth Burnet,  journalism
instructor here.  Viewing the Olympic trials at  the U. of IV. and. taking
one on the  chin from the University Frosh  baseball nine was the Week-end
of  —Well, what should I say—spent  by the Viking diamond kings
last  Friday and Saturday. The Frosh  aces trounced the hilltoppers to the 
tune of A to 0.  Next week there will .be some  form of a tag day or such
to raise  shekels in order that our Viking  track., star,.. Walt..
Schlilaty... may  attend the Olympic Games semifinals  at Long Beach, Cat.
Please  back whatever system is arranged  for so that this school will have
the  high honor of having an athlete in  the trials.  Wampler on Top of 
Girl's Tennis Ladder  Final tennis matches in the  girls' ladder
tournaments have been  played off this week.  Alice Wampler gained the top
of  the ladder by defeating last year's  champion, Helen Howell, 6-0, 0-6, 
6-2, thus winning the intramural  ladder tournament. Julia Christen-sen 
and Inez Williams follow Helen  Howell in placement. "'  A few doubles
matches will be  played off at the W. A. A. field day  meet tomorrow
morning.  _o  NORMAL GOLF SQUAD  PLAYS FIVE MATCHES  Saturday, May 28, at
Seattle, Walter  Schlilaty, Viking sprint ace, popularly  known as
"Mercury," qualified  in the Olympic finals, taking first  place in the
100-meter dash and  second spot in the 200 out of a field  of twelve
contestants representing  the cream of the cirider-burners  from Oregon,
Idaho, Montana and  Washington.  Friday saw the elimination of half  the
twelve contestants in each race.  Two heats of six men in each were  run in
both events Saturday. The  three winners from each heat were  run together
with our own "Mercury"  clicking the tape in 10.7, second  by a mere hair.
Both the winner  and Schlilaty were so close together  they were clocked
together.  This time was one tenth of a second  below the qualifying time
of 10.8.  He took the 200-meter, about  218.75 yards, in 22.6, one-tenth of
a  second above qualifying time.  At Long Beach, Cal., preliminary  trials
will be run July 1 and 2. Later,  at Palo* Alto, elimination trials will 
be held, preparatory to the meet at  Los Angeles. Schlilaty plans to go  as
far as is possible in the elimination,  hitting for the top.  Previous to
his enrollment at Bel-lingham  Normal School, Schlilaty  had two years
track experience under  Jay Kempkes, track coach at  Everett high school.
His first year,  1928, he went to Pullman to compete  in the all-state
track meet held  there annually. In that year ^he  copped third in the
century and second  in the 220-yard dash. The next  year, 1929, he also
went to Pullman,  and in both events was second only  to Paul Swift.  Brown
eyes, dark hair and an  Everett blonde are his chief qualifications,  and
speed and style his  merits. A certain girl, whose name  I will not mention
but who played  the lead in "Liliom" winter quarter  is the apple of his
eye this spring,  and as for her, she told me of his  "speed and style." 
• He is taking a special course here  at Normal, is a close friend of
John  Gable, lives with "Posy" Flowers  and his merry-makers, and likes 
liver and onions—lots of onions.  VIKING TENNIS MEN  BEAT G. P. S.
TWICE  Few Matches Are Played but Six  Men Win Sweaters  The Vikings tennis
team ended  the season very successfully by defeating  the College of Puget
Sound  twice. The first match was won by  the Normal by a score of 5 to 2. 
The team took three single matches  out of five, and made a clean  sweep of
the doubles, taking two  straight matches. In the second  match with the
Tacoma Loggers we  won again by a score of 5 to -2. This  match was also
won by the Normal  by taking three single matches and  both of the doubles.
 The Normal did not have any outstanding  player this year, but as a  whole
it was a very good team. Poor  weather made it impossible for the  Vikings
to play several of the  matches scheduled for them this  season, but they
made a good impression  by defeating the College of  Puget Sound twice,
which is considered  a very strong team.  The six men who won their letters
 in tennis for this season are Houghton,  Wahl, Fisher, Lahtonen, Carr  and
Bond.  NORM AL BASEBALL  TEAM BLANKED BY  UNIVERSITY FROSH  Iverson Pitcher
for Normal,  Gets into Hole in First  Three Innings  But  LAST SCHEDULED
GAME  SOPHOMORE GIRLS WIN  CLOSE BASEBALL GAME  CLASS SPEEDB ALL  TEAMS
SELECTED  Last Games of Successful Season  Being Played This Week  The
Bellingham Normal golf team  played five matches this season.  The Vikings
won two of their  matches and lost three. They defeated  Burlington high
school once  and Whatcom high school once.  They lost at the tri-normal and
to  Whatcom high school twice.  The men who played golf for the  Normal
this season were McBeath,  Gross, Lahtonen, Lovegren, Sells,  Carr and
Harris.  • : O : —  Bellingham Herald  Rates Knuebuhl as  a
Brilliant Speaker  "Rated as one of the most brilliant  speakers in America
and an  authority on political education,"  was the opinion of the
Bellingham  Herald regarding Miss Emily B.  Kneubuhl of New York City,
national  executive secretary who was honor  guest at the annual banquet of
 the Professional and Business women's  dub of Bellingham.  Class teams in
speedball were  chosen Tuesday and the last games  of the quarter are being
played off  this week. The girls have had a  fair break in weather
conditions and  have had successful turnouts this  season.  The freshman
lineup is: Isaacs,  Aisted, Flick, McLeod, Mcintosh,  Schuehle, Shepard,
Williams, Mac-  Fadyen, McArthur and Peters.  Sophomores: Tarbox, Thompson,
 Pilquist, De Witt, Howell, Davis, Ro-senquist,  Wirsing, Jacobsen, Wampler
 and Price.  The last games of the quarter will  be played off Saturday
morning. All  girl athletes will participate in various  sports throughout
the morning.  Letters and honors will be received  at a banquet at Edens
Hall  for all girls who successfully participated  in athletics during
spring  term.  : O _  The sophomore girls' baseball  team romped over the
freshman  girls Tuesday in a fast seven-inning  game. Peggy Davis, of the
sophomore  team, played a nice game at  right field, and Elva Pilquist,
catcher,  brought in the scores for the  sophomores.  The freshman team
looked good  and was expected to take the sophomores  down the line, but
they  failed to quite keep up with their  opponents and the score ended, 7 
to 5.  Violet Stranburg pitched for the  freshmen and Alice Wampler for 
the sophomores.  Phyllis McCloud, baseball manager,  deserves the
admiration given  her for the good work done in managing  baseball this
quarter and for  her loyal and enthusiastic attention  at every game. 
— o  Class Net Tourney  Nears Completion  In the class tennis
tournament  Sells defeated Dow, 6-4, 9-7, in the  final match at 1 o'clock
class Monday  and Wednesday. Locke and  Skotheim are to play for the
championship  for the 1 o'clock class  Tuesday and Thursday. Sells, the 
champion of the 1 o'clock class  Monday and Tuesday, will play the 
champion of the 1 o'clock class  Tuesday and Thursday for the  championship
in the class tennis  tournament.  o —  REGISTRATION FOR THE  CITY
TENNIS DRAWINGS  TO LAST TILL JUNE 20  Coach "Pop" Gunn's baseball club 
finished the season last Saturday at  Seattle where 'they were beaten by 
the University of Washington Frosh  by the score of 4 to 0.  Frosh Score
•  The frosh garnered their first run  in the first inning when
Mathis' hit  was stretched into a triple because  of an error. He crossed
home plate  on Cook's hit. The third inning was  a slugfest for the Frosh.
O'Brien  started it off with a three-bagger  and he came in on a single by 
Mathis. Then Mathis scored on a  triple by Cook, who scored when  Dawes
bunted.  Iverson Improves  During the rest of the game Ing  Iverson held
the Frosh down and  they were unable to get more runs.  This game was the
first that Iverson  has pitched this season and at  the start he was a
little wild. It  might be said that these four runs  were the result of
walks and errors.  Lineup  The lineup for the game was as  follows:
Francisco, Cook and Campbell,  fielders; Comfort, third base;  Eacrett,
shortstop; Smith, second  base; Abbott, first base; Flint,  catcher, and
Iverson, pitcher. Frosh  lineup: Hinkle, batt and Cook, outfielders; 
O'Brien, third; Mathis,  shortstop; Kelley, second; Lirhus,  first; Dawes,
catcher, and Enquist,  pitcher.  Summary  Ending the season the Vikings 
have a fairly good record. They have  won two games and lost four games. 
All of these games were hard games  and the victor well deserved the  win.
Also the Vikings scored 22  runs to their opponents' 42 and lost  only two
shutout games.  Sweater Winners  The lucky men who won their  THe
Downstairs Store  at  SILK STOCKINGS  75c  Service Weights  and  Lace-top
Chiffons  sweaters in baseball are as follows:  Loomis Iverson and Leatha,
pitchers;  Flint and Macomber, catchers;  Abbott, first; Smith, second;
Comfort,  third; Eacrett, shortstop; Cook,  Gallenger, Francisco and
Campbell,  fielders. However, some of these  men have already won their
sweaters  in other sports and will not get  another sweater.  The highest
diving record is 205  feet, 9 inches made by Wickham,  native of Solomon
Islands, at Melbourne,  Australia, in 1918.  Normalstad Shelter |j  Nearly
G6nstruc|ed  Employed by the students ofithe  school, two men are building
a shelter  cabin at Normalstad. Professor  E. A. Bond says the men will
remain  there until the building is completed.  It will be 24x18 feet in
size, and  will have one story. A stone fireplace  will be built. ^  It is
expected that with the shelter  house finished, Normalstad irill  be one of
the popular outdoor rejh-dezvous  of the Normal. *}  PALS OF TRAIL  AND
HIGHWAY  "Where Knowledge Combines with Common Sense"  Success Business
College  Accredited by the National Association of  Accredited Business
Colleges  Subjects Offered  Accounting  Shorthand  Typing  Spelling 
Penmanship  Business English  Letter Writing  Commercial Law  Rapid
Calculation  Filing  Bookkeeping Machine  Office Appliances  Calculators 
Comptometer  Monroe  Dalton  Victor  Burroughs  Miss Nora B. Cummins of the
 Normal school introduced the speaker  at the banquet which was held in 
the Leopold hotel Tuesday, May 31.  Several members of the faculty and  of
the library staff were present,  among them. Miss Mildred Tremain  and Miss
PPPPP