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1932_0729




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Northwest Viking - 1932 July 29 - Page 1



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V.-.  W   XXXI-4SIO. 40. WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, BELLINGHAM,
WASHINGTON Friday, July 29, 1932.  MINS DATA FOR  STUDY OF ACTIVITIES  Two
Hundred and Fifty-two Give  Answers to Survey in  Assembly  Women's League
Tea  Next Thursday to Be  Scene of Much Gaiety  INFORMATION IS USEFUL  Only
two hundred and fifty-two  students responded to the questionnaire  on club
activities that was  prepared by the Inter-Club Council  and distributed in
assembly, Tuesday,  July 19. Helpful information  was obtained from this
survey.  Of the 252 who answered the  questions, 148 are or have been 
members of a club and 84 have  never belonged to a club. The number 
belonging to each club follows:  W. A. A., 25; Dramatic, 25; Vanadis 
Bragi, 23; Alkisiah, 16; Philos, 13;  International Relations, 19;
Scholarship,  10; Pep, 12; W. Club, 10;  Y. W. C. A., 9; Social Science, 9;
 Tri-C, 17; Parliamentary Law, Z-,  and Choral, 4. The statistics show 
that W. A. A., Tri-C, Vanadis Bragi  and International Relations have 
proved most beneficial in teaching.  Other answers and questions from  '
the survey follow:  Which type of club do you consider  of most: value? 
Answer—Literary, 155; Dramatic,  137; Social, 126; Musical, 68;
Religious,  40; Economic, 43; Industrial,  39; Political, 52; Debate, 36;
Pep,  28; Athletic, 82, and Parliamentary  Law, 59.  Question—Has
your club participation  in any way benefited you in  community activities?
 Answer-^-Yes, 105; no, 43.  Question—Have you had any need  for
parliamentary law?  The Blue Room at Edens Hall will  be the scene of much
gaiety next  Thursday afternoon when the Women's  League entertains the
women of  the school at tea. Music and drama  will be the high lights of
the program.  Each week tea and wafers are  served in the Women's League 
Room. The girls have worked to  make the teas enjoyable weekly  gatherings
and a means by which  students could get better acquainted,  and have
succeeded well. For quite  a while, however, they have planned  to find and
feature school talent  and at last the ambition is about to  be realized. 
Christine Albers, talented young  pianist in school, has consented to  give
several numbers during the tea.  At 3 o'clock a group of girls from  the
Drama Club, under Mr. Hoppe's  direction, will present a short, clever 
skit entitled "The First White  Woman."  All the girls in the school are
invited  to attend the tea, which.prom-ises  to be one of the most
enjoyable  Women's League affairs of the quarter.  The hours are from 2
o'clock  until 3:30.  O ;  Henry Neumann  Discusses Books  Aug. 8,9,10,11 
"Alisons House' is Glaspell Play  Of a Character That Really Lived  Main
Characters Do Much to Make  Though Years Dead  By MISS BEATRICE DOTY  4
AHis on Ave  (Continued on Page Three)  o  Normalite  GREATER LOVE?  CHIMP
CHAMP  CONGRATS  YE PROF'S DIARY  By Sanunie.  We feel pretty
low—about as  droopy, in fact, as the skeleton in  room
202—perhaps not quite as bony  —but fully as droopy.  Greater
love—and all that sort of  rot! You can call it love—I'll call 
it darned foolishness. A lady's husband  told her she was too beautiful 
—and being too beautiful—too many  of ye stronger sex glanced
askance  at her. The lady took a strong caustic  and smeared it upon her
too  beautiful countenance! Result? The  stronger sex will glance the other
 way for awhile!  Hey! Iss there no yustice? A local  headline stated that
a murder trial  cost the taxpayers $50,000. Quite a  racket—this
murder business! And  profitable, too!  We hear a zoo in St. Louis has a 
new ; chimp champ—his name is  Sammy. All samee Normalite—yes? 
^Many families, so 'tis written, are  seeking jars from the Red Cross.  Let
there be peace! By coming to  the Normal—and obtaining a seat  in the
rear of any of our classes on  the day the grades are returned;  they'll
see numerous jars, any of  which are gladly gotten rid of.  August 8, 9, 10
and 11 have been  selected for a series of lectures  which Dr. Henry
Neumann, author  and lecturer, will give in the Normal  school auditorium.
Dr. Neumann  will speak primarily concerning  "Four Outstanding Recent
Books."  Willa S. Cather's "Shadows on the  Rock," James Truslow Adams'
"The  Epic of America," Ole Rolvaag's  "Their Father's God" and Van  Wyck
Brooks' "The Life of Emerson"  will be reviewed in consecutive  order at 8
p. m. beginning August 8.  Two assemblies, one Monday at 11  o'clock and
the other at the regular  time on Tuesday, will be presented  with Dr.
Neumann as speaker. The  lectures are to be free to the public.  Has
Written Books  Dr. Neumann is the author of  "Education for M o r a l
Growth,"  "Drums of Morning," " M o d e rn  Youth and Marriage," and his
brochures  consist of "Moral Values in  Secondary Education" and "Teaching 
American Ideals Through Literature."  "Moral Education in College 
Teaching" and "The Child—His Nature  and His Needs" comprise chapters
 written by the famous author.  Having graduated in 1900 from the  Business
Administration College in I  New York City with a Phi 'Beta  Kappa honor,
the lecturer attended  both Cornell and Columbia, where  he obtained his
doctor's degree. He  then returned to the Business Administration  College
and taught education  and English. Later he acted  as instructor in moral
education at  the University of Wisconsin, after  which he taught in Ohio
State University  and the University of California.  The Brooklyn Society
for  Ethical Culture claimed him for a  leader since 1911. Again, he acted 
as vice-president of the Lincoln  Settlement for Colored People. Neumann's 
home is in Brooklyn, N. Y.  -o :—  It is something of a mental
journey  from "Camille in Roaring  Camp'* to "Alison's House," especially 
with "Liliom" and "Cradle Song"  as way stations. Yet this is the  route
which the audiences have taken  this year with the Normal  Drama Club under
Mr. Hoppe's able  direction, which always lifts the dramatic  productions
on this campus  well out of the class of the amateur.  Pulitzer Prize
Winner  "Alison's House," the 1931 Pulitzer  prize play, is a unique and
interesting  play by Susan Glaspell. It is  not obvious just how far the
author  intends to mirror the life of Emily  Dickinson, .poet of the
nineteenth  century, who for a time was almost  forgotten, when suddenly
our postwar  decade again became aware of  her poetry and pronounced it
great.  At any rate, the play changes Emily  Dickinson's environment from
the  cloistered New England college town  of Amherst to an unnamed Iowa 
village on the banks of the Mississippi  river. We are made to feel 
Chicago's cultural needs, not Boston's  intellectual assurance.  Main
Character Dead  If the meaning, or meanings, of  "Alison's House" are
somewhat obscure,  that did not prevent the cast  from portraying
characters in whom  we were very much interested. The  real heroine of the
play, Alison, never  appears; she has been dead eighteen  years.. Yet we
feel her influence—  even her presence—as did Elsa Stanhope, 
Eben and Father Stanhope.  This in itself was an accomplishment  and much
praise is due Dorothy  Fiala, Preston Wright and Mr.  Hoppe, who played
those parts. They  made Alison as real to us as she was  to them. Miss
Fiala had the most  difficult role, yet she interpreted it  with feeling
and understanding.  fully made vivid.  Leatha Is Humorous  Vernon Leatha's
callow college  youth (Ted Stanhope) brought some  very welcome humor into
the play.  College boys were not very numerous  at the "turn of the
century" .and  probably there were no typical ones.  Mr. and Mrs. Hodges
(James Butler  and Evelyn Swalling) also gave us  an opportunity to laugh.
They carried,  their parts with such ease that  we welcomed their
reappearance  even though the Stanhopes did not.  The Yankee tang in James
Butler's  voice tickled our ears.  The nice young reporter and aspiring 
poet, Richard Knowles (Roger  Chapman) was so engaging that  Recital and
Lecture  Will Be Presented  In Next Assemblies  (Continued on Page Three) 
o  Louise Van Ogle  Gives Review of  Popular Opera  Characters Well
Portrayed  Mr. Wright, as Eben, showed much  intelligence in his acting,
and especially  in the way he spoke his  lines. If he never lost himself
completely  in the part, still we sincerely  sympathized with Eben's
quandary  and -well realized there was no humor  in his remark, "If I
didn't have  to do anything for awhile, I could  do something."  Mr. Hoppe,
as Father Stanhope,  clearly made us feel the values that  the nineteenth
century held dear;  family unity and family pride, dutiful  performance of
disagreeable  duties, and a code of honor rigidly  adhered to. His fear of
the ruth-lessness  of youth and the destructive  forces of a coming age
were skill-  Mr. Ruckmick to  Attend Columbia  Industrial Classes  Will
Visit Foundry  Congrats are in order! All of ours  gQ to Alison's cast.
They did a fine  piece of work last night and the  n|g^t before—but
we weren't sur-prisei—  the Drama Club has a habit  6i d^|ng that!
••  had an operation for  (Continued on Page Two)  Industrial
arts 60c classes will  make their foundry work more true  to life when they
visit the Union  Iron Works next week. The exact  date has not been set
definitely yet.  Students will be given the opportunity,  then, to see the
metal poured  into the molds on a larger scale  than it is done here. One
of the  projects in junior high school industrial  arts is to make a
pattern  and cast it in metal. Lead has been  used in the past quarters,
being cast  in the form of paper weights, book  ends and in some cases
paper knives.  Acting as a delegate to the International  Y. M. C. A.
organization in  Detroit, Mr. Herbert Ruckmick, of  the industrial arts
department, will  fly eastward in his "Chewie" during  the latter part of
August. He  represents the local Y's Men's Club  of Bellingham. Although
the first  part of the trip will be made as  quickly as possible, Mr.'
Ruckmick is  deeply interested in making this into  an industrial
excursion.  In Detroit, besides attending the  convention, he plans to
visit the  Ford plant at River Rouge, and then  go on to Akron where the
Goodyear  rubber plant and the airships will  claim his attention. Chugging
along,  he will pass up the Great Lakes and  travel to Buffalo. Some of his
time  will be spent visiting the boys' camp  in the Adirondacks, where he
taught;  for eight years.  During his year's leave of absence,  he will
attend Columbia University,  where he will elect philosophy and 
psychology;  By ETHEL PAGE  The student body was entertained  in Friday's
assembly by Mrs. Van  Ogle, of the music department of  th Ueniversity of
Washington.  She gave in the form of a reading  with musical illustrations
a review  of the popular opera, Schwaiida,  the Bag-pipe Player by
Weinberger.  She presented the old folk story of  the temptations and the
adventures  of Schwanda, the virtuoso bag-pipe  player, with a subtle wit
that was  very entertaining, holding the interest  of her audience. She
played  several of the song themes of the  opera and several of Schwanda's 
dance tunes. She presented several  of the clever musical ideas which 
Weinberger works out so aptly in  his opera but we feel a certain regret 
in that she did not give us  more of 



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Northwest Viking - 1932 July 29 - Page 2



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^5^l!P#l ^  WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, BELLINGHAM. WASlHl^C-tt
gt;N  The Northwest Viking  Formerly The Weekly Messenger—Founded
1899  Published every Friday except" during^ the month of Sep**™: 
ber by the Associated Students, Washington State Normal  School,
Bellingham, -  Entered in the Postoffice at Bellingham Washington, as 
second class matter by virtue of the act of March 3, 18/y.  Printed by the
Miller   Sutherleo Printing Company, Bellingham  National Bank Building.  '
Subscription rate by mail, $1.50 per year, in advance. Advertising  rates
on application. ^ •  National Advertising Representatives:
Littell-Murray-Barn-hill,  Mars Advertising, and Collegiate Special
Advertising  Agency, of New York City. .  Address all communications, other
than news items, to the  Business Manager of the Northwest Viking,
Bellingham, Wash.  Telephone 3180  ROGER CHAPMAN .Editor  JIMMIE STODDARD
Associate Editor  VIRGINIA CARVER Assistant Editor  BOB WATERS Business
Manager  SPECIAL STAFF WRITERS  Jacqueline James, Dorothy Mala, Naomi
Watson, Pat  Allan, Gerda Jensen, June Welch  REPORTERS  Pat Allan, Nadine
Mattson, Kathryn Berkeley, Lorinda  Ward, Eileen Taylor, Martha Pearson,
Norma  Lee Lasco, Darrow Gwinnup, Gerda Jensen,  Glenn Rockey  P URPOSEFUL
AND  ROPER  UBLICITY  A L A R G E and attractive "Welcome to Bellingham" 
signboard has been placed just north of the city  iimits, with Bellingham
Normal school as one of its  featured items. Under a large painting of a
scene on  Chuckanut drive is the wording: Recreation—Industry— 
Normal School. On the side of the sign board  a description of the Normal
is briefly outlined. Standing  as it does to the north of the city where
visitors  from Canada, and visitors from the south returning  from
Vancouver, may see it, the Normal school will  undoubtedly profit from this
sign board publicity.  MORE P U B L I C I T Y for the Normal school will 
unquestionably be a good thing. With our decision  to retain football as an
intercollegiate sport we will  have need of plenty of advertisment to bring
players  to our school and an audience to our games. If we  are going to
make football a semi-professional activity  and a paying proposition it
will take much publicity,  and much effort on the part of the Associated
Students  and the Administration. This sign board advertising  is a step in
the right direction.  B U T P U B L I C I T Y for the Normal school should 
have and does have a larger significance. The City  of Bellingham has one
of Washington's five large  educational institutions. More than that this
school is  one of the outstanding schools of education in the  United
States, recognized nationally as a superior  institution. Bellingham has
never taken the initiative  in pointing us out to her visitors nor even in
giving us  ample recognition in the community itself. If we take  the lead,
perhaps Bellingham will follow and support  us and our activities as they
deserve to be supported.  Between Classes  By P A T ALLAN  A gentleman was
committing suicide. Nearby stood  a policeman, armed and capable.  The
gentleman was about to jump off a bridge. ,  But the policeman, nearby,
armed, and capable, rose  to the occasion and a bit of quick thinking. 
"Here!" he snarled, "what's the big idea?"  "I," said the gentleman "was
once a stock broker."  The policeman stopped to reflect. Should he let him 
jump, or should he shoot him and make sure? He  drew his gun. "Stop, or
I'll shoot!"  And the man stopped, but they were both killed in  a wreck on
the way to jail!  Moral: If you are a stock broker and start to commit 
suicide, nothing can stop you.  A Day $ | ; ^ ^ ^  By ROMA HENDERSON  ,,
Better than that is the story about the man who  went to sleep in front of
a mirror. He dreamed he  lived his whole life, and at last, old, bearded
and  penniless, decided to kill himself. He had turned on  the gas and was
growing faint when he woke up and  stared in the mirror. The shock killed
him!  But the queerest death of all is the death of the  henpecking
Mohammedan lady, just widowed, who  stabbed herself so she could see that
her husband  didn't have too good a time with the houris in heaven. 
-y—•» u lltl  According to the dean of men at a large
Eastern  school, between 30 and 50 per cent of the male students  at
American colleges are doing part time work  outside school hours to help
themselves through. No,  gentle reader, Young America has not lost its
backbone.  If a fellow hadn't been watching the papers closely,  he'd think
the Eighteenth amendment had been repealed  at the amount of rosy,
sunburned noses there  are around here.  MR. V. H. H O P P E again scores
with an excellent  performance. The Drama Club is one organization  the
school can be proud of. Each quarter of the  school year the Drama Club
under the direction of  Mr. Hoppe presents a play of outstanding merit and 
each time the play is presented in a creditable manner.  The work of the
Drama Club might well serve as a  model for the founding of other
organizations.  o  The big recreation event of the summer quarter has  been
completed. Mount Baker has been scaled. To  the recreation committee, all
hail, for planning such  enterprising and successful trips.  o ,-  WE WISH
to thank the administration for responding  to a recent editorial in the
Viking and  checking upon the lighting of the library. The present  lights
have been given a careful inspection and reports  indicate that the light
over the charging desk is much  improved.  Extremely utilitarian are the
smart new robes made  of toweling cloth. Best for the beach and just as 
good at home.  Correct Costume Jewelry  Along my way I did a little window
shopping and I did  see the most attractive necklaces, bracelets, rings and
 other things that would just "make" a costume. They  are so novel, so good
looking and—stop me before I  forget to tell you that they are all
priced less than a  dollar. When you are down town tomorrow do see  their
display at  MULLER   ASPLUND.  Now for a Bite to Eat  Just a word to the
weary shopper who will want to  have lunch down town. You will go about
your business  refreshed after you have visited the  LEOPOLD MALTED MILK
SHOPPE.  We note that stripes are quite the thing this season,  especially
when they go diagonally.  Have It in Print  Before you leave school this
summer think hard!  {Aren't there some things which you wish to have 
printed for your convenience in your work next year  or to put a "personal"
touch to cards? Have your job  printing done by  MILLER   SUTHERLEN
PRINTING CO.  They Say  that men do not care for variety (in food) but I
rather  think that women do. However, whether you vary  your repast daily
or weekly you will get the best suggestions  from the neighborhood
store—  FAIRBURN'S GROCERY.  Fashion forecasts velvet for fall. Even
accessories  favor it.  A Point for the Puzzled  Sun-tan is still in vogue.
But that same sun-tan may  be a deplorable state of speckles and peeling.
Yardley's  preparations for sunburn and tan will end this worry  and the
powder which is priced at $1.10 will blend with  your skin tone. Why not
have a Yardleytan? Ask  here at the  THE SMALLEY DRUG COMPANY.  Let's
Go—places  Cheer up your check book! Why not? Down  town on every
hand are announcements of "Midsummer  Sale" or "End-of-Season Sale" and
they offer  great reductions, too. You have undoubtedly learned  thai it is
belter to buy for quality than for low price  and now you can get real
values at a great saving.  Let our advertisers prove that this is true.  A
Timely Sale—  For about this time we really need something new to 
replace our early summer shoes which have traveled  to and from so many
classes. Here's a happy thought!  Shoes which were formerly $6 are reduced
to $3.95  and those which have been priced at $4.95 are now  $2.95 and
$1.95. You can profit by other, exceptional  savings in, shpe^ ffox both
men and women, ,at  .''"'r ,..u-,- ., .RATHMAN ..RAYMOND. ,  When Luxurjtes
Are Limited • ,* ;..:,.!. ;  one must t a k i h o t e ^ f specials of
reaXvaluq. .Imported  toilet water^sr :fprmerly sold a t ^ j   ^ t ^ a n d
^ t t ie  same yaiuev j^  '• by/Jhe-.-'-.^ o: lt; •#•. no
•!••.•• • y ••
••:•"•' gt; U [ R ^ ' , ^ ^ ' • 
..'fogATJBERT iJRtfG. ,  lt; $ I ^ A N Y ,  Well Read?  It is nice to read
for pleasure and better to get pleasure  out of beneficial reading matter.
Did you know  that there is a rental library right in the school which  is
up to the minute in literature? There is a new book  which gives lots of
good information that teachers can  appreciate and use. It is "The Story of
Uncle Sam's  Money," by W. O. Woods. And the library is right  heer at the 
CO-OP.  Now that the 



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Northwest Viking - 1932 July 29 - Page 3



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^^^^^^^^KS^^^IP^^PIiPi  WASHINGTO^f STATE NORMAL ^SCHOOL.
BELLINGHAM, ^^Hj^GTON  Answers  To Letters Mailed  Through Ad Staff  CLUB Q
U E S T I O N N A I RE  GIVES MUCH DATA  (Continued from Page One)  Two
weeks ago the business staff  of the Northwest Viking sent out letters  to
aU advertisers of the paper.  Several of these advertisers acknowledged 
receipt by sending letters  of encouragement.'  Mention was made in the
letters  sent by the business staff of their  efforts to make the students
ad  conscious. A column has been devoted  to specialties of the shops, 
announcements have been made in  assemblies and notices have been  posted-t
on the bulletin boards.  These letters were" signed by Mrs.  Ruth Burnet,
adviser to the Viking;  Bob Waters, business manager of  the Viking, and
James Butler, president  of the Associated Students.  Return Letters
Received  I n return, the Bellingham Savings   • Loan •'
Association complimented  the business staff for their efforts  to attract
the merchants of Bellingham  to the benefits received  from, advertising in
the school paper.  Percy Livesey, who signed the letter,  hoped this effort
would just be the  beginning of more efforts along the  same' line.  Walter
Green, of the Black Ball  Line, thanked the paper for its mention'.  of.
co-operation shown by the  company.  "The Northwest Viking hopes to  show
the merchants of Bellingham  and the students of the Normal the  benefits
which each can derive from  the other," says Bob Waters.  Durham Heads 
Newly Formed  Roosevelt Club  Adelaide Dale, Betty Troll and  Genevieve
Nelson spent the weekend  at their homes in Mount Vernon.  * * * *  Silva
Briner Harriett Rome, Georgia  Bowers and Marguerite Biersner  spent
Saturday in Vancouver, B. C.  ; i • • * * * *  Bernice Norton
and Marguerite  Wilkie went on the Mount Baker  hike this last week-end. 
Violet Waeck and Dorothy Jackson  were Portland visitors Sunday.  * * * * 
Marie Wold and Lillian Nesheim  were;; visitors in Everett over the 
week-end.  Esther Sydow spent Sunday in  Tacoma.  •s * * *  Esther
Whitemarsh was a guest in  Aberdeen over the week-end.  * * * *  Martha
Pflugrath visited at her  home in Sedro-Woolley.  * * * *  Inga Kristianson
spent the weekend  at Redmond.  A picnic at Whatcom Falls Park  was enjoyed
last Wednesday evening  by the girls of Enger Hall.  * * * *  Frances
Mullen spent the weekend  at her home in Hamilton.  * * * *  Sophie Walen
and Elma Laine visited  at their homes in Issaquah last  week-end.  Melba
De Witt spent the week-end  at her home in Lyman.  Answer—Yes, 171;
no, 52.  Question—Are clubs that are organized  purely for social
purposes  justified?  Answer—Yes, 155; no, 26.  ' Question—How
often should clubs  meet?  Answer—Bi-weekly, 140; monthly,  26;
weekly, 27  Question—Do you attend club  meetings regularly? 
Answer—Yes, 108; no, 58.  Reasons given for lack of attendance  were
lack of interest, work,  illness, and lack of organization. 
Question—Should club advisers be  chosen by the club members or 
should they be appointed by school  authorities?  Answer—Club m e m b
e r s , 187;  school authorities, 45.  Question—Should students be
given  recognition for outstanding club  work by the appointment bureau? 
Answer—Yes, 173; no, 59.  Question—Who should control the 
school social calendar, the Inter-  Club Council or the dean of women's 
office?  Answer—Inter-Club Council, 181;  dean of women's office, 48.
 Question—Should club life in this  school be abandoned or
maintained?  Answer — Abandoned, 8; m a i n tained,  243.  Many
excellent suggestions for the  stimulation of club life in this school 
were received. Some suggestions  were free Klipsun pictures for clubs; 
more and better publicity, both in  assemblies and paper; credit for
outstanding  achievement in clubs; more  inter-club co-operation; better
qualified  leaders in clubs; elimination of  club tryouts; dropping of
inactive  members; activities for summer students  as well as regular
students,  and making it necessary to join at  least two clubs and attend
them regularly.  Many students thought that more  co-operation could be
fostered by  better attendance of club members  at the meetings. Compulsory
attendance  of club members was favored.  "ALISON'S HOUSE" IS  REVIEWED BY
CRITIC  (Continued from Page One)  To stimulate an Interest in the 
forthcoming national election a  group of Normal students have  formed a
Roosevelt - for - President  Club.  At the organization meeting held  last
Tuesday, Tom Durham was  elected president. Other officers  elected were
Irene Mars and Wilbur  Farmer, vice-presidents; Leslie Ab-shire, 
secretary, and Charles Gerold,  treasurer.  It was decided that the club
would  not charge dues or other fees, but  would endeavor to raise the
finances  through club dances or similar activity.  Mr. Edward J. Arntzen
spoke to  the club on the future and promise  such an organization holds.
His talk  was very enlightening. He very ably  discussed the economic
barrier of  the present tariff. All men and  women of this school between
the  ages of 21 and 30 are invited to attend.  "It makes no difference what
 party or political convictions you  may now have," says Tom Durham,  "you
are welcome to study our organization."  The club has not taken a definite 
platform for local politics and  agreed that it would not until after  the
primaries. The next meeting  will be held in the Mount Baker  Tea Room,
next to the theater, on  Tuesday, August 2, at 7:30 o'clock.  o  The girls
of El Nido Lodge, accompanied  by their house mother,  Mrs. Downs, spent
Sunday cruising  among the islands of Puget Sound.  Captain Garland's boat
was used for  the trip.  even though one stood ready to  condemn the
publicity he represented,  one was glad when he "wooed  and won"—to
use a phrase of the  mauve decade—Ann Leslie (Christine  Albers), who
was regarded as  more than just a stenographer. In  fact, she was thought
-of as one of  the family by all save Louise Stanhope,  Eben's wife. Louise
voices vehemently  all the platitudes of respectability.  Ethel Page was
natural  and convincing as Louise.  Gertrude Hancamp, as Miss Agatha 
Stanhope, and Margaret Owen,  as Jennie, were, in very fact, old  guardians
of old things and old  ways.  Meaning of Alison's House  What was
fashionable because  quaint or ugly; what was much to  be condemned,
finally is condoned,  or forgiven and forgotten; what was  held guarded and
held sacred, is  seized and carelessly thrown to the  mercy of the four
winds. Is this  the meaning of "Alison's House"?  Or shall we accept the
caricature of  Eben and Richard Knowles that  there is a debt to art, and
hunger  for art of Chicago's populace must  be satisfied at the cost of
Father  Stanhope's (and Louise's) sense of  family obligations and the
fitness of  things? Or do we agree with Elsa  that Alison's understanding
of love's  imperious demands on a woman  must be reiterated to a censorious
 world?  Maybe one should say with a recent  newspaper critic, "Why all
this  pother about a few old love letters?"  To which a witty woman
replied,  "There has to be a pother about  something."  THE HOSIERY SHOP 
Announces  "Honeycomb," a beautiful Jacquard Mesh,  all silk foot, 5-thread
strong reinforced heel.  $2.95 value. Special at $1.95.  1312 Cornwall Ave.
MRS. R. A. OBERLATZ  Near American Theater Phone 1154-W.  Applicants Wanted
 In Canadian Schools  As a contrast to our situation, Guy  Springsteel
noticed advertisements  in the July 9 issue of the Vancouver  Daily
Province, of Vancouver, B.C.,  for male teachers.  The advertisements
actually asked  the applicants to state the salary  they required. Oyama,
B. C, wanted  a teacher for high school able to  



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Northwest Viking - 1932 July 29 - Page 4



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WASHINGTON S T A T E NORMAL SCHOOL; B E L L I N G H A M . ^ A S H r
N G T QN  um  Rock  GOBBLERS WINNERS  OF CLOSE CONTEST  Rummies, Hold Game
in Hand to  End of Seventh Inning  It's going to be a dark day for  some of
the Olympic aspirants when  they run into those two black shadows,  Eddie
Tollen and Metcalf. Some  of the cash customers will believe  nothing else
than an eclipse has  happened when these two dusky  runners come. dashing
down the  home stretch. Anyway, some of the  boys will begin to think that
day  has turned to night.  See where Connie Mack, the elongated  manager of
the Philadelphia  Athletics, has threatened to disband  his collection of
pennant winning  ball tossers at the end of this current  season if they
don't come  through with another pennant. Well,  fourteen' years was quite
a spell to  wait for a winner after he disbanded  his 1914 championship
outfit, and  if Mr. McGillicuddy (Connie Mack)  decides to do that little
thing again,  it's a 10-to-l bet that he will be past  the century mark
before Philadelphia  sees another world series. It  seems as though the
only players he  is inclined to keep are Jimmy Foxx,  the league-leading
home run swatter,  and Mickey Cochrane, the  American League's best
catcher, until  Pepper Martin stole everything  but his socks in the last
world series.  Scoring Wilson from second with  a smart single through
pitcher's box,  Glenn Rockey, Gobbler leaguer,  proved himself the hero of
the day  when his team dropped Rhodes'  Rummies, 9-8, last week. Rockey's 
timely hit capped a three-run last-inning  rally by the Gobblers of Gable. 
Rummies Lead  Up until the last of the seventh,  the Rummies held the game
well in  hand and almost had a victory  cinched at that point with a
two-run  lead. However, homers by  Gaasland and Siler in quick succession, 
a double by Wilson and  Rockey's single spelled defeat for  the downtrodden
Rummies.  Homers Plentiful  The game was marked with three  home runs.
Adkinson, loaned to  the Rummies, boomed out a four-bagger  with two
aboard. Gaasland  and Siler slapped out their circuit  clouts with the
bases clear.  I Summary: AB H R E  (Gobblers 31 8 9 7  'Rummies-. 38 11 8 7
 o  McBeath Reaches Top;  Carver Stops Counting  After Century Mark  Losing
by a. score which he does  not wish to divulge, Coach' Sam  Carver
relinquished his hold on the  top rung of the golf ladder to Clint  McBeath
last week in the big match  of the season. McBeath scored a 77  for the
day's efforts.  "The less said about that the better,"  was the retort a
staff writer  received when Sam was asked for  his score. Aas a matter of
fact Sam  intimated that he stopped count at  the century mark.  Skotheim
Climbs  Scotty Skotheim dug down into  his bag of handball tricks and 
dished up his finest exhibition of  the year to relegate Bill Osborne to 
second place on the ladder. Skotheim  now occupies the ceiling roost  with
Gunn and Leatha following  Osborne.  Chandler Drops  Coming through with a
fine flourish,  Frank Forstrom threw rings all  around Myron Chandler's
last year's  record to climb into the initial notch  in the horseshoe
ladder. Adkinson  is now reposing in second place,  with Chandler
following.  LEATHA'S LILACS  TRAP RATS 8 TO 3  Vernie's Boys Outplay 
Rodents ..  Bert's  Even though the Seattle Indians  are riding in the
second division of  Coast League standings, it isn't  Freddie Muller's
fault. The young  second sacker smashed out his twenty-  eighth home run
Wednesday  night to further his lead in the home  run department. Nothing
less, than  an earthquake can keep Muller out  of tthe majors next year if
he keeps  up the sensational hitting the rest  of the season, although he
is a little  weak in the fielding department.  But what the majors want is
players  that can hit 'em a mile even though  they have to keep straw in
their  hats to protect their heads from  fly balls.  i / 2WITTS N O W L E A
D I NG  I N T R A M U R A L BASEBALL  "Pop" Gunn's lung tester is the 
center of interest at the P. E. department  this week. It is a contrivance 
that measures one's lung  capacity to the exact pound and  even though some
may find it impossible  to shove the indicator up to  twenty-five pounds,
the majority of  the,students BLOW until they are  black in the face. Which
isn't hard  to do, taking everything into consideration.  "Ing" Iverson,
the Port Orchard  Broncho Buster, hove into port this  week to familiarize
himself with the  doings or undoings of the students  this quarter. "Ing"
is one person  we look at with envy. He's one in  a thousand that has a job
next fall.  Adkinson's % Witts were leading  the intramural baseball 
league last Monday night. The  Lilacs were sitting nicely in  second place
at that time.  The summary, not including  last night's battles, is:  Won
Lost Pet.  ViWitts ...: 2 0 1,000  Lilacs 2 1 .667  Rats 1 1 .500  Gobblers
1 1 .500  Rummies 0 3 .000  o  Finley on Top  Davey Jones, for the past two
 weeks the king of the racket wield-ers,  met his Waterloo in one Otto 
Finley last Tuesday. Finley outwitted  his lanky rival, who was un-  ' able
to click against Ot's unorthodox  style and was downed, 6-3, 6-4. Stan 
Willard, in second place, and Van  Over in fourth completes the list of 
top-notchers.  Suffering a setback in their second,  league, following a
successful  season, Gallanger's Rats played  the stepping-stone role for
Leatha's  Lilacs last week to the merry tune  of 8-3.  Skotheim hurled fair
ball for the  losers but was given miserable support  behind him. His mates
booted  eight during the course of the slug-fest.  Boulton Fast  The Rats
hit very fair but we're  unable to connect squarely with the  offerings of
Boulton. Boulton has  by far the fastest delivery in the  league and knows
how to control it.  Ke also collected a single and a  circuit clout at the
plate.  Edwards Hits  "Gus" Edwards Rat third sacker,  boomed out a single
and a homer  to lead his mates at the home plate.  He also scored two of
the losers'  three tallies. But to spoil an outstanding  day, he booted
three  chances, all of which terminated in  Lilac scores.  Tlie
^Do^hstaii^^tore  at  m  A Clearance of Summery Dresses  .-':'.• at
/:£:::,y'z\.  $4.95  Summary:  Rats  Lilacs  Score Stands at 12 to 8
at Close  of Hard Game  Clash With U on  H R E  7 3 8  8 8 3  RECORD HITS
MADE  Superiority Displayed by Boulton  Over League Teams  Including White
and Pastel, sleeveless and shirt  sleeved frocks, some with jackets; 
Wanl's on the air—Tune KVOS each week day a t , 2 p.'clock.  for one
of the best programs on the air. With John ChurchilL  This is your program.
We invite your criticisms.  BUT, DO WE?  I t is our fundamental likeness to
 other men that enables us to understand  them, and to live in peace. 
—Woman's Home Companion.  LUCK FOR THE RABBIT  "Dar is luck in a
rabbit's foot,"  said Uncle Eben, "specially if it  helps de rabbit run as
fast as de  'casion requires."—Washington Star.  Tudor   Linn  437
High St. Phone 742 j  PICNIC SPECIALS, :\  1 doz. Paper Plates, 1 pkg. 
Napkins ....,...„ 15c 1  1 doz. Cookies ............,J5c  Large can
Ripe Olives 10c  % lb. pkg. Marshmall6wsl:^^lci|.  1 can Dill Pickles 15cK 
Potted Meats, can 5c and i0c$l  : 3,  Looking over the Longview News  the
other day we came across a  box score of a baseball game with  a familiar
name in it. Saw where  Eddie Macomber, the handy Andy  of "Pop" Gunn's
baseball team last  spring, did a fairly good job of  chucking the
Weyerhauser ball club  to a victory" over another city league  team.
Macomber would be a welcome  addition to any ball team—he  was one
utility man that could  catch, play infield and outfield all  in one
afternoon and do a fairly  good job of each.  / / any of you soft ball fans
want  to see some powerful swatting just  travel out to any of the local
mush  ball games. Cable, the Cobbler  manager, has collected as fine a 
bunch of hitters as anyone would  wish to see. Led by Wilson and  flanked
by Jim McCleery, the outfield  possesses as much power as  any outfield, in
the league. With  Siler, Roul and the 205 -pound  [first baseman, Gaasland,
and possibly  Hugh McCleery holding down  : positions in the infield, it's
going to  be tough on any pitcher who takes  it unto himself to try and
tame this  gang of stick wielders. Hugh Mc-  : Cleery is only a possibility
as he has  just finished a sojourn in the pest  house and may not elect to
play any  soft ball this year. But at any rate  it wouldn't be a bad idea
for the  opposing teams in the league to supply  their outfielders with
bicycles.  O. K, KALAMAf l'M'-  In Wednesday night's play hour  game,
Stoddard's Clan outslugged  Jim McCleery's Muckers in a 12-to-8  slugfest.
Cy Boulton, Stoddard's  starting chucker, had too much on  the ball and had
the Muckers eating  out of his hand-all afternoon, save  for a blow now and
then.  McMackin Homes  Going into the fourth inning with  a 4-to-l lead and
two men on the  sacks, McMackin crashed out a  homer for the Clan, putting
them  into a lead that was never overcome  by the Muckers.  Gable, throwing
for the Muckers,  was in trouble most every inning  PPPPP