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Northwest Viking - 1932 October 14 - Page 1



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*  p)L, XXXII -NO. 3 WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL-SCHOOL, BEELINGHAM,
WASHINGTON Friday, October 14/1932  iPorinalite  Circuses  More Circuses 
Criticism of Women's League  Cheers, Not Sneers  By Pat Allan.  -Birch, the
Magician, makes us  think of the days when there was  loose money and
carnivals came to  town.  A month before the Great Day  picturesque
gentlemen would rumble  into town on trucks painted a  sprightly green to
plaster buildings,  barns and signboards with vivid  posters announcing
"Eunfonixes P.  Aripsto's /Colossal Menagerie and  Carnival. Absolutely
without Rival.  The Greatest Show on Earth, featuring  Oscar ina, the Only
Cow with  Five Legs and Eighteen Strands of  Hair in her Tail on the Pace
of the  American Continent.  ——W.S.N.S.  Small boys and boys
who Wrestled  for a living. Boys of six and  boys of "61-65" perked, up.
Eyes  brightened. Despite exhortations,  Time dragged lagging feet. 
———W.S.N.S.——  Then comes the Great day. The 
very young folks of the town turn  out at the railroad station en masse, 
fully equipped with peanuts for the  elephants and pressure oiling systems 
for their tonsils. Wide, gleaming,  sparkling eyes-^tinkling voices— 
"Hey, what's that for?"—"Whad-daya  pullin on tha rope
fer?"—"Kin  -I help ya, mister."  '•'•-
•••-;• ——W.S.N.S.—=  The first
night everything happens  at once. Two drunken sailors  get in a fight, and
in jail. The gentleman  in the toupee and whiskers a  la Carbonairi has his
pockets picked  of three dollars and eighteen cents  and a package of Bull
Durham.  (This is not an advertisement). A  mouse runs up the fat lady's
leg.  It rains. The spun candy booth  caches on fire. A lion gets the 
hiccups. Men get excited, put peanuts  in their vest pockets and chew 
their watches.  — gt;. W.S.N.S. *  '. ;--The Fourth day, the show is 
: forced to remove itself from the  town as a "Moral distraction to the 
^c^imunity" and a nuisance to the  ^LatHes' Aid society, but Mr. Birch 
^ish't all that.  r ^ 5 ^ ; : ::--::'° W.S.N.S.-  ' • A t the':
Women's League meeting  after the assembly last Tuesday a  movement
started, which if continued  will cause this school as a  unit of spirit
and purposes to disintegrate.  —W.S.N.S.—  To vote for a woman
merely because  she is a woman, to refuse to  ,yo,^e f or a man merely
because he is  a i n a n is to disregard ability, to  discount courage, to
reject veracity.  Such conduct comes under the label  of mob spirit;, such
conduct is folly;  such conduct leads to ruin.  To vote for the person most
fitted  for the position, to elect capable  officials, be they women or
men, is  wise procedure. ,'•'.  Aiiy other conduct is folly.  :fj'-'^
''"* W.S.N.S. ;  . '^Lfpnt Forget your pep! We are  plot, interested" in
what the "kids  down at the U . " do about things.  ^ e do not care about
the murderers  of school spirit who hang crepe in  order to s h ^ salt
tears at the dead  ness of; tne school. We do not  tfianl students who are
ashamed to  he here in:Be1fagh(uh-k What we  Want is cheers, fhot sheerers?
 •SThe Scholarship society held ia  •business meeting at the
Edens Hall  jflub .room ';last; Friday evening.  :i|^^Knapmah^" was e l e c
^ ipresl-  : Clark HublerK vic« president;  k el Page,
secretary-treasurer, a ^  Plorence Smith, Inter-Club Council  lie. Plans
we^  PULITZER PLAY TO  BE READ TUESDAY  Mrs. Ina Kirkman, Local Student, 
Will Tell and Read Selections  From "Of Thee I Sing". • gt;  Mrs. Ina
Kirkman will entertain  in next Tuesday's assembly with accounts  an 
selections from this  year's prize play, "Of Thee I Sing".  "Of Thee, I
Sing," Pulitzer prize  play for 1932, opened at the Music  Box theatre, New
York, in December  of last year, but tickets are still  hard to get.  As
staged there it requires a cast  of 19 main characters, 45- chorus  girls
and as many chorus men, a  couple of bands, and numbers of extras 
raiijking from senators to flunkies.  The stage settings include  Madison
Square Garden, the Boardwalk  at Atlantic City, the United  States Senate
Chamber and the  White House.  It takes an unusual musical comedy  to win
the Pulitzer prize. "Of  Thee I Sing" is a political lampoon,  a form of
drama which dates back  to Aristophanes. "The less critics  have to say
about a lampoon the better,"  writes Thomas Hutchinson of  the Saturday
Review of Literature.  "It either is or isn't,—and 'Of Thee  I Sing'
most definitely is!"  It aims its shafts at every current  mania,—big
business, beauty contests,  wrestling, political hokum, radio, 
advertising, and the American  sentimentality which demands a  love affair
in its headlines and a  prominent baby in its rotogravure.  _—. o 
Thespian Try outs Are  Completed and Plans  for Quarter Adopted  Tryouts
for new Thespian members  were held last night. The  committee in charge
was "Davey"  Jones, John Lensrud, Helen Richardson,  and Christine Albers,
together  with faculty advisor, Mr. Fowler.  At a Thespian meeting held
Oct.  10, the initiation date for new members  was set for Thursday, Oct.
21.  "Curly" Gross being appointed head  of the intiation committee, and 
Glenn Rockey, head of the refreshment  committee. A salmon bake will  be.
one of the features of the inir  tiation. ;v  Davey Jones reported that
each  club will take charge of one Rec  hour and the Thespians will have 
charge of the first, with Lew Love-gren  as chairman.  o—:  W.E. A.
CONVENTION  IS TO BE HELD HERE  Weidman, Superintendent of City  Schools,
is General Chairman;  Normal Teachers Will Speak.  The annual convention of
the  Washington Education association  will be held in Bellingham, Thursday
 and Friday, Oct. 20 and 21. D.  E. Weidman, superintendent of city 
schools, is general chairman.  Two training school teachers will  speak.
Miss Marjorie Dawson will  speak on "Language Arts in the  Primary Grades".
Miss Katherine  Casanova will also give an address. 
•'.•'.•"- : O- : •- r VOTE WEDNESDAY  Attention is
called of all students  to the general election to  be held next Wednesday,
in  room 103 for the selection of  new members to the Board of  Control.
/7: w^'-..  Three officers will be voted  upon Four quarter representative:
 Otto Finley and Marydel  Conrad; three quarter representative,  Doris
McEImon and  Harriet Rickerson; vice president  of the Associated Student* 
Bert G«Ilanger and Fred K n ^  be rotod f or and the polb wfll  m 
Klipsun Elects  Kangley, Adviser;  Morrison, Editor  Photographer Sandison
Is Taking  Pictures of the Seniors,  . Juniors, Sophs.  The Klipsun staff
for the 1933  annual were selected this week by  Eilene Morrison, editor;
and Miss  Kangley, faculty adviser.  The members of the staff are as 
follows: Associate editors, Eleanor  Finnegan and Marie Clancy;
organization  editor, Doris Barron; administration  editor, Wenonah Peck;
fine  arts editor, Jean McMillin; Women's  sports editor, Mary Fisher; 
men's sports editor, John Lensrud,  Victor Iverson; photo-engraving editor,
 Annette Austin; activity editor,  Pat Allan; copy editor, Lorraine 
Shepherd; art editor, Elizabeth von  Hoene; assistant art editor, Jean 
Shaver,-Rosanne Young.  e~- 0 r-r-r  Dr. H.V. Masters  Uses New Course  A
course in psychology is being  arranged by Dr. H. V. Masters, of  the
Research department, for use in  the regular meetings of the Bellingham 
Music Teachers association  this year.  Dr. Masters plans to consider 
three main points in his course.  These are: What psychology is
contributing  in a general way to the  advancement of science; some of the 
more recent and pertinent findings  of experiments in the field of
educational  psychology; a discussion of  recent experimental work which 
deals particularly with the psychology  of music.  o  Miss Fitcha Called 
By Mother's Death  LEAGUE AND CLUB  HOLD FALL MEET  In place of the
all-school assembly  this morning the Women's League  and the Men's Club
held their first  fall quarter meetings.  The Women's League was conducted 
by the president, Virginia  Carver. She introduced the committee  heads who
in turn gave short  talks. A very interesting program  was presented by
Harriet Oxford  and Jean Bowles, who gave a number  of popular vocal and
piano selections.  An election of president and vice  president took place
in the Men's  Club meeting. Jimmie Stoddard,  the former president, at this
time  announced his resignation. President  Fisher and Mr. Marquis
contributed  to the program by short  speeches. ,.  Magician Fascinates 
Two Audiences With  His Masterly Skill  Miss Orleane Fitcha, switchboard 
operator in President Fisher's office,  was called suddenly to Portland
late  Sunday when her mother passed  away unexpectedly following a major 
operation. Mis Fitcha has many  friends and has made many contacts  with
students, and the heartfelt  sympathy of the entire student body  is
extended to her in her bereavement.  Last Saturday Birch, the famous 
magician, appeared before two small  but enthusiastic audiences in the 
auditorium. The afternoon audience,  composed mostly of'school children 
and Normal students, enjoyed the  show perhaps even more than the  evening
group.  Program of Interest  Birch proved to be a master of  his art in
every stunt he performed.  His patter was refreshing and amusing,  ( and
his love and understanding  of children brought much co-operation  from the
kiddies in the audience.  Miss Sperry; delighted • with  selections
on her artists xylophone.  She also aided in being a charming  foil for
many of the tricks.  In the evening show Birch mystified  everyone by
permitting himself  to be securely nailed inside a packing  case and then
reappearing on  the stage in less than three seconds  afterward.  Dr. and
Mrs. C. C. TJpshall spent  their summer vacation in making a  trip to Los
Angeles to visit Dr. Up-shall's  parents and making an extended  trip to
California cities and  thereabouts.  Board Decides on Fund Apportionment  *
* •-* *  ALL ITEMS SUFFER THE AXE  Lectures and Athletics Funds
Slashed  -The Board of Control convened  last Monday afternoon and cast 
their votes in favor of the yearly  budget presented by President Fisher. 
Because this quarter's enrollment  is below expectations, the  yearly
budget adopted last spring  quarter suffered a revamping and  was passed by
the present board  Monday. This new budget was cut  $1800 or approximately
13%. This  was based on a drop in enrollment  from 750 to 650.  All Suffer
Drop '  Social life was cut $200 and was  apportioned $1800. The Northwest 
Viking suffered a $300 slash and now  rests at $1500. Men's
athleticsdropped  from $4250 to $3875. Women's  athletics from $500 to
$450. Drama  club $450 to $375. Musical artists  course was cut $500 and
set at $1009.  Assembly ^programs dropped $100  and was allowed $1700for
the coming  yew. 'Lectures were forced to  take
a;!$200:;i^ubti6a'':and^weref.alrv''  ; y||lfellk^namount of the old budir 
:a1^||^e||crtal ialrib^^ of .'the sew'  editor of the Homecoming booklet, 
itjW^de^  year but instep  edition of the Northwest Viking with  an extra
page to take- its place.  The rec hour of last Friday was  discussed and
various plans and suggestions  for the handling of this  affair were
brought up. A motion  was passed to accept Dr. Bond's  plan of a
one-hour



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Northwest Viking - 1932 October 14 - Page 2



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WASHINGTON STATE,NOR^MLkH6oLtBEIXINGHAM/WASHINGTON  fpie ^  Formerly
The Weekly Messenger—Founded 1899  Publfshed every Friday except
during the month of September  by the Associated Students, Washington
State" Normal  School, Bellingham,  Entered in the Postoffice at
Bellingham, Washington, as  second class matter by virtue of the act of
March 3, 1879. ;  Printed by the Miller   Sutherleo Printing
Company,-Bellingham  National Bank Building.  gt;  Subscription rate by
mail, $1.50 per year, in advance. Advertising  rates on application. 
National Advertising Representatives:  hill. Mars Advertising, and
Collegiate  Agency, of New York City/  Littell-Murray -Barn-  Special
Advertising  Address all communications, other than news items, to the 
Business Manager of the Northwest Viking, Bellingham, Wash. 
:;•'•'• Telephone 3180  Hollis J. Stoddard ...... 
Lorinda Ward  Pat Allah ......... ......  Roger Chapman......... .^i. 
Barrow Gwinnup.  JEditor-in-Chie|  Associate Editor  Assistant Editor 
Business Manager  Circulation Manager  DEPARTMENT EDITORS  Society'Editors,
June Welch, Dorothy Flala; Feature  Editors, Bob Thompson, Naomi Watson;
Sports Editors,  Glenn Rockey, Bill Fisher;. Copy Editor, Ina  Kirkman;
Special Staff Writers: Virginia Carver,  Darrow Gwinnup, Helen Northern,
Marydel Conrad,  Dick Albert, Irene Schagel; Business Staff, Julius 
Dornblut, Harriet Rickerson.  REPORTERS ~  Bill Malmquist, Bob Roberts,
Margaret Eckert, Elnora  Engebretson, Louise Schutz, Jack Kemphaus, Fred 
Cockerill, Bubbles Bremnes, Gordon Carter  Mary Ann Fisher,,Harold Walton,
Edith Swarth  Ina Kirkman, Paul Jackson, Preston-Wriglit  CAMPAIGN TACTICS 
AUSE DISCUSSION  With the primary election a thing of the past and 
candidates selected for the final vote in the general,  election next week
it is not untimely to air a few rumors  concerning political practices by
certain cliques  and organizations within the-school.  Some gossipers have
suggestd a "Tammany Hall  Jr." among the men for the establishmentof their
"select  few" on the Board of Control. Really, this  sounds hardly
plausible, for the men in nearly every  instance are backing women for
various offices.  Other rumors, based on movements by certain feminine 
factions, are somewhat more substantiated and  have a rather sinister
complexion. The instructions to  prospective voters at certain meetings to
vote for only  a woman or a woman and a weaker man candidate  in the
primaries; the request for co-operation from the  men through these columns
and then the massing of  their strength to elect a woman candidate, whether
she  be good, bad or indifferent—-these actions do not tend  to the
promotion of clean, fair politics, if there is  such a thing.  It must be
remembered by the women that it was  a majority male Board of Control last
spring that'  voted them money for women's athletics and sent two 
representatives from the Athletic Association to California.  And still the
incessant cry goes up that there  must be a majority of women on the board
to get a  square deal.  But in any. event, go to the polls next Wedensday 
and cast your vote for your honest choice. Not as  some clique has
instructed you to ballot, but for the  candidate you think most qualified
for the position.  Be fair in your convictions, and always VOTE  YOUR OWN
MIND.  B ELLINGHAM NORMAL IS  USINESS CONCERN  With the advent of fall
quarter at the Normal  school it is imperative that the students and the
people  of this community consider what this school actually  means to
them. Not only must they consider it as an  institution of educational and
cultural value, but also  as a business organization.  This Normal school
is unexcelled as a teacher  training institution in the West and to obtain
a diploma  of graduation is indeed an honor. These facts have  long been
recognized in this community, but very  seldom do the citizens realize that
it is one of the finest  local industries.  An estimate by President C. H.
Fisher states that  the Normal is capable of a $750,000 output in cold 
•cash to this community; $400,000 for operation,  $275,000 for
salaries and $1*25,000 for maintenance,  including overhead expense and
operation of  Edens Hall. The student expenditures alone bring  $200,000
more to the city.' . (  The Normal school is also a source of saving to 
those students whose homes are in the, city and county.  Because.of its
nearness young men and women realize  a saving of nearly'$500 yearly over
the amount necessary  for expenses at an outside institution. This  item
represents $150,000.  , The Normal school'therefore may be classed as  one
of the largest industries running continuously in  Bellingham. Certainly it
can boast of having the city V  largest continuous payroll.  ; Because of
its smoothness of operation the school  ' h a s been taken some\$at for
granted. , A coriiplir  • jnenty perhaps, •but ill is becpni^
moire arid more  peoBssary fpij'both students and townspeople to rec-i 
fognizefethe fact that •tji^ Jichobl" is;'6n]B of its  ; ^finest i
assets.^';:  :V_V' ;_"';,-•,, _;:y.. • £y :;%^:?-:-V.'r|''
zf'' gt;•;'%':.•• •  ;;  v^-;isvtii^  '
•';-..-'•'£y';BOB Tfl0MPSON  gt;  Life is a, book, a
breath, a dream; and Uvihg:is ttie  blending of these, in the course of a
day, into their  proper proportions. The complete life is the balanced 
life, and the happy life is the fjull Ufe. •  One picks up a book for
ah hour's relaxation in  reading about people who lived yesterday or
last.year  or a century past, but he soon lays" it aside; saying:  "Very
interesting, but those folks are dead. Living  with them through the pages
of this book is of no  use to me except that their^experiences have at
times  paralleled my own, and through them I may be able  to guide my steps
a little more wisely.  "But they are gone—it is for me to live." 
Here, is another, outwardly perhaps as normal and  lively as his fellows,
but who in truth has secluded  himself in the library of his own
past—has shuttered  himself from the world—who converses with
ghosts o£  another day and moves in the shadows of memory.  Afraid to
come out. The sunshine frightens him—-the  little barbed words of
society are cruel—he is tender—  he is hurt—he finds
solace and consolation with his  books. That is all—defensive
always—afraid to touch  sword to sword.  He who lives only for the
breath he breathes is the  sorriest of the lot, for he has nothing. He is
the link  between what has been and what will be—and they  together
are the substance of life. Like a dumb-bell,  you know, with the weight on
either end and very  little between. But how important that little bit is! 
Sever that—and what then? Forever there will be a  past, and always
there will be the future, but the  present is such a transient thing.  Of
tomorrow we dream—just'a little, not too much.  The happy man lives
for tomorrow, not in it. He who  lives only in part can hope to see only in
part. No life  is vain, though some are tragically misapplied.  V IKING
GRID MEN  IE WITH LUTHERANS  Football, the king of all national sports, has
definitely  arrived. Here at the Normal school Coach  Carver and his
assistant, Coach Gunn, have been  driving a rather small but promising
group of gridsters  for the past three Weeks. Several lettermen,
replenished  with many hopeful prep stars, make the outlook  anything but
gloomy.  Tomorrow afternoon the Vikings will tangle with  the Pacific
Lutheran College of Tacoma on Waldo  field.  Last spring quarter the
students voted to retain  intercollegiate football at the Normal school.
The  discussion centered about the advisability of keeping  the sport
because of its expense and in preference to  an intra-mural program. The
students voiced their  approval of the grid sport and final voting results 
showed that it was favored by a large majority of  the student body.  As
this is the first football season following the  vote it is the duty of the
students to turn out en masse  for our home games and prove that the vote
last spring  was one made after thinking of the question and not  made on
the spur of the moment.  May we take our hats off to the finest Rec Hour 
in many months. The affair last Friday evening was  certainly incentive
enough to continue the night affair  at certain intervals.  Although the
faculty were conspicuous by their  absence, the dance hour was conducted in
a fine  manner and was indeed a tribute to this time-honored  recreational
"hop."  REJUVENATION OF CLUBS  EACHES NEW LEVEL  Stimulated by new blood
and new ideas, club life  at the Normal school has already taken on as
healthy  an aspect as has been seen for several months.  Realizing for the
first time in a considerable period  the value of their clubs, the various
organizations have  called together their few remaining members, held 
their initial meetings, made plans for the coming quarter,  and have
started their "rushing season.'Big  things are going to be done this ~year
by these clubs  and they will once more take their place in student 
activities and government.  As an added stimulus to the promotion of club
life,  the Board of Control is offering a trophy to the organization 
making the most remarkable and outstanding  record during tlie year. This
will be based on attendance;  accomplishment,, pr^rams.: and; various other
 activities^ the ;cfob may' ex^el in-h : . . :C:  :':7y A;::; •/.'-V 
TheV clubs ihus| f e ^ l i^  |n^itufi6h^)Ae^;c6uid b^  cient" auxiliaries ;
ojfi pur;u s pWt ^ Board' pfHi^ritrol;  ;:::''•;::'' ByTSA tWBXMW^^A 
For shame pin 8 o'clock laggards!  Down in the big kindergarten where  Miss
Carrie Bowman took charge  five weeks ago, very small boys and  girls begin
arriyihg at 8:30. They  don gay smocks or aprons of bright  oil-cloth, and
sire 'wielding crayons,  paint-brushes, saws and hammers,  before the last
breakfast straggler is  out of Edens Hall.  Thirty-Three Enrolled  By 9:30
o'clock 33 tots are making  happy use 



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Northwest Viking - 1932 October 14 - Page 3



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vwlinii^  •N • % •   lt;*  ::";ii,a; W CLUB
INFORMAL  Clarence Thue's Orchestra Will Flay  for Annual Affair October
22—  Tickets on Sale by Members.  Ghuckanut Shell has been chosen 
for the W Club Informal to be held  Oct. 22. This dance, an annual affair 
of the fall quarter, promises to  be-one of the crowning events of the 
year: gt;  ^According to "Posey" Flowers, the  chairman of the committee,
the sale  of tickets will be limited to 75, due  to the small capacity of
the hall.  The tickets can be bought from any  member of the W club this
week.  Ghuckanut Shell, whose popularity  has gained lately as a desirable 
Hal! for student affairs, will ring to  the music of Clarence Thue's
popular  orchestra.  Everyone is urged to buy his  tickets as soon as
possible.  ; VALKYRIES SERVE TEA  CRISP, stuigey, frosty mornings  prompt
Joe College to wrap himself  in a warm woolly polo coat. They  certainly
are -the go this season.  With enough fabric for an ordinary  coat and a
half these fascinating  snappy styles appeal to Joe College  on every
campus. Camel's hair is  still good and we find many attractive  models in
this fabric. Tweeds  come in for most popularity in polo  coats, among
college men, but the  new polo cloth is considered the  more tasteful for
young business  men. Military o'coat collars are a  feature, not forgetting
the wide belt  which is to be tightly drawn about  the waist to form natty
pleats.  THE NEW Clark Gable hats will  be worn with polo coats.  To
promote interest in women's  school activities, the newly organized 
women's pep club known as the  Valkyrie club served tea on Wednesday, 
afternoon from 2:30 to 3:30 in  the Women's League room. June  W^elch was
the chairman for the  affair and the hostesses were Bubbles  Bremness,
Harriet Rickerson,  June Jevning, and Katherine Bow-den.  SHOES this season
have taken a  turn to the heavy, due perhaps to  the necessity of
distinguishing oneself  from the prevalent gangster.  English brogues in
chocolate browns,  and moccasin toed ski shoes are the  thing for school
wear. For dancing  and evening wear the plainly stitched  plain toed black
calfskin shoes  are ih good taste.  TIES take a darker hue, wine  tones and
the darker burnished autumn  shades in cravenette and barathea  with raised
white dots are  being featured.  NEW AVIATOR styles in leather  jackets are
promiscuous on every  campus. White .goat skin is a, late  innovation.
Buckskin is its natural  shade is popular. Suede is stijl  being worn but
that is about all  that can be said for it.  CORPS are still in the lead
for  school wear. The Spanish waists are  definitely out.  RICH MAROONS and
deep electric  blues are featured in sweaters.  I • *  K On the  AMP
US  Side of the  EYHOLE J  Hallowe'en Spirit  To Be Present at  League
Informal  An informal dance will be given  byi: the Women's .League in the 
Crystal Ballroom of the Leopold  .Hotel, October 29. The decorative  scheme
will be in accordance with  the spirit of Hallowe'en. Louise  Schultz, the
general chairman, announces  that refreshments consisting  of punch and
wafers will be served.  : Anyone interested may sign the  notice on the
bulletin board.  Officers Elected  At Club Meeting  Reins of office shifted
hands  Monday afternoon at a meeting of  the Drama club. The new Officers 
are: President,*Elsie O'Donnell; vice  president, Martha Shudshift;
secretary  and treasurer, Doris Barron,  ;and representative ' to
Inter-Club  Council, Milford "Pete" Peterson.  As a result of the try-outs
held  last,, week the following students  "were admitted to the club: Mary 
Huth Bailey, Marion Cole, Katherine  -Kellogg, Louise Lawrence, Rhoda  Le
Cocq, Lillian Marsblaus, Mildred  ! Olson, Edith Swarth, Lila Weider  and
Eleanor1. Finnegan. Try-outs  were held yesterday to fill three va- 
• cancies in the "Alison's House" cast.  The next scheduled meeting
of  • the club will take place in . the  j Eden's Hall Blue room, the
first  ; Monday in November. Two speakers  j are scheduled to appear before
the  | club at this time: Dr. Fowler, whose  [subject will be "Current New
York  'Plays", and Pat Johnson, president  ...of.the Bellingham Theater
Guild,  flfefreshments are to be served and  'M record turn-out is
expected.  Vernie Leatha—the other fellow  beside "Posy" with blue 
socks and plus fours, moaning  because "some darned, dame  wouldn't dance
more'n three  times with him at Rec Hour-  Naomi Watson flashing a
perfectly  scrumptuous golden  bracelet about the halls. (The  Editor drops
his eyes)—Local  Youths dragging home a couple  of deer (d-e-e-r,
please; not  d-e-a-r) "Dean" Snyder being  seen around and about with  that
up-and-coming brother of  a couple of up-and-coming  Montgomery Co-Eds.
tsk. tsk!  —What do we hear, what do we  hear? Can it be that Nelson 
Brewer, our own bashful "W"  Clubber, is sending flowers to a  litle
resider of Edens Hall? Be  still, my fluttering heart—And  Al
Charlesworth. The dear  child waxes romantic all over  the campus about a
certain little  brunette who taught at Gla-last  year. We wouldn't mention 
names for anything—Betty  Watts sprung a new one too— 
—coming to Rec hour last week  with that exceedingly tall and 
exceedingly handsome stranger  who has been causing feminine  hearts to do
strange things  lately—none other than the  eminent Arthur
Reed—Another  Jones takes a stand. This time  he's little and cute
and has a  smile that would put old Sol to  shame. Be careful, girls. His 
name is Harold—Welcome home  Truman Berg. The Normal is  glad to s?e
you back at your  old haunts. Here's to a very  successful season on'-- the
old  gridiron—Walt, Schil —: Scbil—  Spigettie has been
searching  for a girl. A nice girl, please  who has a few looks and a 
little bit more poise than  avoirdupois — Enough scandal  for one
week — Be seein' ya  around.  DON'T  wear derby hats.  dark blue
overcoats (evenings excepted),  high waisted cords,  pastel shaded ties.  o
 ENGER HALL  Thelma Finley entertained relatives  from Anacortes and
Seattle on  Sunday, Oct. 2.  The members of Enger Hall held  a' house
meeting Thursday evening,  Oct. 6, for the purpose of electing  bficers.
Thelma Thompson was  chosen for president, and Thelma  ' ' . : - T-^—
0 ; .  HENNINGS IS CHOSEN  Many Social Events Are Scheduled  The W^ Club
dance, qn October 22;  at the Chuckanut Shell, will set- off  this
quarter's social whM with .a  blare of jazz. It also paves the way  for the
WQnien's League informal on  theif qUpwing: S^tiirday, This is to  be held
at the Hotel Leopold as us-_  ual, and as it' conies on Hallowe'en 
much;isi expectedTpf it..  Another Hallbwe'en feature will be.  the Edens
Hail tea on Oct. 30.  It has leaked out that the Sophomores  are planning
something big in  the way of mysteries for their class  party, Nov. 5, but
you'll just have  to wait and see.  The crowning social week-end of  the
whole year also comes in the fall  quarter—Homecoming. Two whole 
exciting days with a serpentine  through the town; a bonfire and pep 
rally; and alumni banquet; a thrilling  football game and a big dance 
ending everything.  Another delightful affair will be  the informal in
Edens Hall Blue  Room on December 3, which will  only be open for Edens
Hall girls.  And winding up the quarter is a  big farewell Christmas party
for the  whole school.  ;••'•',• Which Guarantee
ffi^  7 Seven Fall ShacWj 69o —  1312-B Cornwall Ave. MRS. R. A,
OBERLAT|  Near American Theatre T—' ^5 4 ;^w  Club Council Convenes 
For Purpose of Study  In Correct Procedure  At a recent house meeting held
by  the girls of Ragans, officers for the  ensuing quarter were elected.
They  are Camilla Hennings, president, and  Henny Lund, social chairman.
Plans  for decorations for home-coming  were also discussed.  Mrs.
Hennings, mother of Camilla  Hennings, was a visitor at Ragan's,  during
the week-end.  . o—  The girls living at Mrs. Vikes held  their
quarterly election last week.  Those elected were Beth Jones,  president,
and Diane Hershman, social  chairman and reporter.  The Inter-Club Council
held its  first meeting Wedensday afternpQJi.  Thomas Nelson,' the
president, pre?  sided. Miss Jones and Miss Cum?  mins, faculty
representatives, were  also there.  The Council is an an important  club
that is composed of representatives  from every active club. It  pronounces
the interment for dead,  inactive organizations. It is a coordinating  body
that builds the  school calendar. The President of  the Council checks the
ehgibilty of  candidates for offices of the Associated  Studenty Body.  At
present they are giving a  course in parliamentary procedure.  BEVERLY HALL
NOTES  Miss Nona Peterson spent the  week-end at her home in Arlington. 
Miss Janet Mulford spent the  week-end at her home in Everett. 
^—-o—•—;—  Announcement has been made of  the
marriage of Miss Edith Nelson,  graduate of this school, to Mr. Robert 
Guerin, which took place Saturday,  Oct. 1.  Mr. and Mrs. Guerin will take
residence  in Bellingham.  BLACK   WHITE'  CLEANERS   DYERS  We Call and
Deliver  PHONE 1670  Across from Y. M. C. A.  Birthdays  Richard
Miles—Oct. 14.  Molly Pearl—Oct. 14.  Thelma Finley—Oct.
15.  Evelyn Montgomery—Oct.  Suzanne Waters—Oct. 16.  John
Dempster—Oct. 18.  Phyllis Cole—Oct, 20.  Sidney 



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Northwest Viking - 1932 October 14 - Page 4



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iX Si.  WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, BELLINGHAM. WASHINGTON  \ S
W W V W A V AW  BILL FISHER  ^^^^^vv«w^r^wwy gt;^^vwl  : ^Thedays are
tinged with a cool  bijfce ttiat fires us with enthusiasm,  thoughts of.;;
pumpkins - and corn-shocks  in the banner's brown fields  and instills in
us the rejuvenating  feeling that "footballs' in the air."  The situation
has assumed a nation^  scope and as we suryey the  "colitch" field we
become aware  that already a few schools are fielding  powerful football
aggregations.  By virtue of their impressive :. wins  over Iowa and
Northwestern respectively,  Wisconsin arid Michigan  look hot i n the Big
Ten. In the  East, Harvard, for one, has been  bowling 'em over in a big
way. In  the South, Tulane and Florida are  looking good; while in the Big
Six,  we have Oklahoma as the only team  that has chalked up any
outstanding  victories.  AT WALDO FIELD  Sqiiad Is in Excellent Condition 
All Set for ^ickoff  Saturday, 2:15  LUTHERANS STRONG  IVEN only twenty- 
four hours between  n o w and  the opening football  battle of the  1932 s
e a s o n,  Coaches C a r v er  a n d Gunn w i ll  shake up t h e ir  sack
of football  candidates s o me  time tonight with  wide open in hopes of 
On the coast, we have our eye on  Stanford and listen boys, we're telling 
you that Washington is plenty  nice but oh my!—if they had only 
taken the Oregonians for a ride!  Observing local antics, we've concluded 
that the ^ligh school conference  is going to see a fight all the  way with
Everett's fame and Ana-cortes'  impotency as the only possible  extremes. 
Hi, Bill! Quit running, you fellows,  we're just calling one particular 
Bill—Osborne's the name. By the  way Bill, how was your date with 
Mrs. Bell Sperry (alias Mrs. Birch)  last Saturday afternoon?  Yeah, we
heard all about it! How  you just couldn't wait any longer so  you dashed
right out on the athletic  field and cornered your woman.  Well, did you
get the date Bill?  The story is as follows: The magician's  wife (and was
she nice!)  . came tearing around the corner by  the old tennis courts in
her new  Buick eight. She wanted to turn  around and since magicians wives 
are "different", she thought she'd  take a fling at the race track. Bill 
Osborne, our athletic manager was  in the vicinity and thought she 
wouldn't. He was on that woman  like a shot and they had it out.  Bill sure
did his duty but we'll  bet a cooky that next time he goes  chasing people
off the track, he'll  make sure ahead of time what they  look like. Was she
nice?  When Sam Carver embarks on an  expedition there has to be a purpose 
for it. We heard he left town  last Saturday with "Pop" Gunn, and  "Posey",
and; "Brink," so we decided  to check and re-check. We also  heard rumors
of a girl's note but  we couldn't verify them.  Last. Monday we saw Freeman
 Berg down in the main hall so we  put two and two together and got  five.
•• But anyhow, the visitation  must have been a success because
 Berg is back with us and Sam has  quit losing sleep over the center 
position.  "Welcome back" Berg, from Deb  by Altose, the students and the
faculty!  The setting: WalCeo field. Time:  ;2:15. Stage set: grandstand
full (?)  of people and a field with some  white stripes on it and some
funny  cross-bars at each end. The charac-  •ters: Twenty-two he-men
warriors,  and two odd birds dressed in white  shirts and bloomers, one of
whom  is always running around in circles  tooting a whistle.. "Okay," Mr
referee  —Curtains!—I say, get all of  those fool stage hands
on the ropes!  ? Eleven men bear down—a big  foot collides with the
pigskin and  Ithey're off£ arid the lid is pried off  •and out
jumps our little jack-in-the  ibox "Footbaii.rt^See:^bu at the big  jgame
tomorrow!  |; katheriner Holiis ' and Mildred  jFrenz spent ;the week-end
in Arling-  K, •••.'.-.••:" — _ O
— — — '  fi Marian Wells enjoyed: a pleasant  their eyes 
selecting a truly representative team  to wear the Blue and White tomorrow 
against the Pacific Lutheran  gridders of Tacoma.  The condition of the
squad as a  whole is excellent with only a few  minor injuries scattered
here and  there among the candidates as they  tighten their belts with
determination  for what promises to be a battle  to the finish. With the,
Lutherans  favored to win over the locals,  the Viking mentors are leaving 
nothing unturned in their quest for  victory and feel that the Vikings, 
together with the spirit they have  shown in practice plus .school support,
 will'give the visitors a run for  their money.  Lineup Uncertain  Wwho
will start tomorrow's game  is a problem. With approximately  twenty-five
men still very much in  the running for varsity positions  Carver's job of
picking a starting  lineup is a difficult one. When asked  for a probable
lineup, all the Viking  mentor did was bury his head and  say, "Your guess
is asf good as mine,  so go ahead." With due credit to all  backfield
candidates it looks as  though Flowers, Brinkman, Smith  and Bagley will be
the starting  backs when the referee blows the  whistle Saturday, with
"Swivel-  Hipped" Sinko, John Beaton, Behme  and Les Williams ready to
spell the  starters. The backfield will possess  plenty of speed and power
and with  Bagley's ^passing plus the kicking  ability of Art Smith, Beaton
and  Williams, should stack up fairly well  against the visitors.  Comfort
to Start  When Sid Comfort and Nelson  Brewer, veteran linemen on the
forward  wall, flanked with either Fin-ley  or Berg at center, the line
will  have two and possibly three veterans  from the last year on the
forward  wall. Others' who will probably  get their initial baptism are: 
Gable, Partes, Flint, Banner, Sul-kosky,  Hallowell, McLean, Turner  and
Christy. These together with  Cole, Joe Hermsen, Foster, Good, 
Charlesworth and Hogan will give  the Parkland line plenty to shoot at. 
The Pacific Lutheran squad by virtue  of their impressive showing  against
the College of Puget Sound  shape up as a stiff test for any team  and if
the Vikings can tie or hurdle  the City of Destiny eleven, the Normal 
gridders, will be in a fair way  to go places this season. The opening" 
kickoff is set for 2:15 on the  local gridiron.  . ' ~ _o _  SMITHV\*ETC 
Name: Arthur Smith.  Born 1908, Bandon, Ore.  Age: 24; height, 5 ft. 8 in. 
Weight, 164 pounds.  Schools attended: Arlington  high school, Bellingham
State  Normal.  Hobby: Placing punts where  someone isn't.  Smith,
ietterman and second  baseman of "Pop" Gunn's 1932  baseball squad, is
commencing  his second year of football cim-petition  at the local
institution.  Although not playing the required  time to earn a sweater  in
football last fall, Smith,  nevertheless, was a valuable  part of the
Vjking machine,  and with an early start this  season, stands a good chance
of  being one of the mainstays of  this year's eleven.  While attending H.
S. at  1 Arlington, Smith played base-  { ball, football and basketball  I
and was a member of the track  I team. In all earning nine high I  f school
letters, a record to shoot I  I at considering these were {  I earned in
three year's time. ]'  U'lov-  When the smoke of tomorrow's,  game has
cleared away]  the football season will be in  full swing. Two weeks hence,
 the Vikings tangle with the  powerful St. Martin's eleven.  St. Martin's
boast a powerful  \ | aggregation and the outcome of.  these.first two
games will serve  as a barometer, insofar as the  Viking strength is
concerned.  . . C. P. S. Next  i After the St, Martin's game  on October
28, the Vikings  face three weeks of tough"  football assignments. Carver 
will bundle up his charges for  a game with the College of  Puget Sound in
their own back  yard on November 4 and then  will take on the Wildcats
of.El-lensburg  in, -an Armistic day  tilt, only to PPPPP