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Northwest Viking - 1932 December 9 - Page 1



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 OL; XXI^NO; 1 1 •iSWs! WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL.
BELLINGHAM/WASHINGTON Friday, December 9, 1932  ' p$L--  J  Normalite 
FACTS—OR THINGS? „  COMEDIAN  MB. WIMPY  By Pat Allan.  Estelle
Gray—Lhevinne Relates the  Story of Each Piece; Plays On  Two
Historical Cremonas.  LADDIE MAKES DEBUT AT FOUR  Hey! Hey! Hey. and
Ha-cha-cha.  Only five and one-half more studying  days till hibernation!
We can  sleep the sweet beery sleep that  Yuletide meant to gentlemen
before  the days of Carrie Nation!  W.S.N.8.^-  And Christmas in those days
 meant something. Four little boys  were usually hired from across the 
railroad tracks to carry in the dinner  which began with a small glass  of
small beer and continued through  to pudding, ..piped . in" all ablaze 
with burning rum of the prettiest  blue, flanked with roasted apples  and
wal-. and chest-nuts. .  "i-i\: • W.S.N.S. . . . . .  Christmas is a
good illustration of  the philosophy that things are not  so important as
the ideas they represent/  Christmas, the 25th of December,  as a day, is
no different  from; ^ n y | other* day. The things  which set itt apart,
making it different;  are the ideas we have built  up around it; the
thoughts we have  of Christmas, differing from those  of any other day. - 
v t W.S.N.S.  Hotd many of us are really more  affected by the depression
than by  the{ concepts and ideas of the depression  being constantly
brought to  our attention from day to day?  Why is the press such an
important^  factor in our Hoes, in. the way in  ibhiih we live? Is it not
because the  press is the most popular and most  universal medium for the
exchange  of ideas, and the best and cheapest  source of raw material for
ideas?  Are iea-and-idast for breakfast and  @od more actually important to
us  than the ideas associated with them?  \l:'- '.•"-•
";w.S.N,S, '•"; • : -  According to that philosophy, one  would
be. almost safe in saying one  lives in a world of absurd concrete 
actualities illustrating fundamental,  ideational facts, wouldn't one? 
WJ5.N.S.- —  ....A-very staid: and .proper lady once  met a gentleman
widely renowned  for his amusing insanities on the legitimate  stage. The
lady, having  heard of him but never having met  him nor seen his act, was
very interested;  and"; curious.. "Why,? she  saJd, gt;'do you act so
absolutely idiotic?*  1 N '  "Lady," said the comedian, "if I  didn't act
idiotic, r d go crazy."  ;.' W.S.N.S.-  Mr. Wimpy, the gentleman of
som-nabuiistic  tendencies, so widely noticed,  dn the Sunday journals, has
 gjyejfrrus "a new method of 'going  through school. Mr. Wiinpy handles 
his .-system with great deUcsxy.iand  tact. He is a' past master/ His 
system is original (?) and clever (?)  Laddie, "the little boy who plays 
for universities", and his mother, the  celebrated violinist Estelle Gray- 
Lhevihne, will perform in the assembly  at 11 a: m., Monday, Dec. 12 
Laddie is one of the youngest of  American piano artists.  When he was only
four years old,  Laddie was presented before a Pacific  Musical society
audience at the Fairmont  hotel in San Francisco. He  played Bach, Hadyn,
Beethoven and  Mozart. At six he made his Eastern  debut and was hailed by
critics  and public alike'for the individuality  and charm of his
interpretations.  The New York Musical Courier  wrote "Laddie plays Mozart
with the  poetic soul of genius".  Monday, Laddie will play Mozart  and be
dressed as the genius was  dressed at his age. '  Musical America, of New
York,'  devoted an editorial to the lad's accomplishments,  laying stress
upon  his. individuality. Yet."at the age  of ten, he is still a child,
singularly  unspoiled by plaudits."  His distinguished mother only allows. 
Laddie to travel a few weeks  ;eaeji.year, for his development. The,  rest;
pi the,tinie he lives a rustic life  in his San Francisco bay home, with 
earnest diversified studies in advance  of the usual boy his age.  For the
past three years Laddie  has been a piano pupil of Lev Shorr,  who is a
graduate of Petrograd conservatory-  and the teacher of Laura'  Dubman. 
Estelle Gray-Lheyinne tells the  story of each piece' before she plays  the
music. The New York Times  says she is the "outstanding violin  personality
of the hour". She plays  two historical Cremona violins that  were made in
1675 and 1715.  • • • ' ^—- o— :  Artists for
Monday's Assembly  LADDIE BOY AND HIS MOTHER, GRAY-LHEVINNE  ASSEMBLY
SHIFTS  Christmas Party to Furnish Finale  for Quarter  Facts Uncovered  by
Questionnaire  Next Tuesday's assembly has been  shifted to Monday morning
at eleven  o'clock. The appearance of Laddie  Boy, famed eleven year old
pianist,  and his equally ramous mother, on  the violin, "will. feature
that hour.  Monday elven o'clock classes will be  held on Tuesday at the
same hour.  o :—, •  To cap a glorious quarter the entire 
school is invited to attend the  Christmas party to be held in the  Big Gym
next Thursday evening  from eight until eleven o'clock. Rumors  have it
that two hours *will be  devoted to dancing and the remainder  to a program
now being prepared.  A masculine style show is in  treat for the (Christmas
get-together.  : -O—  FOWLER SPEAKS  Prof. Addresses Kiwanis Meeting 
on Economics. • •'  ON RADIO PROGRAM  That nearly one-half of
all the  students have never belonged to a  club while attending Normal was
 only one of the many interesting  facts revealed in the Club Life
questionnaire,  which was filled out in  assembly last Friday.  Nearly
every phase of club activity  was covered by the questions,  and the
answers were as varied as  they were numerous.  Clubs of the dramatic type,
such  as the Drama and Thespian clubs  (Continued on Page Two)  Miss
Beatrice I. Doty, children's li?  brarian, will talk over the microphone 
tonight between 9:30 and  i0:00 o'clock. She will take her  listeners on an
imaginary tour to a  bookshop to select suitable Christr  mas books for
boys* and girls.  Among the many books to be discussed  by Miss Doty is the
"Modern  Machine Age", a book for boys that  should captivate their
attention and  interest. For the little tots,. "Today's  A B C Book" is
colorful and  different from the usual book of  that type. "Swift River" by
Cornelia  Meigs, was written for children,  but grown-ups will enjoy the 
subtle - undercurrents that run  through the lines. "Waterless Mountain" 
is the John Newbery award  for 1933. The "Christ Child" is a  colorful
attempt to give the actuality  of the holy land.  .Final Broadcast  Next
Friday night, Dec. 16, will  mark the final presentation of Normal 
broadcasts .for the year. A  Christmas play, "Thirty Pieces of  Silver",
will be offered by Louise  Lawrence, Sterling McPhail, and  Paul Jackson.
The winter quarter  will see the resumption of the regular  twice-a-week
broadcasts, and all  students are urged to come forward  and offer their
talent.  Dr. Herbert E. Fowler head of the  English department here,
addressed  the Kiwanis club at its luncheon in  the Bellingham hotel last
Tuesday,  Dec. 6. He was introduced by Dr.  Irving E. Miller, also a member
of  the Normal faculty.  Dr. Fowler's address was on "Me-cnamzed  living"*,
in which he stated  that the nation today is too highly  mechanized, and
that this excessive  mechanization of the United States  is one of the
causes of the present  economic stress. ,  CONTROL BOARD TO  INVESTIGATE
CO-OP  Men's Club Holds  Regular Meeting  Fisher Talks of Opportunity for 
Men in Teaching Field  The Men's. Club held their semi-quarterly  meeting
today to discuss  the possibility of holding a dance  next quarter. The
dance will probably  be given some time in the early  part of the quarter. 
Following the regular business  meeting Clarence Thue and Wayne  Priem
entertained the men with a  number of musical selections.  A quartet
directed by Johnnie  Lensrud and accompanied by Virgil  Griff en sang a
number of vocal  selections.  President Fisher talked concerning  "The
chances for young men in the  field of education." He spoke of the  fact,
that more and. more rnen are  being hired in the school systems  throughout
the land.  ..:-___—o '  JOHNSON'S CHORUS  THRILLS AUDIENCE  Choir's
Appearance Begins Concert  Season hi Bellingham  Bond ' Makes Arrangements 
Normalstad Survey  for  Discussion was ' held concerning  cutting the
salary of Mr. Sam Ford,  manager of the Go-op, ;at -the. last  meeting of
the Board of Control,  presided over by;' Bert Gallanger,  vice-president. 
It was decided to drop the matter  until Mr. Ford could be more fully 
interviewed. Dr. Bond reported  that Mr. Ford would submit a detailed 
report of the financial condition  Of the store some time in the hear 
future, probobly the first of next  quarter.  Board to Investigate  Next
quarter the Board of Control  is to. go down to the Co-op en masse  and
investigate Conditions thoroughly  to see what can be done to  give
students the best service possible.  . . , • . , " - . •
• -  Dr. Bond reported that he had  made arrangements - to survey the
 property line at Normalstad.  Bee Hour Plans  Rec Hour was fixed for this
afternoon  from 4:00 to 5:30 o'clock, It  was decided that next week the 
dance is to be two hours long.  Suitable festivities to celebrate. 
Christmas at the end of the quarter  were discussed and it was decided 
that, the vice-president confer with  the president of the Associated
Students  concerning a program and  party to be held next Thursday.  I t ^
beyond- reproach. His technique  ahd execution are unique..... But  more,
it is very simple. The lowest  ij^. can use it. All that is required Is 
tfajfr lability to say, "I would gladly  $9% iy°u Tuesday for a
hamburger  r. ^Editor's note: Yeah,; Just try that  'ifrith your tuition,
;^  Dr. In^.RMUler of the Normal  Doctor Fowler Returns After Long  - _
• * • * - * * - . ' • ' * • • • *
• - * *  SIX WEEKS SJPENT ON TRIP HOME  Absence at New York
University  ^ ^ ^ m i ^ ^ ^ 9 ^ Study  club. The meetingvwas held at eight 
Wi0i^u^tm^m ~  -Dr. H. E. Fowler-, chairman of the  English department, has
returned to  Bellingham Normal after two years  at the New York university
where  he received his doctors degree. While  there he served as lecturer
on education  in the School of Education.  Dr. Fowler found in New York 
much to satisfy his prime interest  in plays, lectures and art exhibits.  A
side walk display by modernistic  painters; using every conventional  and
unconventional medium of color  and form, he visited several days.  ' He
spent much time wandering  about the foreign districts of the  dl^-each
section like a; portion'-(ojt:  the old%worM transplanted. Many  hours were
passed msnuai^  of magazines.  Dr. Fowler and his family occupied  six
weeks on the return trip  by automobile, including stops to  visit
relatives in Colorado and  friends in Brimfield, Illinois.  A surprise was
in store for Dr;  Fowler in Shiprock, New Mexico;  where he found Mildred;
Greenwalt,  a graduate of Normal, teaching the 
lir^-^gzaii^^ian^^^'^Naya'jo reseryW  tion. Dr^fpVSsrier visited jwr
classroom  and' comments that Miss  Greenawalt is doing very successful 
work. ^ : ; •';/".; •;; H'' •; !"..': '••:
"'••?; v ;'?.;:*"  They, witnessed a very amusing  Indian
celebrailin while on the reservation.  When in Arizona theyvis-nationa^ 
parks beto^  BeUingham m t h ^  T CALENDAR  FRIDAY-rDec 9.  4:00 p. m;, Rec
Hour in Big  Gyn^": 



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Northwest Viking - 1932 December 9 - Page 2



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wAJstii^^N s r ^  Whe Northwest Viking  Formerly The Weekly
Messenger—Founded 1899  Published every Friday .except during the
monthi of S*P*"|:  ber by the Associated Students, Washington, State Normal
 School, Bellinghani, __•___ ' " • " ' ' • '-- ."
''••'-  Entered in the Postoffice at Bellingtoin, WjisKln^n.^
as  second class matter by virtue of the act of March 5, W*.  Printed by
the Miller   Sutherleo Printing Company, Bell-ingham  National Bank
Building. •__  Subscription rate by mail, $1.50 per year, in advance.
Advertising  rates, on application. , .  National Advertising
Representatives:  hill, Mars Advertising, and Collegiate  Agency, of New
York City.  Littell-Murray-Barn-  Special Advertising  Address all
communications, other than news_ items, to the  Business Manager of the
Northwest Viking, Belhngham, Wash.  Telephone 3180 ^ . .  Afraid To Live 
By BOB THOMPSON  Hollis J. Stoddard.  Lorinda Ward —  Julius Dornblat
•;'•  Roger. Chapman..-.  Darrow Gwinnnp..  ; .Editor-in-Chiel 
Associate Editor  .. .....Assistant Editor  .......Business Manager 
...Circulation Manager  Bob Roberts ......: ...Advertising Manager 
DEPARTMENT EDITORS  Society Editors: Bubbles Bremnes, Marian Wells.
Fea-ture  Editors: Bob Thompson, Pat Allan; Sports Edi  tors: Glenn Rockey.
Bill Fisher, Helen Northen. Copy  Editor: Ina Kirkman. Special Staff
Writers: Virginia  Carver, Marydel Conrad, Irene Schagel, Naomi Watson, 
June Welch, Harriet Rickerson  '• REPORTERS  Margaret Eckert, Elnora
Engebretson, Fred Cockerill,  Bubbles Bremnes, Bill Malmquist, Bob Roberts,
Louise  Schultz, Jack Kemphaus, Gordon Carter, Mary Ann  Fisher, Harold
Walton, Edith Swarth, Ina Kirkman,  Paul Jackson, Preston Wright, Marian
Wells; Joe Irby.  Being a short, short story of four chapters.  Time:
Tomorrow.  I picked a purple lilac arid pinned it to your breast,  and
jokingly I told you it was my heart I laid at rest.  And then—and
then—I kissed you! And in the raptured  hush I saw my moon-touched
lilac, between us  had been crushed. Crushed and bent, yet so content 
—splashed above your heart; and then I knew my jest  was
true—that lilac was my heart.  Time: Day after Tomorrow.  Dead? Dead?
It cannot be.  Why, yesterday she was life, itself, laughing and  singing
and clicking her heels at worry and care. So  soft were her arms and body
warm—yet I saw her rigid  and cold; dancing eyes that mocked
me^-closed forever,  to tease me no more; lips, once rd, and full of 
caresses, r saw them—flat and pale.  And her hair—ah, that was
her glory! They had it  brushed back smooth from her brow, but -I put the 
wave again on her forehead like a careless, happy  strand, hiding the
little scar she has carried so long.  Somehow she wasn't SO'dead that'way,
nor seemed  so far away from me.  Time: The Same Night. . ,  Just leave me
alone in the firelight with my dreams  and briar pipe—living again
the gladness,, thrilling  again at the madness, feeling again the sadness
now  part of oblivion's night. . .' r  Time: Later the Same Night.  The
deadening gloom of this lonely room stifles my  very breath, and a cruel,
heartless moon is mocking  my doom, and watches for my death. .A creeping
cold  is taking hold—I only want to rest—the sand has run,  my
hour's done, Life's sun is in the West.  . o ..•-•'•
— •  « ••  Oh the "  AMFUS  Side of the  E Y H
Q L E  Collins Museum Givenflo ScM|||  By 1M R^den^^^^^^  N EXT QUARTER
WILL  ET CHANGES  T H E BEGINNING OF N E X T quarter will  find a large
turnover in the student working forces  in the Normal school. The grade
system adopted  by the faculty last summer will be the direct cause. 
Students who have but one or two quarters left to  obtain their diplomas
will find themselves without  the jobs they have been holding for the past
three  and four quarters, which represented their largest financial  reason
for staying in school.  IT W O U L D A P P E A R that the standard of 2 .4 
set by the faculty is too high as only 2.0 is required  at our state
college and university. And the rule  which will go into effect next
quarter should concern  only students entering at that time, not those who
have  been working on the' beats.  IT IS R U M O R E D that students may
enter their  cases for exception before a faculty committee. If  this is
true it would be greatly appreciated if the  sudents were so informed. '
Agitation is growing  'among the students, and something definite will have
 to be announced immediately. The quarter is drawing  to a close and
students must know what to decide for  the future.  THE EDUCATION O F T H E
2.4 student is  just as valuable to him as the 3.5 student. Probably  one
of the reasons his, grades are at 2.3 or 2.4 is  because he has to work and
fight his way for an education.  But in all fairness, he must b given a
chance.  CASE FOR TROPHIES  OULDBEUSED  MAY W E SUGGEST that some political
aspirant  stress' the need of a trophy case for Normal  prizes in his
campaign speeches next quarter. Money  placed in a project of this sort
would indeed be well  spent. Coach Carver states that the school possesses 
many athletic trophies that have been put. a way in  the vault and in the
attic because there is no place  where they may be displayed before the
students.  SEVERAL OF T H E cups were stolen from the  attic when they were
moved there a considerable time  ago. We should be proud of our school's
winnings,  and place them on display for the students—not in  some
corner to be stolen.  W H E N OUR TEAMS visit other schools on  their
athletic trips they return home with stories of  seeing trophies on display
in a prominent place. There  is no reason at all why the board of control
can't  authorize the order of a cabinet, and the collection  of the cups
and pennants.  Beeg triangle in the DAHL-."  QTJIST HOGAN affair. JIM 
CAMPBELL gallops into the  picjture in grand/style—JOHNNY  LENSRIJD,
the dormitory  nightingale, taking a blind  date the other night. And 
whatta date! whatta date!—  NELS BREWER still Hanging  on at fpurth
place in the CAMERON  affair—JOE IRBY tak-ingout  his FORD and
walking;  funny very funny — BERT  LUNDBERG searching earnestly 
for-, his razor in a vacant Jot  —The BAR|tON girls and the  . GABLE
boys- trotting happily  about the  lt;»mpus--BILL FISHER  ..innocently
'wearing his  sweater wrorig side out! It's an  old Fisher custpm-HCLAUDE 
BEHME escorting blonde ladies  and their relatives about the I  fair city
— LEW LOVEGREN, J  Bellingham Normal's Bing j  Crosby, going Edens
Hall with I  a little r e d ^ d - ^ J IM STOD- f  'DARD beating his head
against  the wall at a recent basketball  game—The Navy, in the form 
of /ARTHUR REED, coming  into its own at the last Rec  hour. And with a
.model T, too;  that's what.lppks'il.do for you  —LESTER DENNY
joining the  house of DAVID—JACK FALK-NER  drawing portraits on the 
Viking board, .Handwriting on  the wall, and.all that sort of^  rot! "
"_.''-" . ".  m ._'..H ..
„—.n—.«»—«•—••
n nft  ELEMENTARY  SCHOOL  —By INA KIRKMAN  From photographs to
motionpic-tures,  then to blue prints--this road;  Questionnaire 
(Continued from Page One)  Talks Are Given  to Rotary Club  "Pieces of
Silver"  To be Presented  Kenneth Bernet, Margaret Wheeler,  and Robert
Heaton gave .their  impressions of experiences gained in  taking the
teaching courses offered  at Bellingham Normal at the Rotary  club luncheon
held at the Leopold  hotel Monday, Dec. 5.  The civilization courses of the
 Freshman curriculum formed the  nucleus of Mr. Bernet's talk. He  also
discussed the fine arts, library  instruction, and human relations 
.courses.  Laboratory Angle Presented  "Margaret Wheeler, who is doing  her
student teaching in the training  school, spoke on the technical end  of
teaching as presented in the various  educational courses.  '^Teaching in
the Field," was the  - subject of Mr. Heaton's talk. Mr.  Heaton was
graduated in August,  1931. Since that time he has taught  . at Mukilteo
and is now co-operative  eighth grade teacher and principal  of Laurel
school.  President C. H. Fisher said "The  talks were very well presented
and  . made a favorable impression."  •*/•••: ,
-—-—-o^r——- -  Ruth Dunn and Eunice Dinsmore 
visited in Ferndale over the weekend.  •'- .''.'.•'.  ; Marian
Wells enjoyed a pleasant  •week-end trip with her parents in  ; B l a
i n e . \%  f^:-;
••••••••••" ::
••'•• ••   lt;^i Marie Thompson* 7 Mary
Tarbox  1$ aM: Marg^t/PBbere  %|; | « c ^ t ; ^ r n o i i and spent
the-weefc-  SINGERS PLEASE  PECTATORS  THE BOUQUET FOR T H E finest
musicale of  the season goes to the Normal school and the Bellingham 
Woman's Music club for their presentation of  the Hall Johnson Negro choir
last week. Famous  nationally and Pulitzer prize winners, the choir held 
an audience of more than two thousand spellbound  for two hours as they
delivered a Wonderfully well-balanced  group of numbers. No doubt the
students  would enjoy more musicales of this type and less of  a few that
appear in some of our assemblies.  to bed, and drops into a chair to 
think. The tramp then reappears,  and in spite of Peter's furious attitude,
 coolly sits down and tells  Peter the evil deed he is contemplating  will
gain him only misery.  Startled and aghast, Peter asks the  identity of his
visitor. "In God's  name!" he cries, "who are you"  The tramp answers in
strong and  yet sorrowful accents, "I am ".  Will Be Broadcast Tonight  The
climax of this dramatic  Christmas play will be unfolded to  the students
both in the Friday  morning assembly and over the air  in the evening from
9:30 to 10:00.  o'clock. Since this play marks  the close of both air
presentation  and assembly programs for the quarter,  listeners and
auditors may look  for a finished piece of work.  Special attention has
been given to  the preparation of the play to be  presented in assembly
next Friday,  Dec. 16. The literary interpretation  class, under tne
guidance of Victor  H. Hoppe has been consistently turning  out work of
superior quality.  One-act plays and other forms of  the dramatist's art
have been offered  to the students, both in the as-  ; sembly and over the
air. This final  play, under the title "Thirty Pieces  of Silver", has a
moral, and the  hearts of many should be touched  by the manner in which
that moral  is developed and "put over".  The Play  Louise Lawrence, who
did such ah  outstanding piece of work as Aunt  Agatha in "Alison's House",
carries  the part of Prudence . Prudence is  a hard woman; even on
Christinas  eve she finds the power in her heart  to turn from her door a
broken,  bleeding wanderer. The 



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Northwest Viking - 1932 December 9 - Page 3



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WASHINGTON STATE'NO,-*M ; l iNGHAiVi: WASHINGTON  BkfcRoom  AA.lt .,
 Informal  CAMPU^^^^  ^ A snow man, fire sprinkled with  Show; a snow fort
and a full yellow  moon made a pleasant setting for  trie Snowball Informal
given Saturd  a y night, December 3, jn the Blue  Room of Edens Hall.  . A
fat snow man in a tall-top hat  dheld the center of the floor. Firs 
Sprinkled with snow stood around  : gt;ibe outside of the room while in one
 ^corner a snow fort served as a refreshment  stand.. A full yellow  ~.i
moon winked from. his corner all  -evening, making moonlight waltzes  -fa
reality when all the other lights  Were put out. while the dancers emulated
 trie owl and the pussy-cat and  vjfdanced in the light of the moon".  Jack
Burn's orchestra furnished the  music for the occasion. During intermission
 sherbet snowballs were  served for refreshments. The.programs  for the
dance were white  suede snowballs tied with black and  white ribbons. 
Helen Jecklin,. social director for  the Hall, was in charge of the dance. 
Those working with her were: Dorothy  Kelyly, in.charge of decortions; 
Betty Jock, programs; refreshments,  Betty Todd;.and clean-up, Evelyn 
JAngg. . . . . . . .  By FLORENCE  It's snowing, and the wintry wind  dost
blow—How'd.. you., like., some  warm and woolly ideas?  This should
bring joy to your  heart—a turtle neck scarf. It is like  a wristlet
gone ineckwise. In reality  just a straight tubular piece of alternate 
rows of knitting and purling  which flares into a little collar 
cape—just as if you started to knit  a turtle neck sweater and got
tired  before you came to the sleeves. The  undeniable fifteenth century
flavor  is not the least of its charms.  Another clever idea (not mine, I 
assure you). Take a long narrow  piece of knitted, fabric fringed on  the
end; this is folded in half and  stitched up one side from the fringed 
ends almost to the fold, where an  opening?is left an inch and a half 
long. You wind it about the neck,  slip the fringed end through the slit 
and, Voila! You.have the smartest  and newest thing in Schiaparelli 
scarfs.  Skipping into the evening mode-woolen  gowns are not absolutely a 
novelty—|I've been wearing outing  flannel for a week)..But, to get
back  to the subject. I'm serious about  thin wool evening"gowns. They are 
ultra-ultra-ultra-simple in line. Dark  colors predominate, tete-de-negre, 
bottle green, and. wine shades,  though some white. Their chic is  in lack
of adornment, which is rather  remarkable during the present  era of
abundant chromium plate,  from earrings to automobiles.  Quite irrelevant
to wooly clothes,  but I can't resist mentioning them,  are the new evening
hats. Just a  halo of twisted velvet, set saucily on  top of a mere wisp of
crispy mesh  veil. Quite a booh on the evenings  your waves are cutting up^
Christmas  is coming and it's the clever  child who knows the power of
suggestion.  Speaking of Christmas-—have you  seen the latest
compact, or should I  say flapjack? It not only has  loose powder and a
swansdown  puff, but you can view everything  but your tonsils in its
beveled mirror.  It will give you a great kick.  So will the price tag. 
Board's X^rterly  Dinner Celebration  fpRKTMAS TEA  BREAKFAST HELD  BY DORM
GIRLS  Who can speak of Christmas without  mentioning the eternal hankie. 
Chanel's recent evening mouchoir is  a white chiffon square with a black 
velvet poinsettia appliqued in the  corner. Even your most difficult 
friend would adore one.—More anon.  The quarterly Board of Control 
banquet was held Wednesday, evening,  Dec. 1, at the Bellingham Hotel. 
James Butler, president of the  student body, was toastmaster. Harriet 
Rickerson acted as general  chairman.  Speeches for the evening were  given
by: Miss Mary Rich, Miss Emma  Erickson;. Dean' Marquis, Dr.  Bond; Bert
Gallehger and Jimmie  Stoddard.  Those present were: James Butler,  Marian
Todd, Bert 6allenger, Janet  Mulf ord, Vernon Leatha, Louise  Contents,
Davey Jonesi Virginia  Carver, Harriet Rickerson, James  Stoddard, Miss
Rich, Miss Erickson,  Miss Florence Johnson, Dean and  Mrs. Marquis, Dr.
Bond, Miss Linda  Countryman, Dr. and Mrs. H. E.  Fowler, and Mrs. Ruth
Burnet.  _ : —0 ;  Valkyrie Elects  N.Watson Head  ^toliepB^lfl 
Event of Holidays  The annual Christmas tea is to be  held at Edens Hail on
Sunday at  5:30 o'clock. Ah enjoyable program  has teen planned consisting
of musical,  numbers,; featuring , Chris,tmas  carols both old and new. 
Edens Hall is to hold open house  at this tea. All faculty members office 
help, and students are invited  to attend.  Peggy Alderson is" chairman of
the  invitation committee, aided by Evelyn  Clark, Peggy McKay, and
Gret-chen  Mihnear. : June McLeod will  be in charge of refreshments, and 
Merle Williams, Helen Klumb; Hazel  Moore, and Louise Contento will 
decorate the Hall. The program  committee is composed of Lorinda  Ward,
chairman, Madolyn Snyder,  and Elizabeth Schuehle. ..  . •—o-
:— • ' • '  Jack Temple spent the week-end  visiting
friends and relatives in Ta-coma.  Mildred Franz visited the Bushby  home
at Sumas over the week-end.  Ah"-mfcrmai:event',tQ;bfe" hejd-durr  ing the
hoUday./'seasonite.:the; gt;.all-;:.;  college dance scheduled for Dec. 23;
 to be held at the Crystal ballroom of}:.  the Leopold hotel.  Alumni,
former students of all  colleges, and those now attending  the Normal,
Whatcom high and  Fairhaven high schools are invited,  jack Burn's
orchestra will, furnish  the music for the evening. Robert,  Whiteside and
Glen/Fairbanks are  making, the arrangements.  '•• ' " "
':'_:—.—o—~—'•—•"  Clarence Locke
and Paul Jackson  left Friday for Rattle where they  visited oyer the
week-end. They returned  by boat Sunday evening.  2-Lb. Box only One Dollar
j  "She Would Like This!" \  FOUNTAIN LUNCHES!  BELLINGHAM DRUG, j  Phone
1801 1331 Cornwall  Rogers Chocolates  Fowler Speaks to  Thespians on Trip 
: : : At 5:30 in the morning next Sunday,  Edens Hall girls are to go
carol-  -'-"'' fing through the residential sections  of Bellingham',
canvassing the homes  of faculty members. Each girl will  carry a candle to
correspond to the  candles which will be shown in the  - windows along the
way.  .j*'*]']After they return, the Freshman  } " "girls will have, the
opportunity; of  1 ,.Jproviding the singers with a break-  ^ "fast at which
gifts will be distributed  •"to the deserving.  : .. , The committee
responsible for the  ...sophomore breakfast, on Sunday  ni,vmorning are:
Gift committee, Gwen  ; A j Eder, chairman, Peggy McKay, Betty  .j;;,;Todd,
Betty Jock, Merle Williams,  i^.^and Dorothy Kelly; decoration, Peg-   lt;.
gy Davin, chairman, Dolly Anderson,  .-. lt;'jA Clara Cameron, Louise.
Contento,  • ;.....• Jane O'Neil, Elva Loomis, and Moana 
Mqnkman;, program, Lucy. Van  Vechten, chairman, Evelyn Larson,  :and
Lottie Stevenson. , • ... . - .  Officers Elected  for Science Club 
Dr. H. E. Fowler spoke before the  Thespian club at their regular  monthly
meeting held last Thursday  night in room 308. He spoke on  matters
pertaining to the club constitution,  and to his recent two-year  stay in
New York.  He advised that the constittuion  either be revised, or the
policy of the  club changed to fit the constitution.  He also spoke of some
of his experiences  while studying and teaching  at New York university.
New York  life, according to him, is not comparable  to that on the coast. 
Preceding the talk a short-business  session was. called to order by  the
president, Doris McElmon. A  suggestion for a winter quarter banquet  and
dance was met with favor.  The assembly program to be given  early next
quarter was discussed.  John Lensrud was elected by the  club to take
charge of the broadcast  Over K-V-O-S in January.  -^—:—o - 
Lake Whatcom Scene  ofY. W.C.A.Party  Final Meeting of  Drama Club Held  -
The final meeting of the Drama  club for this quarter was held Monday 
evening in the auditorium. As  a rather long 



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Northwest Viking - 1932 December 9 - Page 4



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W^^^^^^^^M^XSSs S^iBMf BXB  WASHIN lt;3TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL/
BELLINGHAJf^ WASHIl^TON  rsrpg:  mm BEATS  JAYVEES IN CLOSE  BASKETBALL
TILT  Viking Forwards Are Stopped by  ITS Close Checking ,  The Normal
Jayvees met- their  first defeat Tuesday night, 26-27, in  a hard fought
contest with the Y.  M. C. A., played on the Association's  court. 
Jayvees' scoring machine couldn't  find the basket and trailed in the 
first half, 11-6. Sam Carver coach,  gave the team a pep talk during the 
half, and the boys came back strong  in the second half, led by the scoring
 of Nolte flashy guard, who rung  the basket five times. With the  score
27-26, Sorenson missed a foul  shot that would have knotted the  score. 
Sorenson and Harris, fiery forwards,  and Nolte, guard, were outstanding 
for the Hilltoppers. Nolte  led. in the scoring for the Normal  with 10
markers, while Sorenson  followed with 6. Albee,'aggressive  guard for the
Y. M. C. A., scored 11  points; McAllister, forward, followed  with 8 to
aid the Association's attack.  Normal at the present time has  won and lost
one game each. They  play the strong Union Printing company  next Tuesday
night at the Y.  M. C. A. . The Printers are now leading  the Class B
league.  Summary—  Y. M. C. A., 27 Jayvees, 26  McAllister 8 i
„F. Harris 4  Brummell 0 ..........P. Sorenson 6  Graybdal 0 C.
Campbell 0  Woitulewicz 4 ....G Nolte 10  Albee 11 G... Miles 4  Harris 4
:.Sub .. Zoet 1  Sub Malmquist 1  Referee: Thorsen.  . o—  W. A. A.
Members To  Vote on Amendment  In Room 119 at Noon  •X-r'l*.-.•
.-*•' •V.-'": **'':.:  nrvivivivrvivivivjrviw.LViW]  ierial to 
schedule.  What a race the Intramural league  is putting on. Four out of
the nine  teams in the league are very much  in the running, and with the
start of  the: winter quarter the first of the  year it looks as though the
weak  sisters will have plenty of opportunity  to sign up enough
good;ma-put  their teams in the running during the second half of the  So
be on your toes, managers.  m u-M^y^'y-  # Hi  And, on the other hand, if
enough good material doesn't show up by the  start of the second half, it
wouldn't be a bad ijdea to consolidate a number  of the weaker teams, and
make the league a six-team affair during the  last half. Possibly the only
disadvantage as the league now stands is  that the games take up too much
time, especially with three games scheduled  for one night; and the first
encounter starting at 7:15. By cutting  the teams down to six entries this
would eliminate the night struggles.  Pete Baffare, a Renton product, was
announced as the winner of the  Rotary Medal, presented to the most
outstanding football player during  the season just past at the Ellensburg
Normal school. Over at Whitman  college, Les Voris, a former Viking
football star, was voted the Niles  trophy for being the greatest
inspiration to his team mates during the past  season. It wouldn't be a bad
idea for the local sport followers to get  together and acquire some sort
of an honorary award to be presented to  Bellingham's most outstanding
athlete of the year. We had in this institution  one of the best milers to
run in college competition in! the person  of Norman Bright and we have
with us now one of the best football  stars in these parts, but not even as
much as a tin cup to remember these  men.by. In a couple of years entering
freshmen and upperclassmen will  know nothing of the men who made history
in this school of ours. And  when someone mentions Bright or Sulkosky, they
will probably ask, when  were they president of the institution? Anyway
something should be  done about the matter.  TEAMS MOLD LEAD  With the
iritra-mural ;gan»es,jwell  under way only three teams of the  nine in
the league- are undefeated;  they are the Relics. Raiders, and  Manor.
There are some strong teams  hi the conference this year and no  team has a
cinch for the championship  as each team has 18 games to  play..  High
Scores  The Night Raiders lead the scoring  with an average of 40 points a 
game, but the Revelers are close  with 38 points. Flowers leads the 
individual scoring with 39 points,  Stoddard is second with 35. Some  teams
have played three games while  others have played onyl two.  This is the
present standing: .  Team— Won Lost Av.  Relics 3 0 1000  Night
Raiders .3 0 1000  Viking Manor 2 0 1000  Co-op 2 1 667  Revelers 1 1 500 
Doormats..... 1 3 250  Bachelors club 0 2 000  Mullins Angels 0 2 000 
Harlequins 0 3 000  CO-OPS CLEAN  UP DOORMATS  / .While on the subject, it
Wouldn't be a bad idea for some of the political  candidates who have
aspirations in the coming election to stress  the need of a trophy case for
the Ideal school... There are cups and trophies  enough in school to fill
th main hall. But as long as they are locked  up in the vault and; in the
attic, ilts a cinch they won't be  en.  Now back to Hfe. It looks like
Ernie Nevers at Stanford. When Pop  Warner threw up the reins at Stanford
Monday, to take up the duties of  head coach at Temple University of
Philadelphia, he threw the job right  in Nevers' lap. Nevers knows plenty
of football and has proven bis worth  to Stanford in the role of assistant
coach under Warner. It was Pop's  last wish that Nevers be appointed to
fill his shoes. . •  For the purposes of voting on a  proposed
amendment to the constitution,  members of the W. A. A. will  meet this
noon hour at 12:35 in  room 119.  The proposed amendment reads  as follows:
In order to receive an  award for a class team a woman  must be a member of
the W. A. A.  at the time she is participating on  class teams.  o  Viking
Manor and  Revelers Manage  Win Over Set-ups  The Revelers went on a
scoring  spree and defeated the Bachelor's  club 43 to 25 last Monday night
in  the men's gym. Hammett and  Matheny, Reveler forwards, were  tied for
scoring honors, with 11  markers each. Bushby led the defeated  squad by
chalking up 10  points. .-.  In a game following the above one,  Viking
Manor kept their unbeaten  record intact by swamping a weak  Mullins
Angel's quintet 31 to 10.  John Gable, classy forward, continued  to be
high scorer for the  Manor by gathering 13 points.  Revelers, 43 Bachelors,
25  Hammett 11 ....L....F. Minnehan 4  Matheny 11....1 P. Keck 4  Williams
8 ,..:... C........ Behme 4  Sherwood 1... G... Smith 0  Hall 6
...........G...: .. Bushby 10  Christy 0 Sub :... Bickford3  Referee:
Robinson.  Manor, .31 'Angels, 10  Robinson 0 .....F... Allen 0  Gable 13
...P. '. Stiger 0  Kean8 ....................C. Beckenu  Knutsonl
.......„...G.......... Henrikson4  Brewer 6 ....„ .....G: Keck
6  Lewis 3 ......: ..Sub McNeelyO  Y Referee: Gunn..  ..; lt;*-. .
•• —r p — ~  ::' Sample units are being written by 
many science teachers in the state.  These units are tested by'actual use 
before being included in the permanent  course. 
•''v-:f;;'::;.:'.;v,-^-i -HO— . •  •4',! Tlie
choosing of the winrier of a  beard growb^con^st added much 
testandattracted quite a crowd to  tiw arwual p ^ ^  dena Junior col^ 
Jimmy Phelan has the University of Washington on the spot. It is a  cich he
can almost Write his own price when he puts his name on the  doited line in
the near future.  How good are these Yellowjackets of West Seattle. Mathews
had welded  together one swet bunch of football players. Max Krause,
Gonzaga's  contribution to men of All-America calibre will be in the West
Seattle  line-up against the University of Washington Saturday. According
to the  dope it will be a great battle. The athletic club is plenty tough
and will  push the University to the limit December 10th.  Carter Hi-Point
Co-op Hoopster;  35-20 Is Score  Showing a fast breaking, sure  shot team,
the Co-ops emerged victorious  over the Doormats with the  score 35 to 20.
Penny Carter, Co-op  forward, gathered high point honors  with 16 markers.'
Glopin and  Miller for the Doormats contributed  with eight points apiece.-
 Co-op; 35 Doormats, 20  Lensrud 2 P. Glopin 8  Sulkosky 0 .P. Reed 2 
Carter 16 C...:.... Richardson 0  SJwaschka 8 G Miller 8  Griffenl G Perry
2  Cockerill 8 G Jones 0  G McDonald 0  Referee: Sam Carver.  Harlequins
ves Night Raiders  at  A Lovely Stocking  for Gift Giving  No. 202  by
Humming Bird  A stocking that rivals a spider's web for sheerness but 
wears well if properly taken care of . . . for instance, one  one of our
salesgirls, wore a pair of them every day for three  three weeks, rinsing
them each night. They're all silk,,  finished with lace tops.  $1.00 per
pair  "A  * — •• I|I  Norman Bright  (Continued from Page
One)  Well, Fans and Fanettes, here's the price story of the week. Yours
truly  recently wrote to a number of high schools for some basktball games
dur-ins  the Christmas vacation. And not being overly flush with funds,
asked  for a nominal sum-of 020 per game for expenses-^And here's the reply
 from a coach not so far from my home town. "Dear Mr. Rockey: We  wouldn't
mind paying expenses of your team, but we sure hate to think  of putting
the boys through school next quarter. Hoping to hear from  you again, we
remain yours very truly,—". • * •  Take it Away—! 
W. A. A. Members  Presented Awards  Final plans for the W. A. A. quarterly 
banquet to be held on Saturday,  December 10 at 1: o'clock in the  Edens
hall dining room, are PPPPP