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Northwest Viking - 1935 January 25 - Page 1



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VOL. X X X I I I — N O . 15 W A S H I N G T O N S T A T E N O
R M A L SCHOOL, B E L L I N G H A M , W A S H I N G T ON Friday, January 2
5 , 1933  Nortnalite  EXPENDITURES  SALARIES  LITTLE FLEA  KLD7SUN  By Pat
Allan  Tragic consequences of newspaper  "cut school expenditure" jingo 
threaten the very existence of the  public schools in the state. A people 
forgetting the welfare of its  children has cut educational appropriation 
from 33% million dollars  in 1930 to 21% million dollars in  1933. This
reduction, more than  35 per cent, will have inevitably  disastrous
consequences.  On the school cost basis of 1931,  current appropriations
will enable  schools to remain open only until  the second week in January.
The  reduced cost basis of last year will  prolong the term only until the
third  week of February. The loss of potential  power accrued to the state 
by the education of its children will  be tremendous. The collapse of the 
school system will without a doubt  mean the collapse of other democratic 
institutions.  Winter Budget  Completed By  Control Board  Candy And Ice
Cream Are  On Cash Basis At  School Store  Put  Survey by Northwest Viking
Shows  Candidates Nominated by Students  Have Varied Interests in Affairs 
When a survey of the successful  nominees was made, it was discover-plays. 
At present she is managing  editor of the Viking. Her other main 
Richardson and Millikan Win  Prexy Primary Nominations;  Hartley and Smith
are Choice  Co-op Gets Register  Recreational Program Discussed  At Board
Meeting  Further reduction of the already  minute salaries of teachers is
assured  unless the legislature chooses  to devise means of providing
revenue.  Last year twenty-two teachers  received less than three hundred 
dollars for the year's servces. Fifteen  of these received less than two 
hundred dollars. Eleven hundred  and thirty-nine teachers received  less
than the extinct NRA minimum  for 52 weeks under the President's 
agreement. 2,342 teachers receive  less than the lowest paid vendor in  a
state liquor store.  The training for state liquor  vendors is aptly
.described by  H. L. Mencken, who once asked  one of them the nature of a
dry  wine. That worthy replied,  "One that isn't wettish."  Winter
quarter's budget of student  fees was presented and accepted by  the Board
of Control at their regular  meeting held last Wednesday  afternoon. Men's
athletics was given  $3 per student ticket, while the  social fund and
Northwest Viking  received $1, and women's athletics  and the division of
drama received  $.25. The budget was figured on an  enrollment of 630
full-credit students.  Special students are not required  to purchase
activities tickets.  Dr. A. C. Hicks presented to the  board a report of
the recreational  program committee. The program  was discussed by the
board members,  and the secretary was instructed  to order equipment v/hich
was  suggested as necessary by the committee.  Final action of the board 
will be taken at next week's meeting.  Charges Limited  To take effect
immediately was  the motion which permits no students  to put candy or
ice-cream  purchases on their Co-op bill. The  board also authorized the
purchase  of a suitable cash register to replace  the inadequate register
now in use.  Rec hour tryouts of orchestras  were postponed one week.
Students  will vote on February 1 which orchestra  they wish to play for
the  remainder of the quarter. A union  orchestra will play this afternoon.
 The board plans to make a few  changes in the by-laws after the 
elections.  o  ed that many of the candidates orig- interest is golf, 
inally came from other countries, i Bob Hartley is in his eighth quar- 
Other facts about them have beenjter at Normal. He was graduated 
unearthed, and are hereby present-1 from Lynden high school. Hart-ed:  |
ley's main interests are basketball  President  Gordon Richardson, a home
product,  was graduated from Whatcom  high school in Bellingham. Since 
coming to Normal, Richardson has  had prominent positions. Last year  he
was editor of the Klipsun, and is  at present secretary of the Board of 
Control. He works part time at the  Co-op.  Gordon Millikan, the other
successful  nominee, is now in his fifth  quarter at Normal. He comes from 
Pateros, Washington. Millikan has  become prominently associated with 
clubs and he is now president of the  Social Science club, and vice
president  of the Inter-club council.  Vice-President  A contribution of
Fairhaven is  Nancy Jane Smith, candidate for  vice-president. This is Miss
Smith's  fifth quarter at school, and since  coming, she has been in
several  and studying. He is employed at  the Normal library.  Four-Quarter
Representative  Although born in Norway, Oscar  Svarlien was graduated from
Fair-haven  high school. This is his fifth  quarter, and he is employed
under  the FERA. His main hobby is hiking.  The WAA candidate, Agnes
Martin,  comes to us from Canada. She  is reputed to be an excellent
swimmer  and tennis player.  Four-Quarter Representative  Blanche Pearce,
who comes from  Burlington, is another "foreigner",  for she was born in
England. She is  a second-quarter sophomore, and is  a candidate of the
YWCA.  Born in Red Deer, Alberta, Louise  Schulz came to this country and 
was graduated from Whatcom high  school. This is Miss Scl;ulz's eighth 
quarter.  Frosh Jubilee Has  Sports For Theme  Planned by Miller and
Wellman  Basketball Decorative Motif  Carried Out  Governor Offers 
Biennium Budget  Allowance Is Given for Physical  Education Building; 
Prexy Pleased  Hope is again rising that the  physical education building
may become  a reality. In Governor Clarence  D. Martin's budget, submitted 
to the legislature, he recommended  a biennium appropriation  of $428,000
and a building appropriation  of $218,500, for Bellingham  Normal. 
Shakespearean  Drama Offered  "Twelfth Night" To Be Presented  As Quarterly
Production  Of Drama Club  Council Will Discuss  Luncheons, Conflicts;  New
Ruling Effective  Demagogues may blat about  "teachers' ideals of social
service,  not salary," but what self-respecting  human is willing to train
three  years to enter a profession which  pays less than twenty-five
dollars a  month?  "Big fleas have little fleas and  ministers have
secretaries." Louis  Shaffer, dynamic wart on the incumbent  board's
proboscis, wants to  be little flea to the next Board of  Control. Elect
him, new board, but  first stretch a piece of adhesive tape  tightly from
his nose to his chin.  Luncheons for assembly speakers  and conflicts in
club calendars are  the issues to be discussed at the  Inter-Club council
meeting January  30.  Conflicts have resulted in club  calendars because of
the basketball  schedule. These conflicts may necessitate  minor changes in
the calendars.  It has been recently decided by  the council that if the
representative  of a club misss two successive  meetings that club will no
longer  remain approved.  o —  Moffett To Present  Alkisiah Club
History  With all the political criticism of  the expense for the annual
and all  the dirty slaps at the editor of that  publication, no one has as
yet suggested  a means whereby its expense  to the students might be
reduced.  May we, while gently hinting at the  inanity of intending to do a
thing  without knowing how, suggest a  remedy for the much criticised ills?
 Give the business manager something  to do other than signing contracts 
and requisitions. Devote a  section at the back of the annual  to
advertising. Bellingham merchants  are wild to give themselves  publicity
there. By giving them  what they want the cost to the  students might be
reduced to little  over one dollar.  On next Monday evening, the  Alkisiah
club will hold its regular  meeting in the club room of Edens  hall. The
gathering will be in the  nature of a review of the history  of the club,
which is the oldest organization  of its kind in this school.  The feature
of Monday night's  meeting will be an address by Miss  Mildred Moffett, who
will speak on  the subject, "The History of the  Traditions of Alkisiah". 
Frisby Fresk has an unusual way  of requestng food at the dorm.  Passing
his plate, he says:  "Will you potato me, please?"  "Will you meat me,
please?"  "Will you carrot me, please?"  ' B u t - . _ \ ; ' / . . : " '
'!,'.•;.'' ;'. V'':"'  "Will you pour me a glass of milk,  please?" 
Normal Carpenter Shop  Is Completely Demolished  Damages amounting to
approximately  $2,000 were counted at the  Normal school late Monday night.
 The warming weather melted the  snow, dislodging rocks which were  sent
crashing down Sehome onto  the carpenter shop, which is located  at the
foot of the hill.  The building which is comparatively  new was completely
destroyed.  Work has been started towards  clearing up the ruins, as there
are  a few things worth salvaging.   gt;: Investigations have been made as 
to the possibilities of another slide  so that measures may be taken to 
prevent another costly disaster.  Building To Be Erected  Of the $218,500,
$200,000 will be  used for the long-dreamed-of physical  education
building. The $18,-  500, if obtained, will be used for a  new roof on the
main building, and  for work on the new athletic field.  This
recommendation was made  with the proviso that state and federal  building
money is available.  President C. H. Fisher expressed  satisfaction over
the governor's two-year  appropriation recommendation.  This amount is for
salaries, wages,  and operations. The recommendation  was about $40,000
less than the  board asked, but it is about $85,000  more than was allowed
for the  present biennium.  o  Mc Ilvain Prefers  Pottery to Paintings 
Southwestern Indianfc have recently  been called the real pioneers  in art.
In California, Arizona, and  Nevada many cliffs and rocks are  painted with
surrealistic paintings  done with special oils. The Indians  believe these
pictures to be done  by "spirit painters", but scientists  today accredit
this super-natural  work to the nightly visits of the  medicine man. 
"Since these pictures have, little  logic and no plan of construction, 
they have little value in real art,"  states Miss Dorothy Mcllvain. art 
instructor. "Personally, I admire  Indian pottery and much of then-talent, 
but surrealistic painting has  no meaning to me."  o  New Student Officials
 May Expect Initiation  Following its usual custom, the  Board of Control
will give a banquet  for its members sometime later  in the quarter.
Christine Albers will  be in charge of the affair, which  will be held at a
down town hotel.  Each quarter, in the past, the  board has been in the
habit of  holding some sort of social function  honoring the members of
that body,  and this quarter, it will honor not  only the old members, but
the new  ones as well, and will probably take I  the form of an initiation
for them.  By V. H. Hoppe  There are four reasons why the  department of
Drama should produce  "Twelveth Night", or any  Shakespearean play. The
first is  because Hollywood doesn't. Practically  all modern plays are
being  screened by the movies and amateurs  cannot produce until the 
screen version is released.  The second reason is that Shakespeare  should
be kept alive by the  schools. The best method of appreciating  Shakespeare
is to enact  his plays. Thirdly, "the play's the  thing" after all. These
old plays  are still vital 



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Northwest Viking - 1935 January 25 - Page 2



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WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, BELLINGHAM. WASHINGTON  ^ ^ ^ - . ^
• The^No^^^^dKING  Established 1899  published every Friday except
during the month of  September by the Associated Students, Washington 
State Normal School, Bellingham.  Entered in the Postoffice at Bellingham,
Washington,  as second class matter by virtue of the act of  March 3,1879.
^_  Printed by the Miller   Sutherlen Printing Company,  Bellingham
National Bank Building.  Subscription rate by mail, $3.00 per year in
advance.  Advertising rates on application.  Address all communications,
other than news items,  to the Business Manager of the Northwest Viking, 
Bellingham, Wash. Telephone 3180.  Take Your Own Pillow  RALPH SHENENBERGER
- — E d i t oT  NANCY JANE SMITH Managing Editor  VICTOR DICKINSON -
...--Business Manager  DICK BELL - --Advertising Manager  NEWS DESK 
FRANCIS FISHER - N e * s E d l t or  FEATURE DESK  CALISTA SIMONDS •
- ^*t u r e E d i t or  SPORTS DESK  BOB LINDSLEY - BP«tB Editor  PHIL
CAMPBELL - - -Assistant Editor  SOCD3TY DESK  CATHERINE MCDONALD Co-Editor 
~ « « - T ™ Co-Editor  MAXINE MICKLE  ART DESK  DOKAVAN
BEEVES *«« * * '  Get Ballot Here!  / Wish to Nominate  _as the
most popular WOMAN on  the campus, for the KLIPSUN  POPULARITY CONTEST.  /
Wish to Nominate  _as the most popular MAN on the  campus, for the KLIPSUN
POPULARITY  CONTEST.  Relaxation?  Here's How  Next week we will probably
have our first chance  to enter into and pass judgment on the new
recreational  program. The program, drawn up by the recreational 
committee, ofters an excellent chance for students  to become interested in
activities which may help  them in their teaching field.  The basic idea of
the program, as explained by the  backers when they introduced it before
the Board of  Control last quarter is simple. It is to round out the 
social life of those students in school who do not  dance Previous to this
time no recreational program  has been offered non-dancers, although there
have  occasionally been a few bridge tables set up in one  corner of the
dance floor. However it was far more  conspicuous for a few to play bridge
all evening than  to stay away entirely. The class parties are all dance 
affairs, while most of the school organizations sponsor  dances once a
quarter. All this made it impossible  for many students to meet school
associates away from  me school setting, or outside of the decidedly
limited  club affairs.  The W club steps from the beaten trail tonight 
when they sponsor a roller skating party. This type  of affair as a school
function comes seldom, but appears  to be a bright idea to credit to the
athletes.  "Executioner Waits"  Grampus' Weather  "Glacial ice sheet halted
by a  cloudy south wind, but damage is  heavy up north at Ferndale. Natives
 drink fire water to keep warm.  Barton and Daniels go— " roars 
greasy weather Grampus.  I had to ban the last of that on  account of
Prosh. This was to be  a "Grampus's" article, but me-thinks  I must add,
"Damage to education  irreparable when Normal is  closed for twenty-four
hours because  of a wind from Siberia"—personally,  I thought it was
from the northeast  but I'm scared of public opin- i  ion.  To return to
Grampus, my frost  bitten readers, there he sits toast-in'  his shins by'
the proverbial stove  like ah oven bird. His whiskers  quiver and he
speaks, "Wall, squirt,"  that's what he always calls me—  "these
icycles are nigh on to as  bad as the ones that we had in the  winter of,
Oh—le'me see, wall, the  winter of eighty-five."  "But it's raining
now," Grampus.  "So it is, squirt, many a winter  I've spent on a raft just
going up  and down with the rain, this is the  rainiest region."  "Aw, now
Grampus, if it was as  cold as you said; it would always  have been ice
back in 1885."  "Many a time I've had to chop  holes in the ice to give the
old  Nooksack a chance to run,"  says.  o  As can be seen from the above, 
skates have been the cause of this  three-point landing, and they will 
probably be the cause of many tonight,  at the big skating party, being 
given by the W club. If you  can's skate, come and learn. If you  can, come
anyway!  *es Looking Thru  Reasonless Rhymes  By Who Knows  Little Jack
Horner  Sat in a corner  Eating his Christmas pie,  He stuck in his thumb 
And pulled out a plum  And said "How'm I doin'?"  he  Reaching For  The
Stars  There was a crooked man,  Who walked a crooked mile,  He found a
crooked sixpence  Against a crooked stile.  He bought a crooked deck,  And
played a crooked game,  Now nobody likes him  And he's got a crooked name. 
Twinkle, twinkle, little star,  How I wonder what you are.  Up above the
world so high,  Remind me to ask Miss Piatt.  Three blind mice, three blind
mice,  See how they run, see how they run.  They're running away from the 
farmer's wife,  She'll cut off their tails with a  carving knife.  Did you
ever see such a thing in  your life?  No, I never did.  -Executioner
Waits»-*y Josephine Herbst, Harcourt  Brace and Co., 1934-371 pages.
$2.50.  By Wilson Waylett  in this novel, telling of the disintegration of
the  Traxlers, because of petty internecine squabbles and  growing poverty,
many will find striking parallels to  their own family history.  The book
begins with illness falling on Aaron  Trexler, and placing him at the mercy
of a wife,  Sally, who hates him. It is to rescue some of his  estate from
her that his sister, Anne Wendel, comes  to his bedside and cares for him.
But after his death  the settling of the estate drags interminably and Anne
 dies, having reaped scarcely any of the benefits she  had hoped for
herself and hers.  In general the author does an exxcellent job of 
depicting the family as a group and arranging their  various relationships,
but many of the individual  members do not leave a definite impression.
However,  Anne Wendel seems remarkably real, probably because  Herbst's
earthy metaphors relate so well to  ; her character.  Anne's daughters,
particularly the two younger, receive  more attention than any other
members of the  third generation. Each is a distinctly superior sort  of
person but neither's frantic struggle for happiness  is very successful.
Rosamund, defeated by poverty,  goes to a suicidal death, while he husband
seeks salvation  in the working class movement. The other  sister, Vicky,
with her lover tries the ivory tower  escape but finds it inadequate, and
we are made aware  : that her course will probably follow that of
Rosamund's  husband.  Even David Trexler, most well-to-do of Anne's 
brothers, feels a dark foreboding as the depression  begins. Warned by his
ill health that he has little  time left, he fears the impending crisis
will wipe away  the estate he has spent his life building.  The last scene
leaves one with the feeling that a  change in conditions is brewing; the
"masters of capital"  have danced long enough, "the executioner waits  at
the door."  By Smith and Simonds  Substitute a transportation manager  for
Clark Gable and a script  girl for Loretta Young, add a whiff  of Oakie and
what have you? The  sum total is a psuedo-interview with  these movie
stars.  We succeeded in worming our way  through the throngs of fans, only
to  be met by an adamant desk clerk  who, in a disinterested voice, and 
with words bearing a quality of repetition,  informed us that the actors 
were not at the hotel. Under pressure  he admitted that Oakie and  Gable
were in but both had retired  Shortly afterwards, however,  Oakie walked
gaily in, garbed a la  "Call of the Wild"; a benevolent  smile for all, and
autographs for  a few  About ten o'clock Gable dashed  through the lobby on
his way to a  secluded restaurant.  Reporters Desperate  Desperate at
failure to contact  any other notables, we cornered the  man in charge of
transportation  who, declining an interview, said  that chauffeuring for
Gable was no  more of a thrill than doing the  same for a couple of Viking
reporters,  which puts us on an equal with  movie stars.  Now for the
script girl, BODS  Hoaglund, a very blonde blonde,  with a lovely speaking
voice, who  told us the reactions of the company  to the trip and the
climatic  conditions here. This being the  first real-life action picture
many  of them had ever witnessed, they  were much agog about it all.- 
Gable Fishes  Gable, an enthusiastic Isaac Wal-tonite,  intends to hook
some steel-heads  while in this vicinity. He and  other he-men of the
company, arrived  equipped with guns, fishing  tackle, and other implements
of the  h u n t - ^ „. ~, i  Miss Hoaglund, saying that Clark  was a
dear and a darling, assured  us that we would receive a warm reception 
from him if we could get  entree to him.  So, if the hands of the clock  do
not make faces at the puppy  sitting by the window, we will tell  you next
about Clark Gable at Mt.  Baker Lodge.  Jack be nimble,  Jack be quick,  Or
you'll get burned.  Little Miss Muffett  Sat on a tuffett,  Eating, her
curds and whey,  Along came a spider  And sat down.  Peter, Peter, Pumpkin
eater,  Had a wife and couldn't keep her,  Put her in a pumpkin shell  And
she hated it.  Stage and Screen  Reviews  The American Theatre is delighted
 to announce a splendid series of  first run pictures as well as the 
outstanding second run pictures of  the year to be played in the immediate 
future at this show house.  Following Loretta Young in  "Born To Be Bad"
which was this  star's first picture to be shown in  Bellingham since her
arrival at Mt.  Baker, comes a glamorous new star,  Mady Christians. MGM,
the company  that has found and made more  stars than any other of- the
motion  picture companies and boast of such  



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Northwest Viking - 1935 January 25 - Page 3



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WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, BELLINGHAM. WASHINGTON  a OE 
Remember the  W Club Smoker  301 IOE Viki ing  aoi  Varsity Plays  Cheney
Tonight  aoi IOE  What's  The  Score  By  By Phil Campbell  The question of
having boating  or crew as a sport in this school  was brought into
prominence this  week with the reverting of Waldo  field into a real lake.
It was suggested  that the track in front of  the grandstand would make an
ideal  straight-a-way for a good boat  race.  Incidentally tke purchase of
the  tract at Lake Whatcom, known as  Normalstad, was done with the idea 
that someday the WSNS could have  a crew of its own. Possibly when  the
school gets back on its feet financially  this question may be  brought up,
at least a course in  boating would add variety to the  sports program.  *
# * *  When the Vikings face the El-lensburg  Wildcats and the Cheney 
Savages this week they will be  running up against two of the classiest 
basket squads in the state.  Cheney has met just about everything  in the
eastern part of the  state and has beaten all but WSC.  The Savages knocked
over the Idaho  Vandals, the team that beat the  U of W, and forced the WSC
Cougars  to rally in the last few minutes  to win.  Coach Leo Nicholson's
Ellensburg  Wildcats are as wild as ever this  year and have an impressive
early  season record. Last year they caused  the Vikings plenty of worry
when  they defeated them 42-21 over at  the Rodeo city only to come back 
over here for their return game and  narrowly missed getting scalped. 
Nicholson centers his attack around  Sesby, Sill and Marks, three of his 
outstanding players.  * * * *  The Northwest Vikings continued  to slip in
the intramural  race this week by taking their  second straight trimming-,
this  time at the hands of Jim  Ahern's Portsiders. The loss of  Stone and
Carver is beginning  to be felt and coupled with the  inability of Kean and
Hager to  take part in the games^ consistently  the Vikings are liable to 
find themselves too close to the  cellar before the race is over.  Vikings
Journey East in Face  Of Storm and Floods; Battle  Cheney Five Tomorrow
Night  The Tomahawks, a boy's service  club at Cheney, is donating a
basketball  award that is to be known  as the Tomahawk tri-Normal
Basketball  trophy. The school that  wins it three years in succession will
 have permanent possession of it.  The awarding of this trophy should 
serve to stimulate teams to greater  heights.  * * * *  Did you know that
it was not  Connie Mack, but his son Earl  Mack, who originated thje recent
 tour to Japan and that Earl did all  the planning for the tour? At the 
last moment he was unable to make  the trip and so Connie Mack got  all the
credit... The players did not  forget him, however, and in appreciation 
they sent - him a wrist  watch from Japan.  * * * * *  Prom now on this
column promises  not to mention the Northwest  Viking intramural team but
once  during the remainder of the quarter.  This note should relieve some 
of the few readers of this column.  o  Squad Left Wednesday; Tangled  With
Ellensburg In Season  Opener Last Night  Nine Players Make Trip  Team Will
Meet Cheney Outfit on  Home Court, January 31  The Vikings were defeated 
last night, 33 to 22, by the Ellensburg  Wildcats at Ellensburg.  Bud
Vander Griend was high  man for the lcals with 8 points.  Undaunted by
Mother Nature's  adversities now on display, Coach C.  F. Lappesbusch
headed each last  Wednesday with his band of casaba  tossers to meet the
strong Ellensburg  and Cheney fives. This is the  first extended tour for
the Vikings  this season, and will mark the opening  of the tri-normal race
for them.  The hopeful Norsemen expected  to reach Ellensburg in time to
tangle  with the Wildcats Thursday  night. Prom there they will entrain 
for Cheney and the Saturday night  engagement with the Savages.  Both
Ellensburg and Cheney  have reputedly strong teams this  year and Coach
Lappenbusch  did not hesitate to voice his respect  for them. However, he 
has been pleased by the showing  of the Vikings to date and  hopes for at
least a fifty-fifty  break on the trip.  Harold Fitzer's return to school 
and to the squad has added considerably  to the strength of the team, 
especially offensively. His deadly  shooting eye is always a dangerous 
threat to the opposition. The work  of Zambas at guard and Dick Car  ver at
center has also been a bright  spot on the Viking's outlook.  thers who
made the jaunt were  Vander Griend, Dombroski, Stutz,  McKenzie, Taylor,
Gagnon, and  Manager Ace Winsor.  Teams Compared  Some conclusion as to the
relative  strengths of Ellensburg and  Bellingham may be drawn from the 
fact that the Wildcats nosed out the  University of British Columbia 
quintet several weeks ago. The Vikings  were defeated by UBC last  Friday,
33 ot 29.  Sesby and Marks have been the  two scoring aces of the
Ellensburg  five thus far this season, and will  have to be bottled up if
the Vikings  expect to come away with a victory  there.  Cheney's team
basts of three  veterans, Peterson, Danekas,  and Rebensdorf. Eustace,
extremely  tall center, and Kerns  at guard complete this strong  layout. 
But there will be no rest for the  weary Vikings when they return  home
again, for they will have two  heavy assignments for the coming  week-end
bearing down on them  like a Femdale silver thaw. They  are slated to
tangle with the Cheney  Savages again Thursday night,  January 31, at home.
This will be  the first conference game at home,  and should be a bangout
tussle for  the fans to witness.  o  Men's Club Win  Over Scotchmen  By
Large Score  I n a fast and interesting game  played last Tuesday the Men's
club  won over the Scotchmen by a decisive  score of 40-23. The Highlanders
 gave the Clubmen a battle  for about ten minutes of the first  half, but
at this point the "big  guns" of the club started to find  the range, and
the score took a  one-sided effect.  Starlund again was among the  high
scorers with 10 points, but his  work was overshadowed by the  basket
tossing of his teammates,  Oltman and Stockton, who garnered  11 markers
each, and that of Stuur-man,  of the Scotties, who was high  man with 12. 
Men's Club, 40 Scotchmen, 23  Oltman. 11 F Stuurman, 12  Kenoyer, 2 F-
Wickstrom, 2  Starlund, 10 C S. Kvinsland, 3  Divird, 5 G H. Kvinsland, 0 
Stockton, 11 G. Richardson, 6  Randrup, 1 Sub Trimble, 0  Big W Club Smoker
Rounding  Into Shape As Boys Work Hard  For Next Friday Night's Show 
Reporters Lose  Second Straight  Game of Season  The once-powerful
Northwest Viking  intramural squad lost its second  straight game of the
second  half last Tuesday night when the  Portisders handed them a 23 to 17
 defeat. The game was closer than  the score indicates and was one of  the
best seen this year.  Half time found the reporters  leading by a one-point
margin, 11 to  10. However, with Meyer and Goff  scoring, the Southpaws
jumped into  a lead from which they were never  headed. The newsmen managed
to  tie the count at 17 all, but that was  their last threat.  Vikings 17
Portsiders 23  Shangle 2 F Goff 5  Lindsley 3 -F Singer 2  Shenenberger 2
..C Meyers 8  Wooten 6 G. Hoekstra 2  Angel 4 _ G — Ahern 6  Miller
and Guglimo Will Supply  Action For Main Event on  Boxing Card  With the
WAA  By Joan Hoppe  STUDENTS!  At Last the  T Y P E W R I T E R  Everyone
Has Been  Waiting For  L.C. SMITH  SILENT  PORTABLE AND STANDARD  MACHINES 
Union Printing  Co.  421 Cornwall Phone 1264  Learn to swim and save the 
trouble of blowing up your water  wings every time you want to cross  the
campus.  Unless the heavens cease pouring  forth torrents of moisture this 
may be a good advertisement for  Normal swim hour. It has also  been
suggested that a raft and diving  board be anchored half way between  the
building and the library  for those swimmers who, because ot  shortness of
breath, are unable to  take the whole distance at one time.  Row boats tied
to the lamp posts  would also be an added convenience  for students and
faculty who do not  know how to swim and can't afford  an inner tube.  * *
* *  The opportunity of a lifetime  —Maxine Iddins was heard to  say
that for a dollar she'd swim  across Lake Waldo—but if anyone  has a
stray quarter she's  sure to bring down her price  with a little urging.  *
* * *  If the WAA skiiers return from  their trip to Heather Meadows
diminished  in number no one need  w o r r y—the missing travelers
will  probably have gotten parts in "The  Call of the Wild". They can
always  use another Eskimo in these mob  scenes of the wild North.  



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Northwest Viking - 1935 January 25 - Page 4



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 - r ^ \ J C ^ H I ^ G T O N S T A T E N O R M A L SCHOOL, B E L L I
N G H A M , W A S H I N G T ON  Number of Students Go Home  For Week-end;
Others Go To  Glacier and Heather Meadows  Terrace House Has Big Waffle 
Breakfast Followed by  Card Games  Houses Elect Officers  Johnson Just
Escapes Being Snow-  Bound in Vancouver  Alcina Allen and Mildred Hendricks
 went to Sedro-Woolley last  Saturday and returned Sunday.  Miss Florence
Johnson spent the  week-end in Vancouver, B. C. She  says there was a lot
of snow and  that her bus was the last to go  through before the road was
closed.  Helen Griffith reports being snowbound  last week at her home in
Alger.  Chet Dombroski, Don Holder, and  Bud Vander Griend went to Heather 
Meadows and Glacier to see the  movie set-up and to ski.  Gladys Jacobson,
an out-of-town  guest, has been visiting Virginia  Barbo for the past week.
 Frances Mueller and Helen Gaddis  spent the week-end at their home  in
Sedro-Woolley.  Elna Trask visited her parents in  Mount Vernon over
Saturday and  Sunday.  Margaret Carmichael spent the  week-end visiting in
Seattle.  o  Mabel Rolls was elected president  of Downs house at, a
meeting held  last week. Other officers elected  were: social chairman,
Virginia Davenport;  reporters, Margaret Win-terhalter.  Senior Honor Court
 Body To Be Created  Judiciary and Advisory Body To  Further Student
Co-operation  Collette Court has several new students  who have enrolled
for the  winter quarter, including Selma Set-terman,  Seattle; Nita Beak
and  Florence Gasser, Omak; and Mrs.  R. McBeath, Alaska.  o  The girls in
Mrs. McCrmick's  house had a waffle breakfast Sunday  morning, January 20,
after  which the freshman girls were initiated,  and cards were enjoyed. 
Varied Violin Program  Presented in Assembly  Miss Viola Wasterlain,
violinist,  presented a varied program before  the student assembly
Tuesday, January  22. She was accompanied by  Alice Spencer Weiss.  Miss
Wasterlain, who is a member  of the Seattle Symphony orchestra,  has
appeared before the Normal  assembly several times in the past.  o  Women's
PE Class  Schedule Is Changed  Due to a conflict of space and  classes, the
women's physical educa  tion schedule has been changed for  the winter
quarter.  Miss Ruth Weythman's games  class that was held on Tuesday and 
Thursday at 2 o'clock, has been discontinued.  The rhythm class formerly 
taught at 2 o'clock on Tuesday  and Thursday is now being  held on
Wednesday and Friday at 2.  Miss Mildred Jewell has charge of  this class. 
All women's physical education is  taught in the large gym, leaving the 
small gym entirely for the men.  Believing that the peace and dignity  of
the school can be greatly  furthered by the acceptance of more 
responsibility and a greater co-operation  among the students, I, President
 C. H. Fisher, do hereby create,  at the request of the Student  Committee
on Traditions, a judiciary  and advisory body to be known  as the Senior
Honor Court, the duties  and privileges of which are set  forth by the
committee." This is  the purpose of the preamble as  stated by President
Fisher.  This Senior Honor Court is to be  composed of five members, two of
 which will be selected by the faculty  from the Junior-Senior class. Two 
will be elected by secret ballot, and  one member shall be president of 
the class.  This Honor Court will have jurisdiction  over all members of
the  student body. It will accept any  and all evidence or testimony
presented  to the court by any and all  parties concerned and weigh it with
 consideration.  Board Will Decide  On New Program  Next week the Board of
Control  will pass on the new Recreational  Program. The program is in
charge  i  of Christine Albers of the students,  and Dr. Arthur C. Hicks,
of the faculty.  The west end of Edens hall will  be the scene of this new
program.  Ping pong and card tables will be  installed. Other necessary
equipment  will also be purchased.  This plan will be in operation  from,
six forty-five to eight o'clock  on Mondays to Thursdays, inclusive,  and
from seven to eleven o'clock on  Friday evenings. No designated  time,has
been set for Saturdays and  Sundays.  Big Frolic Tonight  At Auditorium Has
 W Men's Backing  Party for Normal Skaters Will  Be Sponsored by Athletes 
At Local Rink  With the husky heroes of the  W club as sponsors, the
skating  party to be held tonight at the  State Street auditorium should be
 a success. And especially so' if the  sponsors are on hand when the  doors
open at 8 o'clock.  So all those maidens who haven't  yet met certain blue
- sweatered  ideals are advised to get their tickets  at the Co-op right
away. They  are 15 cents.  When accosted by a, reporter on  the subject the
members of the  committee were strangely noncommittal.  They said they
expected  it to be '"lots of fun" and that  they hoped students would
"start  buying tickets right away." The  order and nature of events is a 
secret to be divulged tonight.  o  Viking Staff Planning  A Week-end Party
At  Baker Cabin in Glacier  February 1, 2, 3, are the dates set  for the
Viking week-end party to  be held at the Mt. Baker club cabin  at Glacier. 
Printed invitations to the party  are being issued by the entertainment 
and invitation committee of  which Ralph hSenenberger is chairman, 
assisted by Bob Lindsley and  Nancy Jane Smith.  Maxine Mickle is chairman
of the  food committee, with Joan Hoppe  and Margaret Morris assisting
her.'  Philip Campbell is chairman of the  transportation committee 
Penguin Prom to be  Held by League  Women February  Girls Are Urged To Sign
Up For  The eLague Infirmal If  It's Possible  The Penguin Prom which is
the  quarterly Women's League Infirmal  is to be held at the Crystal 
ballroom at the Leopold hotel, February  9. A penguin idea, featuring  that
unique bird of the north, is to  be carried out at the dance.  At the
former dances girls living  at the Edens hall dormitory could  not attend
the Women's Informals,  but contrary to this custom it is  thought that the
dance will be open  to these girls this quarter.  "I would like to stress
the importance  of more girls signing up for  the dance," says Sara
Jamieson,  "unless they do it will not be possible  to hold the dance." 
Johnny Miller's orchestra will furnish  the music.  Klipsun Popularity
Contest  Prizes Announced; Choice  Will be Made At Election  Fourteen
Players  Receive Sweaters  Art Bagley, Star Backfield Man,  Gets Three
Striper  New Deal Philosophy  Expounded by Arntzen  To Psychology Group 
After developing the reasons for  and historic background of the New  Deal,
the discussion led by E. J.  Arntzen, social science instructor,  at the
Psychology-Philosophy club  meeting Wednesday evening, centered  around the
nature and purposes  of the New Deal itself.  The purpose of the New
Dealers,  as outlined by Arntzen, is not to  destroy capitalism or to
abolish institutions  of private property and  individual enterprise, nor
is it an  attempt to establish some kind of  socialism. The program of the
New  "A large crowd, plenty of food, Deal is one of social reorganization 
and a good time is guaranteed to and reconstruction so as to re-estab 
everyone attending the party," says  Nancy Jane Smith, managing editor  of
the Viking.  A week-end party of this type is  usually held every quarter
by the  Viking staff.  — o  Hicks Offers Courses  In Byron and
Shelley  Courses in Byron ,and Shelley  which have not been taught
previously  at the Normal, are being of- Mabel Rolle was elected president 
fered as English electives this quar- J 0f Downs house at a house meeting 
lish the great American tradition  of democratic individualism.  "True
individualism in the democratic  sense was the prevailing condition  in the
early history of the  United States, explained Arntzen.  It can be
described as that condition  of life where property ownership  is widely
diffused, where the  social outlook is one of neighborly  interest and
humanitarian concern  for the general welfare."  Fourteen football
lettermen were  proudly displaying their new sweaters  through the halls
and classrooms  Wednesday morning. Included in  the list were Art Bagley,
star back-field  man, who had three stripes,  Chet Ullin, Bill Frender, and
Mike  Tomco who each had two, and those  with one stripe were Fay Franklin,
 Bill Ames, Gene Waara, Clyde Mac-  Kenzie, Jim Miller, Fred Guglomo,  Don
Holder, and Morris Tarte.  Fearing stage fright, the men did  not have
their sweaters presented  in the assembly, which usually is the  case, but
instead, Harry Winsor,  football manager, had the honor of  giving out the
sweaters to the boys  in the Men's dressing room.  o  'Society Boys' Will 
Play at Mens Hop  " 'Member the good time we had at  the Men's club dance
last quarter?  Well, we're putting on another one  Saturday, February 2, in
the Crystal  ballroom of the Leopold hotel which  will put the last one
entirely in the  shade," says Emil Starlund.  Starlund, who is in charge of
the  entertainment committee, says special  stress will be put on the
school  letters WWCE. Ken Roberts' orchestra  from Everett and Seattle 
will furnish a mixed program of  dance music. The social will continue 
from 9 until 12 o'clock.  o  Viking Staff Welcomes  Reporters With Party 
Nine new shows and two repertory  companies opened on Broadway last  week.
Not since 1927 had the  Christmas-New Year week been so  packed with
premieres.  Among these is "The O'Flynn,"  a tuneful and colorful tale
about  the battles between William of Or  ange and James II of Ireland. 
ter by Dr. A. C. Hicks.  "We are branching out. taking  into account the
literary work of  these poets as well as Classic, Greek,  and Roman
contemporaries," says  Dr. Hicks in commenting upon the  courses.  Since
these poets lived in an age  of great revolutionary change, a  study of
them at this time should  be of special interest to students.  Byron is a
two-credit course while  Shelley is a three-credit course.  held this week.
Other officers elected  were: social chairman, Virginia  Davenport;
reporter, Margaret Win-terhalter.  AVERILL'S  CLASS JEWELRY  Made to Order 
The party celebrating the admittance  of the future Walter Winch-ells  into
the Viking staff is tonight.  A main event will be the reading  of the
interviews that the news reporters  have wrangled from various  'men about
town'.  The party will be held at the  home of Miss Nancy Jane Smith. 
Candy, Subscription to Esquire  Will Go To Winning Girl  And Boy  Make
Nominations Today  Contest Not Open To Wives and  Children of Klipsun Staff
 To the girl, candy. To the boy,  six month's subscription to Esquire, 
naughty-nice magazine for men.  These are the prizes in the annual  Klipsun
popularity contest to be  held next weex. m addition to this,  the winners
will have their pictures  featured in this year's annual.  Nominations Made
Today Only  The co-ed and man will be chosen  Thursday at the final
elections. Nominations  may ne made only by ballots  printed in today's
issue of the  Northwest Viking. Names of the  nominees must be written
legibly in  the blanks provided and the ballot  dropped in the box on the
landing  of the main stairway. They must be  placed there before 5 o'clock
today.  The names of three men and  three women receiving the highest 
number of nominations will be voted  upon by the entire student body  in
Thursday's election.  In case of a tie for third in nomination,  both names
will appear on  Thursday's ballot.  Winners Announced in Viking'  The
winners of the contest will  be awarded their prizes in a hear  assembly.
Their names will be announced  in next week's Northwest  Viking. Until then
the returns will  be kept secret.  Any student who is enrolled in  school
this quarter is eligible for  the contest with one exception.  Members of
the Klipsun staff, their  husbands, wives, or children, will  not be
permitted to enter.  Popularity, no other qualification,  is recommended as
the basis for the  selection. Activity in school life,  academic rating,
personality, are to  be ignored except for their effect  upon the
acquaintances and friendships  of the candidates.  Don Quixote is on the
screen !—  his own dreamy, hollow-eyed, gran  diloquent self flitting
along on his  ribby old steed. The picture was  filmed in France.  WAHL 
Beauty Parlor  j . D. MCDONALD  Prop.  Hunting Season Is Here  f J C p
Western Super X Amunition  Remington and Winchester Arms  We Sell Them
PPPPP