Primary tabs

1935_0308




     ----------

     

Northwest Viking - 1935 March 8 - Page 1



     ----------

     

—-REMEMBEKH!  WAA  PLAYDAY  TOMORROW  as* BEMEMBEH' •
'• 'i  DIVISION  OF DRAMA PLAY  TONIGHT  XOL. XXXIII—NO. 21 
WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, A COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, BELLINGHAM,
WASHINGTON Friday, March 8, 1935  Normalite  LETTER  By Syd Lines  And the
first performance of  "Twelfth Night" is over. That  leaves one more chance
for a boner.  Maybe you remember the time an  ovenealous dramatist "died" a
little  too far down stage and the curtain  came down behind him leaving
the  poor boy there to pull a Lazarus  act before the play could go on. Can
 you thing of a more embarrassing  moment?  -w.sjsr.s-if  there's anything 
that makes me sore  and spoils my whole day  and loses by temper  more than
snow  on the day I  left my raincoat  at school the night before  making it
necessary  to trudge that great  dslance half soaked  its having a sunny 
hot humid afternoon on which  I must carr ymy  heavy old useless raincoat 
home from school  with me so I Wont  have forgotten it  the next morning 
when I wearily trudge  to school again  in the snow,  punctualelhisy our
self  . W.S.N.S.  Members of the school's most  .useless oganizatiqn, out
in the  cold again, are losing their  once marvelous overstuffed-chair 
technique. However, spring is  coming and park benches will  soon be the
vogue.  w.sjsr.s.  Dear Presidents:  I am writeing you in a sorrowful  mood
because I see by the papers  that your wanting to change the  name of my
old almah matter, that  is fine alright but I do hope you  wonte get
stuckup with this newfangled  hifelutin cognowmen. (you  see I still rember
some of my college  learning). When I was still  attending youre
Institushion we all  thogt that plain Normal School was  good enough for
us. It sort of des-tinkwished  us from the wrest of the  cllege kids of are
time, those that  didnut go to Normal school was  ' just not normal you
see. now I was  planing to to send by Kid Percivale  up to Normal school
but now I  now I donte know about it what  with youre trying to chanje its 
name and all that I am kind of  indesided. Do you think it would  put a
stigma on him for the world  to laugh at if he arent a Normal  school kid?
I am thanking you in  advance,  yours truely  an old graduate  W.S.N.S. 
Pacific Exposition  Features Education  Education will have its place at 
the California Pacific International  exposition, to be held next summer. 
The Department of Education has  planned an exhibit ait once unique  and
scientific, built around the  theme, "Education for Good Life."  The'Palace
of Education will embrace  15,000 square feet of exhibit  space. Its
architecture is of Indian  pueblo style, embossed with flowers  and vines. 
The housewife has her place in  this educational exposition, for according 
to Maud I. Murchie, she  will be shown how to get the most  for her money
in the shopping  world, while Mrs. Vita Muesleiseh,  director of the
exposition's educational  department, has arranged exhibits  to cover
nearly every phase  of education; including education  for deaf, blind, and
pnysicaliy handicapped.  Tournaments at  Rec Programs  Attract Players 
Chess, Pinochle, Bridge, Checker  Contests Have Numerous  Participants 
Monday Is Last Date  Martin and Newlean In Charge  Of Challenge Games  That
the quieter pastimes have not  been overlooked by the students at  Normal
is proved by the number of  entrants in the tournaments being  played this
week as a part of the  recreational program in the Edens  Hall cafeteria.
Twenty-six people  have signed up for the bridge tournament,  seven for the
chess matches,  six for the checker games, and  63 for the pinochle
play-offs.  Challenges were advanced and accepted  by the contestants last
week.  According to the rules, the first person  listed is the challenger.
If his  written challenge is not accepted  and the match played in three
days,  the match is declared a forfeit to tne  challenger.  "I wish it to
be emphasized that  all matches must be played before  next Tuesday," said
Richard New-lean  who, with Agnes Martin, supervises  the games in the
cafeteria.  Games Follow  Following the faculty dinner Saturday  evening,
the teachers will  take possession of the equipment for  an evening of
ping-pong, chess,  checkers and various card games.  As a result the amount
of time allowed  tomorrow evening for tournament  playoffs will be limited.
 It is reported that the most popular  hours at the recreational corner 
are from 6:45 to 8:00 on week  nights, when many students drop  in for
recreation before going to the  library to study.' The supervisors  also
say that the average turnout is  about eight boys to every girl.  The first
pinochle game played  was won by Russell Stockon. Other  matches are being
played daily during  the regular recreation hours.  o  A. C. Millikan
Writes;  Article for Magazine  On Ancient New Deal  "A New Deal in Ancient
Rome" is  the title of an article by A. C. Millikan  father of Gordon
Millikan, in  the March issue of the Washington  Education Journal. In it
Mr. Millikan  traces' the activities of such  men as Julius Caesar, Caius,
Augustus  Caesar, and Licinius Stolo in  reforming and rebuilding their 
lands.  "There is much of value to every  live teacher of ancient history
in  how both Greece under Solon and  Rome under the above named reformers 
solved their depressions and  rose to heights of prosperity —  Greece
reaching her height under  Paricles and Rome under Augustus,"  concludes
Mr. Millikan.  Miss Cummins Speaks to  Elks Club Organizations  Miss Nora
B. Cummins of the  Social Science department spoke on  "Political
Psychology and Social  Welfare" at a meeting of the Welfare  organizations
at the Elks club  last Wednesday.  Dance Class Organized  Starlund and
Watson Instruct  All Beginners  Under the supervision of Naomi  Watson and
Emil Starlund,  a class of beginners in dance  instruction has been
organized  in connection with the recreational  program being followed 
this quarter. The class meets  in the gymnasium every Monday  and Wednesday
nights  from 7:30 to 9 o'clock. The  first class was held Monday  evening,
March 4, with about  twenty persons in attendance.:  All beginners are said
to be  progressing successfully.  All those who desire to learn  to dance
are asked to join the  class, where special attention  will be given to aid
their danc^  tag attempts. :•  Program Announced  W A A Playday
Schedule Given  For Saturday  9:30-10:00  Branding—Main hall. 
10:00-11:30  Riding the Range—Big gym.  12:00-1-30  Come and Get
It—Edens  hall.  1:30-1:45  Badminton Exhibition — Big  gym. 
1:45-2:15  Shindig—Big gym.  2:15-3:00  Gabfest—Edens Hall Blue
 room.  3:00-4:00  Last Roundup—Edens Hall  Blue room.  Prexy Returns
 From Olympia  Fisher Reports Progress Made for  Bellingham Normal at
•  Legislature  ' "Conditions look far more favorable  than they did
two years ago,"  said President C. H. Fisher upon his  return from Olympia
the • first of  this week. He spent several days  at the legislative
sessions.  Cuts May Be Restored  Mr. Fisher expressed the opinion  that
progress is being made. "At  present it looks as though the legislature 
will restore some of the cuts  they have made in the salaries," he  said,
"but I am uncertain as to how  much this will be."  "The legislators seem
to be in  favor of giving $6,000 to finish the  athletic field and $200,000
for the  Physical Education building. The  appropriation will be subject to
the  approval of the governor," Mr. Fisher  said. "Everything depends on 
what the legislature does about  raising the revenue, and whether or  not
state and federal funds will be  available."  o  Play To Be Given  Before
Guild Soon  Marian Cole, Francis Fisher, Peggy  Strand, and Virginia
George,  members of the Normal play production  class will present "Cloey,"
 a one-act drama, before the members  of the Bellingham Theatre  Guild. The
performances will be  held at the Walnut Street playhouse  on the evenings
of Tuesday  and Wednesday, March 12 and 13,  at 8:15 o'clock. The play,
directed  by Marian Cole, is an intense drama  of the Carolina hill people.
It deals  with a domineering old woman and  her crushing influence on two 
young lovers.  o—  Negro Concert Singer  Wins Court Judgment  In Taxi
Accident Suit  Roland T. Hayes, negro concert  singer, was awarded a
judgment last  week in his suit over injuries received  in a taxi-truck
collision in  Seattle in January, 1934.  Mr. Hayes was on his way to
Bellingham  where he was scheduled  to appear at the First Christian 
Church, when he received these injuries.  Because of this accident, it  was
necessary to postpone the concert  from January 15 to January  20.  Varsity
Debate Squad  Gives Munitions Talk  A symposium on munitions was  presented
by Merrit Tanberg, Lewis  Schmitt, Herbert Sandry, and Miner  Baker,
members of the Varsity debating  squad of the University of  Washington, in
assembly this morning.  The group is under the direction  of Professor
Horace G. Rah-skopf  of the English department at  the university.
Professor Rahskopf  was formerly a member of the Normal  faculty.  ;
• ' O——— :  Among the Normal students who  attended
the district high school  basketball tournament in Mount  Vernon last week
were Bob' Linds-ley,  Mary Templin, Donovan Singe;r  and others.  Chairman
For  Campus Affair  To Be Chosen  No Quorum Present at Board  Of Control
Meeting  Yesterday  Requisitions Discussed  Legislative Group Meets Today 
To Settle Business  Because no quorum was obtained  at the Board of Control
Thursday,  the meeting was postponed until  three o'clock this afternoon,
when  it will be held in the associated  student's office. The members who 
were present yesterday discussed the  proposed plan on business proced-ur. 
Prominent topics to be brought  up today are requisitions and Campus  day.
Plans for the annual all-school  function of spring quarter  are usually
made and approved by  the Board long in advance of the  date of the affair.
Being at the  head of this big day is one of the  most important and
responsible  year. The names of Jim McCleary,  chairmanships of the
school's social  Randy Oberlatz, Cliff Johnson, and  Mon Orloff were
suggested for this  position. Definite action will be  taken today.  A
report of the success of the recently  established dancing class,
instructed  by Emil Starlund and Naomi  Watson, will be heard and further 
arrangements will be made.  The representatives and officers  present
yesterday were President  Gordon Millikin Dr. E. A. Bond,  Marie de
Gallier, Maxine Iddins,  Oscar Svarlien, Nancy Smith and  Secretary Gordon
Richardson.  Senior Committee  To Plan Program  Sanford Heads Group In
Charge  Of Graduation Plans -  Work on the programs for the  graduating
class will begin in earnest  at the start of the spring quarter,  according
to Keith Sanford,  chairman of the committee. "It is  a little early to
make any definite  arrangements yet," he states.  Class pictures and senior
committee  pictures have been taken for the  Klipsun. While the schedule
for the  class is usually the same, it is expected  that there will be some
slight  differences this year.  Genevieve Strain is in charge of  the Class
day assembly, and James  McCleary with Gertrude Hall, will  plan the events
for that 



     ----------

     

Northwest Viking - 1935 March 8 - Page 2



     ----------

     

WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, A COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, BELLINGHAM,
WASHINGTON  Tomorrow's Frolic  Established 1899  Published every Friday
except during the month of  September by the Associated Students,
Washington  State Normal School, Bellingham.  Entered in the Postoffice at
Bellingham, Washington,  as second class matter by virtue of the act of 
March 3, 1879.  Printed by the Miller   Sutherlen Printing Company, 
Bellingham National Bank Building.  Subscription rate by mail, $3.00 per
year in advance.  Advertising rates on application.  Address all
communications, other than news items,  to the Business Manager of the
Northwest Viking,  Bellingham, Wash. Telephone 3180. *  Associated
(fotlcaiatc *?press  - = 1934 (NATIONAL (^srpfcsr*) COVCRAOE) 1935 rr 
RALPH SHENENBERGER Editor  NANCY JANE SMITH Managing Editor  VICTOR
DICKINSON Business Manager  DICK BELL _ ...Advertising Manager  PAT ALLAN
Copy Editor  FRANCIS FISHER ._ — News Editor  CALISTA SIMONDS .
Feature Editor  BOB LINDSLEY _ Sports Editor  PHIL CAMPBELL _ Assistant
Editor  CATHERINE MCDONALD Co-Editor  MA3PNE MICKLE Co-Editor  DONAVAN
REEVES !.Staff Artist  Questionnaires  Are Interesting  Last week feature
page questionnaires were circulated  about school to find the reaction of
the student  body to this inside page. Nearly 200 of these were  filled in
and returned to the staff members for tabulation.  Keeping in step with the
results received last  quarter the Keyhole column and Campi Coast to Coast 
polled the largest votes, both as far as being read  weekly and enjoyed the
most are concerned.  Votes on the different articles on the feature page 
were most favorable, but those expressing opinions  concerning the sport
page indicated some dissatisfaction.  As long as there is any level of
distinction between  major, minor and intramural sports, the make-up and 
contents of sport page will be severely criticised by  those who believe in
the all-importance of varsity  teams.  In our opinion varsity sports are
highly important,  but the value received from an adequate intramural 
program in which the majority of the student may  weekly participate,
overshadws the benefits of inter-school  competition. Varsity games arouse
school  spirit, but intra-mural activities are important enough  to deserve
the recognition given them on the sport  page.  Educational System  Proving
Successful  Perhaps not all students have heard of the system  of education
which is at present in use at the University  of Chicago. Although it is
not strictly new,  having been in operation for four years, it has now 
been in operation long enough to reveal any faults  whicH it may possess.
The following editorial, reprinted  from the Pitt News, summarizes the
system.  An experiment in modern education which dispenses  with credits,
course marks, and compulsory class  attendance, being carried on by the
University of  Chicago in its College, is showing a marked advancement 
over the College's former method of  instruction. '  The new plan, in its
fourth year at the University,  gives students full latitude in use of
their time.  They are judged, for course completion by their  ability to
pass batteries of comprehensive examinations  rather than attendance in
classes and  ability to pass instructors' examinations. 
•Concentration by the Chicago faculty on course  design has resulted
in belter selection of materials  and better class organization. It is no
longer necessary  to be in residence at the College, and a  student may
take the comprehensive examinations,  seven in number, whenever he thinks
it advisable.  Examinations are six hours long, divided between  morning
and afternoon on a given day.  Each student must pass forty-two hours of
exams, at  one exam period of two weeks or spread them over  several
periods within two calendar years. For all  students there are five general
comprehensive examinations  specifically required in these five fields: 
English composition, biological sciences, the humanities,  social sciences,
and physical sciences.  Two additional examinations are elective, chosen 
usually from the departmental fields.  According to Chauncey S. Boucher,
dean of the  , College, the results of Chicago's experiments are 
gratifying: "As a result of printed syllabi and,  particularly, of our
examination system, we have  developed in three years more significant
improvements  in the clear definition of educational objectives,  and in
the selection of materials and their  organization and presentation that
would otherwise  have come in a score of years. These gains are 
attributable to our abandonment of the course  credit system and the
adoption of a program of  comprehensive examinations.*'  Eyebrows  How To
Convert Yourself  Into a Highbrow  By Frances Pelegren  If you are a
consistent reader of  Normalite you will recall that in  last week's column
the writer suggested  that there should be something  written about
milady's eyebrows.  Somebody took the author  seriously, so here is the
result.  Eyebrows an. individual mustaches  situated above each eye re 
spectively (not. always respectfully,  however), and extend anywhere  from
the bridge of the nose to the  temple.  In spring housecleanings they are 
frequently mowed so closely that  one needs a microscope to detect  them.
In this case there is a remarkable  new application used  which not only
covers up but also  enhances the unnatural line of the  so-called
well-groomed eyebrow.  If an eyebrow dabbler wishes to  appear
sophisticated she needs only  to tilt the corner of her eyebrows  so as to
change the center of curvature,  which will then give the desired  effect
of a high brow. Then  again, where she must acquire a  visage most fierce,
she has only to  accentuate the natural line of said  eyebrow by means of
the very latest  appliance (patented in 1879), which  can be carried with
one at all times.  The moral is (we didn't know it  had one either): never
even dream  of stepping out into society unless  fully equipped with tools
and applications  for the eyebrows, for otherwise  you will not be able to
assume  the proper mood for each occasion.  At the Theaters  Lovers of
animals and the outdoors  will find a treat in store for  them in the
screen production,  "Sequoia" with Jean Parker, appearing  at the Mt. Baker
Sunday,  Monday, and Tuesday. The picture  is highly recommended for both 
children and adults.  This excellent portrayal of animal  life in Sequoia
Park is being  sponsored by the PTA of the Washington  school. Tickets may
be ob-  N ew tension PI an  By Nelson Ault  Do you want $500 a month? This 
is the slogan for a pension plan  which will make the Townsend Plan  and
all other proposed pension acts  look very ill indeed. The Sutherlen  Young
Men's Stationary Pension  Plan is drawn up by Walt Sutherlen,  versatile
printer of The Northwest  Viking, and endorsed by many  prominent citizens
of Bellingham.  Will Bring Back Prosperity  The plan promises to bring
prosperity  back from behind the corner  where it has hidden these many 
months. In fact, prosperity will not  even be needed or wanted. Who  would
even think of prosperity with  an income of $500 a month?  Main points on
the program include  the following: This is a stationary,  not a revolving
plan. Money  will be issued on n?e first of each  month, and no check will
be made  at the end of the month to see if  it has been spent. The
committee  feels that there is no need for such  a check, as they are sure
that the  young people will spend it.  Old Folks No Go  "A pension for old
people might  be spent by the youngsters. Give it  direct to them and the
old people  will never see it. Never mind the  girls—they will be
taken care of—  in fact they can't lose with this  plan," says
Sutherxn of the scheme.  With such a plan in effect most  of the students
of Bellingham Normal  could quit pretending that their  greatest ambition
was to pound useful  facts into the heads of the  grubby masses of young
America  and devote their entire lives to doing  what they really want to
do—  nothing.  —o  tained from the pupils of that  school, or
at the Owl pharmacy.  Louisa May Alcott's "Little  Men" will appear at the
Grand  theater this week-end. According  to several critics, this does  not
equal the excellent performance  "Little Women", but will  nevertheless
prove entertaining.  For those who crave mystery  thrillers, the Grand
theater brings  "The Mysterious Mr. Wong", full  of Oriental mysticism,
starring Bela  Lugosi; and "Girl of My Dreams",  with Mary Carlisle.  Thi
mgs  Concerning the League of  Decency and Nietzsche  By Enter Lade 
Against a background of peach  blossoms and bluebirds they embrace.  Gone
doubt and fear, gone the sorrows  of yesterday—all is dissolved  in a
gooey affirmation of Life's essential  sweetness. The music swells,  the
scene fades, and we are left  brushing tears of happiness from  our eyes. 
It would be more to the point, but  probably less sublime, to know what 
eventually became of the blissful  pair. We cannot logically believe  they
spent the remainder of their  days embracing under the peach  tree and we
must, out of respect to  the League of Decency, assume they  were wedded.
Now marriage some  say, is but the opening gun to bigger  and better
tribulations.  Anyway, the lushness of popular  films is great stuff for a
people  rapidly becoming destitute of all  save an unpleasant suspicion
that  the cherries in the bowl have gone  the way of most perishable goods.
 Once inside the theater we are exempt  from the necessity of even the 
most elementary cerebration; we  are safely removed from



     ----------

     

Northwest Viking - 1935 March 8 - Page 3



     ----------

     

WASHINGTONSTATE NORMAL SCHOOL, A COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, BELL1NGHAM.
WASHINGTON  Vikings Win Nine  Games and Lose Six  Varsity Ends Successful 
Year With UBC  Game Tuesday  Lappenbusch Praised  Scribe Predicts Title 
For Next Year  By Bob Lindsley  With the fine record of nine victories  and
six defeats, the Vikings  closed their most successful season  in recent
years last Tuesday night,  when they lost a tough game to the  University
of British Columbia. In  this, their final game, the Vikings  were
brilliant even in defeat, as  they displayed their finest form of  the
season.  Opening their season with two  victories, the Vikings defeated
Seattle  College 40 to 19 and Seattle Pacific  College, 13 to 35 They then 
hit a losing streak, dropping four  games, three of them away from  home.
University of British Columbia,  Ellensburg, and Cheney were  the victors,
Cheney turning the  trick twice.  Locals Defeat Frosh  The locals then went
to Seattle  to take a close game from the Frosh,  30 to 26, only to return
home and  lose on of the best games of the  season to Ellensburg, 21 to 20.
 With the tri-normal games out of  the way the Vikings embarked on a 
six-game winning streak that was  ended by the University of British 
Columbia in the final game. These  victories were at the expense of  Seatte
Pacific, Seattle College, U.  of W. Frosh, Yakima Junior College,  and
Pacific Lutheran twice.  Much credit is due Coach Lappenbusch  for the
splendid work he  did with the team this year. Starting  the season with
only three one-year  lettermen, he gradually changed  his untried squad
from a loose-working  team into five men that  worked as a unit. His style
of offensive  attack worked much smoother  and more effectively this year 
than last. From this improvement  the outlook for next year is bright. 
Vikings Fail To Hit Peak  In view of the fact that the Vikings  did not hit
their true stride  until midway in the season, after  the tri-normal games
were passed,  we hesitate to admit that the Vikings  were inferior to
Ellensburg  and Cheney. They hit both of these  teams when they were at
their mid-season  peak by virtue of road trips  and games before the
Vikings even  started turning out.  Tournament Won  By Ladd Shangle  Joly
Is Beaten To Take Second  In Badminton Games  Ladd Shangle won the
badminton  tournament by taking the odd set  from Jack Joly in the finals
played  last Tuesday. The scores were 15-  13, 14-16, and 15-1. The first
two  sets were closely fought, but Shangle  had a decided advantage in the 
third. Shangle advanced to the  finals by winning from Mullen,  while Joly
scored an upset to defeat  Shaffer in the other semi-final  match. 
Considerable interest was shown  as this is the first year badminton  has
entered the men's intramural  program.' Eighteen players took  part under
the direction of S. E.  Carver, coach.  PACIFIC COAST PAPER MILLS 
Bellingham, Washington  Vikings Trounce- ,  Pacific Lutheran  Quintet 31 to
26  Norsemen Pull Ahead in Hectic  Climax After Lutherans  Knot Score 
Vikings 31 PLC 26  Fitzer 3 _ F Taylor  Gagnon F Solie 2  Carver 10
„„F Nilsen 9  Zambas 2 _.C Jack 7  Stutz S G _. Tommerick 5. 
Dombroski 8 G Ford 1  Vandergriend 2 Sub Sanderson  Sub Votaw 2  Extending
their winning streak to  six straight games, the Viking quintet  pulled a
close battle out of the  fire last Friday night to defeat a  strong Pacific
Lutheran college aggregation  31-26. The Norsemen had  defeated the
Lutherans at Tacoma  the previous week, 27-24.  The Vikings held a slight
lead  most of the game, the half-time  score being 17 to 9 in their favo. 
With about five minutes of play  remaining the PLC boys put on the 
pressure and came from behind to  take a 23-22 advantage, which they  held
for a few minutes.  Vikings Rally  In the dying minutes of the  game, with
both teams traveling at  a terrific pace, Vikings Carver,  Dombroski, and
Vandergriend, doing  the point getting, rolled up 8 more  points to push
ahead of the Lutherans,  who tallied four.  For the Vikings the play of
Dombroski  at forward stood out. Dombroski  scored 9 points and played  a ,
great defensive game, checking  very closely and breaking up many  PLC
passes. He was taken out on  fouls near the end of the game.  Fitzer also
went out- via the foul  route.  Carver Leads Scoring  Carver again led the
scoring for  both teams, swishing the net for  10 points. His corner shots
were  particularly effective. Gagnon, although  failing to score, did a
nice  job of holding Jack, the Lutheran's  ace scoring threat, to 7 points.
Zambas  and Stutz also clicked defensively.  Outstanding for the Lutherans 
were Nilson, forward, with 9 tallies,  and Jack, center with 7. Tommerick, 
a veteran guard, also played  a very steady brand of ball.  The Lutherans
used a zone defense  throughout the entire game,  which bothered the
Norsemen con-  Newsmen Win  Weird Playoff  Batde_37-31  Game Turns Out To
Be Wild  Affair in Last Half; Eight  Players Used  Ahern Is Sportsmanlike 
Vikings Rally To Force Game Into  - Two Overtime Periods  LATE NEWS  "The
Northwest Vikings are the  intramural hoop champions. There  will be no
more play-off games."  This announcement came last night  from Jim Ahern,
manager of the  Portsiders. This settles all rumors  of a play-off game. 
By Phil Campbell  Vikings 37 Portsiders 31  DeVries 7 F .T Singer 4 
Lindsley 6 F Hoekstra 4  Hager 2 C Meyers 7  Shenenbergcr IS G Ahern 8 
Angel 7 —G McCleery 3  Sub Goff S  Northwest Viking hoopsters came 
to life in the last half of the "final"  game of the intramural playoff 
Wednesday to win over the Portsiders  in two overtime periods, by a  score
of 37-31.  The game nowever will probably  be played over, as it was only 
through the good sportsmanship on  the part of Jim Ahern, Portsider 
manager, that the Vikings won. The  Paper crew could muster only five  men
for the game, and when Hager  was fouled out in the opening of  the second
half the Lindsley squad  had only four men left. To make  things more even
Ahern promptly  jerked one of his players, although  he could have played
his whole team  and have easily hacked the Vikings.  After Singer had
counted first for  the Southpaws with a field goal the  Vikings retaliated
with three foul  shots to take a temporary lead.  Then the Ahern crew shot
ahead  with field goals by Hoekstra, McCleery,  and Meyers, to take a
commanding  lead.  Second Half Weird Affair  The second half was a rather 
weird affair with the Vikings gradually  closing up the gap in the  scoring
to tie the game up at 28-  28 at the end of the regular playing  period. In
the first overtime period  the Vikings took a-lead only to  have Singer tie
it up again with ten  seconds to go.  o  siderably, since most of their
plays  are designed to break up a man to  man defense.  With the WAA  By
Joan Hoppe  Yip-yip-yipee-yip—yore right, kids,  this air yore ol'
Uncle Filbert, the  hoss-thief, back with you ag'in. Now  let's all jine in
singin' thet thar  jolly cowboy favorite, "Oh Buree  Mc Not on the Lone
Prairiee". . . . .  That was jist fine.  Wal, I reckon you-all air anxious 
to hear the next serial of our western  thriller bedtime story, "Flat-foot 
Joe of the Bloody Range," so  hyar goes.  "Out of the silence of the night 
come the dull thud of hoss steps  then thar appears on the prairie the 
figger of a lone hossman. Jest a  minute, kiddies, while I take a closer 
look. It seems to me—in fact  I'm durn shore—yes it
is—it's that  invincible cowgal Ruth Pearson.  Thar she
blows—^1 should say goes  —up over the hill. Now she's
sur-veyin'  the countryside. In the distance  the sound of many hosses can 
be heerd—they're approachin*—now  they air ridin' over the
ridge. What  ho! Thar rides a desperate lookin'  bunch of rustlers. By
cracky, thet  Pearson gal shore is a plucky un.  She drags out a white rag
and  waves it furiously. Now those thar  fellers seem to be wavin'
somethin'  back. What could this be? Shore-ly  not Boy Scouts practisin'
signal-lin'.  No—I'm wrong—now I can  make out the printin' on
the first  one — It says, 'W-E-L-C-O-M-E.'  



     ----------

     

Northwest Viking - 1935 March 8 - Page 4



     ----------

     

WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, A COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, BELLINGHAM,
WASHINGTON  Gasthaus Zum Armen Lehrer;  Student Teachers Give Party;  Bride
is Honored by Social  Birchman Honored by Informal Birthday Dinner; 
Terrace House Girls Have Theater Party; Few  Students Attend Tiden 1 ennis
Exhibition  Members of the faculty will attend two parties over the
weekTend; many  are to be visitors in Seattle; several students go home for
week-end visits;  many former students visited the Normal campus during the
past week.  The quarterly faculty party will be held at Edens hall this
Saturday  evening. Orange and black invitations have been sent out to all
members  of the teaching staff.  Primary student teachers in the  city
schools gave a dinner at Edens  hall on Thursday evening at 6:30  for their
room teachers and for Miss  Marjorie Dawson, supervisor^ Genevieve  Strain
had charge of the affair.  At a two-taole bridge party given  by Mrs. W. H.
Williams in the Bel-lingham  hotel for a number of Normal  students, the
high award was  gained by Lois Aubert and the ace  prize by Harriet
Rowlands.  Katherine Kurtz entertained a  group of friends at her home on 
Broadway in honor of Mrs. Harold  Gulbranson, who was recently married. 
Among the guests were several  Normal students: June Goodman,  Hazel
Jacobson, Sophie Farn-ham,.  Bernice Von Pressentin, and  Katherine Kurtz. 
The girls from Terrace house enjoyed  a theater party Sunday,  March 3rd.
Those present were:  Alice Bartholemew, Bertha Pur-viance,  Pauline Green,
Gertrude  Birchman, and Jean Hoagland.  Gertrude Birchman entertained at  a
birthday party last Friday evening.  Al the girls of Terrace house  were
present and also two invited  guests, Cora Paradis and Thelma  Finley.
After the dinner they attended  the basketball game.  Ona Conner went home
to Sedro-  MANUFACTURING  J E W E L E R  Watch Repairing  Engraving  R. L
AVERILL  1418 Cornwall Ave.  AVALON  Now Playing  "CLEOPATRA"  CLAUDETTE
COLBERT  WARREN WILLIAMS  and  HENRY WILCOXON  MM  Sandison  Portrait and
Commercial  PHOTOGRAPHERS  Woolley last Saturday.  Many Visit Seattle  Mrs.
May Lovegren of the faculty  visited her son Frank in Seattle  last Friday
evening.  Frances Thompson and Wynne  Campbell visited in Seattle Saturday 
and Sunday.  Jerry Jacobson, Ladd Shangle, and  d i e t Ullin attended the
Bill Tilden  tennis exhibition in Seattle last  Saturday.  Cleora Vaughn
was in Seattle last  week-end.  Oscar Starlund made a visit to  Monroe last
Friday and Saturday.  Helen Neely left school last Monday  night for her
home in Everett,  where her father is seriously ill.  Club Will Discuss 
Growth of Fascism  Member Will Lead Discussion  Of Movement in U.S. 
•'Fascism in the United States"  will be the subject under discussion
 at the next meeting of the Social  Science club next. Tuesday,  March 12.
Members of the club  will speak on different phases of  the problem. Those
who will lead  the discussion are: "Philosophy",  Einar Larson; "Huey
Long", Warren  Toms; "Hearst", Wilson Way-lett;  "Anti semitism", Marian
Peterson;  "Fascism in the Colleges",  Pat Jacobson.  Newspaper clippings
of interest  to social science students have been  posted on the Social
Science club  bulletin board. They concern recent  developments in student
movements  and in fascism.  After the Show  Have a Milkshake  10c 
Bellingham Drug  Cornwall and Magnolia  A complete Optical service  at
reasonable rates.  Thorough scientific eye examinations  and lenses
accurately  fitted and ground.  Dr. John P. Woll, Optometrist,  205 W.
Holly  St.  Established 1889  PACIFIC  LAUNDRY  PHONES 126 and 127  Give Us
a Daily Thought  Remember to get one of those special  SUNFREZE  ICE CREAM
SANDWICHES  at the CO-OP  As New as 1935 and as Different  WESTERN DAIRY 
908 Alabama PHONE 353  TO CATCH THAT FISH  Use the Best in Tackle and Bait.
 We Sell All kinds of Sporting Equipment  NORTHWEST HARDWARE CO.  213415 W.
Holly Phone 381  Satire on Waltz;  Byron s Character  Analyzed by Club 
Vanadis Bragi Society Discuss  Importation of Waltz and  Byron's Works  At
the last meeting of the Vana-dis  Bragi club Monday evening,  Lord Byron,
Englsh author, was  discussed, as to character traits and  works, by Lorene
Smith. In continuation  of the idea, there was an  informal round-table
discussion  characterizing the nature of any  Byronic individual his views
on nature,  his personality as a whole,  and satire on English society.  A
humorous satire on the "Importation  of the Waltz" from Germany  was
presented by Einar Larson.  The next and last meeting of  the society this
quarter will be  March 18, at which time other authors  will be discussed
and the club  will adjourn until next quarter,  ter.  o- •  Scotch
Hop Held  Saturday Evening  Was Peppy Affair  Sophomore Prom Was Atttended 
By Record-Breaking Crowd;  Burn Plays  There was nothing lacking in the 
value of the entertainment in spite  of the Scotch decorations at the 
sophomore party last Saturday evening.  The sophomores certainly made  a
favorable reputation for themselves  as far as sponsoring nifty  parties
are concerned. It seemed  all the men and women were too  stingy to let the
very delightful  music be wasted—therefore, no stag-line  nor
wall-flowers.  For those merry-makers who were  just a wee bit saving of
their shoe  leather provisions were made for  bridge.  Mrs. May Lovegren
and Miss Lucy  Kangley were the faculty guests at  the party.  o  Carnegie
Foundation  INow Sending Books  A group of new books on social  and
political questions is being sent  to the International Relations club  by
the Carnegie foundation, which  sponsors these clubs. The list include: 
"Russia's Iron Age" (William  Henry Chamberlain); "Problems of  New Cuba"
(Foreign Policy association)  ; "British Way to Recovery"  (Herbert
Heaton); "Permanent  Court of International Justice"  (Manley O. Hudson);
"American  Consultation in World Affairs"  (Russell Cooper); "Arms and
Munition"  (Baccus and Nichols); "The  Saar Struggle" (Michael T.
Florin-sky).  Several pamphlets on world peace  foundations, world affairs,
and the  United States government are also  being sent.  Education of
Adults  Subject of Meeting  An interesting meeting was held  by the Blue
Triangle members,  Wednesday evening, in the members'  clubhouse at which
Miss Beis-wenger,  Adult Education leader, was  guest speaker. In a short
business  meeting, plans were discussed for  raising money to send
delegates to  Camp Seabeck.  Miss Beiswenger is at the head  of six
districts including Whatcom,  Snohomish, Skagit, Island, Pierce,  and King
counties.  Leooold Hotel  Coffee Shop and Dining Room  LENTEN SPECIALS 
SERVUWELL  After the Play  Drop in at the  SERVUWELL  Across from Library 
We Specialize Our  Fountain Service  AFTER THE GAME  Drop in at  FAY'S  For
a Bite to Eat  1303 Cornwall Ave.  Comparison of  Colleges Made 
Continental Student Is Trained  For Definite Practical  Professional Career
 "Many Europeans have a superiority  complex toward the standards of 
scholarship in America. The Continental  student is prepared for a 
definite, practical, professional career.  The American college is a  real
alma mater where her children  remain bound by many ties," ob  serves a
European professor in an  interview recenty given to the  Christian Science
Monitor. "A  loyalty of this kind is unknown in  Europe. There the college
aims  solely to impart knowledge.  "Students in America are found to  work
harder and more conscientiously.  This is especially true  about women's
colleges where the  average student is more mature  than a boy of the same
age.  "Many teachers are insufficiently  trained." Most Continental
teachers  must have a Ph. D. degree.  "Survey courses in the first two 
years of college might remedy this,','  suggests the professor. "To me, 
American colleges seem much more  promising for the future of free and 
universal scholarship."  Kibbe To Be Host  To Philosophy Club  Lives of
Psychologists Sketched by  Kendall and Grant  Sketches from "A History of 
Psychology in Autobiography" by  Carl Murchison will be presented at  the
next meeting of the Philosophy-  Psychology club to be held at the  home of
Mr. L. A. Kibbe Wednesday  evening, March 13.  Donnie Grant will handle the
autobiography  of Mary Whiton Calkins,  professor of psychology at Vas-sar 
College, in Poughkeepsie, N. Y.  Clyde Kendall will discuss Robert  S.
Woodworth, professor of psychology  at Columbia university, whose  text is
used by Dr. Irving Miller  and Mr. Kibbe. Miss Calkins and  Mrs. Woodworth
are livingPPPPP