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Northwest Viking - 1935 October 4 - Page 1



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I f t l l l l l f M ^ _:')':-: ) - : ^ : ' : ^ •'::• 
115 FOOTBALL  SCHEDULE  '"'••- 'v''"'^-^' -• -:'{'/.:'
gt;;• '^'^vi'|:^W'?3^^Pl  -:-;;':FXeULTX, . ...  RECEPTION TONIGHT 
» i i Xxxiv—NO. i WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. BELLlNGHAM
WASHlNqipN JEnflayx QcSobiy    ingham Normal Is Awarded  PWA Money For
instruction  t^ESf; Physical Educational Building  Detailed Working Plans
Now Ready for Approval  • Of Board of Trustees and Federal Engineer;
New  T':£^eltic Field To Be Site of Structure.  A gnat of $16,725 has
been awarded Bellingham Normal by the PWA  tor construction of the new
Physical Education building. The remainder  of the original request of
$200,000 will be supplied by the state,  with the consent of Governor
Clarence D. Martin.  Detailed working plans, which are now ready, must be
approved by  the Board of Trustees and E. R. Hoffman, federal engineer at
Olympia.  After the approval of the plans, contractors will bid for the
construction.  The project must be under contract not later than December
15,  and must be completed in one year.  BoUding to be on New Field  The
location of the building will  be on the northwest corner of the  new
athletic field. The structure  will be fireproof, of reinforced concrete 
with brick facing. The architecture  will correspond to that of  tthe
library.  On the first floor will be offices  for men and women
instructors,  health examination rooms, separate  showers, dressing room
for women,  and separate quarters for the varsity  teams which will
accommodate  100 men. The swimming pool,  which will be a standard pool 30 
feet wide, 90 feet long, 10 feet deep  at one end, and two and one-half 
feet deep at the other, will also be  on the first floor. It will be
lighted  by windows and skylight.  The second floor will contain the 
pnnasium, which win be 90 feet  wide and 100 feet long. Folding  bleachers
at the sides will seat  1200. During the day a canvas  curtain will divide
the gymnasium  Into two gymnasiums. 50 feet wide  $ and 90 feet long. These
will be,  used for classes and practice.  ; "The building will meet a
long-felt  need* and will be one of the  greatest assets of the jjchool",
commented  President O. H. Fisher,  o—  Women Develop  Plans for Year
 At House Party  Amendment Made for Women's  Constitution; Campus Sister 
Idea Launched  K-*»  k  The Patsy," Sparkling  Comedy Presented by 
Penthouse Players  :**The Patsy," a true-to-life play  by Barry Conners,
was presented in  the Normal auditorium last Monday   gt; evening for the
entertainment of  the new students and their friends.  It was presented by
the Penthouse  players under the direction  of Glenn Hughes of the Division
 of Drama of the University of  \ Washington. Penthouse plays are  given in
Seattle in their own theater  which has ben especially designed  for them. 
"The Patsy," a light drawing-room  comedy, features pretty little  Patricia
who has long been "the  Patsy" of the Harrington family,  named by her
mother and overruled  by her spoiled sister. When she  finally: decides to
do something  about it all, the scene changes to  a rip-roaring comedy.  ..
This rollicking play of homellf e  has been the ranking dramatic hit  of
the current amateur season in  Seattle. Audiences and critics alike 
registered their hearty approval of  this . sparkling comedy of Barry 
Conners.  o  / -  gt; URRENT  I ALENDAR  ^^^^^/of Happemngi  Friday,
October 4—  '• 8:00 p. m.—Faculty reception  at Edens
hall for all stu-  :;: gt;''';;" dents. -  gaterday,' October• * -
•  '1:00 p. m.—All Normal hike  ^i to Natural Drydocks. 
I^HiCft:-pih^"kid; Party" spoh-  •brod by Women's league  :vy-'
gt;'*Br.''all women students.  r/^v'JWg'-'JJHii ;''fTr.'^'--;  I f ^ mcrU*
* «Wb-party •  at Edens halL  Lively programs for Women's 
league assemblies, better coordination  for women's activities, "Campus 
Sisters", and social functions,  were some of the topics discussed  when
members of the Women's  league commission held their first  fall conference
in the form of a  houseparty at Edens hall, September  25 and 26.  The
commission developed the  idea of "Campus Sisters" hoping  that new girls
would be more easily  introduced into school life. Some  of the
opportunities for the Campus  Sisters'to interest the new girls in  school
activities are the Faculty reception  this evening, the all-Normal  hike
and the Kid Party tomorrow,  and social events'in the following  weeks.  In
order that the Women's league  may be a centralizing unit of all the 
women's activities in the school, the  following resolution was adopted at 
the conference:  'Whereas there has been felt a  need for bringing the
women of the  school into closer contact, and  whereas until this time
there has  been no agency for effecting this cooperation  with Women's
organizations  except in the case of the WAA  and the YWCA as provided in
the  Constitution, be it resolved that for  this year the following clubs
composed  of women students, 'the Blue  Triangle, Valkyrie, and Alkisiah, 
shall be invited to send a delegate  to sit with the Women's League 
Commission in a consultative capacity  at their regular meetings once  a
month".  Conference to Continue  Miss Linda Countryman, Women's  league
advisor, and Miss Nora Cummins,  Inter-club Council adviser,  were faculty
guests at the Conference.  The conference had been  called by the new
president, Dolly  Anderson, to outline the League's  work for the year and
to get the  members acquainted. The commission  felt that this first
conference  was of enough worth to make it an  annual fall event.  Members
of the Women's League  Executive commission for the coming  year are:
President, Dolly Anderson;  vice-president, Blanche  Pearce; secretary
pro-tem, Helen  Scott; treasurer, Helen Lewis.  Standing committees are:
Fellowship,  Florence Lund; Standards,  Dorothy Peterson; Leadership, 
Charlene Mautz; Room Service,  Helen Monson; Social, Mary Jane  Moergeli;
Program, Blanche Pearce;  Press, Beverly Holiday; WAA Commissioner, 
Maureen McClellan.  • —; o—  ' T Club Informal To  Be
First Social Event  ents Prexy  GivesWelcome  To New Frosh  Millikan
Expresses Wish That  More Would Enter School  Opportunities  You whb are
new students, both  transfers from other institutions  and freshmen, the
Associated Students  greet you. We hope that you  will enjoy your work here
and make  the best of the many opportunities  open to you in the line of
student  activities . . . probably many of you  have planned on attending
the  University or State college, but, due  to financial problems, it is
impossible  for you. This may result in a  certain amount of
disappointment,  but this disappointment should not  lead you into an idea
that this  school is a resting station or school  of disappointment. Such
an attitude  as this can do more toward  destroying our spirit than any
other  factor.  Putting the last year in retrospect,  would say that many
things were  accomplished and many more plans  are laid out for this year.
The success  of our activities program depends  upon our interest and
effort  in this direction. This school holds  much for you; what you want
to  make of it depends on you.  GORDON MILLIKAN.  o  Faculty Furnishes 
Fun, Food, Frolic  Informality Is Aim of Reseption;  Hicks Desires
Attendance  "There will be a minimum of formality,  a short receiving line,
refreshments  for body and soul, and  a chance for all connected with the 
school—students, faculty, and office  staff—to get acquainted,"
says Dr.  Arthur Hicks, English instructor, in  referring to the Faculty
reception  to be held this evening from 8 until  11 in the Edens Hall Blue
room  Miss Emma Erickson, education  instructor, is general chairman of 
the reception, assisted by Miss Irene  Elliott, second-grade instructor,
decorations;  Miss Ruth Weythman,  P. E. director, receiving line; Miss 
Ruth Van Pelt, seventh grade, refreshments.  E. J. Arntzen, history 
instructor, has the task of getting  the men students to the reception. 
Miss Florence Johnson, dean of  women, and Dolly Anderson, Women's  League
president, are in charge  of the women. .  Dr. Hicks wishes to stress the
fact  that the men are invited and urged  to attend the reception as well
as  the women.  Special music will be furnished by  the Williams Trio and
Donald Bu-shell,  of this school's music depart  ment.  _ o  Officers Are
Elected By  Harborview Hall Girls  Girls of Harborview hall elected  new
officers for the coming year  at their first house meeting held  last
Tuesday evening. Ruth Gordon  was elected president and Wil-da  Hawley was
chosen social secretary.  Florence Nieveeh was elected  reporter for
Harborview. There are  sixteen girls now staying at the  hall.  Fisher 
Upperclassmetii  New Students  Prexy Thinks Students Fortunate  To Persue
Higher Education  In These Times  If I were a student today, I would  make
every effort to get as much  education and preparation as I possibly  could
to make myself equal to  the demands that the future is going  to make upon
young men and  women. You are extremely fortunate  if during these days you
.are  able to pursue a course in higher  education. According to the number
 of applicants we had for the  N.Y.A. jobs many more students  would attend
a school like ours if  they had the funds. Those of you  who are among the
fortunate ones  have a year ahead of you that  ought to mean much in your
development.  From past experiences I  know that the faculty and the office
 staff stand ready to assist every  student to use the opportunities  that
a new school year has to offer.  Sincerely yours,  C. H. FISHER, President.
 o  Inter-club Council  Holds Annual Rally  Edens Hall Blue Room Is Scene 
Of Social Activities  The Inter-club Council members  held their first
meeting of the new  school year in room 209 last Wednesday  at 4:00 p. m. .
. _ „ .'  This meeting was called for the  purpose of making the
final plans  for the rally and for the all-club  assembly to be held Friday
morning.  It was suggested that all club officers  be elected just once a
year;  and that the presidents be the representatives  to the ICC, instead
of  electing special representatives.  They also discussed the matter of 
sponsoring luncheons for the assembly  speakers.  Notices are going to be
sent to all  clubs who have been dropped from  the ICC because of failure
to attend  two consecutive meetings. These  clubs can be re-instated if
they apply  at the next meeting; but they  lose the privilege of attending
the  nominating convention. Those clubs  which have been dropped
temporarily  are: Thespians, Valkyrie, W.  club, Men's club, Social
Science,  Freshman class and the Junior-  Senior class.  The purpose of the
Inter-Club  Council is to arouse enthusiasm  throughout the club year.  o 
- - . ..- t:^.-,^Mi0§  shmait Glass Has, La^  Enrollment As
Many.Sffi^lJf88*1  Fail To Return TTiis % i | i i i  Official Registration
Records Are Not Ccra^ie^j;  Available Positions Filled as Demand for
Wb«3  Greatly Exceeds Necessity for Room and B p a ^ S |  While
official records of the registration for the faU quarter at Norma)  wili
not be complete until the close of the second week of school, President  C.
H. Fisher said that he believed the total registration would be
considerably,  larger than that of last year. The registration was 



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Northwest Viking - 1935 October 4 - Page 2



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WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL gCHOOL, BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON  Established
1899  At the Bottom of the Stairs of Knowledgt  Published every Friday
except during the month of  September by the Associated Students,
Washington  State ormal School, Bellingham. ^  Entered in the-Postoffice at
Bellingham, Washington,  as second class matter by virtue of the act of. 
March 3, 1879.  Printed by the Miller   Sutherlen Printing Company, 
Bellingham National Bank Building, Bellingham.  Subscription rate by mail,
$3.00 per year, in advance.  Advertising rates on application. .  Address
all communications, other than news items,  to the Business Manager of the
Northwest Viking,  Bellingham, Wash. Telephone 3180.  JOAN HOPPE Editor 
MARGARET MORSE Managing Editor  NANCY JANE SMITH , Business Manager  Harry
Kluge -i- - Sports Editor  Melvin Munson Assistant Sports Editor  Phyllis
Robinson - Society Editor  Margaret Thon News Editor  Louane Pinckhey . .'.
:....Feature Editor  Beverly Holiday - :....Copy Reader  Aloha Genther -
...Staff Artist  STAFF WRITERS  Helen Hostetter, Maxine Mickle, Lucille
Lee, Mildred  Larson, Francis Pelegren, Mary Elaine Johnston, Arne 
Johnsen, Frank Pratt, Louise McBurney, Rose Works.  Normal Welcomes  You 
Greetings to you, who find yourselves for the first  time within these
halls of learning. We, who are  age-old veterans, salute you. We have
weathered  the storms of registration, aptitude tests, and entrance  exams
and have come through "bloody but unbowed".  Friendliness, as we hope you
have already discovered,  is the prevailing spirit of this school. In 
spite of the traditional ballyhoo and belittling of the  incoming class,
putting them in their places, we are  all very glad to see you and are
anxious to get acquainted  and have you feel you are an important part  of
our student organization.  Whatever your special interest is we know you 
can find some club or activity to satisfy it. At your  disposal are dancing
classes, rec hours, mixed recrea-ton,  a full athletic program, a beautiful
library full  af interesting and valuable books. What more could  anyone
ask?  So take off your hats and make yourselves at home.  • o  Give
the Faculty  A Hand  If the faculty are noble enough to sacrifice
themselves  on the altar of hospitality and good fellowship  should not we
make that surpreme sacrifice worthwhile?  We know how they enjoy fastening
on their  starched fronts and putting on their best smiles. It's  no small
accomplishment to stand for two hours in  tight shoes shaking hands with
the right, balancing a  punch glass in the left hand, and still maintaining
a  cordial and gracious countenance.  But in all seriousness, we, as
students, will certainly  enjoy and gain more from our work if we really
make  an effort to 'become personally acquainted with our  faculty. They
are willing and ready to come half  way if we will come the rest.  That
half way point is the Edens Hall Blue room  and the hour of the tryst is
eight o'clock this evening.  Let's not keep them waiting!  Soaks, Chislers 
Back to School  Local Theaters Show Great  Variety on Screen This Week  Not
for sometime have the local theaters had such  a complete variety of
pictures as, they are showing  over the coming week-end.. Practically every
type of  life from that of the Russian nobility, during the  reign of the
Czar, to the wild and woolly life of the  early west may be witnessed at
one of' the local theaters.  At the Mount Baker, Hollywood's sensational,
and  most dramatic actress, Greta Garbo, portrays the part  of Anna
Karenina in M.G.M.'s super production of  the life of the Russian people
during the reign of the  Czar, "Anna Karenina". Previews have it that
Hollywood  has never tried to outdo itself in such a lavish  manner as it
has in this production. One movie book  writes, "The settings of the
picture alone are worth  many times the price of admission". Supporting
Miss  Garbo are Frederic March, and the talented child  actor, Freddie
Bartholomew.  Transferred from the Mount Baker to the Avalon  because of
public demand, is the great musical production,  "Broadway Melody of 1936,"
with Eleanor  Powell, Jack Benny, Una Merkel and ten other stage  and
screen stars. Miss Powell's dance routines and  Jack Benny's wisecracks are
highlights of the show,  not mentioning of course the six new song hits
that  are destined to become very popular in the next few  weeks. It opens
Friday at the Avalon.  Opening Saturday with a double feature, the American
 theater presents first a thrilling murder mystery  with its setting at
college. The name of the picture,  "College Scandal" and stars, Arlene
Judge and Kent  Taylor.  Cinemaland's sensational little star, Shirley
Temple,  will charm you with her acting, in "bur Little Girl".  This is one
of Shirley's recent pictures and she does a  grand job of it. In the
supporting cast are Joel Mc-  Crea and Carol Lombard.  Friday opening at
the Grand, that grand character  actor, Edward Arnold, will play his first
role as a  star when he portrays the man that books have been  written
about/ Jim Brady. From the previews of the  picture one can see Very well
that Arnold outdoes  himself in the part. The name of the picture, "Diamond
 Jim", covers the life of a man who has a  .twelve million dollar bank
account, and doesn't know  quite what to do with It.  Registration is
vexation,  Exams are pretty bad,  Rule of T. T. doth bother me,  And copy
drives me mad.  Well here we are, soaks, back to  the old grind and do we
love it, anyhow  almost as much as castor oil.  . . . Something certainly
ought to  be done for the entering frosh. We  should recommend a liberal
shot of  m a t r i c u l a t i o n toxin-antitoxin  (shades of H. Ed. 50!)
to immunize  them against t h e shock of finding so  many blanks to fill
out. Their poor  heads appear to be as empty as the  registration cards. .
. . We see that  Cliff Johnson was beating Harold  Fish's time after the
play Monday  night, and Maxine Mickle was ably  squired by Ted Parker. . .
. When  the profs review English 1 in a single  hour for the benefit of
vacation-dulled  memories we cordially wish  that they'd do the same for
English  2 and let it go at that . . . The click  of pens against inkwells
in room  313 reminds us of the time we flunked  our penmanship tests
because  our hands shook so. Excuse pliz, we  can't seem to get away from
the  frosh.  Thi  Book Shelf  Chase, Mary Ellen  A Goodly Heritage  N. Y.
Holt 1932 p.. 298 $3.00  Hackett, Frances  Francis the First  N. Y.
Doubleday p. 448 $3.00  Kaus, Gina  Gatherings: the Portrait of an  Empress
 N. Y. Viking Press p. 384 $3.50  Wells, H. G.  Experiment in Autobiography
 N. Y. MacMillan 1934 p. 718 $4.00  Fit subjects for the biographers  are
those persons who stand out  from the mass. History offers subjects  whose
fitness is almost inevitable.  One of the notable recent  works is Francis
Hackett's volume  "Francis the First." Despite the  great mass of material
utilized in  drafting the book, the author  achieves a compression which
assumes  almost too much at times. A  good historical knowledge on the 
part of the reader is presupposed.  The resulting delineation of "the  most
typical Frenchman" it written  in splendid prose leaving a vivid 
impression of peace and mood.  Of virtually the same type is  Gina Kaus'
study of Catherine  the Great of Russia,, "Catherine:  the Portrait of an
Empress." Of  the Adlerian school of psychology,  Frau Kaus offers an
unusually  sympathetic and yet not over-elaborate  interpretation of the
woman  Catherine. It is handled in a dramatically  effective style. One
feels  however, that her material is inadequately  documented.  v)Turning
to a slightly different  field—the effort on the part of an 
individual to find some means of  expressing that personality, we find  two
autobiographies of extreme interest.  "A Goodly Heritage" by  Mary Ellen
Chase is a refreshing  picture of t he ordered simplicity  of American
living in the thirty  years following 1880. Miss Chase  writes with a
graceful' restraint,  lightened with a gentle humor.  I n a vastly
different manner is  H. G. Wells' "Experiment in Autobiography."  He
assures the reader  at the outset that his sole motive  was to clarify his
own mind. It is  amazing the degree of objectivity,  the candor, which he
attains in a  volume to be read by the world at  Local Cub Reporter 
Finally Hands Himself  After Story Failure  A cub reporter strayed put of
the  fold the other day trying for a  shovel—or whatever it is that
reporters  are supposed to want. He  walked slowly around



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Northwest Viking - 1935 October 4 - Page 3



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WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, BELLINGHAM,WASHINGTON  f W t f W W W
W S M W W y W WW  MEN'S EWTRAMURAIJ  BEINGN STARTED  NOW Viking v */
FOOTBALL SEASON  GIVEN FLYING  . START;'  Vikings Triumph in Warm-up 
Session With UBC Gridders;  Entire Squad Used In Game  Norsemen Show Plenty
Reserve  Strength in Backfield;  Shift Smooth  Lappenbusch Is Pleased 
Chinese Halfback Delays Game;  Is Returned to B.C.  Viking hopes flared
high for a  successful football season when  they trounced the University
of  British Columbia 77 to 0 in the  first home game of the season.  Coach
Charles Lappenbusch's proteges  showed much power and reserve  strength in
downing the Car  nadians. The first team back,  composed of Dzurick,
Whalen,  Tarte, and MacKenzie, took the  ball over the line for a touchdown
 in the first 4 plays of the game.  Whalen made the touchdown, but  Frender
failed to convert. There  was no stopping the Vikings from  then on. The
third team performed  as well as the first.  Lappenbusch used his entire 
squad of 43 men in the play. The  Canadians used 26 men.  The first team
line functioned  well and opened large holes for the  Normal backs. Pence,
Frender, and  TJllin looked especially good. Ul-lin,  whose usual position
is guard,  was moved to tackle in the second  half. Popovic, Johnson,
Siebar, and  Tooley showed themselves worthy of  first team merit. 
Cherval, Ovenal, Nogrodski, and  Guglomo made a very formidable  reserve
backfield. At one point in  the game Ovenal returned a punt  68 yards to a
touchdown.  Hay, Runkle, and Paradis were  effective in the UBC backfield. 
Deptford and Preston, BC tackles,  were also strong on stopping Normal's 
line bucks.  The game started 15 minutes late  as the result of a 2-hour
argument  with immigration officials over a  Chinese halfback. The half had
to  return to Vancouver and the Canadians  came on without him.  LocalyPrep
Teams  Play*Games Today  Whatcom To Play Mount Vernon  For No. 1 Position 
Local prep school football teams  open their third week of competition 
this Friday when they don  their fighting togs and dash into  the
"pigskin'arena" ready to do or  die for their "alma Mammie".  Over at
Fairhaven, after a rather  slow start, the practically green  squad of
Coach Lee Rankin is ironing  out 'the kinks in great shape  and tonight's
game with Burlington  Tigers, under the flood lights  should show a great
improvement  in the southsiders' ranks over  their previous encounters.
Incidentally  the Grizzly aggregation  has voted not to shave the "down" 
from their delicate skins until they  have come home with the so treasured 
and proverbial "bacon".  On the north side of town,  "Swede" Anderson's
Redskins are  showing plenty of the so-called  "stuff" it takes to make
real football  teams. Up to their usual form  the Whatcom boys have won
their  first two tussles with comparative  ease, although their last game
with  the Anacortes Sea Gulls proved the  most nip and tuck battle around 
here for sometime. This afternoon  the Redskins journey to Mount  Vernon,
where they take on the  Bulldogs in a play-off for first  place in the
local league. Both  teams have an abundance of power  and should give a
good exhibition  of football.  Keep, your eyes on these prep  teams. They
play some more good  games.  Viking Punter  Fall Intramural  Ladders Ready 
For Signatures  Carver Now Ready To Resume  Sports Program Started  Last
"Year  Hurley Boggess, halfback from  Seattle, is a former Roosevelt high 
school player and is playing his  second year for the Vikings. Boggess 
weighs 175, is a fast back who  can pass and kick with the best of  them. 
_ o •  Vikings To Play CPS  On October 12  October 12—C. P.
S.—Tacoma.  October 19—U. of W. Frosh—  Seattle.  October
26—Port Lewis—here.  November 2—P.L.C.—here. 
November 9—Cheney—Cheney.  November
16—Ellensburg—here.  November 23—U. S. S. New 
Mexico—here.  November 30—Oregon Normal  —here.  Coach
Chuck Luppenbusch  has drawn a schedule for the.  Vikings that includes six
home  games, with but three games out  of town. The Ellensburg game  will
be a feature of Homecoming.  SEAFOODS  YOU LIKE TP EAT  At  Prices You
Lifce  To Pay /; gt;"••;;,.  Bornstein's  FISH   OYSTER ck. 
Phone 882  Located i n the Home Market  Patronize the Advertisers!  An Old
Saying  But Worlds of Truth  Thank You  NANCY SMITH .  Business Mgr. 
Greetings!  For Our 13th Year of  Service to Normal Students  :Dairy
Products, Fruits, Vege-..  ..tables, Groceries, Drugs, No-..  ..tions,
Candies, School Supplies..  and a Post Office  Highland Creamery  611 High
St. Phone 182  Intramural sports for fall quarter  are under way. Coach Sam
Carver  has already started the tennis and  golf ladders. Names such as
Shan-gle,  Mon Orloff, and Starlund have  appeared on the ladders. New men 
have also stopped into the PE office  to sign. Coach Carver announces  that
the big intramural  program that was inaugurated last  year will be
continued.  A new sport for fall will be track.  As yet there has been no
official  announcement, but plans are being  made. The track intramurals
will  give Carver a chance to eye the  new men in school for future varsity
 competition in the spring. A  pole vaulter has reported and several 
milers are ready to begin  training. As regards to rain dampening  the
spirit, Coach Carver says,  "Let it rain".  Basketball will also begin
soon.)  Prospective managers are already j  beginning to sign men for
future)  hoop wars. Barton's hall and Daniels  hall are all set to meet for
the  "thugs" championship. The frosh  should have a team and so should  the
defunct Men's club. Coach  Carver announces that managers  should not sign
too many men in  order that all can participate in  the sports.  Kiddy-car
races! A prize will be  given the winner a? the Bad  Party for women
tomorrow night.  Successful Fall  W A A Program  Starts Monday  Rally Held
To Arouse New Girls  Enthusiasm Over Various  Sport Fields  Monday, October
7, is the1 date set  by the WAA to open the season for  Women's fall sports
this quarter.  These will be carried on under the  supervision of Betty
Ewing, Florence  Lund, and. Joyce Jansen,  president, secretary and
treasurer  of the club.  The rally held Thursday in the  gymnasium was for
all women students.  Its purpose was to arouse  the enthusiasm of the new
entering  girls and some of the old members  in the various women's sports
and  to acquaint them with the types of  sports played in the school. 
Appointments for the management  of the various sports have  been made as
follows: Elsie Jensen,  soccer; Maureen McClellan,  hockey; Anna Berg,
volley ball;  Agnes Martin, swiinming; Dorothy  Peterson, hiking.  "For the
benefit of the new girls  in school," says Miss Ewing, "the  rules
concerning turnouts and  membership to the WAA should be  stated. Anyone
may join the club  by paying the regular fees, also any  girl may turn out
for sports. To  play in the inter-class finals, however,  student must have
a C grade  average".  The girls are working hard to  make this season a
successful one in  women's sports. Plans are being  formulated to encourage
turnouts  in soccer, hockey, volley ball, swimming  and hiking.  With the
WAA  By Mildred Larson  Looking It Cher  By Harry Kluge  A rustle, then a
scuffle, a clatter,  then a bang—the latter is the door  by the gym
as the feet of the on-rushing  soccer and hockey enthusiasts  make a dash
for the lower end  of the football field to start their  quarterly "fresh
air" sports. The  explanation of the rush as the fact  that the heroes of
the football field  also turn out at the same time. Of  course, girls, you
aren't supposed to  be looking their way but maybe a  glance now and then
will cause no  comment from either side, however  don't let the boys know,
it might  make them nervous.  Another tempter, all ye 'of the  fairer
sex—the WAA has just received  (and paid for) twelve brand new,  spic
and span hockey clubs, so if  flying mud and stones with a few  blackened
shins appeal to you—here  is the opportunity of a lifetime. I  mean
the opportunity of being the  first twelve out in the field to get  your
hands on those new red, white,  yellow and maybe green clubs. T  didn't
look that close, it was too  hard on my eyes, and by the way,  that will be
a good excuse for poor  playing. for the first two or three  turnouts or
until enough'school real  estate has been deposited on them  to calm down
their overwhelming  colors.  But, girls, don't be too hasty in  being the
first ones in the PE office  to get the new clubs—they  might be
given out last.  Volley ball, swimming and hiking  offer other
opportunities to the  maid who does not care for the  great open spaces
where the cool  breeze fans your overheated brow  (caused by overexertion)
and the  sun—if you can find it, shines down  upon the upturned
faces, peppering  the noses with flecks of gold or  maybe, well—you
guess, over which  cold cream, hand lotion and powder  is applied in a vain
attempt to regain  their feminine charm. Anyway,  you still have a chance
to indulge  in your favorite sport, just  sign on the dotted line if you
can  find a sign to sign—well there  should be one on the bulletin
board  in the lower hall.  Fossils Found Five  Million Years Old  At
Canyon, Texas, a 3,500-pound  fosilized rock formation Was recently 
unearthed that contained  bones of cats, dogs, camels, horses,  tigers,
mammals and martodons,  said by scientists to have lived approximately 
five million years ago.  I t is in the possession of C. S. Johnson, 
professor of paleontology at  West -Texas State college.  Bellingham,  We
Try Our feest To Be  — F R I E N D L Y —  J. C. PENNEY CO. 
Wash.  Welcome!  The serious and the dignified, the frivolous and the gay 
are gathered together for another year of learning.  We welcome you all,
and hope that you may find those  things for which you seek. And may D A R
I G O L D assist  you,in your heavier as well as your lighter moments! 
Whatcom County Dairymen's Assn.  '"' '''—•-•
•:'1"-"'- •• PHONE 314 v •:,.-.*•:. 
---'-"—• ;, •,,,,.,.;.8270f  "Now, boys, do be careful,
and  don't hurt anybody. Lookout, Bill  don't tackle that fellow so hard. 
Oops, I almost said, "darn" when  Boggess fumbled that ball."  I was
amazed. Was this our football  coach of last year? The fellow  who worked
his players hard  and didn't care who knew it.  Rather timidly, I asked,
"What's  the matter, coach? Have you  changed your style of coaching?"  And
in a meek little voice, he said,  "Yes, I just got married." 
"Congratulations," I said as I  tiptoed away, being careful not to  mutter
anything under my breath  as I stumbled over the rocks in the  football
field.  In all seriousness, however, this  department offers sincere
congratulations  to Coach 



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Northwest Viking - 1935 October 4 - Page 4



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/  WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON  Smith 
Head Staff of  NW Viking  Millikan To Advise Nominating  Convention of
Tuesday's  Election  Six Vacancies on Board  Johnson Heads Dancing Class; 
Shangle Yell King  Failure to attain a quorum ac the  Wednesday meeting of
the Board of  Control led' to the postponement  of the meeting until
Thursday. At  that time the Board named Joan  Hoppe as editor of the
Northwest  Viking and Nancy Smith as business  manager.  President Gordon
Millikan was  asked to advise the officials of the  nominating convention,
to be held  next Tuesday, of t h e number of  positions to be filled at the
coming  election. Besides the two four-quarter  representatives which are 
regularly replaced in the fall, there  are four vacancies left on the 
Board.  Because of the school ruling on  activity points," Miss Hoppe and 
Miss Smith tendered their resignations  to the positions as representatives
 and vice-president, respectively.  Louise Schulz, who had another  quarter
to serve on the Board,  failed to return.to school this fall.  A sixth
vacancy was made when  Miss Charlotte Richardson, industrial  arts
instructor, was granted a  year's leave of absence. President  Fisher will
appoint another member  of the faculty to replace her.  Further business of
the Board  included the appointment of Ladd  Shangle as yell king with the
request  that he suggest the names of  his assistants.  t l was moved that
dancing instruction  be continued with Cliff  Johnson in charge. Other
phases  of the mixed recreation program  will be discussed at the next
meeting  on October 9. The local representative,  of the State spoke to 
the Board about the bearing of the  new business occupation tax upon 
public activities of the school.  The members retaining then-seats  on the
executive board are  Cliff Johnson, Oscar Svarlien,. Mr.  Edward Arntzen,
Dr. E. A. Bond,  and President Millikan.  ——. o  Alkisiah Club
Members  To Select New Adviser  Many WSNS Faculty Members and  Students
Spend Vacations Traveling;  Officers Elected by Edens Hall Girls  Members
of Terrace House, Kozy Kottage.and Collett Court Also  Choose Leaders At
Recent House Meetings  Fall social activities at Normal began with the
return of students and  faculty members to school after vacations spent
visiting relatives and  friends, traveling, and at their homes. New
students are being welcomed  and organized houses are  Alkisiah club
members considered  candidates for club advisor at a  special meeting held
last Wednesday  in room 108.  The next item of important business  was the
electing of delegates  to the nominating convention,  which will be held
next week. They  also planned their program for entertainment  at the club
rally which  was held last Thursday evening.  This year the club hopes to
be  actively responsive to the current  arts since the purpose of this
organization  is to promote a general  culture in the fine arts. 
——.—o-  Pierron Accepted By  Government; Position  In
Veteran's Service  William Pierron left Bellingham  Oct. 3 to work as
junior file clerk  in the Veteran's Bureau at Washington  D. C. Mr. Pierron
was a  third year student at the Normal  and was also a staff member of the
 Viking.  Pierron took his civil service examination  three years ago and
the  first return he had was an official  notification that there was a
position  waiting for him at Washington.  When Pierron reaches tne  capital
he will join Allan Waters,  another Normal graduate.  Because Pat Allan and
Ruby  Victor failed to return to  school this quarter, we are  forced to
omit keyhole until  conditions arise when its return  will be merited. 
Arden  Featuring Arden s '  Freshly Frozen  ICE C R E A M !  FOUNTAIN
SERVICE  ' MALTED MILK  MILK SHAKES  Bellingham Normal Special  115 E.
Holly Phone 353  selecting officers and planning recreational  programs.  *
* * * *  Students Transfer  Ralph Shenenberger, former editor  of the
Northwest Viking, is now  attending the University of Washington  at
Seattle. Phil Campbell,  former Viking sporto editor, is also  attending
the University of Washington.  Both men are enrolled in  the School of
Journalism.  * * * * » •  Harry Goheen, a member of the  Viking
staff last year, has gone to  Palo Alto, California, where he has 
registered as a senior at Stanford  university. He received the Stanford 
Converse Scholarship for the  year 1935-1936. Goheen is working  for a
degree in mathematics.  * * * * *  Rose Altose and Marye Louise  Harrison,
who left school last spring  to attend the University of Washington  in
Seattle, are now enrolled  at Normal.  * * * * *  Officers Named  Marian
Price was elected president  of Terrace House at a meeting  held October
first. Hazel Oie was  chosen social chairman. Four new  members, June
Weckwerth, Beatrice  Palsfoot, Bernadine Smith, and  Myrtle Oie, were
initiated.  * * * * *  • Edens Hall girls held their first  house
meeting last Thursday evening.  Helen Scott was elected  president; Eileen
Kongsback, social  chairman; Virginia Holm, secretary-  treasurer; and
Maureen Mc-  Clellan, house reporter.  * * * * *  Members of Collett Court
held  their first house meeting last Tuesday.  Margaret . Davis was elected
 house president; Margaret Collett,  social chairman; and' Elsie Boland 
and May McKay, reporters.  ? * * * * ,  Officers of Kozy Kott.age, elected 
at their house meeting last Monday Her trip lasted three weeks.  evening
are: president, Jean Dug-gan;  social chairman, Ruth Fisher,  and house
reporter, Jean Cucksey.  * * * * *  Positions Obtained  Among former Normal
students  who received teaching positions this  summer, for this year are:
Eilene  Morrison, Esther Hill, Victor Dickinson,  Harlan Jones, and Francis
 Fisher. Miss Morrison is teaching  at Shelton and Miss Hill has a 
teaching position at Port Angeles.  Dickinson is teaching at Foster and 
Fisher is teaching a Friday- Harbor.  Jones is principal of the Pleasant 
Valley Grade school.  * * * * *  Vacationists Return  Dr. and Mrs. E. A.
Bond accompanied  by their son and daughter-in-  law, Dr. and Mrs. Austin
Bond,  recently visited the San Diego exposition,  Zion National park,
Boulder  Dam, Bryce Canyon and Salt  Lake City. Mrs. Bond accompanied  Dr.
and Mrs. Austin Bond to New  York City, where she will visit. Dr.  Bond
returned to Bellingham September  15 to resume his work as  head of the
mathematics department  at Normal.  * * * * *  Miss Ruth Weythman, head of 
the Women's Physical Education  department, and Miss Elizabeth  Hopper, who
is in charge of the Appointment  Bureau, spent the month  of September
traveling and visiting  in California. They returned to  Bellingham last
Sunday.  * * * * *  Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Philippi returned  to Bellingham
last Friday  after spending twenty days traveling  in California and
Oregon.  Philippi is a member of the science  department at Normal.  * * *
* *  Lucille Lee visited in Oregon and  California during last July. Miss 
Lee visited relatives and friends and  attended the San Diego exposition. 
Editor Hostetter Calls for Staff  Applications Now Being Received for Work
on  Klipsun; Fifteen Positions Are Open to Qualifying  Students.  "Students
who wish to make applications  for a position on the Klipsun  staff must
submit applications  before Thursday, October 10", reports  Helen
Hostetter, editor of the  Klipsun, Normal's annual. Applications  may be
made in person to  the editor or written qualifications  may be placed in
the Associated  Students' box in President C. H.  Fisher's outer office. 
AH Positions Open  Fifteen positions are open to  qualifying students. The
positions  are: associated editor, art editor,  photography editor and four
assistants,  classes, organizations, administrations,  photo engraving,
typist,  copy editor, men's sports PPPPP