Primary tabs

1935_1122




     ----------

     

Northwest Viking - 1935 November 22 - Page 1



     ----------

     

WATCH FOR VIKING  WEDNESDAY  10 A. M.  BEC HOUR  TONIGHT  8 P. ML 
VOL. X X X I V . — N O . 8 W A S H I N G T O N S T A T E N O R M A L
SCHOOL, B E L L I N G H A M , W A S H I N G T ON  Friday, November 22, 1935
 Campus  Chatter  SUMMARY  MELODY  SUGGESTIONS  jEcclesia Choir Is To
Appear  In Special Assembly Monday  With Sacred Music Program  Hoe and cry
of Homecoming has  died down, bat the event is imprinted  in the memories
of all alumni  who returned and all students of  Normal who joined in with
plans  of the week-end. Chairmen deserve  praise for making this one of 
the "biggest and best" of Homecomings.  Everything moved smoothly  and, for
some, too swiftly. To  all those who were appointed to  serve on the
various committees,  and felt that they were merely a  fifth wheel,
remember that as gt; every  club must have a vice-president*  so every
affair of importance  must have many and large committees.  They at least
lend prestige  and dignity to the undertaking, and  sometimes prove to be
necessary.  Remember  Probably the most pleasant surprise  was the defeat
of Ellensburg  on Saturday. The fact that it was  the first time since 1925
that Normal  had won the Homecoming  game almost proved to be the grand 
climax of the entire Homecoming.  Free Can of Paint  Gained by Victory  "I
would like to thank the  football team for winning the  game last Saturday
and helping  the Edens hall girls to get  a can of paint free", said Agnes 
Martin, who lives at Edens  hall. The manager of the  Northwest Hardware
bet Miss  Martin the price of a can of  paint that the Vikings would  not
win their Homecoming  game. Edens hall got then-paint  free.  Miss Martin
would also like  to thank Diehl Motor company,  Champion and Cornwall 
streets, for the use of a truck  and Auto Rebuild, 401 Grand  avenue, for
the use of spot  lights. "These companies certainly  showed cooperation",
she  said.  Work Starting Bellingham Enthusiasts Form  Chorus of Nineteen
Members Is  Conducted by Elton Roth;  Begun in 1930  Interest displayed by
students in  Saturday's luncheon should have  been gratifying to the
committee  in charge. The large dining room  of Edens hall was filled with
guests  who were well entertained by brief  after-luncheon speeches and
musical  numbers.  Twenty-seven  A true benefit to all lovers of  music has
been brought about by  the organization of the Civil Music  association.
Through this association  many of the world's outstanding  artists will be
brought to Bellingham,  three or more each season.  Student activity
tickets will admit.  Shopping  Delegates Discuss  Ideas Concerning  Dances,
Corsages  Suggestions on Etiquette Given;  Women May Sponsor Tolo  Next
Quarter  To evaluate the many ideas on  the subject of corsages and all
that  they stand for, representatives of  Women's League, Edens hall, Man's
 club and the W club met last week  in the Women's League oom for an 
hour's discussion.  Out. of the conflict came the suggestion  that the man
send a corsage  for women's informals but that for  men's dances there be
no corsages.  As an act of sociability the committee  favored going some
place  Revive Early Melodies  Singers Have Made World Tours;  And Many
Broadcasts  Directed by Elton Menno Roth,  the Roth Eccelesia Choir of
Southern  California will appear in a special  assembly at the Normal
auditorium  Monday morning at 11:00.  The group of 19 singers are on a 
tour of the United States and Canada,  reviving the music of the cathedrals
 and abbeys of the early  centuries and presenting sacred  music in
symphonic style.  I Since its organization in'1930 this  choir of select
voices has made  trans-continental, American-Canadian,  and European tours
and has  received favorable press notices in  such cities as Los Angeles,
Washington,  D. C; Atlanta, Ga.; Salt  Lake City. Utah; Philadelphia, and 
New York City.  Though best known for their concerts  and personal
appearances, the  choir has also been heard on radio  programs. One of
their broadcasts  was over KHJ of the Columbia Network  on the American
Legion Memorial.  Day Sunrise Service program  last Memorial day.  o 
Normal Students  Local Performance  Immediately on  PE Structure  Bids
Opened, Contracts Awarded  For Construction of New  $ 2 0 0 , 0 0 0 Gym 
New Civic Music Association;  Nils Boson Named President  With bids opened
and contracts  awarded construction of the Physical  Education building on
the new  athletic field will begin immediately,  according to an
announcement  made by President C. H. Fisher last  Wednesday. The $200,000
building  will be erected with the aid of a  $70,000 PWA grant. 
Henrikson-Alstrom company of  Seattle, with a bid of $139,790, was  awarded
the general construction  contract, their bid being the lowest  of the
seven general contract bids  submitted. Other low bids were  $148,596,
submitted by the Daily  Construction company and $150,-  664 by William
Peterson, both of  Seattle. The highest of the general  contract bids was
$179,900.  Tegenfeldt and Parquharson, of  Bellingham, with a bid of
$42,699.60  were given the contract for ventilating  and plumbing. The
contract  for electrical work was granted to  Ne Page-McKenny company of
Seattle,  after eleven bids ranging from  a high $9,758 to the low $7,195,
were  offered.  "All bids were basic bids, tendered  without any
alternates," President  Fisher announces. Upon the opening  of the bids,
architects were instructed  to draw up contracts in  favor of the lowest
bidder under  each contract classification.  o  Hoppe  to  Something
different in entertainment!  Monday in a special assembly,  the Ecclesia
Choir of Los Angeles  will present a program of  acapella music. We hope
that the  confusion of the assembly will disappear  so that the program may
be  fully enjoyed. After all, it isn't the  best plan to send visitors away
with  the fixed idea that the Normal  assembly is one of the most stupid 
to entertain.  Daj's  That stag line is absolutely invulnerable.  No matter
how many  complaints reach their ears, no  matter how many frowning glances
 are sent in their direction, they  continue with greater force at each 
succeeding rec hour. It would  seem to be a deliberate example of  "malice
aforethought." Not only dp  they crowd the dance floor,- but  they
completely hide the faculty  sponsors from view. If the stags  have no
consideration for their fellow  students, at least might they  not think of
the faculty guests?  Until  K.M . „ .. . Publicity may be all right
in its  Sight of all the various repairs way but it certainly is a
nuisance,  that are taking place around the according to Dr. E. A. Bond of
the  Speech Pupils Take Part  In Passion Play  Students Registering  For
Winter Quarter  Football Players  Have Intelligence  Football players are
not always  dumb, according to M.  F. Cederstrom, of the English 
department.  "How many times have you  heard people say that football  is
all bawn and no brains;  that colleges make easy courses  for their
football squad and  perhaps pay t h e i r way  through?"  "Having a good
share of the  football men in my classes, I  feel sure that they have been 
maligned", says Mr. Cederstrom,  adding that so far as  he has noticed the
boys are not  at all dumb.  Our football team, he reminds  us, w h i l e
showing  brains in classes also shows  brains on the field—just
remember  that last game if you ,  are in doubt.  Membership Drive Closes
Soob;  Yearly Fee Is Reasonable;  Students Admitted  Normal Students 
Attend Northwest  Christian Council  Bible Lessons Given by Seattle 
Speakers To Members of  Four Schools  Registration Now Taking  in Bever's
Office  PI lace  in town  dance.  If neither'the man or the girl can 
arrange for a car ahead'of time the  man should provide a taxi, said the 
representatives. Two couples going  together makes the cost very small.  j
It was suggested that the Women's  League winter informal be a  Tolo affair
with the girl taking the  responsibility for everything, including  a
bounteous boutonniere for the  man. The men discussed making a  formal of
their spring dance, that  is having men wear tuxedos.  Dolly Anderson, and
Carol Hughes  represented the Women's League;  Helen Scott, Edens hall; Mon
Or-loff  and Bill Taylor, Men's club;  Oscar Starlund and Bill Frender, 
the W club.  o  Bond Finds Publicity  Keeps Him Occupied  Although none of
them had  speaking parts, five Normal students  who took part in the
Passion Play  presented at the American Theater  Monday and Tuesday, wore
costumes  and saw action in the performance.  They were: Alfred Loop, a cap
 Pre-registration for the 1936 winter  quarter for students now in  school
began November 12, according  to announcements from Dean  James Bever's
office. Students who  entered as freshmen in the fall, and  who are in
group 7, registered that  day and continued on November  13. Those in group
8 programmed  eat a bite after the tain in the Roman guard; Maurice o n
November 14 and 15, and in  Tooley, who played the role of the  Apostle
James; William Weeks and  Frank Nims/ Roman guards; and  Robert Lisle, who
took the part of  one of the mob leaders. All these  students were chosen
from V. H.  Hoppe's speech classes.  Loop's name appeared on the  program. 
Several Normal students sang in  the chorus.  group 9, on November 18 and
19  Other students will register as  follows: transfer students who entered
 in the fall, November 20, 21,  22; primary and intermediate curriculum 
students, November 25, 26,  27; junior high, December 2, 3, 4;  and
non-diploma and special students;  December 5, . Students doing  teaching
winter quarter registered  in room 122 on November 20  and 21.  Vennoy
Skinner Plays 'Christus'  Appearance of Young Actor Shows Strength,
Fineness, and Sincerity  In 'Master's' Character Portrayal  school suggests
another that might  well be taken care of. Not the safest  even in dry
weather, the board  walk between Normal and Edens  hall is really dangerous
with the  heavy frost and ice on it. Those  who use it step carefully,
tensely,  and when they finally reach their  destination safely usually
sigh in  huge relief.  Christmas  Because of the Thanksgiving vacation 
next Thursday and Friday  the issue of the Viking will appear  on
Wednesday, November 27. As  is the usual custom, the papers will  be placed
in the main hall near  noon, while the staff realizes that  all students
are thirsting for the  items contained in the paper, it has  come to the
conclusion that surely  one paper should satisfy that, thirst.  Remember
that there are some 660  besides the faculty to receive papers.  p  Happy
New Yearl-  Mathematics department. Several  weeks ago Dr. Bond attempted
to  determine what chance there was  of the recurrence of a bridge hand 
dealt in Athens, Ala., in which each  of the four players held 13 cards  of
the same suit.  His estimation was t h a t only in 73,- 
000,000,000,000,000,000,000 deals would  the cards be so divided. This news
 was published in the Bellingham  Herald and sent out to the Associated 
Press. Since then Dr. Bond  has been receiving mail from all  over the
United States asking him  to compute the mathematical  chances on winning
an automobile  or having the writer's name drawn  in a local theater 



     ----------

     

Northwest Viking - 1935 November 22 - Page 2



     ----------

     

WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, BELLINGHAM,. WASHINGTON  Established
1899  Published every Friday except during the month of  September by the
Associated Students, Washington  Slate ormal School, Bellingham.  Entered
In the Postoffice at Bellingham, Washington,  as second class matter by
virtue of the act of  Harch 3, 1879. •  Printed by the Miller  
Sutherlen Printing Company,  Bellingham National Bank Building, Bellingham.
 dfabscription rate by mail, $3.00 per year, in advance.  Advertising rates
on application.  Address all communications, other than news items,  to the
Business Manager of the Northwest Viking,  . Bfellingham, Wash. Telephone
3180.  /DAN HOPPE Editor  MARGARET MORSE Managing Editor  SANCY SMITH
.„ Business Manager  FRED KENT Advertising Manager  ALOHA GENTHER
...Staff Artist  Harry Kluge Sports Editor  Hhyllis Robinson Society Editor
 Margaret Thon ...: News Editor  Frank Pratt .. _ : Feature Co-Editoi  Mary
Johnston _ Feature Co-Editor  Beverly Holiday .._ -—.- Copy Editor 
Trite and True  High schoolish, infantile, adolescent, and even  moronic
are among the juicy adjectives which have  heen applied to the conduct in
assembly of various  individuals. It's an old, old story and many
intellectuals  have thumbed through innumerable pages of  Webster in search
of some scathing terms adequately  insulting to describe these unsocial
individuals.  Dropping all attempts at pedagogical phraseology  tfiey might
be called socially ignorant or just plain  rude. These annoying individuals
spend the first five  minutes of the assembly hour picking the speaker or 
musician to pieces, poking each other and giggling  inanely at the way his
pants bag at the knees or her  toes turn out.  After exhausting this highly
entertaining pastime  they settle back with their heads on the back of
their  seats or on their neighbor's shoulder and give themselves  up
wholeheartedly to munching peanut bars,  ahuffling their feet, crackling
cellophane, dropping  Books, and scratching themselves. This activity is 
o£. course punctuated with muffled sniggerings at their  own
inimitable wit.  And here we have the impression of the Belling-  Jj*am
Normal student body which the guest entertainer  carries away with him.  We
might do well to look to the Training School  for an example of how
intelligent adults are expected  to. conduct themselves in an audience. 
tog Welles On CalAi^e Legs  To Whom It May Concern  REQUISITION  Quantity
Article To Be Used For From  t.5 pat on the back SHANGLE NW Viking  , .. ..
„ J. Jacobson ' "  C. Johnson " **  Randrup '*  Kosky ' "  1.  i. 
Wickstrom  " Millikan " "  i.  5 .. ,, ,,  Signed... ..HOPPE.  Bate Nor.
22, 1935  Kelley  Keller  Activity HOMECOMING  / Tips For Movie Fans  GRAND
THEATER: Starting Saturday, for four big  days. "Shipmates Forever", taken
at our United  States naval academy stars Dick Powell and Ruby  Keeler.
Dick plays the successful young crooner  who has been brought up to hate
the navy because  tris father is admiral at the academy. However he is 
tricked ino entering the training school where he  meets a dancing
instructor, Ruby Keeler. Love! and  a f-hriiiftig climax. Ending tonight,
Pal Night, with  two features, "The Healer", with Ralph Bellamy, and 
"Western Frontier", Ken Maynard.  * * * * *  MOUNT BAKER THEATER: The
thriller of feminine  hearts, Dick Powell comes Sunday to the Mount  Baker
for a four day engagement in his latest music  mad production." "Thanks a
Million". Never before  has Powell given a performance to equal the one  m
this fast moving musical. Ann Dvorak, and Paul  Whiteman with his famous
orchestra do a superb  .job in the supporting cast. Dick sings three songs.
 Ending Saturday Night, a double feature, "Rainmakers",  Wheeler and
Woolsey and "Transatlantic  Tunnel", Richard Dix and Madge Evans. On the 
stage tonight and tomorrow "Foxxy", the world's  smartest dog.  * * * * * 
AVALON THEATER: America's little sweetheart,  Shirley Temple comes back to
the Avalon Saturday  to thrill you in one of her most recent successes 
"Curly Top". On the same bill that grand Mae  Robson and handsome Preston
Foster may be seen  in an insane comedy riot, "Strangers All". It's about 
a family that just loves to make each other miserable.  This double feature
program will run through  Tuesday. Ending tonight "Little Big Shot", Sybil 
Jason, and Glenda Farrel and "Escapade", Louise  Ranier, and William
Powell.  * * * * *  AMERICAN THEATER: Filmed in the heart of Mount  Baker
National forest during last winter was Twentieth  Century's stupendous
production "Call of the  Wild". Acclaimed wherever it has been shown, it 
should be of special interest.to local movie fans with  its familiar
settings. Clark Gable, and Loretta'Young  are its stars and it comes to the
American Satur-  ':' day for four days. .Along with it will be "Strange  ;
Wives'-' with Roger Pryor and Esther Ralston, Ending  tonight two
features;' "Going Hfehbrpw;; with Zaa»  [ Pitts and Edward Everett
Horton^ a^/',GJairyoyant',  s^th Claude Raines and Fay Wray.  77K 
BookShelf  By Chester Orloff  LOOK HOMEWARD, ANGEL, a  story of the buried
life, by Thomas  Wolfe. 1929).  " * * * Remembering speechlessly  we seek
the great forgotten language,  the lost lane-end into heaven,  a stone, a
leaf, an unfound door.  Where? When?  "Oh lost, and by the wind grieved 
ghost, come back again."  The tragic, high-pitched story of  the youth of
Eugene Garit, the  youngest of the children of greedy,  self-centered Eliza
Gant and her  husband Oliver, a big, lank, lecherous  fellow, a merchant of
tombstones  who had longed to chisel  delicately something dark and
unspeakable  in him into cold stone, to  carve ah angel's head, but who 
never learned how.  Eugene grew up in a commonplace  southern town, in a
chaotic household  marked by his father's drunken  debauches and his
mother's constant  complaining. He graduates  from the State university
when  nineteen at the head of his class,  with the nickname "Hegel" Gant. 
His father is now old and dying of  cancer. His mother is sixty years of 
age but still strong, wealthy but  still active in real estate and greedier
 than ever. Poor, lost, cynical  Ben, who had partially protected  him from
the corruption of the  family, has died. Eugene has  become a big, angular
fellow,  six feet four, very imaginative and  passionate. He is a romantic
but  does not want to reform the world  or make it a better place to live
in;  his whole conviction is that the  world is full of enchanted places,
if  he could only find them. The life  around him fetters and annoys him, 
he wants to escape from it. He feels  sure things would be better else-  He
spends a hectic summer at  home, and then prepares to leave  for Harvard.
An insurmountable  barrier exists between him and his  parents; all want to
surmount it  but all know it is too late. Our last  glimpse of him catches
him standing  by the angels of his father's shop  on the day of his
departure eastward,  looking over the town's  square, which already seemed
far  and lost to him. He is like a man  who stands upon a hill above the 
town he has left, yet does not say,  "The fog comes on little cat feet.  It
sits looking over harbor and city  On silent haunches,  And then moves on."
 It isn't the fact that the fog  greets us on these crisp fall mornings 
and it certainly isn't because  it moves on that we dislike it, but  many
of us find ourselves very annoyed  when it stays all day.  Keep Posted  Is
there a student in this college  that hasn't gone down to the scales  in
front of the nurse's office to  Weigh himself? Probably not. That  is fine
and we hope it was satisfactory  and that that extra box of  cream caramels
didn't add undue  poundage. But the point is this:  The scales, are in
front of a room  for the,sick. The people who are  in that room should have
at least a  reasonable amount of quiet. When  you come to use the scales,
think of  them and go about it quietly. It  will certainly be appreciated. 
Inspect your brakes and examine  your lights before you begin your  9:03
rush for your 9 o'clock class,  down the halls and up the stairs.  We have
a campus school and pupils  are ofttinies in the halls. They  don't always
understand the emergency  and so resent being dashed  into and run over
because of your  burst of speed.  We've heard there is such a thing  as
starting to class with time to  spare and have resolved to try it 
ourselves.  And another small matter. Letting  swinging doors bang back on 
people who follow you is definitely  an obsolete sport and so is "out"  in
this polite society. Hold the  door open until they are through or  grasp
it themselves. This leads to  our last statement: Girls, always  thank the
boys for holding doors  open for you. One courtesy deserves  another.  :
o—:  "The town is near". Rather, he  turns his eyes upon the distant
soaring  ranges.  . Muck .  For Morons  A glance 



     ----------

     

Northwest Viking - 1935 November 22 - Page 3



     ----------

     

Wildcats Tamed After Great Struggle  Viking Blue Wave Trounces 
Ellensburg 8 to 0 in Gridiron  j Homecoming Game Saturday  Automatic Safety
and Touchdown Make Up Total  Score for Norsemen; Tarte and. Krueger Kick 
Many Long Punts To Break Wildcat Offense.  Breaking up a 10-year jinx,
Bellingham football squad defeated Ellensburg  8°to 0 in an epic
Homecoming game at Battersby field, Saturday,  November 16. All the scoring
was done in the second-quarter of  the game. The first two points were made
by Tomco and Alpaugh,  who broke through the Ellensburg line to block a
punt and send the  ball over the end zone for an automatic safety. Later in
that quarter  the Vikings started a series of pass  ing and running plays
that ended  with Chorvat tossing the ball to  Smith for a touchdown.
Dzurick  failed in the attempt to make the  extra point.  Viking First Half
 In the first half the Vikings out-gained  the Wildcats in every department
 of the game. After the Norsemen  received the first kick-off they  brought
the ball 20 yards on three  plays. They were finally held and  forced to
kick. Tarte and Krueger  averaged 38 yards on punts to the  JEllensburg's
26 yards. This advantage  was the one that finally  gave Normal its
touchdown by putting  the Ellensburg team in a bad  liole.  Ellensburg was
stopped cold when  trying to make yardage through the  Norsemen's line. But
when they  resorted to passes Holl, Wildcat  receiver, was impossible to
stop.  His six feet six inches of bone and  muscle made him impervious to
the  Viking pass defense. Holl would  .stand 5 yards from the line of 
scrimmage and after catching the  pass would lateral the ball to one  of
his team-mates. Double and  triple laterals featured the Nichel-son  brand
of wide open football.  Defensive Game Played  Coach Charles Lappenbusch's 
proteges seemed content to play defensively  after their scoring spree  in
the second quarter. Each time  an Ellensburg drive was launched  the
Vikings would hold and either  Tarte or Krueger would send a beautiful 
punt deep into Wildcast territory  to stave off the offensive. If  the
Ellensburg team started their  aerial attack a Bellingham man  could be
relied upon to intercept.  Penalties were responsible for the  Viking's
inability to make another  score. Late in the fourth quarter a  pass from
Dzurick to Kvinsland put  the ball on the Ellensburg 3-yard  line. On the
next play Gall pounded  the line for 2 yards but an offside  penalty put
the Vikings back 5  yards. Some confusion in substitutions  placed the
Normal in reverse  for 5 more yards and consequently  put the Wildcats out
of danger.  The rest of the fourth quarter  featured the Ellensburg passing
attack  which won for them in other  games. Dzurick, Guglomo, and  Tomco
saved the Vikings from defeat  by intercepting Ellensburg  passes.  Coach
Lappenbusch was especially  pleased with his men and gave  them his
blessing after the game.  He stated that Boggess, Dzurick,  Tomco, and
Tarte had played  Coast Conference football in their  game with Ellensburg.
 In the words of Cliff Johnson,  "The Ellensburg team that lost in  that
Homecoming game was the  same one that held Cheney to a 0  to 0 tie". 
— o  Hockey Balls Arrive;  New Equipment Spur  To Intramural Games 
Rules Revised For  Basketball Season  One dozen pairs of long-delayed  shin
guards and half-a-dozen hockey  balls arrived at the women's P.E.  office
last Tuesday. Two old chipped  balls were at once thrown into  the
wastebasket.  "Girls have less than a month in  which to take the newness
off the  hockey equipment", said Miss Mildred  Jewell, coach. "Our first
order  being lost in the mall caused  the delay". ( gt; '. :'v;  The
remaining intramural: games  will be battle^ with i » ^ shin guards 
protecting legs from the new bails. -  New Regulations Will Eliminate 
Confusion, Roughness  Basketball rules have been changed  for the 1935-36
basketball season.  The new rules are made to prevent  the confusion that
reigns in the  midst of a fast game, according to  Coach Carver, as well as
to eliminate  some of the unnecessary roughness.  Some of the most
important  changes in rules are as follows:  Rule 7, Section 10—The
definition  of a dribble is revised. A fumble or  attempt to gain control
of the ball  is not a dribble; that is, after muffing,  or fumbling, or
tapping the  ball from a group of players, a player  may then recover the
ball and  start a dribble. A player is to be  given a reasonable
opportunity to  gain control of the ball; but if,  having had an
opportunity to gain  control, he makes an obvious attempt  to advance the
ball, he should  be considered a dribbler.  Rule 8, Section 6—On jump
balls  at the free throw line all players  except the jumpers must remain 
outside the free throw circle until  the ball is tapped.  Rule 13, Section
5—If the free  throw resulting from a personal  foul is successful,
the ball is to be  put into play from out of bounds.  Rule 14, Section
12—A player may  not remain in his free throw area,  with or without
the ball, for more  than three seconds while the ball is  in play and in
possession of his,  team.  Rule 15, Section 14—Penalty—  This
important penalty has been  rewarded, but only two changes  have been made.
In (B) it is provided  that when a foul is committed  against a player who
is hot in  the act of throwing a goal, the official  may award an extra
free  throw for unsportsmanlike conduct.  This case would apply to an
unusually  rough foul. (E) It states that  officials must disqualify a
player  for any unsportsmanlike infraction  of certain sections.  o —
 Foul Shooting Contest  Supervised By Carver  Under the supervision of Sam 
Carver, intramural coach, the annual  basketball foul shooting contest 
began last Monday with approximately  35 boys signed up.  This contest,
which was started  two years ago, allows the contestant  25 foul shots
every week for six  weeks. The person who makes the  highest percentage of
successful  shots is to have his name inscribed  on a cup in the trophy
case. The  average for the first week is about  14 out of 25, or 56 per
cent, which  is considered a trifle low.  Last year the contest was won by 
Bud VariderGriend, who had a percentage  of 75. This means 150 successful 
shots out of 200 attempted.  o  PLAYERS ENTER TEAM  Made u pualmost enirely
of varsity  men, a team sponsored by the  Hotel Henry Palm Garden will be 
entered in the city basketball league,  class "A". Players on the team are 
Dick Carver, Bud Vahder Griend,  Shel Stutz, ;Chet pombrqki, and  Leon
Alpaugh. Moe players will,be  signed later.  Hot Shots Lose  Hard Fast Game
 Pat Jacobsen Scores High Point;  . "W" Glub Wins Game After  Trailing at
Half  "W" Club 26 Hot Shots 23  P. Jacobson, 10....F Dahlstom 5  J.
Jacobson, 5 P Hansen, 8  Starlund, 6 C Borroughs, 8  Richardson, 3 G
Bristol  Shangle G Bryant, 2  Turk, 2 sub Aleaxnder  After leading the
inspired "W"  club quintet at the half by a score  of 17 to 12. the hard
playing Hot  Shots finally lost by a close 26 to  23 score.  Pat Jacobson,
held to a single  foul in the first half, was high  scorer, running wild in
the final  half to score 9 points.  Doug Hansen and Homer Borroughs  scored
8 points apiece to  place them high point men for the  Hot Shots. Starlund
played a good  game at center for the "W" club,  scoring 6 points.  Edwards
Hall, the cellar team of  the league, failed to show up for  the second
game of the day and  as a result forfeited it to the Northwest  Vikings.
The "fast Co-op team  is still leading.  Oregon Normal  Is Tricky Team 
Monmouth Team Slated To Play  Here Thanksgiving Day  In Early Game 
Labelled as the trickiest team on  the Viking schedule, Oregon Normal  of
Monmouth will play the Vikings  in the final game of the season  on
Thanksgiving day. The  game will start at 11:00 in the  morning at
Battersby field.  The Oregon team, coached by J.  .A. Cox as reputed to be
one of the  fastest, shiftiest teams on the coast.  The visitor's squad
will be made up  of veteran footballers, who, through  their long
experience with each  other, have worked up a sparkling  aerial attack and
have the functions  of a lateral down to perfection.  Sometimes as many as
three laterals  are used in one play.  In a recent game with the Fort 
Lewis gridders, the Southerners  scored two 



     ----------

     

Northwest Viking - 1935 November 22 - Page 4



     ----------

     

WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, BELLINGHAM. WASHINGTON  Women's
League  Presents:  # * * *  WE LADIES  Introducing more members of  Women's
League commission which  convenes Wednesdays at lunchtime:  Virginia Holm,
Alkisiah representative,  makes her Bellingham  residence at the dormitory,
but  originally hails from Naselle, Washington.  She is a sophomore; so she
 has two years yet to give us.  Elsie Blandeau represents Blue  Triangle at
the commission. Elsie  itf a fair product of Puyallup. This  is her first
quarter here.  Helen McNeil, leadership chairman,  has the job of posting
candidate  petitions, and seeing that all's  well at the polls. Her home is
in  Seattle, where she attended the  University.  Ruth Decker, YWCA
delegate, is  one of our town girls. She acts as  secretary pro tern at the
commission  meetings and pulls down fine  grades in her spare time. 
Maureen McClellan is our petite  WAA representative. She has often  been
taken for Maureen O'Sullivan,  but is very modest about it. Maureen  is a
crack hockey player and  a member of the Hiking club. Her  hobby is
collecting four-leaf clovers.  (She already has 200.)  Ragan hall was our
hostess at  yesterday's tea; Beverly hall invites  us to tea on the
Thursday following  Thanksgiving vacation. We gladly  accept.  You will be
interested to know  that the commission is working on  a more modern and
vital "Self-  Starter". You may have ideas for  improving it. Let us have
them.  Please reconsider the purpose of  the "We Ladies" box in the Women's
 League room. It is for suggestions!!  ; Questions!! Etc.! We realize  that
the box itself is an artistic  masterpiece, but please remember  its
meaning as well while gazing  upon its beauty.  Upon parting, we hope ail
of us  have a glorious Thanksgiving vaca  tion.  Harborview Hall  Wins Top
Spot  McCormick Takes Second Prize  In Homecoming Contest;  Daniels, Third 
Harborview hall won first place in  the contest held during the Homecoming 
week-end, for the best decorated  houses. McCormick hall was  awarded
second prize, Daniels hall,  third, and Collett court, honorable  mention.
Judges were Nancy Jane  Smith, Ruth Kulle, Dustin Clark,  Frank Pratt, and
V. H. Hoppe.  The luncheon held on Saturday  noon in the dining room of
Edens  hall was attended by students,  faculty, and alumni of Normal. 
Speakers were President C. H.  Fisher, Dr. E. A. Bond, Alvin Anderson, 
Whatcom football coach,  and Frank M. Brock, president of  the Alumni
association. Gordon  Milikan, who presided, extended a  welcome to the
alumni on behalf of  the Associated students, and Nils  Boson led the group
in the singing  of school songs.  The Ellensburg-Normal game on  Saturday
afternoon was one of the  main events of Homecoming. Normal's  victory over
Ellensburg was  the first Homecoming victory since  1925.  Committee
chairmen were: general  chairman, Ladd Shangle;  dance, Jerry Jacobsen;
assembly,  Dorothy Kelly and Annabel Keller;  game, Cliff Johnson;
advertising,  Wes Randrup; rally, Severn Kosky;  and luncheon, Gordon
Millikan.  o  Many Alumni Members Visit  Relatives and Friends While  Here
To Attend Homecoming  Girls of Ragan Hal! Are Hostesses At Women's  Tea in
League Room Thursday Afternoon;  Lee, Monteith Entertain Guests at Parties 
Diversion Asked  For Chaperones  Many alumni members were entertained  by
students during the past  Homecoming week-end. The weekly  tea was
sponsored by Ragan hall  and FUN club members will be entertained  tomorrow
evening. Several  dinner parties were held during  the past week.  * * * *
4  Party Held  Enid Monteith entertained a  group of friends at her home on
 Sixteenth street at a waffle supper  after the Homecoming football  game
last Saturday afternoon.  Guests who were present included  Allie Chaban,
Florence Zil ler, Edna  Poindexter, Beatrice Sturdavant,  and Peggy Foster.
 Members of the FUN club will be  entertained by Marthine Hansen at  her
home tomorrow night. Guests  of the club members will be Mary  Agnes Perry.
Mary Kink, Rebecca  Mounter, Bernice Glenn, Jeanne  Borgstedt and Kwen
Grant.  Drive Improvements  Now Under Way  Normal Drive Is Straightened To 
Make Room for Building  Education Facing  Serious Situation  By Dora May
Conrad  V. M. Hardin, in the November  issue of the Nation's Schools,
flings  a challenge at the educational leaders  which is both inspiring and
pertinent.  "Education is facing problems  more complex and serious in 
their nature than those of any other  time in the past—problems
that-baffle  us and confuse us to such an  extent that we have at times
lost  our sense of direction," states Hardin.  The financial crisis in
education  stands first on the list. He attributes  it to the educational
leaders  themselves who have failed to guide  the public in re-definition,
re-enter-pretation  of the functions of education  in the light of
ever-changing  society.  Socialization of the individual  versus the
anti-social doctrine of  rugged individualism is very aptly  brought out by
Mr. Hardin.  "Education's New Challenge" is an  article in which a student
of education  might well further his ideas of  the theory of our modern
type of  progressive education.  • o  Normal drive is to be moved to 
make room for the new Physical  Education building across from  Waldo
field. George Dack, gardener,  says that eventually Normal  drive will be
straight.  The same WPA j ject that is to  furnish water to the southside
will  straighten Normal drive and resurface  the new athletic field. About 
700 cubic yards of top dirt will be  put on the field. This dirt is
obtained  from Lake Padden free of  charge, although the Normal pays  for
the hauling.  o  Tea Held  The weekly Women's League tea  was held in the
League room from  2:30 until 3:30 yesterday afternoon.  Girls of Ragan hall
were hostesses.  Peggy Foster had charge of plans  for the affair. 
Margaret Osier had as her guest  at Downs hall during the past weekend 
Nelly Nisca of Aberdeen. Sophie  Zambas was the guest of her brother,  Tony
Zambas, during Homecoming.  Richard Dombroski, of Aberdeen,  visited his
brother Chet  Dombroski during the past weekend.  Guests Here  Katherine
McDonald was the  guest of May McDonald and Betty  Chapman at The Cedars
last weekend.  Pauline Carskadden, of Oak  Harbor, was the guest of Maxine 
and Pat Wade during the past  week-end.  * * * * *  Recent guests at Edens
hall included  Margaret Carmichael, Sue  Tidland, and Mrs. C. Y. Kline.
Miss  Carmichael was the guest of Helen  McNeil and Miss Tidland was the 
guest of Mary Frances Morthland.  Mrs. Kline, of Blaine, visited Margaret 
Foote.  Gertrude Allen and Priscilla Le-  Huqult had as their guests last 
Saturday, Kenneth Ross and Paul  Moshner of Kirkland.  * * * * *  Former
Students Visit  Charles Wilson, a former Normal  student who now attends
the University  of Washington, was a weekend  visitor in Bellingham. While 
here he attended Homecoming activities.  * * * * *  Alumni guests at Edens
hall last  week-end were Betty Tod, Isabel  Hinman, Peggy McKay, Mildred 
Hendricks, Phyllis Greely, Genevieve  Strain, Alcina Allen, Catherine 
Cronin, and Gwen Shostrom.  Rolle Proposes Refreshment  Sponsors at Rec
Hours;  Theft Related  Pupils Prepare  Annual Festival  ^r OfThanksgiving 
Card tables and lamps will be  requisitioned for rec hour as a result  of
discussion at a no-quorum  meeting of the Board of Control,  Wednesday. 
Members agreed with Mabel Rolle,  rec hour chairman, that faculty  sponsors
should be provided with  some means of diversion. Arrangement  will also be
made to serve  coffee to the guests at intermission.  "Students go out and
get refreshments  and a pot of hot coffee would  taste good these cold
nights," Miss  Rolle said.  Hat Reported Missing  Cliff Johnson reported
the loss of  a hat at the Armory last Saturday.  He commented on the
irregular  operation of the checkroom at the  Homecoming dance.  In the
absence of President Gordon  Millikan, thfe vice-president,  Bob Hartley,
took charge of the  meeting.  Members present were: Bob Hartley,  Esther
Guis, Cliff Johnson, Mabel  Rolle, Beverly Holiday, and Miss  Elizabeth
Hopper, faculty advisor.  Cabinets Furnished To  Art Department; Made  By
School Carpenter  Julius Dornblut, Ralph Senen-berger,  Phil Campbell, Mark
Jar-rett,  Dick Albert, Jim Stoddard,  Donna Aisted Arnold, Joe Arnold, 
Vernon Leatha, Harlan Jones, and  Francis Fisher, former Normal  students
and members of the Vi-  I king staff, visited at Normal during  J
Homecoming.  Noted Young Violinist Proves To Be  Ordinary Youth Who Likes
Athletics  Campi Coast to Coast  Named Most Popular  Feature Page Column 
Committe'es Appointed  By President of Club  Work was apportioned by
Blanche  Pearce, president of the International  Relations club, at a brief
 meeting Wednesday. She designated  for the program committee: Glen 
Nygreen chairman, Geraldine Flans-burgh,  Neil Power, and Herbert  Eisner.
The following were appointed  on the membership committee:  Anne Matheson,
chairman; John  Jacobson, and Burdette Miller.  The remainder of the
evening  was spent in an open discussion  of the background and present
situation  in Italy and Ethiopia.  Preferences for the feature page  of the
Viking were revealed by  questionnaires sent out recently.  By a large
majority, Campi Coast  to Coast was the favorite, the runner-  up being the
gossip column,  "Muck For Morons". Periodical  Parade, Close Ups,, Student
Opin-non,  Linoleum cuts, Editorials,  Book Shelf, and Nonsense Column 
were rated according to the number  of votes.  Opinions for added features
were  plentiful and some good ideas were  voiced. Comic linoleum cuts, 
jokes, hobby interests, continued  stories, poetry and more about  teachers
were suggested as improvements.  It is generally agreed that  the paper
very satisfactorily represents  PPPPP