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1937_0108




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Northwest Viking - 1937 January 8 - Page 1



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IlilMfe:;;'?  •'•;•: 1'  Weather Report:  Pretty
Hot  For CPS  Tomorrow  Northwest Viking  Effectively  Remodeled  Under HAK
Plan  VOL. XXXVI—NO. 13 \VA gt;H!NGTON STATE NOKMAL.sCH.i v ' l . br
LL1NGHAM. WASHING ION Friday, January 8, 1937  Wt  Th  Viking  . By Will
Stuart.  Unheralded and far less exciting  than his 72 years of mortal
existence,  was the death last Christmas  Eve of one of journalism's
greatest  gifts to a world of news-hungry readers  and eager newspaper
aspirants,  Arthur Brisbane.  » * * * *  Educated abroad mainly by
tutors,  Brisbane's assimilation of European  gentility furnished a
suitable foundation  for an early entrance into a  journalistic trade at
nineteen. Soon  an ally of Pulitzer on the New York  World, Brisbane
attracted Hearst's  attention and finally fell victim to  some of his
rosy-tinted enticements,  taking command aboard the undeveloped  Evening
Journal of that  city. At that point he vowed to  touch not a drop of his
favorite  claret until such a time that his paper  surpassed the now rival
World  in both volume and importance.  This he did readily.  * * * * * 
Together with Hearst, Brisbane  envisaged and fostered numerous  real
estate deals, constructing the  Ziegfeld Theater, the Waring House,  the
Ritz hotel, and other sometimes  not so lucrative edifices around and 
about New York and its constituencies.  Oft-times he attempted to  outdeal
Hearst in these transactions  by subtly inserting a provision  in the
contract which would  ultimately give him 90 per cent of  the cut and allot
a mere 10 per cent  to Hearst. A few things like that  would tend to make
one wonder why  a headstrong person of Hearst's bias  tolerated -Brisbane
as long as, -he  did. Resulting from Brisbane's ambitions,  large papers
grew up in  Washington, Chicago, and Milwaukee,  adding much to the extent
and  prestige of the Hearst chain and  his, what was-to-be $260,000 salary.
 * * * * *  Brisbane was quite taken up by  Mussolini with his dynamic
characteristics,  and evinced a great deal  of pleasure at the thoroughness
of  Italy in its Ethiopian warfare.  Strangely enough he held a distinct 
aversion towards all atheists in his  ordinary estimations.  * * * * * 
Both his columns, "This Week,"  subscribed to by 1200 weeklies,  and
"Today," patronized by 200  dailies, were written in any place  available
at the moment a story was  felt coming on—in a car, ferry,  train,
anything. An extremely facile  and rapid style of writing enabled  him to
turn out eight additional  columns of editorials weekly  and still have
ample time for recreation.  * * » * *  Arthur Brisbane's final column 
was dictated from bed and finished  by his son, Seward, believed to be  the
only ghost-writer employed on  any of his writings. Heart trouble 
intervened before the last paragraph  could be copied.  Filling in next
day, Colleague  Hearst wrote the column dedicatory  to his comrade's life,
setting the  scene for scores of eulogies and  notes of sorrow which poured
from  friends throughout the world, putting  a climax to a career that was 
almost one grand climax from start  to finish. To his grave with him  goes
his column.  * * * * *  Yet not to thine eternal resting  place,  Shalt
thou venture alone . . .  But all that breathe shall (finally)  Make their
bed with thee . . .  —Bryant.  * * * * *  Comparing Brisbane with
other  columnists prominent in public eye.  one can see the versatility
attained  in that particular field of journalism.  New York writers seem to
predominate  as far as national renown  is concerned. N  .Walter Winchell,
of the Winchell*  Bernie publicity feud, in his "On  Broadway' column
covers a highly  local range, New York stage and  soreen, bits of night
life gossip, and  additional information peculiar to  Men's Club  Slates
Dance  Next Friday  Bellingham Hotel Scene of Frolic;  No Corsages Is
Ruling; Much  Enthusiasm Shown for Event  Boroughs Working Hard  Date
Change with Women Give  Males Better Chance  (Continued on Page Three) 
Men's Club . Informal, the firs  venture of the new Men's club, wil  be
held in the large ballroom of th.  Bellingham hotel one week from tonight. 
This will be the first dance  that the men of the school hav..  sponsored
this term.  Homer Boroughs, general chair  man, states, "The men are enthus
 iastic about this affair. They hav  decided against corsages becaus. 
there are many who would not LK.  able to attend if incidental expenses 
were not kept at a minimum." At  may other dances given by the men  there
have been no corsages. Thj i  action, accepted in good spirit by  everyone,
is truly a great help tj  many. With everyone abiding by  the rule no one
is conspisuous.  Dates Changed  The Women's League, which for-;  merly had
next Friday reserved as  the date for their dance, took a later  date
because the general opinion  of the students was that the men  should give
their dance first. The  girls who have taken men to cither  of the other
dances felt that the  men should be given a chance to  choose their dates
without any further  pressure being put upon them.  From Ed Angel,
publicity chairman,  comes the following statement:  "If you haven't a
date, fellows,  get one and sign up right  away. The" low admission' price
of  75 cents means that a large number  of you will have to turn out."  Rex
Rolle, another committeeman,  promises a good orchestra.  Several themes
have been suggested;  as yet none has been definitely  decided upon.  o 
January Program  Presents Famous  Metropolitan Star  Lunjberg, Scandinavian
Soprano,  O'Connor, Irish Tenor,  This Month  Assembly programs for the
month  of January include Goeta Lunjberg,  Metropolitan Opera singer, who
will  appear in assembly January 26. According  to Donald C. Bushel! and 
Nils Boson, of the music department  and also of the lecture and 
entertainment committee, Mme.  Lunjberg is one of the outstanding 
performers of the winter quarter  schedule.  Appears Before Queen  At the
age of eight the Scandinavian  soprano sang for the queen  of Sweden. At
sixteen she entered  the Royal Academy of Singing in  Stockholm. After two
years of pre-  Uminary training there, she made  her debut as Elizabeth in
"Tann-haeuser."  Since 1932 she has been  a member of the Metropolitan 
Opera Association. During the win*  ter season, Mme. Lunjberg devotes  her
time appearing at the Metropolitan  Opera House and concertiz-ing 
throughout America. She spends  the other six months of the year in  Europe
appearing in concerts and  musical festivals.  Scheduled to appear January
12,  is Charles O'Connor, singer of Irish  traditional songs, who will
accompany  himself on the Irish harp. The  legendary and historical
background  legendary and historical background  and tanslatiron of the
songs will be  explained by Mr. O'Connor.  Charles Eagle Plume, interpreter
 of Indian lore, life, and culture, will  present a program consisting of
Indian  dances and songs on January  19.  January 15 has been set aside for
 student elections. Women's League  assembly is scheduled for January  29J
•}.:•• -:-^:\M\i;:'.•/•.•,:
'••••"•;v::-./;  (An Editorial)  In Which the
Editor Makes Several Promises for  Viking Staff, With Best Intentions  of
Keeping Same  To Readers of the Viking:  Today a new newspaper is facing
you. It is new in several ways  —-in makeup, in policy, in
enterprise, and personnel.  The Northwest Viking is no longer on the fence.
This issue will  inaugurate the practice of forming definite opinions on
questions of  concern to Viking readers. 1 hrough the editorial department,
opinions  will be voiced on controversial subjects, not with the purpose of
 inciting adveree publicity or comment, but with the hope of creating 
interest in a hitherto wish-washy section.  Hereafter the Viking WILL be on
time. Believing that news is  valueless if late, the new staff pledges
itself to have the paper in the  front hall when the Friday assembly is
over. In the minds of the  new editorial department, this is the most
important change to take  place.  A criticism from the men students, and
not without some foundation,  that too many females were running the paper,
will now have  no foot to stand on—as witness the masthead.  In
regard to the fact that inaccuracy often creeps into print, the  staff will
take more exacting measures to correct this fault. This  will include bo'.h
mechanical errors and mistakes caused by incorrect  copy. '  Faults
hitherto listed and designed for correction during the coming  quarter are
in no manner to be inferred as casting any reflection on previous 
administrations. Instead, the new staff has simply made a few new 
resolutions. They are a capable, selectei group, and are confident of 
their ability to replace the old with the new, and desirous of fashioning 
a good paper for your approval. Through over-zealousness, inexperience, 
and the human characteristic of being imperfect, it is to be expected that 
this staff will make a few mistakes; but these mistakes will.- it is hoped,
be  so negligible that they will be forgiven in light of the intended
ambitions.  Ullin Sees 'The Floorwalker,  Ten Big Stories  Chosen For '36 
Annual Newspaper Poll Given by  Viking; Simpson Affair  Wins Honor 
Operating in full accordance with  other: first-class, journals and their 
polls, the Viking duly delivers its  annual poll—"The Ten Most
Important  News Stories" for the period  which is now but a fleeting memory
 of better things, 1936. This affair  is put on to acquaint the public with
 those events they should remember  as the most important happenings 
during the past year.  Complete tabulations: one, King  Edward, 167; two,
Roosevelt campaign,  104; three, Italian Conquest,  97; four, Spanish
revolution, 94;  five, Hauptman case, 88; six, Olympic  Games, 54; seven,
Pacific Coast  strike, 38; eight, Zioncheck antics  and death, 31; nine,
Pan-American  peace conference, 26; ten, Midwest  drought, 25. 
Investigation unearthed the facts  that three and five were the only  ones
to repeat from last year's  National polls, that one-third of  the subjects
chosen for consideration  concerned war.  Editor Appoints  Viking Machine 
Kluge, Boothe Head Paper Staff;  Rolle New Copy Editor;  Classes Even 
Headed by Harry Kluge, editor,  and Helen Boothe, business manager,  a new
Viking staff has been  appointed.  The appointments are as follows:  Rex
Rolle, copy editor; Lloyd Nel-  Bob White, advertising manager;  son, news
editor; Clarence Soukup,  sports editor; Don Zylstra and Virginia  Shields,
feature editors; Sybil  Hinchliffe, society editor; and Jean  Hatch, art
editor.  "I think the staff is almost completely  new and as editor I will
get  the paper out on time each week, as  this is very essential in the
publishing  of a paper," states the new chief.  Members of the staff are
chosen  from the advanced class in news-writing,  as this course is
designed  to teach students how to publish a  school paper. Regular
reporters are  taken from the elementary class  with the exception of
special writers.  Mabel Wilson Returns From Around  The World Trip; Visits,
Scenes of  Former Tripy Japan, India, Arabia  By Walt  Having finished the
last installment  of a three-part world tour,  Mabel Zoe Wilson, head
librarian, is  again at her desk in the Normal library.  On the first of
her three  trips, Miss Wilson roamed through  



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Northwest Viking - 1937 January 8 - Page 2



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WASHINGTON ST^f E NOf^AL SCH G^  The-N0R^tf^^KING  Established 1899 
Published every Friday except during the month of September by the 
Associated Students, Washington State Normal School, Bellingham  Entered m
the Postoffice at Bellingham, Washington, as second class  matter by virtue
of the act of March 3, 1879  Printed by Miller   Sutherlen Printing Co.,
Bellingham, Washington  Subscription rate, by mail, $3.00 per year, in
advance.  Advertising rates on application  Address all communications,
other than news items, to the Business  Manager of the Northwest Viking,
Bellingham, Washington.  Telephone 3180 - '  HARRY KLUGE
-»»-••• -..-..Editor  HELEN BOOTHE Business
Manager  Lloyd Nelson -- N e w s Editor  Reporters: Warren Toms, Joan
Hoppe, Walt Skinner, Phyllis Robinson, Pat  Green, Margaret Thon, Viola
German, Marge Osier.  Clarence Soukup : --•
•--•--••-•- -Sports Editor  Reporters: Ed
Johnston, Mitch Evich, Dick Fowler, Betty Howell, Jack  Carver, Leonard
Beehan, Al Munkres. _^  Don Zylstra, Virginia Kanarr Feature Editors 
Reporters: Kathryn Hatch, Bob White, Jack Rauch, Marion Peterson, Don 
Gooding, Betty Bowdish, James Hanson.  Rex Rolle .....Copy Editor  Sybil
Hinchliffe Society Editor  Jean Hatch Art Editor  Cigarette Ads, Yes or No.
 Every so often, a general reckoning of assets and debits is a good habit 
to form. This is true regarding any person or organization. And the  New
Year is the appropriate time for such a procedure. So, the Viking  will now
look in the mirror.  To the casual observer, the business affairs of the
Viking appear to be  in good running order. A more careful scrutiny reveals
this. For the  last two or three years, T H E ADVERTISING HAS BEEN
DECIDEDLY  LOW.  Now this may or may not be the fault of the business
manager. Since  other duties performed by the managers have been judged
competent, it  is to be supposed that the fault lies in other channels. But
that is not  the object of this editorial. The obvious answer is to find
ways and  means to increase advertising.  The simplest method is to take
cigarette advertising. Yes, the Viking  knows that smoking is a useless,
wasteful, senseless, injurious habit. Even  to the point of preaching,
attention should be given to the harmful results  of smoking.  But that is
not the point. Students and teachers smoke and will  smoke regardless of
any preaching. If other school papers, teachers'  colleges included, carry
such advertising, why shouldn't.the Viking? It  matters not whether you
heed such advertising. The Viking would hope  that you don't. It would mean
that the Viking broke a tradition, but  what is tradition in this modern
age? Tradition will not make a financial  success of any paper.  Such a
change would result in a highly lucrative income for the Viking.  Don't get
the idea that the Viking is indorsing cigarettes. We are  merely asking
that, since you are faced with the same situation every day  in other
papers of good repute, why shouldn't we make the most of our 
opportunities?  o  The War and Navy Departments Proves It Is the  War and
Navy Department  The War and Navy department recently made public a plan
whereby,  in time of war, the press would be mobilized for the purpose of
presenting  a unified version of war publicity. Quoting the exact
announcement:  "The mission of this administration is to co-ordinate and
direct the  national publicity activities so as to insure that the
purposes, views  and progress of the government in prosecution of war are
properly  and adequately presented to the people and that the aid of public
 opinion is enlisted to the fulles textent in behalf thereof."  Such a
plan, in simple words, means exactly that freedom of the press  would be
censored in time of war. It means that our press would be  relegated to the
status of the German press. And such a state of affairs in  this country
creates no rosy illusions for this department.  The Observer 
Flash!—and a good, good quarter, ladeez and  gentlemen; this is the
Observers bringing you the  dope on the muck this week, such as it
is—hasn't  had much time to accumulate.  DON REEVES is again the
possessor of the  "piece of ice" MATTIE was wearing on her left  ring
finger last quarter. NELSON, retired sports  editor, is out in the cold
temporarily since the return  of ZAMBAS who comes back to claim his own. 
WE hope CATHERINE FERRIS didn't spend ALL  her Christmas money on the
telegram she sent New Year's eve—or does  she know him well enough to
send them collect?  No time was lost last Sunday night in getting the
various Edens hall  romances under way for the quarter. Indications are
that the LILY  RBOWN-VAN LUVEN, the ANGEL-STODDARD, and BIXBY-PAT affairs 
are coming along as well as can be expected.  —And then there was
SPUD REID who came 3,000 miles to take mechanical  drawing and couldn't get
into the class.  Campi Coast to Coast  mmM®m%'  JV?'i gt;  iCne1  l^tV
/  fi( A?i  Jan.g  UBC  U Frosh! '-r M  By Belly  The registrar of the
University of  Oklahoma told the campus recently  that statistically
students with the  thinnest wallets get the most "A's"  when two
legislators complained  that the $3.00 "flunking fee" is a  hardship on
poor students.  If all students who sleep in  classes were laid end to end,
they  would be more comfortable.  Co-eds at trte*University of Washington 
use an Average of four tubes  of lipstick a year, according to statistics 
compiled by their school paper,  at an average cost of $5 per  year per
co-ed.  * • * * * «_  An astrologer announces he sees  good
times for everyone, in the  skies. Unfortunately, none of us  live there. 
BWnLBi—Bored* as an undergraduate  swing-addict studying 'ancient 
hlatoiy. A '•  Bowdish  A train smokes a lot and also  choos.  * * a
9 *  As the train Was going south  bearing the Washington football  team,
Wally Zemeck, reserve tackle,  was sitting stretched out in a  chair car.
The windows at his side  were open.  Suddenly, Mitch Mondala, who  Was
sitting in the seat back of Ze-meck,  cried, "Shut the windows,  Wally,
were coming to a tunnel!"  Jumping to his feet, Wally meek'  ly asked, "On
which side?"  * * * * * *  American college girls have been  judged the
world's best dancers.  They are also quite proficient at  making someone
else pay the fiddler.  Eskimo questions and Italiano  lies.  The seasons
come ana gu, unu wiou txiciu tux^c aim go our interests in the various
sports.  Last fall, when the fog hung heavy over the city, people, from
grade school children on up  to their grandfathers, were talking football.
Now it is another season—winter—and while  water pipes are
freezing at home, the kids are out shooting baskets.  This all sounds like
sports are just something that are in the air, but it is much more  than
that to many. Take that team of ours; it seems that the very reputation of
the school  rests on them. We have confidence in them, and we are going to
give our earnest support  to their efforts.  MovieReview  By Lucille Lee
_•' '.  MT. BAKER gives you Mae West in 'Go West Young  Man" . . .
from Sunday until Wednesday. Mae meets  a new kind of man on the barnyard
circuit. . . where  the hay is cut early . . . but the hey-hey isn't. Mae 
goes on a personal appearance tour with her press  agent, Warren William,
whose duty it is to keep her  out of romantic entanglements. She falls in
love with  a sun-tanned filling-station operator, Randolph Scott,  from the
farm. How're ga gonna keep 'em down on  the farm . . .after they've seen
Mae West? Also*  "Wanted: Jane Turner" with Lee Tracy and Gloria  Stuart. 
AVALON presents Joan Crawford and Robert Taylor  in "The Gorgeous Hussy," a
lovely siren who became  the power behind the White House . . . but first
of  all, she was a woman . . . beloved by many . . . who  gave her heart to
the one she couldn't win. Through  the hearts of men . . . despite the
hatred of women...  she rose to rule a nation's destinies. There's intrigue
 that stirred a nation's capital... and caused an entire  cabinets
dismissal. Also, "Wild Brian Kent" with  Ralph Bellamy and Mae Clark. 
Playing now at the GRAND until next Monday is  "Sing Me a Love Song" with a
cookoo cast from heads  to toes. James Melton . . . the romantic rave of
the  air waves. Patricia Ellis . . . the pert blonde beauty  with plenty of
thisa' and thata' to make Jimmy lose  his heart. Hugh Herbert . . . plays
not one, not two,  not 



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Northwest Viking - 1937 January 8 - Page 3



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7,  WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON 
HINCHLIFFE,  Editor  Kulle-Carroll Nuptials  Surprise To Friends;  Hartley,
Groom's Man  The marriage of Ruth Kulle, Normal  student, to Leonard
Carroll,  116, during Christmas vacation came  as a surprise to their many
friends.  The wedding took place at 1:00 p.  m. on Saturday, December 19,
at the  home of Dr. Friborg, in Seattle. Dr.  Friborg, Baptist minister, is
an old  friend of the Kulle family.  Robert Hartley, of Snoqualmie,  BJL
'36, acted as best man.  The bride's only attendant was  the groom's
mother, Mrs. B. P. Carroll,  of Perndale.  Mrs. Carroll plans to finish her
 teaching course and graduate in  June. Mr. Carroll is teaching in  the
Seattle school system at the  present time. They both plan on  attending
school here summer quarter.  The young couple are making  their home with
Mr. and Mrs. Wesley  Randrup (Prances Greene) at  2223 Victor street in
Bellingham.  Marian Haydon, former president  of the Valkyrie club, zs
convalescing  from an appendicitis operation at  her home in Olympia. Miss
Hay-den  will not return to school this  quarter.  Mildred Blair is
confined to her  home in Mount Vernon due to illness  and will not return
to Normal  this quarter.  Prances Pelegren, former society  editor of the
Viking, who was  forced to withdraw last quarter due  to illness, has
returned to school  this quarter.  Tony Zambas, former football and 
basketball player, has returned to  Normal to complete work for his 
teaching certificate. He will also  play basketball.  Weddings, engagement
announcements,  and travel have filled the  Christmas vacation with
pleasure  for Normal students and faculty.  Miss Florence Johnson, dean of 
women, made stops in Colorado and  Oklahoma as she journeyed to Lincoln, 
Nebraska,: to spend Christmas  with Miss Janet Matthews as her  home. Miss
Matthews is a former  member of the Music department  of this school. 
Comedy Tryouts To  Be Held Next Week  "Much Ado About Nothing," 
Shakspeare's last great comedy, will  be brought to the Bellingham Normal 
stage during the latter part of  the quarter as a presentation of the 
Division of Drama. Victor H.  Hoppe, drama coach, will direct 
Shakespeare's seldom attempted  play.  Tryouts for the production are 
slated" for Monday and Tuesday.  There are twelve men's parts and  four
women's but Mr. Hoppe intimated  that women may take some  of the minor
male parts.  The play is to be produced in  Elizabethan style with costumes
 and stage effects depicting that period.  It will be played twice at 
Normal and three times at the Bellingham  Theater Guild. No play will  be
exchanged with the Theater  Guild this year as was done last  year. 
—. o  For These Wintry Days  TRY  HARDWICK'S  Delicious Hot Chile 
When It's Your Move  Let's Make it "Our Move"  MODEL .2SS -  PHONE 70 
Monogrammed  Stationery  59c  Your Choice of  Three Initials  BELLINGHAM 
DRUG CO.  Miss Marjorie Dawson, of the  Training school, spent Christmas 
with Miss Janet Matthews as her  holiday, Miss Dawson traveled to 
Cincinnati, Ohio, and New York  City, arriving in Bellingham Wednesday 
morning.  Among members of the faculty returning  to resume their teaching 
duties this quarter are Miss Mabel  Zoe Wilson, librarian, and Mr. Herbert 
Ruckmick, industrial arts instructor.  One of the students who made the 
longest trip was Fritz Chorvat, who  spent the vacation with his parents 
in Chicago, Illinois.  Dan Heaton, a former Normal  student, visited in
Vancouver, B. C,  on New Year's.  Howard Cline spent his vacation  working
at Mount Baker Lodge.  Among former Normal students  who were in Bellingham
during the  holiday season were: Ladd Shan-gle,  former yell leader, and
Catherine  Selander, from the University  of Washington; Rhoda LeCocq,
Betty  Offerman, Viola Menus, and Jean  Spencer, from Washington State; 
Kay Livesey, from Scripps; Charles  Fisher, son of President C. H. Fisher; 
Mon Orloff, former student body  president; Jane Kindall, and Margaret 
Morse, all from Stanford university.  Thygeson-Kirk Wedding  Vows Exchanged
Last  Tuesday In Ridgefield  The marriage of Pearl Marie Thy-geson, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. O.  D. Thygesori, of Ridgefield, Washington,  to
Arthur, kirk, son of Mr.  and Mrs. C. E. Kirk, of Bellingham,  Washington,
was solemnized Tuesday  evening, December 29, at 8:00  o'clock in the
Presbyterian community  church at Ridgefield.  Mr. and Mrs. Kirk are both
former  Normal students. Mrs. Kirk  graduated in 1931, and Mr. Kirk
received  his Bachelor of Arts degree  in 1934.  Miss Roberta Thygeson, a
Normal  graduate of 1936, was the bride's  only attendant.  Mr. Poster
Kirk, brother of the  groom, acted as best man. He also  attended the
Normal.  Miss Ruth Kirk, who is enrolled  in Normal this quarter, played
the  wedding march from "Midsummer  Night's Dream" by Mendelssohn.  The
couple will make their home  in Mount Vernon, Washington,  where Mr. Kirk
is teaching in the  junior high school.  Andrew Jackson and Patricia 
Newman, both former students,  have returned to resume their studies 
winter quarter.  Marian Rhodes, of Downs hall,  entertained Tuesday evening
in  honor of Alice Molenkamp on the  occasion of her birthday. Guests 
included: Dorothy Wilson, Florence  Lewis, Virginia Woods, Marian
Mag-nochi,  Winifred Candey, and Sybil  Hinchliffe, all of Downs hall.  The
engagement of Betty Anne  Russell, of Tacoma, to Mr. Walton  Crane,
graduate of Washington  State college, has been announced.  Miss Russell
attended the Normal  fall quarter.  Health Exams for New  Students To Start
Soon  Health examinations for all incoming  Normal students will begin 
Tuesday of next week, according to  Miss May Mead, school-nurse. "By  this
date it is hoped that ali students  will have completed registration," 
Miss Mead stated.  The examinations will take place  in the examining rooms
of the physical  education building. This will  be the first quarter that
the rooms  in the new building have been  available for this use. 
Examinations will be given by:  Miss May Mead, school nurse;  Miss Nell
Bryant, assistant school  nurse; Miss Ruth Weythman, head  of the women's
physical education  department; Miss Evelyn Rupert,  physical education
instructor; and  three Bellingham doctors.  Miss Mead reports that Ellen 
Wainio, who has »)een confined to  the infirmary since the latter part
 of fall quarter with scarlet fever, is  much improved.  For Good  REPAIR
WORK  and  FRIENDLY SERVICE  See  Joe Martinolich  Holly St. Shoe Repair 
Morse Hardware Company  Established 1884  Distributors of  WILSON ATHLETIC
SUPPLIES  1025-1047 State St. PHONE «4  Date of Nominating  Parley
Announced  Setting the date of the nominating  convention as Wednesday,
January  13, deciding to sponsor this  evening's mixer, and discussing the 
impending Men's club charter made  up the business of the Wednesday  Board
of Control meeting.  The nominating committee will  make nominations for
the following  offices: student body president,  now held by Florence Lund;
student  body vice-president, now held by  Robert Barnhart; and two Board
of  Control positions now held by Ruth  Carroll and Beverly Holiday. 
Petitions for representatives to  the Board of Control will be placed  in
the lower hall. Candidates will  be introduced and given a chance  to make
a short speech in the January  student assembly.  Members of the Board will
act as  sponsors for the mixer and will be  out en masse on the receiving
line.  No action was taken after a,discussion  of the up-and-coming Men's 
club.  Faculty Mourns  Former Student  Herbert Ellison Passes Suddenly  At
Wenatchee Home; Well  Known Here  Students of the Wenatchee junior  high
school mourned this week over  the death of their beloved principal, 
Herbert B. Ellison, 54. He died suddenly  last Sunday.  Ellison, for 20
years a principal at  the junior high, spent his summers  at the Bellingham
State Normal and  the University of Washington, being  graduated from the
latter in 1928.  He returned to the Normal to receive  his B.A. degree in
August, 1933.  The B.A. class of 1933 was the first  of its kind here. 
Many of the faculty of the Normal  school were intimate friends of the 
late Mr. Ellison and feel the Wenatchee  junior high school has lost a 
great master, as well as a grand  man. One of the Normal faculty  members
was heard to say of Ellison,  "He was a splendid personality,  a heart of
gold, and was a wonderful  organizer."  .His thoughtfulness of everyone 
and his good nature made him the  idol of his students during his 20  years
at the junior high school.  o  Jenkins To Teach  Winter And Spring  Miss
Helen Jenkins, of Seattle,  who has been teaching as a substitute  in the
history department of  the University of Washington, is  now taking over
the social science  courses formerly taught by Miss  Nora B. Cummins,
acting dean.  Coming highly recommended by  the history department at the
University  of Washington, and by the  professors she worked with, Dr. 
Jenkins will teach European history  both the winter and spring quarters. 
Miss Jenkins earned her B.A. degree  at the University of Colorado; her 
M.A. degree at Cornell university  and her Ph.D at the University o i* 
Pennsylvania.  Director Slaes  Training School  Capacity Struck  Large
Influx of Transfers Cause  Unexpected Situation; Equal  Number in Each
Department.  Transfer students coming here to  do their teaching have
caused a  great increase in the number of student  teachers. Not only have
all  practice teaching" positions been  filled this quarter, but Miss Rich 
has received enough applications to  fill the training school during the 
spring and summer quarters also.  The technique course 167, Observation 
and Technique of the Elementary  school, which was scheduled  for this
quarter, has been postponed  till spring quarter because  with the
department filled to capacity  each supervisor has a maximum  number of
student teachers to  supervise, and no one is free to give  the course.
When it is given in the  spring Miss Rich will likely direct it.  Of the 70
students teaching this  quarter, 41 are transfers. Most of  these have
taken two years at the  University of Washington or at  some junior college
and plan to get  a teaching certificate after completing  one year here.
The exact  reason for this influx of students  ready to do their teaching
cannot be  determined.  In each of the three curriculums,  primary,
intermediate, and junior  high, there are eleven students  teaching in the
city. In the training  school, there are 17 in the primary  and 14 each in
the intermediate  and junior high departments.  More Brisbane, Etc. 
Continued from Page Three*  New Yorkers' appreciation. Nothing  especially
educational. Directly an  antithesis was Brisbane's column.,  catering to
national and international  news of all kinds, and strongly  scientific at
times.  F.P.A., in the Herald-Tribune, is  an exact compromise between
Win-chell  and Brisbane, well worth the  while. Those two throw-backs to 
sane column-writing, "Bugs" Baer  and Ted Cook, deal solely with
nonsensical  rhymes, riots, and riant re-diculousness.  O. O. Mclntyre
employs  an elaboration of trivia, as  he calls it, into a philosophical 
treatment of human ills and traits.  Thus, both the intellectual and the 
insipid, the serious and the humorous,  are able to enjoy some portion  of
this actively agile journalistic  feature.  Husband (hearing burglars
downstairs):  "Sh-h dear. This is going  to be a battle of brains."  Wifey:
"How brave of you dear  to go unarmed."  SANDISON  Photographers for the
Klipsun  Registration Good  Achievement Tests Required  For New Students 
Although official figures on  the registration for winter  quarter were not
obtainable, all  prospects point to as large a  number of enrolled students
as  last "quarter. However, some  students are still registering  and the
enrollment will not be  complete for another week.  Meanwhile the
achievement  tests 



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Northwest Viking - 1937 January 8 - Page 4



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WASHINGTON ^ A T E NORMAL SCH OOL; BEL^WCHAM, W^HINGTON^  Sport News
SOUKUP,  Editor  SOUKIE SAYS  • Now that football received the gong
and THAT game down in Pasadena  is over, Coach Lappenbusch and his Vikings
can settle down to try bringing  home a championship squad for the first
time in a decade. Back in  1927, when the Depression was still unheard of,
the Vikings gave Cheney  and Ellensburg a couple of whippings that have had
to last over a lean  and lank ten years. Ten years later (1937) and all
three schools are  boasting the strongest teams in history. No matter who
wins the Tri-  Normal this year, the fans will be treated to the hottest
brand of basketball  that has been displayed here for some time.  Fabio
Cappa, of the Ellensburg Crier is pulling for the Vikings to beat  Cheney
but he's keeping the joker up his sleeve. Laurance Butzer of the  Cheney
Journal has his ideas about a championship, too. Cheney's 34-25  defeat at
the hands of the Washington State Cougars doesn't indicate any  Weakness in
the Savage lineup.  LET'S NOT DANCE  President Fisher's address in
Tuesday's assembly brings up the old  question of dancing on the new gym
floor. Our pavilion has been called  the basketball palace by sports
writers around town. Let's preserve that  name by not permitting dancing on
the new foor; not even one dance.  As someone once said to me, "when you
get one you want more." The  old gym and the armory are sufficient for the
dancing requirements of  the students. Please, Prexy, spare that floor!  As
soon as Viking Manor establishes itself as the undisputed boss of the  A
league by dusting off the W club in today's game, one hundred
intra-nniraiers  or the equivalent of twelve teams will get under way for
the  second half of the interclass season. The A league should dish up some
 classy basketball with six strong teams signed up. The B league will take 
the backwash with former has fceens of the A league and veteran B teams 
fighting for supremacy. .  A BIT OF THIS AND THAT  The Vikings will whip
the socks off C. P. S. in tomorrow night's game  . . . . Harold Nelson,
Jorihy and Hugo Anderson were welcome visitors to  the Edmonds Athletic
club as they helped the home team win three games  over the vacation . . .
James Bever, son of the late Dean Bever, scored 29  points for the Y.M.C.A.
in a game recently played in Vancouver . . . .  Wonder what happened to
Bobby Walker, the U. of W. freshman sensation,  who figured strongly in two
Frosh victories over the Normal last  year . . . . Ellensburg holds a 45-31
victory over the Albany squad . . . .  Someone was kidding Fabio Cappa when
they told him Spud Reed and  John Fox were two short fellows from Indiana..
. . Cheney will have practically  the same team as last year plus the
Valley high school squad, state  high school champions . . . Johnny
Anderson, high scorer in the King  County league for two years, has scored
only three points in his last two  starts for the Vikings . . . The absence
of Kenny Wickstrom leaves last  year's illegal ski club without a leader .
. . Andy Heverin'g found studies  too much for him and dropped out of
school for a quarter . . . A young  man by the. name of Weber from
Burlington will be a great help ot the  Viking track squad . . . Sam Carver
will trade the swivel chair in his  office for a good quarter miler and a
couple weight men.  o  With The WAA  By Betty Howell  ONE OF THE FINEST
features of the W.A.A. is the liberalism which  invites any girl in school
to join the club whether she turns out for athletics  or not. The first
meeting will be held next Tuesday afternoon in  the Blue room of Edens
hall. A warning is being issued here and now to  all of you new members;
you're to be initiated, so prepare yourself in  any and every possible way.
Initiation is to be the first thing in order  to start the new year out in
the most properly accepted manner.  BASKETBALL W I L L BE P R A C T I C E D
on Tuesdays and  Thursdays at four o'clock. If the traditional rush for
basketball positions  occur this quarter, as it has in previous years, the
group will likely be  divided into two or three teams. It seems th i in
other years the girls have  played some hard and fast games at these
turnouts. May the best team  win! —  DURING WINTER QUARTER, turnouts
for badminton are to be held  on Monday and Wednesday afternoon. While the
world is rather blus-try  on the outside, many girls of the school are
arming themselves with  badminton rackets to practice and become skillful
at this increasingly  popular indoor sport. Why not join the crowd of
badmintoneers and  learn how to swing a mean racket, too.  A NEW SWIMMING
cub is to be organized next week. At the first  meeting on Monday afternoon
at four o'clock a constitution will be drawn  up and adopted. For the sake
of more efficient "swomocracy" a president  will be elected to head the
club. Regulations, qualifications, classifications  and other necessary
evils will be discussed. From all reports there  should soon be enough
splashing, diving, and swimming in the blue-green  waters of the elegant
new pool to justify all of the worry and work which  Prexy put into that
Physical Education building;  I F T H E G R O U P is of sufficient number
it will likely be divided into  two divisions. The senior group will be for
the more advanced mermaids  and the junior part will supply lots of
swim-action for the not-so-advanced  members. All women who are interested
in swimming are urged to come.  STAGES Bellingham  To  Seattle, Everett,
Mount Vernon—  7:30, 8:30, 10:30 a. m., 12:30, 1;30,  2:30, 3:30.
4:30. 5:30 (6:30 San-days  and Holidays), 7:30 and  9:30 p. m.  North Coast
Lines  ; Depot—Magnolia and State  Phone 5004  Miller A fiutherlea \ 
•;• .JPrtoMnr-Cfc. -...; \  Established 1889  Pacific Laundry 
Phones 126 and 127  Compliments of  CYR  BROTHERS  DAIRY PRODUCTS CO. 
Nelson and Carver Sparkle  Tho PLC Wins Over Locals  Lead Is Tied Five
Times in Last  Moments As Lutherans Ruin  Vikings* Undefeated Standing.  By
Ed Johnston  When two eager and evenly  matched teams get
together—time  will usually tell, and that's just  what it did. 
Pacific Lutheran college, in the  most sparkling and hair-raising
basketball  melee ever to grace the shining  maples of the Vikings' new 
palace, knocked the Norsemen from  the undefeated ranks by a 26-25 
heartbreaker last night before a  frenzied and admiring crowd.  Fast and
deadly passing was the  highlight of the game with both  teams working it
well up under the  basket only to get the jitters and  shoot or throw it
away.  Carver Triumphs  The contest got off to a slow start  as airtight,
zone and man-to-man  defense was displayed on both sides.  Finally Carver,
who swished his way  to high honors with 14 points, dented  the net for the
initial basket of  the evening. In rapid order Solie  and Tommervik forged
the Gladiators  ahead of the classy outfitted  Western Washington college
five  with three clever shorts. During  the remainder or the half, both 
quintets added four to their scoring  columns and it ended 10 to 6.  One of
Coach Chuck Lappenbusch's  best clicking combinations, lead by  Nelson,
played the best brand of  ball of the battle. It was a pleasing  piece of
teamwork they displayed  but without the breaks, they lacked  the scoring
punch.  Whirlwind Finale  Both PPPPP