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WWCollegian - 1942 January 23 - Page 1



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•y?^}'-  Famed Ex of: the Arctic Alaskan regions, Dr;  r . v 
gt; - - - - - — . • • . . : H : F. Kellems, speaks
inTues- ,  r- 'V- day's assembly 6n' /'Alaskaririthe World Picture Today." 
• .- •'••.,•'•. ' ,See page 1. ..
•  gt;;• :  Sunday, at 3:30 p.m. in the college auditorium. ; 
. See page 1.  ?:: •,.'; WWC Men Plov S o l d i e r ^ ^ ^ 
••' .Military Tactics class, 25 college men are learning to
drill  v under the direction of the State Guard.  See page 2  meet the
valiant Vik's in a  The Loggers of CPS basketball game tonight  at 7:30 p.
m. in the college gym.  See page 3  Edwin Espy Stresses Need  For Student
Aid Funds  By Elaine Ringstad  • "Yes, I represent the World Student
Organization," began  Edwin Espy, over his lunch tray in the Edens hall
club room. "At  present, my work deals mainly with student volunteer
funds."  "How did I happen to enter this field' of work?"1 he smiled. 
"Well, to tell the truth, I planned to become a minister and  studied for
this profession in New York. I was sent to Germany  in 1933 to continue my
studies, and it was there that I became  interested in international
service work.  "I attended three universities in Germany," Espy continued, 
smoothing his brown hair, "one of which was the University of  Heidelburg.
After finishing school I worked from headquarters  in Geneva, Switzerland,
doing international student service work.  My headquarters now are in New
York," he added.  Addressing a group in the Edens hall club room, Mr. Espy
stated  that through the efforts on the part of students $100,000 is to be 
raised for the relief of suffering all over the world. This money  will be.
used in three ways—for prisoners of war, for pre-war  refugees, and
for internal civilians (enemy aliens).  "Do you know," he explained, "that
one dollar in American  money will buy food for a Chinese student for a
whole month,  while $20 will take care of all his expenses for a year? A
dime to  a Chinese student means more than ten times what it means to  us."
 "I hope," he concluded, "that you will start a drive in your college  to
help raise the money that is so needed in aiding students  around the
world."  s •  Sailor Reported Dead Comes Home;  Was In Japs Cowardly
Hawaiian Raid  By Harold Loop  • "It's sure swell to be home and not
dead as has been reported,"  smiled Buster Schlafer, one of the surviving
sailors from  the sunken battleship Arizona. Buster's parents were informed
 just.-before. Christmas,, that, their- son,.had died in-action -when 
Pearl Harbor was bombed by Japs; they had something to cele-  ' brate New
Year's day when a telegram came from Buster saying,  "I am well." The
mistake occurred when Buster was wounded  and was unable to answer roll
call after the first raid; all who  did not muster were believed dead or
lost. He was lucky; only  his right collar bone was broken.  "I was hanging
out clothes on deck getting ready to go ashore  for the day when all of a
sudden a whole squadron of planes  swooped down on us, dropping bombs;
machine guns were spitting  death to all who were in their path," Buster
said, with his big  brown eyes flashing a look that only "one who was
there" could  demonstrate.  "At first we were confused and couldn't believe
what we were  seeing. The planes came down so low you could almost reach 
up and grab them as they dove by. As soon as everyone realized  what was
happening we all ran to our posts and started firing  at the diving
planes," he said. "My job was feeding shells from the  side of the ship to
a 14-inch turret gun. We were firing as rapidly  as possible at every plane
that came by."  "The places that were bombed first were the,run-ways of the
 airports, making them so rough that our planes couldn't take  off to
pursue them'. Our ship was anchored to the dock so we  couldn't escape
being bombed. An officer called for 25 volunteers  to go up on top deck and
run anti-aircraft guns. The officer  said,"Men, when you go up there it's
.going to be terrible; all the  men up there are either dead or exhausted
so you know what you  are up against.'"  Buster and 24 other sailors
volunteered and they proceeded to  the anti-aircraft gun nests.  "It was
one of the most horrible sights I have ever seen," Buster  stated, as he
shifted his well developed body back in his chair.  "You couldn't even tell
who most of them were. We were all very  calm, and determined that we would
carry out our part of the  plan to repay the dirty Japs for what they had
done to our buddies.  v  "When I was up with the anti-aircraft guns I
looked up and  saw a bomb falling. .Two boats were destroyed with the one 
bomb.  "We shot those little two-man suicide submarines as if we were 
shooting clay pigeons," Bus said, showing his big, likeable smile.  "A
two-man submarine was in the harbor but some of our boats  couldn't shoot
it for fear of hitting each other. One of our  destroyers deliberately
passed" directly above it. and as they did,  dropped two or three depth
bombs. The bombs blew the little  submarine clear out of the water; as it
came out, other ships  opened fire on it and blew it to bits.  "Another
incident that happened showed how us fellows felt  towards the sneaking
yellow bellies. *A marine shot down a plane  (Continued on Page Two) 
• • * DATELINE  Friday, January 23—  Basketball with
Seattle Independents  at PE building,  8 p.m.  Saturday January 24— 
Edens hail informal, Edens  hall Blue room. 9-12 p. m.  , CCF Fireside,
1212 Indian St..  '••..2:45 p."-m.r'':.  Sunday, January 25-^ 
WWOrchestra concert in aud-ditorium,  130-5:30 p. m.  Monday, January 2 6^ 
4Hne Barnacles, PE building,  .". :";V\*-5.rp gt;''iil.';^ '%',:
':*•v'v,:  Alkisiah, Alkisiah club room,  7 p. m.  Tuesday, January 2
7—  Assembly, Homer Flint Kellems,  explorer, illustrated  . lecture
on Alaska, 11 a. m.  Thursday, January 29—  CoUege-News-Week in
Review,  7:45 p. m.  Mixed; Bee. PE building, 7-9  •..•.'. p.
m. ;;..' .  Friday* January 30--  !'.-;• Assembly.'".. i';;;  VOL.
XLI—NO. 16 Western Washington College o f Education, Bellingham,
Washington Friday, January 23, 1942  Ed ens  Tonight  Flyers Imported For 
Annual Informal  Plans Complete for Dance,  Says Chairman Needham  •
Edens hall's informal, which  takes place Saturday night, January  24, in
the Blue room, is an  annual affair given for former and  present residents
of the women's  dormitory.  The morale of the air corps should  be
increased by leaps and bounds,  according to Shirley Olson, head  of the
date bureau at Edens hall,  because eighteen girls have asked  boys from
Paine Field to the informal.  Committees under Jo Needham,  general
chairman, are: invitations  and acknowledgments, Margaret  Lewis, chairman,
Marion Barbee,  Kay Byrnes, Dorothy Bell, Jane  Aus; decoration, Virginia
Bell and  Jean Van Brocklin, co-chairmen,  Gloria Swanson, Shirley Olson, 
Ruth Bullock, Ellen Van Wieringen,  Jeanette Bright, Betttf Deford, Helen 
Stoddard, Margaret Richards,  Jane Aus, Dorothy Louden; programs,  Nancy
Shaw, chairman,  Alice Knowles, Rosemary Watts,  Betty Deford, Dorothy
Allan, Clin-ta  Campbell, Ruthe Olds; orchestra,  Cheryl Smith.  New
Defense  Classes Full  • Response to defense courses has  been very
good," says Dr. Merle S.  Kuder, registrar. "Some of the  courses have full
enrollment already,  for instance, Home Nursing, with  13 members, and all
three First Aid  courses."  Other new courses are Political  Science 53 and
153, given in two  sections, one Wednesday afternoon  from 2 to 4, and the
other Thursday  night, by Miss Nora Cummins,  with an enrollment of 16
(both  from college and town), and PE  20, a course in military training, 
held Tuesday night, which will  drill at the Armory, using State  Guard
equipment. Men in the PE  20 course do not automatically become  members of
the State Guard,  however.  Two more new courses, Speech  121, Radio
Technique, which is given  Monday night by R. J. Ernst, and  Industrial
Arts 77, a blueprint reading  class under Charles Rice, are  full to
overflowing, says Dr. Kuder.  In these classes the problem will be  to
accommodate the number of students;  they may have to be divided  into two
sections.  Women Assist  In USO Party  • Fifteen girls of the college
 again played hostesses to a group of  soldiers at the home of Dr. F. C. 
Rykken last night. .  Miss Lorraine Powers, dean of  women, stated that the
role of junior  hostess was not one of a personal  nature but one, solely,
for the  entertainment of the men in the  service.  Miss Powers also said
that the  College has been highly commended  for its excellent cooperation
with  the committee members of this  United Service Organization in order 
to establish this entertainment  for the soldiers. ,;  No plans are made in
advance  for. these parties and the girls go  who have free evenings.  CCF
Firesides  • The College Christian Fellowship  group will hold its
first fireside  meeting of the quarter at the  home of Mr. and Mrs; Fred
Hanson/  1212 Indian street, Saturday,  ^January 24, at 7:45 ,pj m. There 
will be games, devotionals, and refreshments,  and anyone who iwbuid.  like
to attend is invited.'  Arctic Explorer Bushell's Symphony Orchestra  Will
Speak ' r  At Assembly To Present Concert Sunday  Kellems, Alaskan
Adventurer,  Will Illustrate Lecture  With Movies in Color  . •
"Alaska in the World Picture  Today" is the title of the lecture*  to be
given by Dr. Homer Flint Kellems,  Alaskan explorer, in the regular 
assembly Tuesday, January 27.  Dr. Kellem will illustrate his lecture  with
motion pictures of Alaska in  natural color.  Dr. Kellems has made five
expeditions  to the Arctic regions, and  has spent a number of' years in 
Alaska on special missions for the  United States government. Dr.  Kellems
originated the movement  for a memorial at Point Barrow in  honor of the
late Will Rogers and  Wiley Post; he organized and carried  out the
expedition which placed  the memorial on the point in 1938.  A search
-along the east Arctic  coast for the six lost Russian flyers  was made by
Dr. Kellems in  1939.  "I believe we are very fortunate  to have Dr.
Kellems in assembly.  As Alaska is now in a far more important  position
than it was before  the outbreak of the war, this lecture  will be timely
as well as interesting,"  says Dr. W. W. Haggard.  Blue Triangle Menu 
Featured in Drive  For More Students  • Using an international menu 
as their theme, Blue Triangle has  started their annual drive to raise 
funds for imprisoned fellow students.  All over the world, the greatest 
number of prisoners in concentration  camps are students, people  who are
slowly going insane, and in  some cases, starving, from lack of  occupation
and nutriment for mind  and body.  Dividing their $50 international  menu
into $10 for soup, $15 for  salad, $15 for meat, and $10 for dessert,  Blue
Triangle members have,  this week, placed soup cans at various  places on
the campus. It is  their hope that students and faculty  members will fill
the soup cans  and next week, the salad bowls. If  they are filled, this
school will be  helping student sufferers in Europe  and China to find
relief through  books, sporting-goods, musical instruments,  and food that
the World  Student Service Fund enables them  to have.  Haggard Promises 
Fee Adjustments  • Adjustment of fees and credits 



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WWCollegian - 1942 January 23 - Page 2



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^^^^^^BW^SSI(S|®|^^^^P|^HP!SSSP8li»S8iS5s 
wes:erhWasnirioron College o* E-'ucation,. BelliriqHam,. Wa'sninqtph
fridavl: January 23; 1942  G)sky WoskV^Siis Boom Ah!  Men of WWC Drill
Together  Women's Athletics—  Wra!Wra!Wra!  BLUE BARNACLES were
"shot" by the Klipsun photographer  Monday afternoon. After much fussing
with the camera..and  the girls, a picture was taken with all the girls on
the diving  board. © -^  ~ Since there was no badminton turnout
because of the initiation  tea, all would-be badminton players should be on
hand for turnout  next Wednesday.  TRYODTS for BADMINTON CLUB were held
Tuesday night  New members are: PAT IRISH, ELEANOR ANDERSON, and  ELIZABETH
SMITH. A business meeting will be held Tuesday  to elect a social chairman
and to make plans for further activities  of the quarter.  •  The
first basketball game was played Tuesday afternoon with  the Bouncing Babes
edging out the Hot Shots by a score of 13-11.  The other two
teams—the Norse Stars and the High Landers-played  Thursday. The
schedule of games to be played for the  next three weeks has been posted.
It looks as though we are  going to have some good games in the future.
WANTED: SCORERS,  TIMEKEEPERS, and ROOTERS!  At Dance Club meeting Monday
night it was voted to become  an ORCHESIS group. There will be no tryouts
for this organization—  members will be obtained by invitation. A
word about  ORCHESIS: It is a Greek word meaning the art of expressive 
gesture, and was started in 1916 at the University of Wisconsin  and
gradually was adopted by other colleges and universities. Of  the 105 dance
clubs in colleges now, 35 call themselves Orchesis.  • 
BIDING—Much enthusiasm has been shown for riding. The  first ride
will be today at 4, so all you riding fans—we'll be seeing  you. 
Many have shown an interest in bowling, and a meeting was  held last night
to discuss the formation bowling teams.  •  The INITIATION TEA was
held last Wednesday in the Edens  Hall Blue room. New members who signed
the scroll will be announced  next week.  Arizona Man Talks On . . . 
(Continued from Page~One)  with his Bowning automatic as the plane flew by.
He ran after  the ship when it hit the ground to see if the pilot was dead.
The  pilot wasn't hurt badly and started to get out. The great com-radship 
and love the marine felt for him dead buddies made him  see only revenge
for .this yellow little Jap. Instead of shooting  him ,the marine ran up
and let-him taste the steel of his basinet,  •finishing him right in
his cockpit."  Buster grinned and said, "As long as us fellows feel like
that the  Japs can never win."  "I was hurt just after I came down from the
anti-aircraft gun.  A bomb or torpedo hit right next to the TJ»at, and
it knocked me  over backwards into a shell conveyer that carried shells up
to a  5-inch broadside gun. Luckily the conveyer was out of order or 
probably I would have been killed," he said.  For the next hour or so
Buster didn't know exactly what happened.  He was struck so hard he was
stunned. One of Buster's  pals had broken his legs at the same time and was
unable to  move. Without knowing what he was doing, Bus picked up, and 
carried him on deck where he was taken care of. If Buster's  friend had
been left below deck he probably would have died from  gas and oil fumes.
This took place while Bus was still stunned.  He didn't know about it until
two days later when he was in the  hospital, and his buddy thanked him for
saving his life.  With his shoulder blade cracked, Buster went on duty that
night  with a close friend. They built a sand bag nest to hide in and  were
ready with their rifles for enemy planes. An officer came  and said, "this
is a swell place for a machine gun; have you  fellows had any experience
with one? Neither of them had, but  they wanted a machine gun, so Buster
said. "Hell, yes, bring it  on."  A 30 calibre machine gun was brought and
mounted for them.  After the officer left, Buster took a few practice shots
into the  darkness. "An officer came up and bawled us out," he said, 
smiling, "but now we knew how to use the thing. Pretty soon  some airplanes
came diving in at us, and we opened fire on them."  Buster's buddy said,
"Shoot them just like you would a duck;  be sure and lead them a little
bit." Both sailors cracked jokes and  enjoyed the excitement.  A plane
swung in low from the west over the landing field; as  it came in range
Buster trained his machine gun on it, as did  two or three other fellows,
with machine guns. "I pressed the  trigger and fire spurted death at the
plane, then it suddenly  twisted, crazily and turned earthward, cracking to
bits."  Two days later Buster and a friend that had been shell-shocked 
were swimming at the beach. Bus was lying on the sand when  his friend
stood up and and suddenly became dizzy, from the  shell shock. He fell,
striking Buster on his cracked shoulder blade,  which knocked the bone out
of place. Buster was unable to move  his arm, and it was immediately put in
a cast.  He was sent back to the States with the other wounded soldiers. 
About a week ago the cast was removed from his shoulder  and he was given
leave of absence. Buster doesn't know how long  he will be off duty at the
present time.  "I would just as soon get back in the battle and help finish
the  Japs," he said, "I know now we will at least have a fighting  chance,
and we. will never be taken by surprise again."  -  It's Skiing Time 
dtwwc..:  YOUR  STUDENT CO-OP  Has SKIS and All SKIING EQUIPMENT  Both for
Sate and Rental  . // Students Need //,  .....,"•' .V'..•;";,/
.,  We Have It.  Early Worms  Get The Bird  HARBORVIEW HALL: Monday ' 
night the whole of Harborview celebrated  hallmate Glendora Jones' 
birthday. anniversary with a surprise  pa jama party. (17 girls  X 19 years
makes a lot of spankings,  huh, Glennie?) Later roommate  Ruth Kosche
proved to be  the life of the party by serving refreshments.  There seem to
be some points  that these Harborviewites 'would  like to have cleared up
for t h e m . ..  maybe someone can set them right.  (1) How do peanut
shells get on  their front porch in the middle of  the night? (2) What is
it that makes  telling time so difficult for college  girls?  • 
DOWNS HALL: Those balls of  fire at Downs hall are still too passive  . . .
or something... to break  into print. Unless, of course, you'd  be
interested • to know that since  Wednesday, four of the Downs belles 
have been purty stiff... no, no,  from bowling.  •  EDENS HALL: The.,
sleeping  beauties of Edens hall were rudely  awakened Sunday morning at an
 ungodly hour (8 o'clock) by the  clatter of ski boots and the crash  of
skis dropping on the stairs as  Alice Knowles, Jean Fbrster, Jean  Pratt,
and Gloria Swanson prepared  to depart for Mount Baker.  That's why the
skiers didn't get any  sympathy for their aches and pains  the "morning
after." _ #,  A delightful dinner (super supper)  party was held Monday
evening in  honor of Ellen Van Wieringen's  birthday. Carnations (which
Ellen  said were from her mother) added  to the table decorations. Ellen's 
guests were Jean Pratt, Alice Know- .  les, Kay Alvord, Dorothy Louden, 
Henrietta Dalby, Joan Burton, Dorothy  Bell, Phyllis West, Shirley Olson, 
Lois Gaines, Betty Marie Gilbert,  Ruth Griffith, Mary Ann Griffith,  Mary
Davis, and Esther Lind-roos.  FACULTY: ..Members of the  WWC faculty who
attended the  dinner meeting of Administrative  Women in Education, held
Monday,  January 26, were Miss Pearl Mer-riman,  Miss Nora B. Cummins, Miss
 Emma S. Erickson, Miss Evelyn  Odom, Miss Katharine Casanova,  Miss Vivian
Johnson, Miss Lucy  Kangley, Miss Elsie Wendling, and  Miss Lorraine
Powers.  Miss Hazel Kenyon, educational  director of radio station KIRO, 
spoke at the meeting which was  held in the Bellingham hotel.  •  Dr.
Robert Holtman, social science  instructor, and Miss Virginia  Hawke, of
the Physical Education  department, are planning to attend  the performance
of the Ballet Russe  at the Metropolitan theater in Seattle,  Saturday,
January 24.  MAKE HER VALENTINE  A LASTING GIFT  DISTINCTIVE LOCKETS 
BRACELETS,  RINGS and PINS  •  We Are the Official Dealers  in
College Rings, Pins, and  Jewelry . . .  PAUL MUELLER  JEWELERS 
Cornwall—Next to Western Thrift  —COURTESY HERALD\  Drilling at
the Armory every Tuesday night, 25 WWC men are learning  Army drill and
tactics from members of the State Guard. When  called for regular military
service, these men will be prepared for Army  life.  Leaders Conference 
Surrounded By  Mysticism  • "We are getting replies to our 
invitations, and all the committees  are digging in to make this the most 
successful conference ever," says  Evelyn Peterson., chairman of the  high
school girl leader's conference,  which will be held February 13 on  the
campus. According to Miss  Peterson, AWS presidents of Eastern  and Central
Washington colleges,  who will be here conferring  with Bernice Monson, AWS
prexy,  have been invited to attend the  conference. \  Hazel Anderson,
fashion show  chairman, has chosen the following  girls to model: Jo
Daniels, Shirley  Polsom, Sheila Moore, Ruthe Olds,  Gloria Swanson, Jo
Needham, Rosemary  Bolster, Kay Finn, Betty Ann  Groger, Ruth Krause, Joy
Hatt,  Irene Slaninka, Mary Buel Stewart,  Margaret Dwelle, Mary Pirrung, 
Sheila Mueller, Mary Main, Betty  Bird, Aileen Gardner, Lillian. Cure, 
Gerry Meek, Barthe vDe Clements,  Bernice Ellenbaas, Mary Burritt, 
Genevive McKamy, Esther Gerfen,  Ecomae Walling, Virginia Bell,  Rosemary
Watts, Nancy Shaw, Dorothy  Miller, Gerry Fegley, Camille  Wilkinson,
Margaret Lewis, Emmy  Earlywine.  New Campus School  Opening Delayed 
• Lack of heat will make it impossible  to conduct- classes in the 
WWC campus school until summer,  it was disclosed by Architect John  Paul
Jones at the board of trustee's  meeting Wednesday afternoon.  Though
contractors expect to  complete their work in April, the  present heating
plant .is inadequate  to heat the campus school in addition  to its
ordinary load. The  installation of a new heating plant  is scheduled for
summer.  vFor improvement of grounds  around the new campus building  the
board has authorized a request  for the allotment of $11,125 from  the
college capital outlay.  L.  Miss Nora B. Cummins of the  WWC social
science department  was the speaker at the Monday  meeting of the
Bellingham Aftermath  club. Miss Cummins' topic  was "Postwar
Reorganization."  FOR THAT  AFTER THE  SHOW FOUNTAIN  SPECIALTY  Try 
•  HARDWICK'S  Where Friends Meet and Eat  The Home of Distinct 
CORSAGES  flOP4§i  1330 Cornwall Avenue  Bornstein - Houser Sea Foods 
Largest Assortment of Sea Poods in the Northwest  CENTER OF HOME MARKET ;.
PHONE 882  College Boys  Mark Time  • "Attention! Get those chins up 
and chests out. Ready now. For-wa-  a-a-a-rd march!"  Down at the armory
every Tuesday  night you will find a group of  WWC men—25 in
all—playing soldier.  Only they're not playing.  From what we hear
the boys are  doing OK. They have learned all  the basic commands, from
Attention  to Halt, but it is said that a few  had trouble with the latter.
In fact,  when that command was given,  basketball player Tony Bezer was 
seen trying to climb the back of  the man in front of him. However,  the
difficulty was overcome when it  was emphasized that halt an stop  mean the
same thing.  Nevertheless, much worthwhile  progress is being made, and the
 commanding officer has promised  recruits a start in military tactics 
next Tuesday.  So, if that old draft number rolls  around and you have
taken the  course, you are certain to be a well-trained,  obedient, and
excellent  buck private.  Kangley To Attend  Seattle Meet  • Dr. Lucy
B. Kangley of the  English department will attend a  board meeting of the
Puget Sound  Council of Teachers of English tomorrow  in Seattle. Miss
Kangley  is vice-president of this organization.  Dr. Kangley made "two
speeches  last Tuesday, both on the subject  "Literature related to 



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WWCollegian - 1942 January 23 - Page 3



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^^^^^^^^^^^ifSllfiSi^^PiPliiiil W;  frida^-Qnuary 23J942  WesTern
WasniriqiWCollege or £ r ^  On The Sidelines  With dick king  Much has
been said during times jfcst about student attitude  and support of sports,
but we're going to add our few cents worth.  As far as we've seen, support
for the teams has been swell. And  while we're at it, lets toss a few
bouquets to the new cheer leaders,  too... Our complaint is the lack of
organization in the cheering  section. Even the small high schools manage
to get a central  rooting section, and certainly with the power to impress
that we  have—band, blue-sweatered Valkyries, etc.—we should be
able to  put on a better display than was evident at the first three games.
 If everyone sat on the EAST side of the gym, with the band and  Valkyries
as a nucleus, we could really give Carter and Keown  some concerted
noise...and while we're getting ideas, how about  working some cute babe
into the team?  •  One of the toughest breaks we've heard of in a
long time is a  tale coming from CPS. The way we heard it, the hoys had a 
pretty fair team and a little surplus money so they decided to make  an
exhibition tour of South America this winter. Tickets were  'bought for the
whole team—600 odd dollars worth—new suits  were picked up, and
everything was tequilla and daisies until...  along came the war. Passports
were cancelled indefinitely and the  steamship companies (showing a decided
Nipponese trend) said  "So sorry—no refund." So the Loggers are stuck
with $600  worth of tickets that they will sell cheap... Should be good
territory  for a recruiting officer . . .  •  Item: 51 fouls
committed as Cheney defeats Ellensburg 57-36.  Those eastern lads really
get excited when they play ball. For  a long time the CWC-EWC encounter has
been the "big game"  on the other side of the mountains. Much to Red
Reese's disgust,  his boys have twice climbed over CW,C to a tie with PLC
toward  the end of t he season, only to have our valiant Vikings knock the 
props out from under the Savages. Nothing would delight Reese  more than to
have bis team reach the same emotional pitch in  Bellingham as i t does in
Ellensburg. So, if Red has anything to  say about it, the pair of games
next week should be a thrilling  spectacle... to say the l e a s t . . . 
•  One team that illustrates perfectly the principle of intramural 
athletics is the White Mice. These boys have had a firm hold  on the cellar
spot ever since basketball season started last fall. In  spite of getting
walloped week after week, they've been in there  pitching every game, and
they kept going after other teams dropped  out last quarter. To a bunch of
guys who are developing  character plus—and we are not being
funny—we say congratulations!  . . .  •  Our lonesome lifeguard
reports business is on the up-grade...  keep it going f e l l a s . . . A
lad named Pettyjohn tossed quite a monkey  wrench into the City league last
w e e k . . . i t seems to us that  the league would do better to
concentrate on getting teams to  show up, rather than to quibble about
technicalities... Remember  what we told you about this new team, the
Honeysuckles? They  started out with a b a n g . . . Looks like the fight
will be between  them and the Hilltoppers... Lappy has a mystery man on his
 s q u a d . . . a boy from Monroe named Aubrey Wilson. For two  weeks the
coach has been following the kid around waiting to  hear him
speak—but nary a word is uttered. Pretty profound,  people are t h i
n k i n g . . . Maybe so, but Aubrey also has a bad case  of laryngitis...
A lot of sighing is heard about Ernie Ludwick sit-nitg  on the bench during
the overtime period of the first PLC  game last week. But, heck, a coach is
only human—he's entitled  to a wrong guess now and t h e n . . . and
aren't we all?  STUDENT PRICES  FRI-SAT.  "You Belong To Me"  Starring 
BARBARA STANWYCK and HENRY FONDA  . ... Plus . . .  "Swing 11# Soldier"  .
. . with . . .  KEN MURRAY and FRANCES LANGFORD  SKINNAY ENNIS AND HIS BAND
 Uuiimui TODAY ONLY  / /  MAJOR BOWES  'SEVENTH ANNIVERSARY UNIT"  Doors
Open At 12:45  Starting Saturday  Tarzan#s Secret Treasure  . . . with . .
.  JOHHNY WEISMULLER  . . . Plus . . .  "Murder by Invitation"  . . . with
. . .  WALLACE FORD  / /  A SUCCESSFUL  BEST OF LUCK FOR  BASKETBALL SEASON
 From The  NORTHWEST HARDWARE  "YOUR HARDWARE HEADQUARTERS"  DISTRIBUTORS
OF SPALDING ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT  213 WEST HOLLY STREET PHONE 381 
DISTINCTIVE PRINTING  Where Job Printing Is An  A R T  MILLER   SUTHERLEN 
PRINTING CO.  THE HOME OF  "'•..:.:'' THE WWCOLLEGIAN  Cagers Tackle
CPS Tonight  Kegling Skirts Lose ;  In Close Battle;  Cats Get Easy Win 
• High scores and close games  marked this week's bowling session  at
20th Century alleys, as the girls  matched the boys pin for pin. Due'  to a
certain tea party the Pinncut-ters  were unable to bowl this week,  giving
the Alleycats 3 points by forfeit.  The Honeysuckles nosed out  the
Collegianettes by a total of  105 pins. The girls are not doing  bad at all
considering the number  of times they have bowled. The  Faculty annexed 3
points from the  Edwards Hall boys, as the Stokers  managed to take 2 out
of 3 points  from Hospice Inn. Justin Simon-son  was hot and took high
singles  honor with a game of 210 pins.  Annie Hovde was close behind with 
209 pins for one game. Dr. Robert  Holtrhan was high with a two game  total
of 394 pins, also setting a new  two game league record.  The Alleycats
moved into first  place as a result of Wednesday's  games. 
Standings— Won Lost  Alleycats 6 0  Stokers 5 1  Pincutters 3 3 
Faculty 3 3  Honeysuckles ........ 3 3  Edwards Hall ... 3 3  Hospice Inn 1
5  Collegianettes 0 6  Hospice Inn 1 Stokers 2  Wilder 211 Targus 373 
\Grubb ...233 Currie 343  Kotula 189 Mowry 260  Bruland 269 Donelson 268 
Dunn 349  Total 1175 Total 1593  Edwards Hall 0 Faculty 3  Kerchen 286
Bushell 266  Simonson 341 George 224  Messinger .... 291 Brewer 274 
• Thompson .... 248 Hamm 281  Washburn .... 294 Holtman 394  Total
1457 Total 1573  Collegianettes 0 Honeysuckles 3  Bryan 170 Biggs 272 
Mohrmann ....183 Gooding 327  De Clements 116 Simonds 248  BaWir 144
Krueger "306  Lanterman .. 150 Prince - 260  Total 1308 Total 1413 
Alleycats 3  Snyder 297  Lahti 263  Lindsey 217  Hovde 338  Loop 325  Total
1440  Hilltoppers Set  Early Lead  9 Running rampant over a disorganized 
White Mice team yesterday  afternoon, the Hilltop Huskies  took their third
straight game of  the quarter 47-21. The- Hilltoppers  used their
overwhelming height  and weight to great advantage in  mauling the Mice. 
In the second game of the day  Edwards hit the cellar after a 20-7  defeat
from_ the Satellites. The  victory put the Satellites in a tie  for second
place with the Honeysuckles.  Summaries:  Hilltoppers (47) White Mice (21) 
McMillan 18 F Goff 3  Gudyka 15 F Iverson 5  Hall 4 .C... Bruland 7  Keown
4 G Chudek 5  Smith 6 G Carter 1  Subs: White Mice: German, Clark. 
Satellites (20) Edwards (7)  Johnson 2 F Messinger 5  Cooper 1 F. Washburn 
Felton C Jensen  Nelson 9 '.G Junkin  Griffith 8 G Schilke 2  Any Meal Will
Soon Seem  Like a Banquet  If You Dress It Up  with  HOT SOUP  We Have a
Big Variety  HIGHLAND  CREAMERY  615 HIGH STREET  Postoffice
Substation—Ph. 182  Lutes Win One;  -Vikings Drop  Behind Cheney 
Vikings Show Power, Winning  Second Game; Ludwick, Dahl,  Set Fast Pace for
Lutes  • Western Washington College  Vikings slipped a notch in the 
WINKO pennant battle last weekend,  but definitely proved themselves 
contenders by defeating PLC's  1941 champs in three out of the  first four
conference games. Defeated  30-29 in last Friday's open- •  ing
encounter with the Lutes in Ta-coma,  the Vikings zoomed back Saturday 
night to smother their rivals  37-26.  I n the first game, Pacific
Lutheran,  on the short end of the score  for most of the''game, came from 
behind in t h e second half and held  a one-point lead 20 seconds before 
the final gun. At this crucial point,  Norm Dahl, Viking center, converted 
a foul to tie the score 28 all.  sending the game into overtime.  The close
checking Lutes held the  Vikings to a lone foul conversion  while the
Lutefisk eaters tossed the  winning field goal through the basket.  Paul
Pollilio was high point  man with 11 points. Berwyn Ny-berg  led the Viking
cagers with nine  markers.  In the concluding game of their  series, it was
Ernie Ludwick with  12 points-who paced the Viks to  their victory. After a
see-saw battle  in the first half, the Norsemen  sharpshooters found their
range and  went on to win easily, 37-26.  First Game  WWC (29) PLC (30) 
Ropes 3 F Pollilio 11  Kink F Bildt 4  Pettyjohn 6 C North 4  Nyberg 9 G
Kyllo 5  Ludwick 6 C Theno 2  WWC subs: N. Dahl, 5; Harkle-road,  Bezer,
Lowery.  PLC subs: Elofsen, 1; Kapus, 3;  Hoskins, Johnson.  Second Game 
WWC (37) PLC (26)  Ropes 5 F. Bildt 7  Dahl 2 F Pollilid 2  Dahl 6 C North
3  Ludwick 12 G Kyllo 5  Nyberg 5 C Theno 1  WWC subs: Harkleroad, Targus, 
Kink, 2; Pett3'john, 3; Bezer; Lowery,  2; Munizza.  PLC subs: Hoskins, 2;
Elofson, 2;  Johnson, 2; Bratlie, 4; Kapus.  This week's intramural scores:
 Friday  Honeysuckles (22) Edwards (12)  Simonds 1 F Simondson  Donelson 4
F Jensen 2  Snow 3 C Washburn  Biggs 3 G Sweeney  Gooding 11 G. Junkin 
Subs: Honeysuckles: Currie.  Edwards: Schilke, 2; Krueger.  Monday  Hospice
(18) White Mice (23)  Loop 5 F. Carter  Bezzo 2 F Goff 4  Lindsey 4 C
Bruland 13  Warner 1 G Chudek 1  Brock 6 G....: Zorotovich 1  v Subs: White
Mice: Iverson, 4.  Edwards (19) Sweepers (31)'  Messinger 6 F Packard 6 
Simonson 11 F Smith 13  Washburn 2 C Mitchell 18  Thompson G Wilder 
Schilke G .„.. Holbrook 4  Tuesday  Hilltoppers (25) Satellites (21) 
Aylen 2 F Griffith 2  Hall F Cooper 3  Gudyka 6 C Nelson 13  McMillan 15 G
Johnson 1  Keown 2 G Felton 2  You Can Get Your 1942  Calendar at The  31
mt  As well as hot lunches with  soup, entree, drinks and dessert  for
twenty-five cents.  We also feature fountain  specialties of all kinds. 
Dahl Hits Stride  —COURTESY HERALD  Norm Dahl, letterman in football,
track, and basketball, will  start tonight's game at forward. Dahl, the
sparkplug of  WWC's second game victory over PLC last Saturday night,  is
playing his third year of varsity athletics.  EWC Savages  Coming Friday 
Crucial Series May Decide  WINKO League Winner  • Eastern Washington
college's,  basketball team will trek to Bellingham  next week-end for what
 may be t he crucial series of the 1942  season. Boasting by far the most 
powerful team in the WINKO conference,  the Cheney Savages will  have to
crush Lappenbusch's green,  but rapidly improving Vikings before  they can
hope to walk on to  the pennant.  Coach Red Reese can put five  Savages on
the floor who go over  6 feet, 2 inches, led by towering  Dave Hipskind who
goes six inches  over six feet. Besides height, the  Cheneys still have
veteran Bobby  Stoelt, roly7poly fireball forward  who led the conference
in individual  scoring last year.  The Vikings will not be able to  match
Cheney in height, but if  they keep up the pace set in their  last PLC
game, the Savages should  have a tough time eradicating them  from the
picture.  Basketball  League Standings  WINKO LEAGUE STANDINGS  Won Lost




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WWCollegian - 1942 January 23 - Page 4



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Friday, January 23/1942  : ;  gt; : . v MEMBER ;•:.,
;••:••;  Washington Intercollegiate Press
Association  1941 Member* 1942 ~  'jBa*- - ESTABLISHED 1899 '••
_. -'" ... ':.-•  Published Every. Friday, Except During the Month of
September by the  "U- S Associated Students, Western Washington College of
Education,  Bellingham, Washington. -.  Entered at the Postoffice . at
Bellingham, Washington -as Second-Class  ^ Matter bv Virtue of the Act of
March 8, 1879. ,  Printed by Miller   Sutherlen Printing Company,
Bellingham, Washington.  • F r , n t c a Dysubycription Rate, by.
Mail, $1.00 Per Year, in Advance.  Advertising Rates on Application. '
•.  ERIC PHILLIPS ...............;.- r„. ...EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
Berriice Shellhammer  Peggy Bryan  Lizabe  ..„.;:..Associate Editor 
...News Editor  | ^ ^ ^ ^ ,.....„..:=.- —:;;::;;;:;y;-sgSlS 
Richard King .... -•—- .......Feature Editor  ? ^ l e ^ T ^ n S
i a n :::::::::::::::::::::A^sociate Feature Editor  Ixjrraine^Lantennan
Women's Editor  Margaret DweUe : ZSsbdate Women's Editor  Elaine Ringstad
*» Theater Editor.  S T S f f i £ 5 S   ' S S K M??ga??t
Stephens, Camille Wilkin-,  Cub BePprt^JSKSc' A S S Fieilman" Maryette
Myette, Russell  wSsnlurn ^ h n T ^ o " 5 ^ ^ , Warren^Beecroft, Ed 
R^wSmon, Gloria' Campbell, Dorothy Easton.  WAYNE KOTULA - BUSINESS MANAGER
 RUTH A. BURNET PUBLICATIONS ADVISER  Vol. XL! Friday, January, January 23,
1942 No. 61*  oditoliali  Try the Co-op First  Believe it or not we have a
well stocked Co-operative borx  and stationery store down in the basement
of our Main, building  The question is: Why doat faculty and students o. 
WWC buy all their books and materials there? Some have  gotten into the
habit of buying just certain things at the Co-op  which they could not buy
downtown; according to Louis tarle,  manager, these things are very few in
number  So, for the sake,of our own business, lets patronize the  Co-op to
the fullest extent.  Remember The 15 Pilots  Many during the last few days
have been the headlines pronouncing  the death of one of our more famous
film actresses.  When most people read these announcements little did they 
realize that besides the'Lombard party, there were-18 other  people aboard
that ill-fated airliner—15.of them United States,  Army flyers More
disastrous at this time than the loss ot  an actress was the loss of these
15 pilots—men vital to the  defense of the American way of life. 
College Students Pick Favorite Shows  Of 1941; 'Sergeant York' Rates Tops 
By Joe Belden, Editor  Student Opinion Surveys of America  AUSTIN, Texas,
Jan. 23.—Favorite movie seen by college students  during 1941 was
"Sergeant York," the annual motion picture  poll conducted by Student
Opinion Surveys of America shows:  Only slightly more than one-seventh of
the students, 14 per cent,  however, could agree on any one picture as the
"best they had  seen."  At that, "Sergeant York" lead in four of the six
geographical  sections of ^the country used in conducting the survey. Based
on  a scientifically representative cross section of the U. S. college 
enrollment, the survey shows that students in the Middle Atlantic,  East
Central, West Central, and Southern states chose  "Sergeant York" as their
favorite picture.  The top ten shows, compiled from the question, "What was
the  best picture you have seen during 1941?" were not necessarily 
released during the last year. In order of their selections, they  are as
follows:  L~ Sergeant York  ^f_Citizen Kane  ^^OnerFoot in Heaven  
•' Meet John Doe  5. Gone With the Wind  6. Blossoms in the Dust  7.
Honky Tonk  8. The Little Foxes  9. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde  10. I Wanted
Wings  In 1940, "Gone With the Wind," easily ranked best of the year, 
polled twice as many ballots as the second ranking picture, "Rebecca."  It
is interesting to note that "G.W.T.W." is still fifth  among the top ten
after, another year.  yB=M^-? Student Price 31c  NOW PLAYING  "Two Faced
Woman"  with  GRETA GARBO and MELVYN DOUGLAS  "Target for Tonight"  The
R.A.F. It Its Cast—The R.A.F? Filmed It  VALON STARTING TODAY  "When
Ladies Meet"  . . . with . . .  JOAN CRAWFORD and GREER GARSON  . . . P l u
s . . .  "Dressed To Kill"  . . . with . . .  LLOYD NOLAN  Starting
Wednesday  Week-end In Havgna^  . . .with. . . V  ALICE FAYE and JOHN PAYNE
 . . . Plus...  "Bad Men of Missouri"  ••• . . . with. .
.  DENNIS MORGAN  n ii  UW Speakers CaiTlpi 
••••"•^•i-  Not Debate  Team/ PJease 
By Elizabeth Douglas  • "No, we dofrt call ourselves a  debate squad.
We?are a public discussion  group," said Don Urquart,  one of the three-
members of the  University of Washington group  that spoke in assembly
Tuesday.  Urquart, a junior in Political Science,  smiled in a friendly
manner,  shoved his hands into.his pockets,  and went on, "We conduct
cooperative  symposiums with the schools  we visit; last year we had 180
engagements."  Carl Robertson, senior in Speech,  and a member of the
squad, broke  in, "We have traveled to Vancouver,  B. C-i to Los Angeles,
arid as  far east as Moscow/ Idaho." Robertson  laughed, and his eyes
crinkled  behind his glasses. "If you  print it. just say Moscow. I'm sure 
that would be more impressive," he  said.  Robertson and Curtis Ellens, the
 third member of the squad,,N are  members of Tau Kappa Alpha, debate 
honorary. "Oh, yes, we speak  a great deal," said Ellens, a tall 
curly-haired senior in Political Science.  "We'll talk for anyone
interested.  In fact," he continued, "they needn't  be interested. Just a.
passive  acceptance will do."  These three young men who had  spoken so
sincerely on the topic,  "What steps should the U. S. take  now to cushion
the post-war depression?"  were being hurried off  to lunch. "We speak in
Portland  next week, and make a trip to  California in March. Thanks for 
listening," they called back, as they  rushed down the stairs to their 
lunch.  Ski Weather Fine  But Underwear  Itched: No Bumps  • At six
-o'clock ..last ..Sunday  morning, many things happened.  The shift at the
pulp mill changed,  a milk wagon jingled along, a street  light burned out,
a car pulled up in  , front of the Pastime, and twenty  alarm clocks
sounded. Simultaneously,  twenty forms whipped out  of bed, hastily donning
two pairs £ gt;f"  woolen snuggies, two or,more shirts,  sweaters, and
a pair of pants. For  they were going—not to the Bahamas,  not to
Florida, not to California,  but to Mount Baker.  The trip to the mountain
was uneventful  except for three unknown  serenaders, Fillacadootchi Hawke,
 Sinamerootchi Hearsey, and Falda  Raldy Holtman. Their rendition of  "100
Bottles on the Fence," was,  most delightful.  Arriving at the mountain,
these  potential skiers eagerly fastened on  their skis. Skiing conditions
were  ideal. The sub-zero temperature  was most pleasant, the snow warm, 
and the Northeast wind refreshing.  After lunch, the student skiers 
practiced their stems, turns, banking,  in hopes of sometime being  able to
stand horizontally on their  skis. And after reallyPPPPP