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1944_0623



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WWCollegian - 1944 June 23 - Page 1



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XmOOk ....  By WALT BAKER  WELCOME:  In the colloqual language of a 
frosh English stude I begin this  summer session column*' "Look",  by
extending tidings of welcome, to  . the many new and old members of  the
student body of this noble institution.  There seems to be a  different
feeling in the air, what  with most of the enrollment having  teaching and
other educational experiences  behind them. But that  doesn't mean that
they are just  serious minded old fuddy duddies.  No sir! Just the other
day three  of our fairer sex were seen hiking  Sehome hill.. Picking
flowers and  taking in the scenery.. Having you  distinguished older people
around  seems to do something to the  place. It will be interesting to note
 the differing ideas of the serious  minded teachers and the timid and 
inexperienced frosh.. The quarter  promises to be one of intereset  both
from an intellectual and recreational  standpoint . . . Welcome  again . .
.  •  BARGAIN BASEMENT:  The deadline for this facetious  piece of
propaganda is but a mere  ten hours away. So, forgive me if  you will, for
what I'm about to  write. It's a bit delicate, but it is  absolutely the
only thing I can  think of to fill space at this dreadful  hour when all
little boys should  be in peaceful slumber.. Just slipping  . . Sliding
from the literary to  the senseless, we came upon the  topic that all of us
must admit  teeters on the amusing. (You guessed  it, women again). For
many  months now the fad has taken a  strong grasp on the young people  and
has sent the jewelers home at  nights happy as a, hound'with a  fresh cut
of meat. What I'm  driving at is the marriage craze. To  put it in the
words of the once,  famous Western Washington journalist,  "Little" Al
Biggs, (who, by  the way, is hooked). "It's nutsy."  But in order to
understand it, one  must be, as it were, of an understanding  nature. 
•  The war has done much to push  it along and the upped wages have 
brought it to the fore also. But  the main cause of this too numerous., 
and., short-noticed., nuptial  wave, is the inner thoughts of the  females,
who dread the idea of  being without a date these troublesome  years. They
cant bear to  face the future without the gold  band on their left hand
that tells  the world they are war wives. Now -  or never i s their slogan
as they  stalk their men no matter what his  position or pocketbook be. 
The general outcome of many of  these hurry up deals will be the 
overcowded courtrooms^ weeping  young girls, who after the romantic  phase
has passed, find themselves  very much alone and mad at themselves  arid
their parents. True,  there are many couples who are  getting married today
who have  the perfect right to do so, but the  majority are the young
"jokers"  who will find out too late that they  were foolish and not in
their right  minds when they took the big step.  You will have to show me
the case  where the young man who has just  been married, and is hustled
off  to the service is really happy. And  you will also have to show me the
 beaming, blushing bride of- a few  thin weeks or months, who has to  sit
at home while her better half  sends his love home in a brown  envelope
along with $50.00. •". The  usual result finds the youthful gent 
residing in his regulation tent at  Camp Omxitpzzq and his sweet  ^
(Continued on Page T^o  Building Money  Budgeted;  Trustees Happy  Men's
Dorm, I.A. Building  Planned by Board;  Locations Not Yet Announced  Money'
to cover the cost of two  new buildings and sites will be incorporated 
into the 1945-47 budget,  it was voted by the WWC board of  trustees last
Friday. The proposed  structures are a mens dormitory  and an industrial
art building.  Dr. W. D. Kirkpatrick, pesident  of the board; Verne
Branigin, secretary  of the board; and Dr. W. W.  Haggard ,WWC president,
have discussed  the plans for the new buildings  with John Paul Jones, of
the  Seattle architectural firm. of Bebb    Jones, and the final estimated 
costs will be completed soon. The  proposed sites, adjacent to the existing
 buildings on the college campus,  have already been surveyed and  the
appraisal work has been completed  by the Bellingham Real Estate  board.
Although the locations  were not announced immediately,  they are
understood to fit in nicely  with the over-all plan for the college  group
of permanent structures.  Major capital outlays are also  planned for
considerable, improvements  on some of the present buildings.  Faculty Row
Shows  Many New Faces  In addition to the regular teaching  staff, eight
visiting members  are included among the faculty for  the summer quarter. 
The following are in this group:  Marjorie Dawson Arntzen. a former  member
of the WWC faculty ~Sara  E. Baldwin, from the State Teachers  College,
West Chester, Pennsylvania;  Josephine Burley, Supervisor  of Art, Yakima,
Washington  Public Schools; Florence Johnson  Kirkpatrick, a former College
faculty  member; and Susan M. Lacy,  Supervisor of Early Elementary 
Education, office of State Superintendent  of Public Instruction,  Olympia,
Washington.  Eleanor McLaughlin, Western  Washington College of Education, 
Kalamazoo; Edith Sifton, Curriculum  Consultant in Mathematics,  Seattle,
Washington, Public Schools;  and Jeahette Woodring, former Research 
assistant, Antioch College.  Hood Likes Coast;  Brought Umberella 
Graciously accepting the introduction,  Miss Marguerite V. Hood,  told of
her schedule for Music'  Week 4n tones which implied that  she was well
used to being busy.  In speaking of her future plans,  Miss Hood said, "I
am going directly  from here' to the National  Music Camp at Interlochen,
Michigan,  where I will work in the  vocal jclinic for high school students
 and teachers, for two weeks.  After "the clinic I will work with  college
and graduate classes for the  remainder of the summer."  As she sat
gracefully on a nearby  table Miss Hood contrasted the  climate of Ann
Arbor, Michigan,  with that of the Pacific.coast. "Los  Angeles is' cool
all the time. Of  course, if you're in the sun it's  hot, but as soon as
you're in the  shade it's cool, and anytime after  five you need a coat. I
brought an  umbrella and rubbers with me when  I came to Bellingham—I
don't know  (Continued on Page Three)  VOL. XLII—NO. 33 Western
Washington College, Bellingham, Washington -Friday, June .23,n 944-  Dr.
Ralph W. Tyler Heads Conference  Dr. Ralph W. Tyler, Department  of
Education, University  of Chicago, comes to WWC to  serve as chairman of
the Annual  Summervconference which  will be held on the campus  next week.
Dr. Tyler will address  the regular student assembly  Friday, June 30. 
Educational Conference Here  Next Thursday and Friday  "With Dr.,Ralph W.
Tyler, University of Chicago, as guest speaker, the  annual Summer
Conference will be held on the campus next Thursday  and Friday, June 29
and 30. The theme for the conference, "The Evaluation  of Education in War
and Peace" will be developed by addresses and  by discussions led by
prominent national and northwest educators.  The program for the two-day
meeting follows:  PROGRAM  Thursday, June 29, 1944  9:30
A.M.—Registration  10:00 A.M.—Morning Session .  Presiding:
President WrW: Haggard." Western Washington College of  Education  Address:
"How Is an Educational Program Evaluated?" Ralph W. Tyler  Discussion
Leaders:  Chairman: Ernest W. Campbell, Assistant Superintendent in charge 
of Elementary and Junior High Schools, Seattle  Chester C. Kimm,
Superintendent of Chelan County Schools  Mrs. Ethel Barber, Marietta
School, Bellingham  Ray Cowell, Mount Vernon Union High School  Paul R.
Grim, Director of Student Teaching, Western Washington  College of
Education  E. L. Lindman, Director of Research and Statistics, State
Department  of Public Instruction .Olympia  12:00 Noon—Luncheon,
Edens Hall  Presiding: Marvin Stevens, Sueprintendent of Thurston County
Schools  Address: Paul F. Gaiser, Superintendent of Vancouver, Washington, 
Schools "  2:00 P.M.—Afternoon Session  Presiding:/Roy E. Harris,
Superintendent of Meridian Schools  Address: ''Has Elementary Education Met
the Test of War?"  Ralph W. Tyler  Discussion Leaders:  Chairman: E. J.
McNamara, Superintendent of Lohgview Schools  Mrs. Mary Bond Lash, Whatcom
Junior High School, Bellingham  C. G. Jesperson, Administrative Assistant
of Tacoma Schools  H. B. King, Chief Inspector of Schools, Department of
Education,  Victoria, B. C.  Hazel M. Lewis, Director of Research for the
Stockton, California,  Unified School District '  Eveln Odom, Campus Junior
High School, Western Washington  (Continued on Page Three)  Modern Dances
Presented Tuesday;  Latin American Music Scheduled  Speaking on ''The Lost
Art of  Listening to Music," Miss Marguerite  V. Hood, of the University 
of Michigan presented the second  of a varied series of summer assembly 
program'Friday.  Other assemblies which have been  scheduled for the
quarter are:  Tuesday, June 27, an evening assembly  presented by the
Modern  Dance group from Oregon State  college, Friday, June 30; Dr. Ralph 
W. Tyler of the University of Chicago;  July 14, a program of Latin- 
American music arid an exhibit of"  Latin American art in the art
department;  and as the last assembly  of the first term, Tuesday, July 18,
 Juanita Carter, soprano,.."  Eleanor King, dancer, will offer  the
assembly program for Friday,  July 12. Other assemblies are  Tuesday, July
15, Howard,A.-Dawson,  Institute of Professional Relations;  Friday, July
28, Lamar Crow-son,  pianist; Tuesday, August 1,  Svenbjorn Johnson,
Lecture on  Iceland; Tuesday, August 8, Fank  Gorow, Lecture on Visual
Aids; and  Tuesday, August 15, Frank Drake  Davidson, lecture. 
••• V'l^G. '•-. . .:••".:•
•;./•:  Superintendent  Conclave Here  In. conjunction with
next weeks  educational conference, featuring  Dr. Ralph W. Tyler and other
 northwest and national educators,  the County Supeintendents' association 
of Washington will hold Nits  summer meeting on the campus  June 29 and 30,
with headquarters  in room 116.  The officers of the association  are:
Marvin Stevens, Thurston,  president; Ray D. Green,fKittitas,  east side
vice-president; Gordon L.  Carter, Whatcom, secretary; William  F.
Standeford, Spokane, treasurer.  Mr. Standeford will be unable  to be
present.  The superintendents who have .  signified their intention of
attending  the conference ae: Neil  Bailey, Pacific; Ruth Bethel, Pierce; 
C. W. Beuswch, Lewis; Wesley C.  Brown, Clark; John R. Byers, Snohomish; 
Lydia F. Crosby, deputy  .' from Cowlitz; Florence Dahlke,  Douglas;...
-Roy D. Green. Kittitas;  Lura A. Grenia, Skamania; Julia  Jensen, San
Juan; H. G. Knowles,  Island; Vern Leidle, Skagit; Velma  B. Oiling.
Okanogan; William F.  Pool, King; Minnie A. Stutler, Jefferson;  Rose D.
Taylor, Wahkiakum;  Ruth S. Timms, Whitman;  O. M. Turner, Yakima; and
A._L.  Venn-Watson, Kitsap. Several deputies  also will attend.  Michigan
Supervisor  Leads Music Week  Continuing through Tuesday, June  27, Miss
Marguerite V. Hood, assistant  professor of Music Education  in the
University of Michigan  and supervisor of music in the Ann  Arbor city
schools, will be working  with groups from the Workshop,, and  the regular
class in 



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WWCollegian - 1944 June 23 - Page 2



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J-r  Western Washihgton College of Education, Bellingham, Washington
' Friday, June B,;1S44  AO*U  ESTABLISHED 1899  Detective Discovers  Campus
Sabotage  Published Every Friday. Except Duriiia Renort to Chief Detective
ffick  the month of September, by the Associated «*pwri,.
«-*» */iuc» i r e « ^ » » * « ~ - 
Students. Western Washington College of Trash v  Education, Bellingham,
y/ashtngton x«wuy..--. .  .Entered at the Postoffice at Bellingham,
Pollowin' yOUT -instructions, I i n -  Washington, as Second Class Matter
by .  Virtue of the Act of March 8, 1879. vestigated t h e WWC campus a n d
it  Printed by Miller   Sutherlen Printing  •• Company,
Bellingham. Washington. looks like 'dem rumors Was right.  Subscription
Rate, by Mail. $1.00 per year, •_  . •"'.''. in Advance. Monday
I reported for duty dressed  Advertising Rates on Application *. r  "MEMBER
; as a plain clothes man but in no  - Washington Intercollegiate time I
looked like a pre-shrunk  19«S S ASSOC' ai943 item for the Sanforized
ads. Seems  . .. . - like I was minden' my own bus-w  ; . « • *+
M i#*-i^ r» - iness when a suspicious character  fissodded College
Press • • *•••*'•'•  ^ ^ -
— comes a long, pokes m da grass  w u.yi II M0 33 and immediately
comes on two  ' / ' Fridav June 23 .1944 dozen sprinklers drenching me and 
** \ - me new pin stripe suit.  "Ha," I decided, "Dis is pos-  JOYCE
WATERBURY.... u, , * • T^ J u*  -,,.„ ,. » i
•**„„„ ~~- sibly a land mine. Dis no doubt  JEditor
and Business Manager J  v needs investigation." So I steps  Pat Bellingham
......Feature Editor ^ ^ ^ g r e e n e r y t o q u e s t i o n d is  M*ay*
Wike Women's Editor g u y ^ h e ^ ^ t ]sing p o t ^  Walt Baker.... J
...Sports Editors a t me and yellin' somethin' about  DaleBurklund f
getting off da grass. .  Paul Plamonden. ....Office Assistant ^ ^ ^ f x ^ ^
 REPORTERS: Geraldine Ludens, ^ ^ ^ ^  Marilyn Turner, Ralph Stevens. ^ ^ .
^ t w Q d a m e s ^ s py  RUTH BURNEX.. glasses. I asks 'em who do dey 
Publications Adviser think they are, June , and May  . '';,. • '
Summers? Well, dey comse back  at me snappy wit da remarks dat  " -^ -
dey're boidin' and if I imagined  £ ^ \ ' / . • I I was a crow,
to go into my act  £sOl\0%{(t\S • • • and fly away.
Da only info' I could  woim from dem was day a pois-  , i „ , rs i A
~.„. onality named Piatt headin' dis  •Hello! Once again we
f.nd our- o u t f i t a n d g i v e s a l l o r d e r s . Da  selves
carrying books, worrying w a y T d o p e i t o u t d i s ^ a s p y r i ng 
about finals, making plans to at- 0f femmes fatales which is spying  tend
all the summer recreational on P-38's around here (dat boid line 
activities, and in general, return- didn't stop for a minute).  '. 1 X 4 .
j«„4- Will close now with love and  ing to the role of a student
^ ^ p l e a 5 e ^ { o r m e o ne  True, it isn't the same as it used n e w
pin_striped suit (pre-shrunk)  to be. Too many of the fellows a nd, if- you
want me to investi-and  gals are in the service or gate dose land mines,
one bullet  working in War plants doing the ' proof helicopter.:. ;  same
thing we are, but in a different  way-^-we're all working to  help wind
this thing up., in a  hurry. .  The WWCollegian staff hopes  you'll enter
into all the activities'  planned for the summer.  They've scheduled to
include a variety  of experiences — boating,  hiking, industrial
trips, picnics,  the shindig, songfests,—what  more could any
individual ask,in  the way of well-planned entertainment?  Of course, each
of you  realizes that the success of these  activities depends on each of
you.  The best way. to get. the most  from the summer is to enter into 
these plans and return to teaching  in .the fall better educated  and a
"more rounded personality:  B.B.  P.S.: Dat suspicious character uses  the
alias "Dack". Dick Tracy could  think up a better one than that. 
Contributions  The Fifth War-Loan Drive is.  on. Very probably you've heard
 that before, but have, you done  anything about if? The business  office
will have stamps and bonds  on sale -today.. Don't continue to  intend to
buy some stamps—tomorrow  isn't soon enough for  something that
important! GO,  DO IT NOW!  Contributions are always welcomed  by the
WWCollegian staff. The  son of one of our summer students,  Paul
Plamondon,, wrote the following  poem in connection with  work he performed
as a janitor at  WWC last summer.  War Worker in Over-Alls  1  Sweeping,
sweeping, down the corridors  arid halls.  That's our war work in
over-alls.  2 v  Some men build ships, others build  planes,  But he is the
guy that takes all  the pains (panes).  '3 "V  A tribute to him who holds
the mop  and brush  Our janitor, Wayne Ensign—  don't give him the
rush! "  Paul Plamondon,  .• Age 12%.  Famifiar  Many familiar faces
have appeared  in the halls tif WWC this quarter.  V- ; •• '-':
,— \ ' -:  Planning to obtain her degree at  the end of fall quarter,
Ruth Laub-er  is up from Vancouver, Wasing-tbri,  where she has been
teaching  the past,year: Together again are  Eldeen Carr and Nelvia
Morrison,  who have come back for their degrees;  Katherine Jarvis, a
Bellingham  girl, returns to work towards  her degree. After a year's
vacation  in Oakland, California, Margaret  McKissic has returned to take 
just art courses (That's still a vacation,  Margaret).,  An Alaska girl who
has been  teaching in Tacoma, Ruth Erickson,  has returned to work for her
degree.  Vigh Lambert is one of the  few new faces this summer. Vigh 
obtained her War Emergency certificate  from EWC and taught a  year before
coming to Bellingham:  "I wanted to see what it was like  but here and I've
found that WWC  is very similar 6t EWC," she declared.  ,  Mm-m^m-m, it
looks as if this  cross-section of returning students  lacks something.
There are new  . men on the campus which your reporter  hopes to round-up
for the  next issue.  more look  (Continued from Page One)  bride back home
with her folks.  The next  gt; time you're down town,  count the number of
dual control  rings on the prim misses as they  pass you on the street. I
walked  half a block recently, in fact today,  and ran out of fingers. Give
it  some thought, readers.  • .. • .  STUDENT LOUNGE:  In case
you new. students don't  know, that door just below the  drinking fountain
on the main deck,  leads to the student'lounge. The  lounge is your place
to relax and  forget all your worries.  CHAUCERIAN:  Now that I have had my
booster  cup of coffee and the hands of my  Ingersoll are racing toward the
 deadline hour, aye now, my se-questrial  wanderings are about to  cease.
Methinks a cask of . Mr.  Dwelley's pepsi-cola is in the offing  for such
bombast. My lips full  parched be, ere my W e is told,  like some arid
field of far away  India before the dread monsoons  strike. !  There is an
episode in Jeff Chaucer's  "Canterbury Tales", of the  cookv who, upon
reaching the desired  length of his tale requested  a drink of water. With
that subtle  subterfuge he rises from his chair  and the story is ended.
Will someone  perchance offer a drink.. I  thirst...  Your WWCollegian
staff hopes  to present a varied and interesting  accounts of what happens 
.at' our school on the hill. You  can' help us fulfill these expec-.'  .
rations/by entering into the.activities  of the RecreationaI program,  by--
telling us", what. you'd  • -like; to Vead in your paper,.; apd,  '.
above  gt;ll, if you have something  to say which you thihk-might in-s  /
terest others gt; by writing it and  backing it oh the WWCollegian  office
bulletin board. Your con-*  •• tributioris will greatly aid us
in  ; reaching the goaI we have set for  v.- this ;#mmer's: publication..
• ' . •''.  WILSON  ALL-PURPOSE SPORTING EQUIPMENT  Morse
Hardware Co.  Established 1884  Summer Students!  Drop in to 'THE CO-OP"
for All Your School Needs  STUDENT'S CO-OP  *  By PAT BELLINGHAM  Pardon
the gap in my column,  but your feature editor needs a  name for her
column. Any suggestions  will be appreciated. Don't  forget, it must be
descriptive.  (Makes it hard, doesn't it?).  Help Wanted: Experienced or 
inexperienced, full time or part  time. Anyone interested in news  writing
please see Mrs. Burnet or  Joyce Waterbury in the WWCollegian  office on
the second floor.  We need.You!  This isn't a paid advertisement,  but we
mean every word of it.  Ye Olde Collegian staffe is headed  for
straight-jackets and soon unless  some aspiring journalists put in  their
appearance to help out.  Whazzis we hear about women at  Hospice? Just
roomers, I guess.  Lotsa good looking women here  this quarter, but what
happened to  the men they promised us? But  says so here in the catalogue.
I  saw a picture of some.  It looks like old home week with  those two
amoebas, Betty Anderson  and Allene Rue back on the' campus...  Halloooo'. 
English studes: Here's some daf-fynitions  for your vocabulary that  really
have Webster beat:  "' Thumbrero—Hitchhiker's hat  Mostuff—A
big dog that eats too  much.  Infizzible—What the. drinks are  when
the drinks late.  Bothtub—A place for bathing  twins. 
Baseball—Talk between the pitches  and catches. 
Breadstead—What you have after  eating crackers in bed.  Hey, editor!
Not that, not the  gag: Well, whadda ya know?..No  free speech anymore. 
Former Student;  Joins Navy  Cecelia North, former WWC student  in 1938 and
now an apprentice  seaman in the Navy, has written  that she is stationed
at Midshipmen's  School, Northampton, Mass.  A letter received from Mrs.
Eric  Phillips (Margaretha Schilke) 



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WWCollegian - 1944 June 23 - Page 3



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Friday, June 23, 1944 Western Washington College of Education,
Bellihgham^-VVasningTOn 3  mmmtm  Around  By DALE BURKLUND  HEY.FItlEND! Is
that you sweating  under that stack of books? What  with golf, swimming,
tennis, hiking,  and all the other warm weather  activities, the calendar,
offered by  WWC this year should satisfy anyone.  Salmon bakes, hikes,
cruises  all are listed on the recreation program,  not once but two or
three  times, during the season."  • •  Not only are many off
campus  trips being planned, but a number  of campus treats are in store
for  the "studes." Two nights a week  will be given over to mixed rec 
periods in the PE building, besides  the afternoon swimming periods for 
men and women two or three times  a week.  All in all it should be a
quarter  chuck full of fun and good times,  so lets all get behind the hard
 working activities committee and  make this an enjoyable as well as  busy
summer.  Intramural Softball  With a little urging and cooperation  of you
sports enthusiasts an  intramural softball t league may be  formed. Last
summer this league  was the biggest success of the whole  receational
program and furnished  a lot of people with some of the  finest memories of
their school year.  • • •  It is a mixed affair with
every  man, woman, and school teacher  having to participate to make 
enough teams. A round robin series  is drawn up in which the last  game is
between the champs and  an all-star aggregation from the  other teams. Last
year's Alger hero  was Don Bushell, the smooth hurling,  hard slugging
pitcher for the  champs. Doc Haggard, by the  way, is one of the more
professional  ball hawks on the campus,  and will be a big addition to any 
team as a hard slugging first baseman.  • - • • ' •
•  Toughening Up  An all star battery ftas already  started to get in
shape with .Mark  Knoll limbering up his arm and  Cliff Johnson catching.
So far  they have been troubled with minor  ailments, • making it
impossible  to scout theny and get a ciear picture  of their potential
ability.  Knoll has acquired a bad stiff arm  from cutting the livers out
of dog  fish (he is earning his way through  college). Johnson -was moaning
 about some second front that keeps  him from getting in the proper 
crouched position of,a catcher.  ' • ' • " • '  :-, Ernie
Hemingsoh and Hal Moe  are training their batting eyes by  watching,
without their glasses on,  all the young coeds as they pass  down the hall.
Vernon Neilsoh' is  in top shape to play the roving  short, fielder
position with all the  walking he does in his leisure  'time'; , -"
••••'• ;••'•,'. \: ,'Cv-
:,;.;•'  Art Department:  Face Lifted  "The big news in the art
department  this quarter is the fulfillment  of our ten-year dream— 
the new celotex walls," "says .Miss  Hazel Plympton, art instructor, who 
returned Monday from her vacation  in Portland.  "We are indebted to Mr.
Aagaard  and Mr. Ensign for the careful  workmanship." Boom 305 also has 
new cupboards and" there is a new  supply of drawing boards in the 
department.  Students are invited to visit the  art department not only to
see the  recent . improvements but also to  study the display of student
work  from the elementary to the college  level. -  Hanson Resigns  Mrs.
Rose Hanson, matron of  the school hospital, is resigning her  position at
the end of the first term.  Miss May Mead, school nurse, announces  that to
date the position  has not been filled, but it is planned  to have a new
matron by the  beginning of school next September..  Picturesque 'Dpt
Island' Nearby  more conference  (Continued from Page One)  College of
Education  4:00 P.M.—County Superintendents, Room 112  6:00
P.M.—Salmon Bake, The Rocks, South Bellingham  Friday, June 30, 1944 
10:00A.M—Morning Session  Presiding: E. A. Bond, Department of
Mathematics, Western Washington  College of Education  Address: "What Does
the Future Hold for Elementary Education?"  Ralph W. Tyler -  Discussion
Leaders:  Chairman: Paul P. Gaiser, Superintendent of Vancouver,
Washington,  Schools  Sara E. Baldwin, State Teachers College, West
Chester, Penn. '  Mrs. Morris D. Kennedy, President, Washington Congress of
Parents  and Teachers  Clare Kersting, Birchwood School, Bellingham,. and
Supervisory  Consultant, Whatcom County Schools  -— Susan M. Lacy,
Supervisor of Early Elementary Education, State  Department of Public
Instruction, Olympia  Stanley Wynstra, Superintendent of Bremerton Schools 
12:00 Noon—Luncheon, Edens Hall  Presiding: O. W. Beusch,
Superintendent of Lewis County Schools  Summarization of Conference: A. C.
Hicks, Department of English,  and Acting Registrar, Western Washington
College of Education  Ralph W. Tyler  __*i ' ; : •_  Burley Returns 
For Summer  "..good to be back," said Miss  Josephine Burley, summer school
 instructor, who also was on the  1943 summer faculty. Miss Bur-'  ley,
supervisor of the Art department  of the Yakima schools,  also has
experience on the teaching  staff of the Central Missouri  Teachers college
at Warrensburg,  Missouri.  Miss Burley is proud of her work  in. Yakima
where the art program  is developing into a , functional  thing. Prominent
among the activities  is a workshop where teachers  may take "artful"
recreation.  Miss Burley announces that her  class in sculpturing meets at
9:50,  with an 11 o'clock extension Monday,  Wednesday, and Thursday, 
which can be arranged by appointment.  Tests On Schedule  Next Week 
Achievement and college aptitude  tests will be given next week; The 
achievement tests will be given  Wednesday, June 28, 4:20 p. m., and  the
college aptitude test, Thursday,  June 29, 7:30 a. m. The date of the 
aptitude test has been changed  from June 27 to June 29, Transient 
students who expect to attend the  summer quarter only and students 
twenty-one years or more of age  who are not applicants for a certificate 
or candidates for a degree  are exempt from all- but the ^college  aptitude
test, which is a universal  requirement. Credits will be provisional  until
this requirement is  fully met. -•• lt;« .  M'GEE RETURNS
IN FALL;  RESUMES SCHEDULE-Miss  Margaret McGee will return  to WWC tins
September to resume  her pre-nussihg classes and her position,  as .nurse
in, the Campus  school. Miss McGee was called to  • • • .
• * • ••. . • Altadena, California, in May
because  of the death of her father.  Exams Completed  Approximately 160
health examinations  will have been given by  thV; time the doctors have
finished  the examinations tests next Monday,  according to Miss May Mead, 
school nurse. Examining physicians  were D. C. L. Longstreth, Dr. A. M. 
Sonneland, Dr. C. V. Parrell, and  Dr. Warren S. Moore.  Surgical  Athletic
 Supplies  DRUGS   STATIONERY  STAR  • •• ' Drug Co. 
Corner State  and Holly  Phone 224  General  School Supplies  STATIONERY 
OFFICE EQUIPMENT  UNION  Printing Co.  1421" Cornwall Ave.  Just North of
Postoffice  DOWNTOWN  HEADQUARTERS  For  WWC Students  Fountain, Food,
Drink  . • - • . •  HARD WICKS  Where Friends Meet and
Eat  PATRONIZE OUR APYERTISERS  Hike! See! Eat!  Recreation!  Getting
underway.: with a hike, to  the natural dry dock at South Bellingham,  this
summer's recreation  program will include . boat trips,  hikes, picnics,
and visits to industrial  plants within the city. Led  by'. Miss Lillian M.
George, cataloguer,  the hikers will leave from  the Physical Education
building at  1 o'clock tomorrow afternoon to  take the 1:10 South
Bellingham bus  at the corner of Cedar and State  streets and will start
the hike from  the corner of 11th and Harris  streets.  Scheduled for
Tuesday, June 27,  is an. industrial trip through the  Bellingham Iron
Works. Notice of  the time of this trip will appear on  the official
bulletin.  Dr. E. A. Bond will be the chef  for the annual salmon bake at
the  Rocks, Thursday, June 29. The  salmon bake will be held at 6 p. m.  to
enable people who are attending  the. Annual Conference to attend. 
Schedules of the recreation program  for the summer were handed  out in
Tuesday's assembly. Additional  information may be obtained  from Miss
Elizabeth M. Hopper in  the Recreation committee headquarters,  room 116.
Office hours aire  from 10:30 till 11:30 a. m., and  from 2 until 3:30 p.
m., week days.  more hood  (Continued from Page One)  who. warned me," she
laughed, Si  she finished her .comments on the  Pacific coast, and turned
the conversation  to the hot, muggy weather  of Michigan. In defense of 
Michigan she added, "Oh, it's not  that way all the time. I don't want  you
to think that. And I "like my  work anyway, even if the weather  .isnt as
nice as that I have known."  Concluding the interview, Miss  Hood spoke in
anticipation of a trip  to Vancouver and said rather wist- -  fully," "I'd
really hoped to be  able to go to Victoria, rve^heard  it is so English,
but I understand  it's so hard to get there."  Jfta0mv  119 W. Magnolia 
INSULATE  Your Home  You Can Save Vs of Your  FUEL BILL  This Coming Month 
Storm-Sash  and All Types of  Insulation  IN STOCK  COLUMBIA  VALLEY 
Lumber Co.  BELLINGHAM;  iiinn



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WWCollegian - 1944 June 23 - Page 4



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Appointments  Announced  Twenty members of the graduating  class now
hold teaching positions  in schools throughout the  state. , v  According
to the records the following  people have been placed:  Shirley Anderson,
Chehalis, inter-mediate  and music; Helen Bagley,  Montesano, intermediate;
Patricia  Bellingham, Overtake, third; June  Benjamin, Tehiho", first;
Doris Bishop,  Ferndale, fifth ;Betty Brunswig,  Tenino, second; May Belle
Bodey,  Montesano, seventh; Georgia Co-louzis,  Juanita school, fourth;
Mary-bess  Daddow, Lower Snoqualmie  Valley, fifth; Leland Dow, Sumas. 
seventh; Serena Elenbaas, Meridian  District, two-three,-'Hazel Jones, 
Hay, one-three; Nada Jones, Monitor,  three-four; Minerva Kern. Mt.  Baker,
Junior high; Ruth Kosche,  Olympia, primary; Pearl Palmroth,  Bellingham,
primary; Margaret  Richards, Everett, primary; Shirley  Sisson, South
Central Dist., primary;  Esther Suthers, Lake Stevens, first-second:  y 
Casanova Vacations  Miss Catherine Cassanova, Campus  school teacher, is
spending her  vacation in the mountains of  northern California. She is
recovering  satisfactorily from a recent  operation.  Charter May be Nil; 
Graduates Warned  Dr. Winslow S. Anderson, president  of Whitman college,
delivered  the main address at Western Washington's  forty-fifth graduation
ceremonies  held June 9.  He said the historic Atlantic  Charter will be
nothing but rubble  unless Americans speak out for  adherence to the
principles of that  document. Dr. Winslow Anderson,  a veteran of World War
I, stated  that Prime Minister Churchill's  speech late in May practically 
junked the Atlantic charter and  neither President Roosevelt or Secretary 
Hull have spoken out against  that repudiation. He wants the  United^
States to say 'where it  stands* as a nation. "We cannot  compromise with
our conscience.  Are we going to go down in history  as the nation which
twice  ' made the same mistake after, a  world conflict? Or are we going 
down in history-as the nation that  provided the world with an enduring 
peace?"  " The commencement exercises opened  with the traditional campus 
processional. Presentation of the  class was made by President W. W. 
Haggard and diplomas were presented  Dr. W. D. Kirkpatrick, chairman  of
the board of trustees. The  Rev.VW. Carl Calhoun gave the  invocation and
blessing. Music was  provided by the college orchestra  under the able
baton of Don Bushel!,  and the women's chorus directed  by Nils Boson. 
Says 'I Wi•l1l1 /  SMASH the i\\S  BJLACK MAKKET!  WRITE YOUR CAR
LICENSE ON  ALL YOURGAS COUPONS NOW!  The engagement of Miss Mary-ette 
Myette to Lieut, (j.g.) Paul H.  Lyons, USNR. son of Mr. and Mrs.  Paul S.
Lyons, of Little Rock, Arkansas,  has been announced by her  parents, Mr.
and Mrs. • M. J. Ny-strom.  of this city. No date has  been set as
Lieutenant;Lyons is in  the South Pacific. Maryette is a  former WWC
student.  Reception Honors  Visiting Musicians  Following a student recital
last  Tuesday evening, Miss Edith R.  Strange, WWC piano instructor,  held
a reception at the aftermath  clubhouse honoring Mr. and Mrs.  ^Chauncey
Griffith, Miss Marguerite  Hood, and Mrs. Muriel Du-fraine.  Mr. Griffith,
who with his  wife and daughter is occupying the  C. F. Lappenbusch
residence, will  take Miss Strange's work this summer  at her studio and at
the College.  He is head of the music department  at the Francis Parker 
school, Chicago.  Miss Hood, an authority on public  school music from the
University  of Michigan, has been instructing  classes on the campus 
during music week. Mrs. Dufraine,  former assistant in Miss Strange's 
studio, will be music instructor next  year at Annie Wright Seminary in 
Tacoma. Both Mr. Griffith and  Mrs. Dufraine are WWC graduates.  Week From
Work  Faculty Report  Not many faculty members were  willing to "talk" but
• those who  were gave us the low down on their  "duration"
vacations. In . other  words the faculty's "week from  work." (read anyway
you choose).  Dr. Kibbe was seen piling wood  and working in the garden. 
Dr. Kangley—painter and gardener,  busy improving the new property. 
Knapman scientific methods applied  to the victory garden.  Mr. Rice "put
shakes on a shack"  (whatever that means).  Miss Wendling picked
strawberries  north of the border.  Dr. Moyle—man with the hoe—
 Cederstrom was seen routing the  enemy out of the victory garden.  Mr.
Hearsey and family spent several  peaceful (?) days at Sinclair  island.
That is peaceful till the  college gals got there to take over.  8ac  Me
Mat/  EXTRA  BONDS  Klipsun Editor  Now Novelist  "My greatest handicap in
writing  my novels has been grammar,  or should I Say, lack of grammar," 
laughed the tiny collegiate-looking  June Wetherell (Mrs, Daniel T.  Frame)
when asked her advice to  aspiring, writers.  Displaying the informal and
easy  manner which characterizes her novels,  Mrs. Frame told of the early 
' writing experiences which led up to  her present success as a. novelist. 
A prolific penwoman, she wrote a  number of novels in an experimental 
fashion before publishing her  last four in that many years. Our  own
campus provided the exterior  setting for her book on sorority life  "But
That^Was Yesterday." "Shut  the Door Behind You," is the title  of her
latest book, scheduled to be  published by E. P. Dutton. August  8. This,
as well as her preceding  novels, has been written under her  maiden name
of June Wetherell.  Originally from Bellingham, Mrs.  Frame attended WWC
for two  years, editing the Klipsun and  working in various positions on
the  WWCollegian staff, before going  on to the University of Washington' 
to major in English and minor in"  journalism.  During this time she worked
as  secretary to Norman Reilly Raine,  who was then approaching fame  with
his Tugboat Annie series.  Mrs. Frame, while visiting with  her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. W. T:  Wetherell, is auditing two English  classes—one
of them in grammar—  at WWC. Enrolled in the "Campus  school are her
two young sons,  David and Michael. Her husband  is now taking his basic
army training  in Texas.  Workshop Features  Many Activities  With a
program featuring tours,  special luncheons, and organization  meetings,
workshoppers met  this week in the fourth annual  Curriculum Workshop on
this campus.  The Thursday noon meeting  honored Miss Marguerite Hood who 
is conducting conferences this week  as an instructor and consultant in 
music education. At the Tuesday  luncheon, recreational plans for the  term
were announced by the Workshop  recreation committee consisting  of three
staff members and  three participants, Miss Marjory  Muffly, Miss Mira
Booth, Charles  Rice, Mrs. Jessie Plamondon, Ernest  Hemingson, and Alvin
Carr. On  Wednesday, under the direction of  Workshop director Dr. Paul R, 
Grim, workshoppers toured the  Campus Elementary School building.  Workshop
was first organized here  in 1940 as a program of in-service  education for
teachers and administrators.  Participants bring curriculum  or
adminstrative problems  which become the basis for individual  study,
discuss mutual school  problems, and confer with staff  members
representing a variety of  major interests and backgrounds  of experiencei
Members of the  Workshop staff new, to the Campus  this summer;' are Miss
Susan Lacy,  Supervisor of Early . Elementary  Education, office of State
Superintendent  of Public Instruction, Olym-  ' pia; Miss Edith Sifton,
Curriculum  consultant, in Mathematics^ Seattle'  Public Schools; and
Miss*Muffly,  new instructor in physical education.  x • , ' ' " . ,'
 A special workshop on the Junior  Red Cross program will be held July 
10-14; Miss Ruth Henderson, Ed-  Hated Hews  -ram Ho uses  RAGAN RAMBLINGS 
Election of new officers took place  at the first housemeeting of the 
quarter with three old members and  three new housemembers taking  part.
The new officers are Mar-jorie  Moll, president; Shirley Sisson,  social
chairman, and Nell Webber,  house reporter.  Doing their bit for the war
eff  o r t -  Ruth Mclnnes is putting the bottoms  on condensed milk cans
at the  Carnation plant at Mount Vernon.  Still at Niki Illie, but
vacationing  (?) from school, Elerine Shan=  non pounds, sands, and glues
at the  furniture factory.  That "old tar" on the roof at  Ragans is being
replaced by some  new gooey stuff. It's refreshing to  look out the window
and see a  man once more, even if he is a  second story man.  EDENS HALL 
What a time the Edens hall girls  have been having this last year, and 
this last week!  Mrs. Eileen Johnson of Mount  Vernon has quit the floral
business  to attend WWC. In the short time  since her arrival she has
already  discovered a method of opening  coke bottles on her bed!  Mabel
Hartley, who- has been  teaching at Vaughn, Washington,  for the past year,
has returned for  another summer session.  Teaching at an Indian
reservation  on Neah Bay for this last  year has been an interesting
experience  according to Agnes Smith of  Emmet, Idaho. She plans to return 
there next year.  Roommates Mary Ellen Nelson  and Irene McPherson are very
enthusiastic  about their chosen profession.  They have been teaching 
ucation Assistant to the National  Director of the American Junior  Red
Cross, will conduct the program,  assisted by Dr. John U. Mi-chaelis, 
Director of Training at  Fresno State college.  Greetings  For  ANOTHER
SUMMER  Here We Are to Give You  the. Best the Market Affords  HIGHLAND 
CREAMERY  615 HIGH STREET  Postoffice Substation Ph. 182  Pepsi-Cola
Bottling  ::" Co'  of Bellingham  at Palouse and next year plan to-go  to
Clarkston.  Port Angeles is well represented  this summer. Those claiming
it  for their home are Yivian Boyd,  Dorothy Fox, Julia Jewett, and  Mary
Porter.  Maybelle Bodey and Helen Bag-ley  returned to summer school with 
five inches taken off their hips.  That's a record of which to be-proud. 
Will one of them please  stop us and give your editor the  low down on how
it's done?  Ethel Martinson visited foFafew  days with her former roomie,
Mary-bess  Daddow of Everett.  Esther Suthers went horse back-riding  and
quote, "it darn near  killed me." Other girls showing  similar reactions
are Frances Benson  and Zosia Nowogrowski.  Virgie Sorgenfrei celebrated
her  birthday by going salmon fishing.  She caught one, too!!  Nada Jones
and Pearl Palmroth  saw "Life" With Father" at the  Metropolitan theater in
Seattle."  Newly elected officers of Edens  hall are: president, Ruth
Lauber;  vice-president, Alice Marie Anderson;  secretary-treasurer, Julia 
Klann; and social chairman, Lois  Faucher.  Melba Mayhew, former Klipsun 
business manager, has recently  been promoted from the rank of  ensign to
that of lieutenant (j.g.)  in the Waves.  • * * * * * * * * * * * *
muxm  WAR BONDS  X * * * * ' r ' * / * *\ £  BARBER SHOP  NATIONAL 
BEAUTY SHOP  1306 Cornwall Av. Ph. 1165  THEATRES  MT. BAKER 
—NOW—  "ANDY HARDY'S  BLONDE TROUBLE"  Mickey Rooney, -Lewis
Stone  "THREE MEN IN WHITE"  Lionel Barrymore, Van Johnson  AMERICAN 
—NOW—  "FRISCO KID"  James Cagney, Margaret Lindsay  "FOLLOW T
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