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1947_1205



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WWCollegian - 1947 December 5 - Page 1



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|^^gS^S^?Sv^S^^«?®  Gals . . . The chance of a lifetime is
at hand.  Tow that bashful fellow you have been eying all  year to the AWS
tolo tonight in the Crystal Ballroom  of the Hotel Leopold.  Be prepared
for anything that happens tonight  or tomorrow night at the drama
department's fall  production, "Skin of Our Teeth." Be prepared  . . . for
an evening of solid entertainment.  Vol. XLVI — No. 10 Western
Washington College of Education, Bellingham, Washington Friday, December 5,
1947  The answer to an age  old question has f i n a l ly  been answered.
It has at  last been proven statistically  that BLONDE hair always  seems
to be discovered  on fathers shoulder. The  fact is . . more blondes are 
likely to become bald than  brunettes. However, brunettes  are more
susceptible  to falling hair than redheads.  The morale . . . put  a
redhead on your shoulder,  father.  * * *  lt;  But s t a t i s t i c s can
be  wrong . . . for instance . . .  W e d n e s d a y evening a  newspaper
article s t a t ed  that more meat is being  c o n s u m e d n o w t h an 
was two months ago. For  a person EXISTING in a  college operated dormitory
 the only answer to such a  statement is, "Brother, you  can't eat
statistics."  * * *  A WISE MAN traveling  in the HOLY LAND these  days
would be wise to keep  his eyes on the heavens . .  with a prayer on his
lips.  * $ «  . . . but, a Wise man in  B e l l i n g h a m tomorrow 
would be issuing words of  wisdom if he urged every  person he met to VOTE 
"YES" FOR THE SPECIAL  SCHOOL LEVY TOMOR-.  ROW.  * P *  To Victor H.
Hoppe, Mrs.  Marion Ingersoll, and individual  members of "The  Skin of Our
Teeth" we toss  our appreciation bouquet of  the week. We enjoyed your 
production and hope that  the acclamation accorded  your performance by the
 audience in some s m a ll  manner repaid you for  your long weeks of
rehearsals.  * * *  REMEMBER . . . it's  the AWS tolo tonight for  a real
treat . . . o n the gals  that is. REMEMBER . . .  it's George Hankins'
band  in the Crystal ballroom, of  t h e H o t e l Leopold TONIGHT!  * *
«  Many people have advanced  the info that instead  of h a v i n g
Moblo's  pep band fill in for unscheduled  Artist and Lecture  Series why
not have  the Artist and L e c t u re  Series fill in when Moblo's  popular
aggregation is unavailable.  Line forms to  the tight. Students would 
attend these performances  even if you called them assemblies.  .  Dateline
. . .  Friday, December 5 — Attend  the AWS tolo in the  " Hotel
Leopold. Second  " p e r f o r m a n c e ' of the  drama department's
hilarious  production "The  Skin of Our Teeth.!'  Saturday, December 6
— If  you have missed "Skin of  Our Teeth" so far, don't  be guilty
again.  Sunday, December 7 — Attend  the church of your  choice. L i
s t e n to the  Christmas Vespers in the  library.  M o n d a y , December
8—  CLOSED WEEK . . OPEN  BOOK WEEK.  Tuesday, W e d n e s d a y, 
Thursday, Friday—Brother,  we m e a n CLOSED  WEEK!  Anniversary
Committee Voted  Funds For Film Production  By GEORGE DOWD  In its meeting
held Wednesday, December 3, the Board of Control voted  unanimously to
place the sum of $500 at the disposal of the general committee  of the 50th
Anniversary celebration headed by Miss Nora B. Cummins,  faculty member.
Also passed was the resolution stating that the  A.S.B. officially endorsed
the ten-minute technicolor movie which has been  proposed to augment public
rela-  Seal Sale Gets  Under Way  Emphasizing the" fact that the  battle
against tuberculosis is a public  affair, and the only way the public  is
asked to support it is by the  purchase of Christmas seals, Clyde  W.
McDonald, chairman of the seal  sales drive, announced that full  scale
vending procedures are now in  operation.  Envelopes containing 200 seals 
have been dropped in the mail already  and checks have already begun  to
trickle into the Whatcom  County Tuberculosis association in  the Mason
building.  Persons wishing more seals, or  who do not receive them by mail
will  be able to buy them at a downtown  booth soon, McDonald reported. 
Chorus, Orchestra  Present Program  Bellingham's Civic Symphony orchestra, 
under the direction of Dr.  Prank D'Andrea, and the Bellingham  Civic
chorus, directed by Bernard  Regier, will present a Christmas  program
Tuesday, December 9,  at 8:15 p. m. in the high school auditorium.  All
students of WWC and  all faculty members are especially  invited to attend
this program.  There is no admission charge.  Program numbers by the
symphony  orchestra will be:  Egmont Overture ••/ —~~- -
- • —  Two Stokowski orchestral transcriptions  of Bach's "Come
Sweet  Death" and "Adagio"  Nocturne f r o m "A Midsummer  Night's Dream"
Mendelssohn  Hansel and Gretel Suite  Humperdinck  Jesu Bambino Pietro Yon 
Choral selections include:  Hymn to Music Buck  Beautiful Savior
Christiansen  And the Glory of the Lord  from Handel's Messiah  Over
Bethlehem Town Mueller  Thine is the Kingdom  from Gaul's "Holy City" 
Appearing as soloists with the  chorus will be Miss Eileen McMillan  of the
Music department and Mrs.  Keith Murray. The program will  close with carol
singing by chorus  and the audience.  HELP! HELP  Lost strayed or stolen.
Brown  leather zipper brief case with  name Vincent Vance on outside.. 
Valuable personal papers that  CANT BE REPLACED. Papers  badly needed. 
tions in regard to the college.  A motion calling for the formation  of a
committee which will control  all of the student body's recreational  areas
(Sinclair Island, Kul-shan  Cabin and Lakewood) was approved.  This
committee will be empowered  to take any steps which it  deems necessary in
regards to the  maintenance a n d supervision of  these areas.  New Finance
System  Finding that the preparation of a  monthly balance sheet of student
 funds will cost in the neighborhood  of $250 annually, the board appointed
 the committee headed by Jim  Sanford to go ahead with any recommendations 
regarding the institution  of the new finance system it  feels essential. 
Klipsun Investigation  Learning that the Klipsun staff  has a deficit of
$192.30 incurred from  last year's annual, the decision was  made to clear
the amount so the  present staff will not need -to suffer  the cut.
However, an investigation  will be made to determine, if possible,  how the
deficit occurred.  Other business discussed included:  the question of what
to do with the  camera which was purchased for the  use of the Klipsun
staff several  years ago; the subject of the new  pep and song leaders'
emblems  which was referred to the heraldry  committee for its
recommendations;  and a repair bill of $44 from the  mffiSc"department
which was approved.  Sociology Expedition  Heads For Woolley  . Interest in
care for inmates of  statev mental institutions on the part  of sociology
classes has resulted in  planning two trips to the Northern  State hospital
at Sedro-Woolley on  the two following Saturdays by approximately  sixty
students, a n nounced  sociology instructor Donald  P. Irish this week. 
Students, leaving at 9 o'clock tomorrow  morning, expect to spend  about an
hour touring the institution  under the guidance of Superintendent  P. E.
Showlain. The experience  will be repeated by a different,  group of
students on the following  Saturday.  Irish suggested that interested 
students not enrolled in sociology  classes contact him if they wish to  be
included in either of the planned  trips or if they are interested in 
undertaking a similar tour next  quarter.  Brown 6K Company Honored As  %7
Klipsun Is 'First Class'  First Class! That is the rating given the 1947
Klipsun*by the Columbia  Scholastic Press association, sponsored by the
Pulitzer School of Journalism,  Columbia University, New York. 925 points
were scored out of a possible  1,000, in competition with liberal arts
colleges of comparably enrollment  throughout the nation. The National
Scholastic Press, sponsored by the  University of Minnesota, will announce
its decisions in January.  "Clark Brown, your editor, schould  be
congratulated," said the judge.  Other comments were: Good taste 
throughout the book . . . the editorial  staff has turned in an** excellent
 job of reporting and editing . . .  your student photographers are to  be
congratulated . . . printing and  typography excellent.  Bigger and Better 
When asked about plans concerning  this year's Klipsun, Betty Mc-.  Leod,
editor, said "The '48 Yearbook  will be 32 pages longer, and we  hope that
it will be even better than  Mt was last year." The new Klipsun  will be
published in May.  Same Crew Listed  Members of the staff of last year's 
Klipsun, who are working on the '48  edition are Kathleen Golly, Barbara 
Cozza, Betty McLeod, Nancy Merrick,  Bettyjane Christie, Ruth Norman  and
Wayne Craig.  Mt. Baker Beckons  Local Snow Birds  All ski enthusiasts
please take  notice! The first bus trip to Mount  Baker is scheduled for
tomorrow.  The bus will leave at 7:30 a. m. if  enough students have signed
to  make a full load.  Holding its first meeting of the  year, the ski club
began tentative  plans for the year's activities last  Monday. Regular
meetings will be  on the first Monday of each month.  Reports from Mt.
Baker lodge indicate  that snow conditions are. perfect  for this time of
year. Already  this tourist mecca has attracted  hundreds of sporting
enthusiasts  each week-end.  Remember! Bus leaves at 7:30 a.m.  Education
Tax Levy  Needs Support of  Every Single Voter  Voting students and
residents near  the college are again reminded of  the special twenty mill
tax levy to  be voted on tomorrow. Polling for  residents of the fifth ward
will be  at the V. P. W. hall, and for  those residing in the sixth ward, 
the Larrabee school.  Proceeds from the special levy, to  be assessed in
1948, and payable in  1949, will be used to effect needed  repairs on
Bellingham's sixteen public  schools and Battersby field.  An itemized list
showing how the  $407,000 to be realized from the levy  will be spent
includes improvements  in sanitation, audio-visual aid facilities, 
interior decorating, lighting,  and playground equipment.  Some of the
schools, built over  forty years ago, have shown need  for repairs to
steps, roofs and woodwork  within the buildings. It • is  planned to
accomplish these things  if the tax-levy passes.  Battersby field wDl have
the addition  of new light clusters; fence  repairs are planned; and the
light  poles will be moved outside the  fence.  Official Roster  Is
Published  Basketball Western Style, the official  basketball roster of
Western  Washington college, will be distributed  next week to all high
school  and college coaches in the State of  Washington. In order to gain
publicity  for WWC, the roster will also  be mailed to newspapers and radio
 stations throughout the state.  The booklet, containing twelve  pages,
will include the schedule of  alL.this^year's, games,,.the schedule,  and
results of last year's games, a  complete roster, and pictures of the 
coach and players/ A picture of  Pinky Erickson will be featured on  the
cover of the roster.  Because of a limited supply of the  roster due to the
high cost, Basketball  Western Style will not be available  to WWC
students.  Violinist Artist  To Entertain  "His recital was the most
outstanding  violinistic debut this season."  These words were used by the 
New York 



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WWCollegian - 1947 December 5 - Page 2



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Western Washington College of Education, Bet)ingham, Washington
Friday, December 5, 1947  oditobials . . .  News Lists Point  To Exciting
Campus  A remarkable parallel can be drawn (with imagination) between  the
United Press' annual list of. the ten outstanding news  events of the year
and the WWCollegians newly thought of  list of the ten outstanding news
events occuring on the campus  during, fall quarter. Of course the only
parallel existing is the  fact of "continuing news stories/' but at least
no one can deny  the fact that we had "continuing news stories." 
•Naturally the high cost of living was number one on the  U. P. hit
parade. '"This was followed closely by "the cold war"  and "passage of the
Taft-Hartley law and subsequent litigation."  In the number four position
we find "the Hughes-  Meyers investigation" while "Texas City, Texas.,
disaster" was  number five. "Princess Elizabeth's romance" and the
"partition  of India" were followed by the "series of airplane disasters" 
and "Arab-Jewish controversy over Palestine." Securely holding  down the
tenth position was "the world series."  . Now we don't contend that our
little list will create any  worid shaking results but we still feel that
cognizance should be  taken of the various department and groups that have
made  WWC such an active and interesting place to sleep for the past 
quarter. So putting our tongue in our cheek and turning our  back we meekly
submit the fall quarter honor list of the  WWCollegian:  1.; New Era
(political expedient, you know).  2. Homecoming . . . special consideration
to Armstrong  and Lapp.  3. Building expansion and enrollment.  4. Student
convoy to PLC and 'Pep club activities.  5. Music department activities. 
6. Board of Control.  7. Drama department (Skin of Our Teeth).  8.
Basketball season opener (U. of W. vs. Viks).  9. War Memorial plans.  10.
Student Artist and Lecture series.  Annual Christmas Vespers to  Be Sung by
a Cappela Choir  Christmas Vespers will be presented to the students of WWC
 December 7, at 4:00 p. m. in the rotunda of the college library.  The
program consists of 16 selections, and is under the direction  of Bernard
Regier.  This program is the most beautiful and outstanding presentation 
of the a cappella choir and is an annual and important  affair *6f the fall
quarter.  This program will consist of:  Prelude—Carol Collectanea 
Brass Ensemble  Mr. Don C. Walter, Director  -Processional — O Come
All Ye Faithful  Choir—  O Gladsome Light Heckenlively  Only Begotten
Son Gretchaninoff  Mr. Bernard Regier, Director  Vocal Solo—  The
Holy Child Martin  Meredith Hess, Soprano  Marjorie Westerlund, Accompanist
 Girls' Trio—  Christmas Day Is Here French Carol  Joseph and the
Shepherds French Carol  Janet Harris, Doris Dunn, and Bessie James  Miss
Mira Booth, Coach and Accompanist  Choir—  Hodie, Christus Natus Est
Willin  Adoramus Te, Christe Mozart  Vocal Solo—  The Virgin's
Slumber Song Reger  Barbara Stockton, Soprano  Men's Quartet—  O
Come, O Come Immanuel Gregorian—arr. Regier  Sweet Little Jesus Boy
Mac Gimsey  Duane Lewis, Glenn Bergh, Fred DeBruler, and  Roland
Peterson—Robert Peach, Accompanist  Choir—  The Angel and the
Shepherd Old French Noel—arr. Morgan  Soloists Margaret Binzer and
Glenn Bergh  Jesu, Tender Saviour Grieg  Recessional — O Come All Ye
Faithful  Postlude Noels  Brass Ensemble  cyryn  Established 1899  Member 
P socioted Cblle6iate Pi-ess  Published every Friday, except the month of
September by the Associated  Students, Western Washington College of
Education, Bellingham, Washington.  Entered at the Postoffice at
Bellingham. Washington as second class matter  by virtue of the Act of
March 8, 1879  Printed by Cox Brothers, Printers, Bellingham, Waslr.ngton 
Subscription rate, by mail, $1.50 per year, in advance  Advertising .rates
on application  Vol. XLVI —No. 10 Friday, December 5, 1947  THOMAS
JEFFERSON—The American way of disseminating  public information is
one of the country's greatest strengths.  Vern D. Matthews Editor  Gene L.
Curtis. Business Manager  Ed Brown and Bob Dickson Copy Editors 
McLaughlin, Slotemaker, Bush Feature Page  John Peters Sports Editor  Hal
Gronseth Associate Sports Editor (This Issue)  June Penn and Beverly
Hanson... Co-editors Women's Page  Special Writers: Barbara Breazeale, Mike
Smith, Nita Clothier, Bill  Hunt, Len Lillibridge, Jerry Waddell.  Wayne
Craig Staff Photographer  CUB REPORTERS: Mary, Schive, Frank Johnson, Bill
Baker,  Harold Gronseth, George Dowd, Pat McLaughlin, Dorothy  Lockwood,
Mary Ann Call, Marion Nattrass, Ruby Johnson,  Dave Orser, Glen Wolf,
Charlotte Ellis, Fran Cory, Cecelia  Martin, Cecil Thomas, June Hardin. 
Registrar's  Duties By  NativeSon  In the contrast to preceding interviews 
of WWC's new personnel,  Donald A. Ferris, registrar, is almost  wholly a
product of the Evergreen  state.  Born in Yakima, Ferris has received  a B.
A. degree in education,  a Master's, and is well on his way  toward a Ph.
D., all from the University  of Washington. Linfield College  in Oregon,
and Columbia University  made their contributions to  his formal education;
but on the  whole, the man who came to WWC  this, fall to relieve Dr. M. S.
Kuder  of a part of a big load could be  called a true "Native son." 
Ferris began his teaching career  in Kent, Washington, and then  moved on
to Issaquah, teaching social  studies.  The pleasant, quiet spoken
registrar  next went to Mt. Vernon to  teach social studies in junior high 
school, high school, and junior college.  He was guidance director in  Mt.
Vernon high school, night school  director, and for two years served  as
vice-principal of that institution.  Graduates or former students ot  Mt.
Vernon junior college will remember  Ferris as dean of that  school, a
position he held for four  years.  Discussing Western, Ferris
enthusiastically  declared, "The college  has great possibilities for
expansion.  I especially* appreciate the beautiful  campus and the friendly
atmosphere  to be found here."  The Ferris family, residing at  1000 Key
street, Bellingham, consists  of Mr. and Mrs. Ferris and  their three
children.  You Select Musical  Program For The  Publications Prom 
Committee members working on  the Publications prom, to be held  February
28, can't decide what kind  of music they want to hear on that  date, so
they've submitted the following  ballot., You readers can  choose your own
dance music.  Simply mark in the little box on  the following ballot your
choice or  choices, and drop it into the ballot,  box to be found in the
front hall  this afternoon.  Jazz •  Hot •  Sentimental •
 Smooth. •  Slow •  3-4 •  Just Music fj  Dreamy • 
Be-Bop Q  Swing •  Sway •  Others Q  Complete  Cleaning Service
 "Our Experience and  Equipment Is Your  Guarantee of Quality"  Vienna
Cleaners  Inc.  206 East Magnolia Phone 265  Drink Milkshakes  HILLVIEW 
DAIRY  1824 Cornwall Ave.  *  WE SERVE LUNCHES  AND REFRESHMENTS  DOWNTOWN 
HEADQUARTERS  For  WWC Students  Fountain, Food, Drink  HARDWICK'S  Where
Friends Meet and Eat  Letters to the Editor  One of the most outstanding
needs  of WWC from the social viewpoint  is 



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WWCollegian - 1947 December 5 - Page 3



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''Friday; December 5/1947 Western VV^ingion
^^i^§^^^.,.^^^tM^^^:.  £atest House Tleivs  Edens Hall  The gals
returned from Thanksgiving a little tired and full of  turkey . . . Roma
Still caused a small sensation with her engagement  ring . . . The question
of the week has been answered—  1 "Rodger" the small pig in Roma's
room, which is full of pennies,  is going toward a good cause . . . Bev
Rothlisberg kind of missed  connections from Portland to Bellingham last
Sunday . . . Shirley  Stamatis had a well-spent vacation at Timberline,
skiing, she  says! . . . And a warning to all the gals on the second floor-
 Charlotte Ellis walks in her sleep, usually with a ski boot on one  foot,
and a wooden shoe on the other'.'. . The girls are working  on their dates
for the AWS formal . . . Dorothy Dahl seems to  have accomplished
something—A date, that is!  Dodie Waxier and Jean McKelvey spent a
few days in the  infirmary this week. It seems they had quite a lovely time
playing  honeymoon bridge and just resting . . . We hear that some of the 
girls o nthird floor have recently acquired some new Al Jolson 
records—someone else heard them Sunday night, too.  Men's Residence
Hall  Four days of Thanksgiving weren't enough, but we have only  another
two weeks of futile struggling and then we can really  cele— enjoy
ourselves . . . That little beam of sunshine is looking  over my shoulder
again . . . What's this in the wind—another  exchange dinner? Great,
we're all for it . . . Room 306 still hasn't  become used to the stairways
in the hall. Else why the step-ladder?  Or should I have said that? . . .
Election of house officers  next week, and I'm sure that they will keep up
the good work  already done and shown by the present group of officers . .
. Say,  "b'gosh, Hopkins really can blush! . . . Maybe next week I can  put
on a big news splurge—anyway it had better be soon.  Senior Hall 
Dragging suitcases down the dark hall, came twenty-six  -weary travellers,
back to Senior hall from Thanksgiving vacations  . . . Housemother Mrs.
Anderson went on a four-day visit  to Vancouver, B. C, and Phyllis
Armstrong went up Mount Baker  over the week-end . . . At a house meeting
on Tuesday night,  plans were made for the Christmas dinner which will be a
date  affair and probably informal . . . Gloria Boyce, Betty Felton and 
Mimi Anderson, didn't quite make the 10:30 deadline on Sunday  night.
What's your trouble ladies? And as for Gladine Simpson  . . . Oh, Ho!
'••  Joanne Rucker, Jane Clothier and Janet Virtue were among 
t h e fortunate freshman of this house to be allowed out to see  t h e
basketball game Wednesday night . . . This hall's claim to  fame is Nita
Clothier, who has such an important part in the play  "Skin of Our Teeth"
that she has to be there all three nights.  Hospice Inn  •
Thanksgiving holidays rushed by all too quickly for the men  of Hospice
Inn. Everyone reports a fine time . . . Charlie and  Duncan McRae, Jim
Loring, and Bud Hale played host at Friday  Harbor over the week-end to
Park Dyer, Jack Kelly, and Jack  Purdy. The fellows wanly reported "a good
time" on Monday  morning . ; . Ace Francis suffered an unfortunate fall in
the hall  of-the main building Tuesday morning. Result: a tooth through  t
h e lower lip. Ace is at the moment well on the way to recovery,  however. 
Off-Campus Girls  This is your off campus reporter bringing you all the
last  minute news on what those gorgeous gals who make up OFF CAMPUS, 
INC., are doing.  Some of the girls were pretty lonesome this week-end
because  so many of the stronger (?) sex went home for Thanksgiving. Not 
so with one blue eyed blonde I know of. Seattle is a wonderful  place if
you know the right people, isn't it Ruby? . . . Say Irene,  how did you get
that bump on your head? Better tell that young  man not to drive so fast .
. . Two happy girls over the week-end  were Bev Snow and Barbara Ritchie,
whose men came home for  Thanksgiving. Happy Day!  Harborview  Term papers,
term papers, and more term papers! Between  term papers, tests, and
practicing our Christmas caroling the  inmates of Harborview are suffering
from an acute case of lack  of sleep. Barry Stockton, president of the
house will sing a solo  December 7 at the Christmas Vesper service
presented by Bernard  Regier. Meredith Hess will also lend her talent to
this affair.  If curses should be heard coming from this humble home it is 
only because the AWS formal is on the same night as the play.  This is
inconvenient for the actresses as they will look rather  queer appearing at
the dance at 11 p. m. smeared with grease  paint. Only 10 more studying
days till Christmas. Hurray!  Forest Inn  Thanksgiving is now over and we
are concentrating on our  studies. At least we are trying to . . . The big
news is that Patsy  Clark came back with a beautiful diamond on her finger.
Congratulations  are in order . . . If you wonder why Tillie Thiel is  down
in the dumps some days and up in the air others, just ask  the postman . .
. When this news was turned in its seems a certain  person in the house was
on a fruit juice and coffee diet. We  wonder how long it will last. Not for
long, 111 bet, because how  can she resist our housemother's cooking? 
Daniels Hall  The fellows came to chow last Monday night with some new 
holds and tricks acquired from their Thanksgiving day tussle. By  the way,
gals, if you just happen to have your eye on some masculine  material from
Daniel's, just invite him over for food. From  then on (if you're a good
cook) it's a cinch . . . (How "bout that  Mel , you oughta know) To
enlighten you on this little insert  here, Mel Lindbloom done went 'n
popped the question to Roma  Still. Roma said YES! Congratulations, kids. 
Chatter Box  Back to the old grind after the  Thanksgiving vacation. We
hope you  all had a wonderful weekend. Seems  as if Bud Boe's was
wonderful, even  though it was lost. Dan Sayan went  to the
Ballard-Bremerton football  game Turkey day. Joanne Rucker  went home to
Shelton and did nothing,  she claims! Evidently Shelton  is a popular place
because Al Eaton  visited the old home town too. Bev  Snow's man came home
from Pullman  so her weekend was complete.  Wick Roth just slept all
weekend.  Wonder what he did the weekend  before?  WWC was well represented
at the  Shell Saturday night. Couples seen  there were Mariqn Hardin and
Bob  Call, Mr. and Mrs. Hal Partlow,  Sally Park and Bob Gates, and  Louis
Kink and Kenny' Betner.  Even if skiing conditions were poor  at Mt. Baker
Sunday, it was popular  with students of Western. Ed  McCullough, Blair
Lewis, Bob Miles,  Doc Walton, Norma Swan, Ruth  Norman, Delores
Christensen, Phyllis  Armstrong, Madeline House and  Stan Thompson braved
the wind and  rain for a day's skiing. Chuck Lutz's  wrenched ankle was the
only casualty  from here.  Many thanks for the new records  on the juke box
in the lounge. We  really like "So Far" and "Bango,  Bango' Bango" and how
about the  new "7-up" slot machine. It adds  variety to the liquid diet. 
Plaids seem to be quite the thing  this season. If you see a cute little 
boy walking down the hall in a  beautiful gray and white plaid shirt 
that's Vern Whitney. Dolly McAr-  'thur looks very smart in her red  plaid
dress. Gordie Smith has a red  plaid shirt that is really good looking. 
Saddles, loafers and Joyces are  still the favorite in shoe apparel  among
the girls. Clogs are often  heard during the rainy weather also.  Looks as
if the days kinda like  these thick-soled shoes. Al Iraola  seems to favor
loafers because when  he had athletes foot he could slip  off his shoes and
scratch his feet.  Now he says other shoes are okay.  Widge Black wears
shoes because  he's from Sequim and ^ everyone  wears shoes there.  That's
about all for today . . .  Have a good time at the dance tonight!  Pauline
Roser Is  New ACE Prexy  At the first meeting of the year,  the A.C.E.
members elected Pauline  Roser as president. Other officers  were: Jean
McKelvy, vice-president;  Esther Mjoen, secretary; and Mary  Ann Oman,
treasurer.  The purpose of the Association for  Childhood Education is to
acquaint  the students planning to become  teachers with the profession as
a  whole and with WWC's Campus  school. The meetings are to be held  in the
Campus school with each  meeting in a different room so that  all can
become familiar with the  building.  Co-chairman for the discussion  group
are Katherine Niemala and  ZIbona Daverin; for the membership  drive are
Marian Overcotter  and Loren Rankin. Social chairman  is Jean McKelvy and
publications  chairman is Jesse Winters. The next  meeting will be held at
the Campus  school January 22.  119 



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WWCollegian - 1947 December 5 - Page 4



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Western Wishington^Gollege of^Ec^tkw, B ^ ^  59-32, Viks Over
Seattle P.;  Reserves Play Important  Role In Falcon Drubbing  By HAL
GRONSETH  Coach Bill McDonald swept the bench clean as the Blue and  White
rolled over the Seattle Pacific Falcons, 59 to 36, Wednesday  night. After
the first four minutes, the game was never in  doubt.  Ten minutes after
the opening buzzer Western held a comfortable  18 to 6 lead. The half time
score was 30 to 12.  Cleans Bench  During the second half the  whole Vik
squad got their feet  wet. Some of the boys looked  as if they need a
little more  work but on the whole the  squad looked impressive. The 
starting five seemed like a fine  ball club. Garry Starr and  Stan Peterson
started at forwards,  "Moose" Zurline at  center, and "Pinky" Erickson  and
Tom Green a t guards. Jack  Ross is back off the injured  list and will now
be fighting  for a starting berth.  "Moose" Zurline.  Tom Green  Stan
Peterson  Tom Osswald  Bob Cline  "Pink" Erickson...  Jack Ross  Bob
English ...  Dick Boyd  Jack Frazer  Ron Anderson  Dan Rosser  59  Pacific
Lutheran Dedicates Memorial  Gym At University Game Tonight  Pacific
Lutheran College in  Tacoma will dedicate its new  $250,000 Memorial
Gymnasium  tonight at 8 o'clock when the  Lute cagers meet the University 
of Washington Huskies. The  gym will accommodate crowds  of 2,400.  The
gyntnasium is a gift of  the citizens of Tacoma. Cliff  Olson, Pacific
Lutheran athletic  director, served as chairman  for the fund raising
campaign,  and Mr. John S. Baker,  Tacoma, was honorary chairman.  A short
dedicatory program  w i l l precede Friday night's  game. Dr. Raymond B.
Allen,  president of the University of  Washington, will speak. Others  who
will participate include Dr.  H. L. Foss, president of the Pacific 
Lutheran College board of  trustees; Dr. S. C. Eastvold,  PLC president;
and Cliff Olson.  ^haicltt ^Kom lite Bench  . . . by peters  CONGRATS . . .
Number one of t he season—and what a tally,  30-12 at the half with a
final marking of 59 to 36. There were  substitutions galore last Wednesday
night as the Viks overran the  Falcons of Seattle Pacific; every man on the
bench was used.  Well the score is now one up and t he Hilltoppers have
faced two  squads of almost opposite ability. First the fast and deadly
game  that the Huskies played and then the rather slow moving type  of ball
played by the Falcons.  •  Next Tuesday, again, the Hilltoppers are
scheduled to face  Art McLarney's five on the home courts, and another fast
breakaway,  rip-roaring game will be fought out. The Viks ought to  do much
better now that they have some height and some pretty  big men.  *  Jack
Ross was laid up in the last U. of W. game with a bad leg  but he
should"get in the next one. Jack Graham has a bum ankle  and Larry Slovak
is complaining of a knee injury. That's all for  this week.  SPORTS ITEM OF
THE WEEK . . . A water boy who had  never before suited up, but with two
years experience in bucket  toting scored four points last Saturday as the
Modesto, California,  Junior college threw all available manpower into a
30-7 football  triumph over Weber Junior college of Ogden, Utah. Rusty
Rusti-gan  went in without any shoulder pads to t ry for each conversion 
after the four touchdowns. He scored on all of them and also a  safety. 
ATTf!N!«ON BASKETBALLERS . . . From Eastern Washington  comesMe report
that the Viking basketball squad will be  fighting it but with the St.
Martin's quintet in the finals. St.  Martin's is predicted to be t he
cellar dwellers! I don't think we  can get them on a liabel charge but we
can sure get them in the  neck. True—Big Bill has played only two
games so far, but the  way his squad is shaping up he is going to have a
good club this  season. Of course it is still pretty, early in the season
to have  much faith in these early season predictions . . . well make ours 
later.  LEAGUE LOG . . . Pacific Lutheran's new $225,000 gymnasium  will be
dedicated when they play the U. of W. five tonight in  Tacoma. Jerry
McLaughlin, a six-foot, three-inch center, will be  in the key spot. He was
second high collegiate scorer in the nation  last season with 479 points.
Wesley Saxton and Gene Lun-gaard  will be t h e starters at the forward
spots. The only two  men on the starting lineup who a re under six feet are
the two  guards—Willis McLaughlin and Howard Willis.  Last week
Whitworth came but nine points short of doubling  the score that Farragut
college chalked up—38. Then we come  to Eastern Washington squad who
racked up more than a triple  tally on the boys from Levitch—72 to
23.  ROUND »N ABOUT . . . Way down in Medford, Oregon, last  week, PLC
came through again to score over Southern Oregon in  a brisk Thanksgiving
day game. And it was brisk too. There was  some good hard playing with
Oregon leading by two TD's at t he  half. Five thousand fans were there to
see the Lutes stage a  powerful second half comeback to defeat the Red
Raiders 27 to 21.  The.victory was the seventh for the Lutes in nine games,
the  other two tilts ended in ties.  *  ACROSS THE NATION . . . Back in
Philadelphia, the Cadets,  led by their brilliant 172-pound fullback, Elwyn
(Rip) Rowan,  walked all over the Navy to bring down the curtain on their
'47  season with an impressive 21-0 eyelashing. Probably the most 
spectacular play of the game was when the powerful back thrilled  the
101,500 fans with his 92 yard touchdown play.  Hoop Secrets  Expounded  For
Matilda  t By BILL BAKER  Matilda went ' to see Western  Washington play
basketball. She  doesn't remember who they piayed,  in fact she doesn't
remember much.  This column is dedicated to people  like Matilda, those who
do not understand  the intricacies of the cas-aba  sport.  The game is
simple, one team  pitted against another trying to sink~  as many baskets
as possible in. the  opposition's basket, that's all there  is to it. Or is
it? The first thing  Matilda should know is t h a t the  plays are set up
by the guards as  they come down the floor. Signa-s  are sent to the rest
of the quintet  by the use of their hands and the  team immediately falls
into a formation.  Blocking is just as essential in  the maple sport as it
is on the gridiron.  The players are assigned men  to block, as
inconspicuously as possible,  to pave the way for the ball  carrier as he
leaps to glory. But remember,  Matilda, the glory doesn't  all go to the
lad that made the basket.  A basketball player may look as  though he is
running up and down  the floor aimlessly, but he has many  tricks that will
make him above  average if w o r k e d e x p e r t l y.  Watch for some of
these details next  time, Matilda, and maybe you will  remember more about
the game.  Does Jersey Joe  Stand a Chance?  Another attempt will be made
tonight  to wrest the world's heavyweight  championship from Joe Louis  at
Madison Square Garden. The unlucky  man this time is Jersey Joe  Walcott, a
lighter but perhaps taster  man t h an the champ.  Louis is said to be in
tip-top condition  and weighs in at 212, the most  of his entire
championship career.  Jersey Joe pounds the scales at 192,  but is
earmarked as making up for  the weight in his speed in the ring.  The
majority agrees that the only  chance Walcott has to defeat the  champ is
to land one lucky punch.  That chance, shown by the betting  odds, is about
10 to 1.  It has been rumored that the  champ has been slowing up a little 
in his old =age (33) but appears to  be in first-rate condition. Jersey 
Joe, also 33 years old, will undoubtedly  have a very difficult time
rocking  the supports from under Louis's  13 year championship career. It 
must be remembered that although  one good punch would shatter this 
career, that one punch is going to  be the hardest to connect with.  Vik
Lads Rate  With Rangers  St. Martin's Rangers came nearest  to an upset win
in holding Central  Washington college to a 7-0  victory, but the Saints
turned right  around and figured that three of  the' Central Wildcats were
good  enough to rate on their all-opponent  team as announced Tuesday.  .
At the ends Rangers picked Walt  Clayton of Western Washington and  Nagel
of Eastern; tackles—Charles  Schroeder of Linfield and Leo Hake  of
Central; Don Bort of Central  and Bill Currier of Linfield, guards;  and
Mork of Central, center.  In the backfield, the Saints' all-foe  choices
are Bud Thrapp of Eastern,  Vern Tucker of Whitworth,  Jerry Karnofski of
Western and  Frank Spear of Pacific Lutheran.  THE PASTIME  BELLINGHAM'S
MOST SPLENDIDLY  APPOINTED CAFE  JOE PAGLIA  1217 Cornwall  DON CAIRNCROSS 
Phone 982  Worn Letters  Faulty Spacing  Let Us Put Your Typewriter in 
Smooth Operating Condition  Quality Office Supplies  Hartman  Typewriter
Co.  217 E. Holly Phone 19  Since 1888  •  PACIFIC  STEAM  LAUNDRY 
1728 Ellis St. Phone 126  Starr Stars For All-Stars  - v —By •
Wayne Craig  Jerry Starr and Tom Green jump for a toss-up during a high
spot  of the previous game on the WWC maple-court. Although the Viks  threw
up a strong defense the height of the university players had its  effect on
the home team. Final gong of the bell at the end of  fourth quarter
finished the game 69-32.  Needed; Ball Teams Standings  For Next Quarter
Won Lost pet  Intramural basketball league czar, Hospice . A 16 8 .666  Sam
Carver, would like all teams Men's Hall No 16 8 .666  interested in
basketball the next Daniels 16 8 .666  quarter to contact him in the gym L
a D D . s 14 10 .583  this week. This applies to those  teams that are now
in a league as Colleges 13 11 .541  well as the new teams. This should
Men's Hall No. 2.13 11 .541  be done by Wednesday, December Hospice B 13 11
-541  11. The league will open winter A u e y ca t s 13 n .541  Quarter.
Tramps 13 11 .541  Last week's games include: Seho'me 7 17 -292 
MONDAY—A League—A Bombers  28, Unknowns 44. B
League—Winos M a t n es  41, Collegians 24.  TUESDAY—A
League—Hoboes vs.  Teetotallers, postponed; Southend- - ^ . ^-^ I I C
 ers 24, D Horns 21. B League—Dan- UlSpUte \JVet U. ^ .  iels 43,
Comets 29; Lost Ten 33, i l l . /*"\| •  Mathes42. Hockey at Olympics
 This Monday the Teetotallers U n i t e d s t a t e s h o c k e y may not
be  fought g a m e s . The Southenders c o m p e t i n g i n t h e 0 i y m
p i c g a m es  squelched a last minute rally of the ^ y e a r T nPPPPP