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Western Washington Collegian - 1949 November 11 - Page 1



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ikXP.Z  WerieA* WadiiHtfen  COLLEGIAN  *m  iM"  Ypj. XLVII—No.
8 Western Washington College, Bellingham, Washington Friday, Nov. 11, 1949 
These are the present members of the board of control. Representing the
student body, they meet each  Wednesday afternoon at 4 o'clock in room 211
to make important decisions on school government.'Next Tuesday  and
Wednesday, Western students are going to the polls to elect 5 new members
to this board. From left  to right: Miss Marjorie Muffly, Ann Pearson, Cec
Hannan, Barbara Hodges, Zona Daverin, Dr. Alan Ross, Mar-jorie  Peters, Vic
Lund, Bill Morton, Loren Rankin, Bill Jones, and Dr. Keith Murray.  608
Students  In Two Days of Board  Primary Election  Vote Tuesday or Wednesday
;  More than 600 students cast ballots in yesterday's primary  election.
Out of a field of 60 candidates 15 have' been selected  to run in next
Wednesday's finale. Those who will appear on.the  ballot for four quarter
man or woman are: JOEL BARBER, MARY  LOU BORCHARDT, BEN CARY, LOUISE
COLLINS, KEN  FORSETH, BONNIE HAYES, HAROLD KLOES, BOB SAR-VIS  and DAVE
GROGOTT. -  Frosh Start  Registration  November 14  "Freshmen should report
to  counselors next week to work  out their winter quarter schedules," 
said Donald Ferris, registrar.  All freshmen, after figuring out  their
class schedules, are to turn in  the slips provided by the counselors  to
the Registrar's office for approval.  ........  "An effort is being made
not to  close' classes as long as facilities  permit. Instructors aref
going to keep  a waiting list of names after the  pna^tmniri number of
students has  enrolled in the classes. This list will  'be. referred to if
any of the other  students changes his program," Ferris  stressed. 
Broadcast, Annual  j Toilr Planned  « By College Choir  fifc*The
college choir is again look-j  f . Ing; forward- to its annual spring  4|
quarter tour, which this coming  4 year will come during the week of 
•February 27 to March 3. Monday,  f November 14, Bernard Regter, di- 
J rector, wlil" be absent ftom school in  - :»n tffo^-to plan the tour
and make  shi* w 11h the various  of nortnwest Washington in  the choir
will perform.  Thechoir has also been invited to  ^ ^ s i ^ o n a series of
choir programs  \^^0vi^^i^^\'^axs6- called  '^f^^Mi^T^at^ea^' The date 
Ittiis" presentation jof the choir  _ j^nbt been-set, Imt it will be 
^^etime in the hear future.  FROSH ELECT OFFICERS  Freshman class officers
were chos-  lt;  en in an election held Wednesday,  November 9.  The
students chosen to head their  class are: Claude Walker, president;  Lynn
Hunt, vice-president, and  Louise Collins, secretary-treasurer.  Education
Week  Broadcast Today  "Making Democracy Work" is the  theme that will be
pointed out in  the American Education week Broadcast  to be presented by
students of  the Speech department, Thursday,  November 10.  Each day of
Education week, November  6 through 12, has its own  special theme, which
the script, written  by Laurence Brewster, radio and  speech instructor,
brings out. The  purpose of the broadcast is to attempt  to show the
importance of  schools to the democratic way of life.  The program will be
broadcast  over KVOS at 4 p. m.  Murray To Go  On Island Trip  In his
capacity as iz member  of the Historical Advisory committee  of the State
Parks a n d  Recreation commission, Dr.  Keith Murray of the college
faculty  will make ah inspection trip  to the San Juan islands t h is 
weekfehd. He will be accompan-ied  byJ'E. T. Becher,' of Spokane,  who is
chairman of the committee.'  "•.''  Murray and Becher will examine 
the site of the old English military  camp, which figured prominently in 
the history of this section about a  century ago. This action is prelim 
inary to prospective purchase of tile  property by the stated with the view
 of making it a state park.  New Psych Gourse  Career Planning  Open to
Freshmen  For those freshmen who* entered  the college this fall without a
definite  vocation aim, a plan for studying  abilities and aptitudes as
well as  occupational opportunity is open to  a limited number through a
course  in the Pyschology department called  Career Planning.  By study,
discussion, field trips,  aptitude tests, and personal conferences  each
stuaent will work toward  the development of his own plan.  M. S. Kuder,
director of student  personnel services, will direct the  course.  - For
this first year the oppprtunity  is limited to thirty students and is  open
only to selected freshmen who  can demonstrate a need for the  course. A
few more places are still  available.  Rotary, Kiwanis  Lions Clubs  Lunch
at Edens  This being American- Education  week- luncheons were held  in
Edens hall for .the Rotary  Kiwanis and Lions clubs of Bellingham  followed
by toursjpf the  campus for the members.  The first of the luncheons was 
for the Rotary club, Monday, at  which Dr. Haggard spoke and  i n t r o d u
c e d Burton Kingsr  bury, new trustee who is replacing  Vern Branigin who
died last  summer. Hazel Dudley and Le-iRoy  Wissinger, Rotary c l ub 
scholarship winners were a l so  presented to the group.  ENTERTAINMENT 
The Kiwanis luncheon was held  Tuesday with, entertainment in the  form of
songs by Herbert Ambros-ius,  of Bellingham, accompanied by  Zona Daverin,
pianist, after which  Dr. Haggard conducted a tour of  the campus and
inspection of the  new buildings.  The Kiwanis club scholarship  winners,
Beverly Dustin and Lynn  Hunt, were also present at the Edens  hall
luncheon.  The Lions club members were entertained  Thursday with a similar
 program. -  The Vocolleglans entertained at  all luncheons and Valkyries
acted  as usherettes on each occasion.  PROFILE GOES ON SALE  This year's
edition of the Profile,  valuable student directory, came off  the press
late Tuesday and selling  began yesterday.-The profile will be  on sale in
the halls today at 25 cents.  For the four quarter woman  the candidates
are: NORMA  BARR, GAIL DILLON atfd  JUNE CARRICK. For on*  quarter man or
woman,. JOHN  HILL, JO SENSENBRENNE ,  and GEORGE YONLICK were  chosen to
appear on the. |jnal  ballot. •-.-'• -J--^'/i: '\  Don Sayan,
and Jim Sjiopk  were the powerhouses of piipHc-ity  who kept election
spirrtlalive  during the primary. They were  actively assisted on the P. A.
 system by Bud Minahari, Bbb  Silverman, Harry Pagels,: and  Dick McClufe.
'.'.."._1-.,L.'  Popular Band Music;  To be Feature of  Election Assembly 
A special election assembly will  be held next Wednesday;^November  16, at
10 a. rri, iri the  auditorium. Gordie Ford's orchestra,  formerly of the
Belling^  ham hotel, will provide musical  entertainment. The band;
features  Hoot Vetter, vocalist; Lynn  Beeler, sax; and Larry iPrague, 
trumpet. Also on call will be the  Dandruff Sisters. ;•;r  -
Following the assembly the girls  of the Valkyrie club will vote in a 
group. To stimulate student interest  in the election, the first 100 women 
to vote each day will receive corsage*  „ V.'"H ,.--•  Don
Sayan, election publicityman  urges everyone to. attend the. as^eni-bly. 
He promises several special  stunts: . . :-";':"  Students Namedllto
Committed  G^'^SB^.'Pr^id^^- iBiltM^*^  Giving mahy students ah.
opportunity to participate  in their student government, ASB president Bill
 Jones has appointed the members to serve on Various  committees. .:  The
election committee is headed by Loren Rankin,  with Robert Bowman,
Stephanie Brooks, Vic Lund,  Don Sayan; and Ralph Bennett, Working with
him.  June Carrick and Jack Headley are co-chairmen of the  properties
committee. Zona Daverine, Hector Gawley,  Carolyn Knittle, and Ray Nette
are the other members.  . Alice Robbins and Marvin West are combining their
 efforts as social chairmen..A,new contest committee  has been created to
exercise .supervision over all student  contests. Paul Gillie and Curtis
Safstea head  that committee, with Bernice Bulen,1Basel Dudley,  Anne Nord,
and Delores TunibuU working on it also.  The,student facilities committee
andc^op^b^«|«l;;  have been combined, under" -Bob;',ftMr*ia
gt;and,-J^|eitt;.:;  Neuman; Cecil Hannan, Bob Kinr^ Chiurlee Pomeroy, 
Mary Frederico, Marjorie Hedlimd, Gkorge B^os,  and Britt Sealander are;
serving on that; grOup^^r^;  ... Pauline B^Bsetv chairman^  ton comprise
the awards comihittee. _. -'^^a^f^.  and pep is being handled by a
committee son^^in^  of Cecil Hannan and Phyliss Annstrong^ co-c)mliprn, 
Artis Larson, NeU Johiu^n, Harry Pagel*# Claude  WaUcer, Louise CbUins, Jo
Aime Leighton, Ken f'or-  •eth, Dale Pferaon, and Jack *?m : 7  vT
These committees ;.ai«•;') ;'.^^^  per»ohs may be added to
them. ' \



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Western Washington Collegian - 1949 November 11 - Page 2



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aiacc U * -L.'-'-' .-••;.;  - ; ' ' ; ' " . Member 
ftssotiried Gbfedicte Press  Entered a* second-class matter at the post
office at Bellingham by virtue of the act  of March 8, 1879.  Printed, by
Cox Brothers   Williams, Inc., Bellingham, Washington.  Subscription rate,
by mail, $4.00 per year, in advance  Represented for National Advertising
by  NATIONAL ADVERTISING SERVICE, Inc.  College Publishers Representative 
430 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y., Chicago, Boston, Los Angeles, San
Francisco  Editor. . ......... Cecil Thomas  Badness Manager. «.A1
Magnuson  Copy Editor. - - ~ ..^...iBurt Horman  News Editor. :.„
...'. .Paul Gillie  Editorial Assistant - ~ v...JLex Milton  Sports
Co-Editors. _ Ken Forse^h, Keith Stearns  Feature Editors. Gary Brandner,
Bod Cardwell  Society Editor...... ,., Barbara Cozxa  News Staff: Shirley
Dickinson. Morrie Knutzen, Paul' Gillie, Bill Stiles,  Frank Ward, Mary Lou
Thomas, Shriley McMicken.  Feature Staff: Bernard May, Mary Jane Zuanich. '
 ' Sports Staff: Jean Baylor, John Keilty, Shirley Sharpe.  Society Staff:
Pat Somers, Kathleen Golly  New Chairs,Don'tMarkThem  For many years WWC
has been suffering along with chairs and  other equipment which dates
farther into antiquity than most of our  instructors. Last year it was
decided that something must be done  about the squeaky, marked up, and
battered furniture. Something  was done, in the form of 500 new tablet-arm
chairs.  This new furniture has seen 10 months of active service, and 
judging by the look of most of it, the service has been very active. So 
active, in fact, that it won't be long until we're using squeaky, marked 
up, and bartered chairs.  Student body president, Bill Jones, put it this
way, "Why aren't  college students mature enough to refrain from carving
their initials  on our good looking furniture?" We give up, Bill. We don't
know. But  we are sure of one thing; anyone who has been around Western
long  enough to remember the old worm woodwork, appreciates the new  wry
greatly.—L. M.  '7 lt;6*tr 306 gt; Vied'  - By WALT BAKER  ARMISTICE
DAY—1949—Just another day to most of us,  another school
holiday, but it is also the day that America will  honor its dead heroes of
two world wars.  Each gold star on the service flag in the main hall
represents  a former student of Western who lost his life during the
terrible  days of World War II. So it is to those men that.we dedicate this
 ^little memento of words from an appreciative and grateful student  body. 
- There you lie, dead heroes, like mystics with lips tightly, brooding; on 
what cannot be uttered. And it sees so natural for your eyes to be  closed;
to see more inwardly, as it were, in contemplation. Your souls are  away
and off into the world of immortality and things unchanging-—a  world
of understanding; understanding not alone of the intellect, but also  of
the spirit.  :How little you were understood here, my friends. Men called
you  introverts and misanthropes because-they did not appreciate you. You 
drew into yourselves at gatherings of the masses. At banquets and public 
assemblies men talked of honor, of pride, of power, and material gain. 
Things you cared so little about. Yours was a hunger for truth,
appreciation  of beauty, and an inspiration toward an ideal.  l i en said
you were brilliant, keen, and bright scholars. To us you  were something
finer—just simple men. Brilliance only makes more clear  the futility
and triviality of the things of man; simplicity gives one an  insight into
the wonder and beauty of the eternal things of God.  Your bodies were
lowered into various graves, You,*who were always  with the minority, have
gone over to the majority at last. You have solved  the mystery of life
after death.  Little you care how large the monument marking your resting
place  may be. Ostentation was never in your make-up. Even in death you
would  be. magnanimous, as we well know, remembering as we do, your saying 
that you should like to be buried at the foot of some noble tree; where the
 roots could get more life from your ..dead body; where the wild flowers 
would grow on your grave, and in their Idle and gossipy moments would  teU
each other—"Beneath us lies one who loved us; we will share our 
loveliness with others like him who loved us in memory of him."  • v
: ' - : " " ' - - . ' - " - ; t - - , ' - " "-"-'''• * * *  gt; "'
-".'•; • •  Students who were killed or died in service
during World War I:  Louie Gtoman, Bellingham, died at Jefferson Barracks,
Misouri; Edward  4L Altaian, Bellingham, died on board ship and was buried
at Brest,  France;. Herman Uddenberg, Gig Harbor, killed by accident in the
artillery  service; Albert M. Emery, Snoqualmie, killed in California in
the aviation  World War^ n killed or missing: Raymond Barnes,  /CVnia
Caim?beU, Gage Chetwood, Joe Dwelley. Eugene Garst gt; Pete Gudyka, 
Freete^ Bar  eMJsliusin, James Jnnkin, Lawrence Klein, Carl I^be, Everett
IiOomis,  WJIttam JfeNeiL Richard Mock, Edward Mu^ Harold Nelson, Robert  N
^ n , John Nix, Chet Orloff, Michael Piiiuto, John Schuberg, Edgar 
Oiltifa, Veroon 8mith, Charles Starkovitch, • Jeff Teareau, Donald
Tyler,  Artbjv TooUinwn, Mat Wheeler, Howard Wright^ R^  By GARY BRANDNER 
(Reprinted by request)  A bunch of the boys were whooping  it up in the
lounge one afternoon.  And in the comer the old juke box  was hitting a
jag-time tune.  Drinking a cup of that jet black stuff  was Dangerous Dan
McGoo; x  And watching him drink was his  light-o'-love, the sophomore
known  as Sue. . '  When out of the hall which was  hung thick with smoke,
and into  the din and glare,  There stumbled a senior with unshaven 
cheeks, in his eyes, a baleful  stare,  He looked like a man who just 
flunked an exam, with scarcely  the strength of a louse.  Yet he pulled a
ten dollar bill from  his poke and he set coffee up for  the house.  Here
was a man who had crammed  for exams, last night and - this  morning as
well.  But he flunked* all three, and he  looked to me like a man who had 
lived in hell.  His eyes went rubbering around the  room, and fiery with
hate they  grew  When he spotted the man who had  stolen his pony,
Dangerous Dan  McGoo.  And "Boys," says he, "now listen  to me, and I'll
bet my roll it's  true,  That one of* you is a hound of hell  . . . and
that one is Dan McGoo."  The lights went out mid din and  shout, and when
they shone anew  There on his side with his throat  slashed wide lay
Dangerous Dan  McGoo.  And back in the corner the juke  played on, though
were added a  few new squeaks;  For it fell in the strife and was  crushing
the life from the senior  with unshaven cheeks.  And sipping a cup of that
jet black  stuff, as if she had nothing to  hide,  Was the woman for whom
Dan had  stolen the pony, the woman for  whom Dan had died.  She laughed as
she lit up a long  cigarette, the smoke tinged the  air a dull blue,  For
she knew there were others  who gladly would steal . . . for.  the
sophomore known as Sue.  Letter to the Editor  There are two problems that
constantly  face the student body of  WWC. These problems are, the  chronic
financial trouble of the  Board of Control, and the parking  situation
which keeps motorists forever  zooming around the blacktop  area looking in
vain for a place to  settle down.  With one simple act this situation 
could be completely alleviated. Hence  my proposal is that the Board of 
Control look seriously into the following  suggestion, and then act 
accordingly.  My proposal is so simple that I  cant imagine it has never
been  thought of before by some fertile  mind; It is nothing less than the 
installation of two-hour parking  meters in the blacktop area.  My reason
can;be advanced to:  By ROD CARDWELL  Borne by a uniformed color guard, 
the American flag passed by as the  long Armistice day parade continued  to
.move down the avenue. Beside us,  a middle-aged gentleman replaced  his
hat and remarked, "I wish my  brother could see this." , -  The jostling
crowd forced us to a  rear position and our 



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Western Washington Collegian - 1949 November 11 - Page 3



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i  By PAUL GILLIE  T^ILORE OF USERS TO KEEP  UDENT LOUNGE CLEAN 
HIKE INi COFFEE PRICE  ^Conditions in the student lounge  ^riave-w ched the
point where the  •-'.Board of Control has been forced,  action. Upon
recommendation  p^JUpuis Earle, Co-op manager, they  * vgted yesterday to
authorize Mr.  Barie to raise the price of coffee to  tefPcehts. The higher
price will pre-  ^'StPuntil such time as users of the  Si ^i-  ^lounge
acknowledge their responsibilities  in maintaining its cleanli-  ..ness, ,.
 . It; was reported at the board meet-  - lt;ing^ that there isconsiderable
interest'  iii the resumption of Sunday  November 11, 1949 Western
Washington Coueege, Bellfngham, Washington Page 3  ^movies, which proved to
be a suc-cessful  venture during spring guar-ter.  The matter was referred
to the  ^Student Facilities committee for further  action,  n Results of
the student primaries  were read and entered in the min-  "*lites; Cecil
Hannan reported the results  of the freshmen elections.  ^The success of
this year's first  4and only after-football game mixer  wafe reported.
Action will be taken  ^to recommend that these be planned  for next year. 
^Iioren Rankin reported on plans  /OT next Tuesday's election assembly.  *
Zsz iv. --;-:..•.•••  .Keep Church, State 
Separate-Haggard  ^ Dr. Wr W. Haggard, Western  Washington college
president, told   lt;* large group'of Bellingham American  Legionnaires in
a speech last  ^Monday evening "We must keep  .church and state separate."
Dr.  Haggard presented numerous examples  of where religion was taught  in
public schools only to have court  "action stamp it out, sooner or later. 
Dr. Haggard pointed out constitutional  gtwrantees of religious freedom 
and separation of church and  state" and cited cases of supreme  ^ I r u l
l n g s .  Valkyries Invade  ensburg, Have  Shut on Them  Potential
Novelists Enlightened  By Bruce Marshall, Novelist,  During Last Week's
Assembly  By MORRIE KNTJTZEN  Bruce Marshal, amiable novelist from the land
of the thistle, delighted  an audience of WWC students last Friday with his
enlightening discourse  on how to .write a novel. Of Very special interest
to budding young Journalists  in the assemblage was his curt dismissal of
their potentialities as  novelists. "  In a brief interview after his
lecture the lovable Scot leaned slightly  on his cane and repeated what he
had said before. "Writers of news are  too close to the event. They write* 
too much, too often and have little  Abziovs to leave for their invasion 
•f.EUensbnrg. twenty Valkyrie girls  left BelKifcham at 7:20 Saturday
 ^Borntog, November, 5. The ..group  |lwal~chaperoned by Miss Anna Ullin, 
|W•jae language department.  ^ The trip was comparatively uneventful 
except upon their arrival at  4be football field. AIL of the girls  were
wearing their Valkyrie uniforms  and were marching in with  the,band. As
they reached the gate,  me .ticket-takers slammed the door  Jn their faces.
Evidently there was  some misunderstanding, because the  «nensburg
officials thought that the  group.was "pulling a fast one."  ^ 4f.t^- much
protest by Don Walter,  baj^djrector, the girls were admit-  '\ediJo the
game. They participated  Ja. pre-game ceremonies and accom-  ^anie4 tiie
band on a triumphant  fna^ch through town after the.foot-i  would like to
thank Dick  v^a^oni,mho was a very under- j  time for reflection." The
implication  was clear. Reporters, like housewives  and bookkeepers, should
snuff  ther secret yen t write the great  American novel.  When asked what
he meant by  saying that journalism is not literature,  Marshall's blue
eyes narrowed  a little. His sensitive face took on a  reflective mood as
though he were  thinking of the years of thoughtful  consideration that had
gone into  his books. He began to explain, in  words* that at once seemed
more  understandable, about the role of  a novelist and a journalist. 
BEYOND SUPERFICIALTY  The novelist, according to Mr.  Marshall, sees beyond
the superficiality  of an event. He takes time  to reflect on its
significance so that  he can report it in due time in its  proper
perspective. It takes years,  sometimes, to record accurately and  fairly
an event which the press had  long ago bandied about and forgotten.  At
least one reporter who listened  to this distinguished literary figure  has
taken time to reflect on what  he said. For three thoughtful days  his
words have occupied a top priority  position in this newsmonger's  brain.
What at first was taken to  be a slam at journalism, is now recognized  as
sage advice. Marshal was  right; the. way to become a successful  novelist
is not through journalism.  . - • •'.•..  Monologue Given
 By .Hoppe at  Thespian Meeting  During the meeting of the Thespian  club
Tuesday, November 8,  Victor Hoppe presented a monologue,  "Illustrating:
the Difference Between  Literature of Inspiration and Literature  of
Information."  Three amendments were presented  to be voted on at the next
meeting,  November^23. They are: (1) In case  of a financial emergency the
debt  is to be distributed among'the members;  (2) elected officers are to
be  in office for a year instead of a  quarter; (3) amendments must be 
written up and handed in before the  meeting; that is they are not to  come
from the floor.  Also to be voted on during' the'  next meeting are the
officers for  next quarter. Nominations are for  president; Bob Scott and
Lex Milton,  vice-president; Fat Dickey and Jim  McHeffey, secreary; Nona
Cochran  and Maureen Beach, treasurer; Dale  Pierson and Don Pearsall.  The
meeting was held in room 120  instead of the lounge due to the fact  that
Bill Morton, club member, who  was to open the lounge, was becoming  a
father.  500 GRADUATES AND ALUMNI  HEAR PROF'S DINNER SPEECH  Dr. Keith
Murray, social science  instructor at Western and an alumnus  of Whitworth
college, was the  featured speaker in that institution's  Homecoming
banquet held* last  Friday night in Spokane.  The dinner was held in the
Davenport  hotel and was attended by  over 500 students and graduates.
•*"  With the exception of the football  game, which they lost to
College of  Puget Sound, the celebration was an  outstanding success,
according to  Murray.  IndigestionDeclines  wGirlsLeajrii  Fine Art of
Cooking  Food preparation 251 is now open  to all girls, regardless of home
economics  prerequisites, announced Miss  Linda Countryman this week. The 
three hour lab course, which Includes  planning, buying for, cooking  and
serving all types .of meals, is  being offered winter quarter. The  class
makes these meals their lunch  on the days they meet.  Girls -who are home
economics  majors are required to take foods  course 151 first, bu^ anyone
else with  some cooking experience can elect  the class. Miss Countryman
also  emphasized that a cooking class is  being offered for boys next
spring  quarter.  Blanket Insurance Offered to All  Students, Reports
Kermit Bengtson  Ski insurance provided by United  Pacific Insurance
company is being  made available by group subscription  on a blanket basis
to all students  of WWC who ski,_ reported  Kermit Bengtson, Shussken Ski
club  adviser, Tuesday, November 8.  The cost of the plan is $3.50 per 
person for the whole season, which  runs through July 1, 1950. If more 
than 100 sign up and pay for their  policies, it may be possible there will
 be a refund of $1.50, bringing the  cost down to $2.00. Persons interested
 in this grpup insurance are  asked to go to the ski shop opposite  the
Co-op to sign up;  A brief outline of, the benefits is  as follows: V 
Every, injury -sustained while skiing  as an individual or as a member  of
the ski club (the company does  not pay for accidents occuring while 
traveling to and from-the place of  I activity). : '  Death and
dismemberment benefits—  payable in addition to medical  expense for
the same injury.  Hospital Rodm and Board—limit  $8.50 per day up to
maximum of  $255.00 for any one injury.  Other Hospital Services-Minis
provides  for ambulance, operating room,  etc., not to exceed $42.50 for
one  injury. .  Special Nurse—rpays for fee of registered  nurse. 
X-ray—pays according to policy  schedule.  Dislocations and
Fractures.  Other Operations. -' gt;?-  gt;*: ,;: gt;"  Dental Injuries. * 
Minor Injuries.  The maximum payable for all  medical and - hospital
expense (except  death and dismemberment  benefits) for one injury is
$500.00.  All students, whether or not members  of Shussken, but who ski,
are  urged to take out this insurance. ~  Walter White, Author Educator, 
Speaks at College Nov. 18  Walter White, executive secretary of the
National Association  for the Advancement of Colored People, comes to the
college campus,  November 1 , to speak at the Friday morning assembly. ' 
Fair-skinned, blonde and blue-eyed, White has devoted his life  to the
fight for human, and particularly for Negro, rights. His  accomplishments
as an author, sociologist, and educator, together  *with his life work,
have earned  him respect both in America and  abroad.  White's
accomplishments have'  made him an outstanding spokesman'for  his people.
He has worked  unceasingly to convince Congress  and the American people
that  Negro Americans must be granted  the first-class citizenship
guaranteed  them by the constitution^  OFFICIAL OF NAACP / '.  As an
official of the NAAOP,  White has made personal investigations  of 41
lynchings and 8 race  riots. His tireless, efforts to secure;  enactment of
federal antl-lynch v  legislation . have won him the  Spingarn medal in
1937 as well as  honorary degrees from Howard and  Atlanta universities.
^*-  In 1948 White served at the Paris  meeting of the U N Cfeaeral:|ii^t 
sembly as a consultant to the tf^f;;  delegation and as representative of 
national organisations. '. ::•''.;:•:;  During the summer of
1949 Ma s  made a round-the-world trip with  Town Meeting of the Air. '
7?-S.  In addition to producing several •  books, among them "A Man
Called  White." and "Fire In the Flint,'*  White has contributed articles
to :  numerous magazines and newspap- I  ers throughout the country..  11
— Armistice  Dateline ..  Friday, November  day.  Saturday, November
12 —.Football  game, WWC vs. CPS at Tacoma.  Monday, November
14—Klip s un  meeting, 4:00 p. m.  Tuesday, November 15 —
Cornelia  Stabler, assembly.  Wednesday, November 16 — Student 
general election.  Thursday, November 17—Basketball  game, Seattle
Pacific here.  Friday, November 18—AWS dance.  Faculty Travel  Off
Campus  . Dr. R.  lt;F. Hawk, of the Campus  school, was to Olympia Monday
and  Tuesday, November 7 and 8, attending  a meeting of the Teacher
Education  committee, State Department  of Public Instruction.',-...  Miss
Vivian Johnson, Miss Ruby  Mclnnes, and Mrs. Bearnice Skeen  were in
Burnaby, B. C, s c h o o ls  Thursday, November 10. This visit  was in
repayment of visits from the  Canadian city's school officials. 
BruceiCheeyerv of the WWC Social  Science department attended a  meeting of
the Whatcom-Skagit  American Banking association. ";'- "  Klipsun Members 
Plan to Attend  Ellensburg Meet ;  Approximately 14 members of the  Klipsun
staff hope to attend  the Northwest Inter-Collegiate Press  conference at
Central Washington  college, inensbur^, December 2 and  '%• Five^r.ti
gt;e students will be sent  as officiaT representative^  yearbook, w^th
expenses paid, while  the others will go in an unofhcW  capacity, sharing
the c c ^ . ^ e y plan  to ^go^iprh^tej 'cm^^^^J^-i^¥^   V •
Joyce:? titugatt^  porteoT^thafc5t^  completed and sent to L ^  graving
company  .fh^v:erthiaai^  "• During class Mo^da^  membere tought the
^



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Western Washington Collegian - 1949 November 11 - Page 4



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iter  Blue-White vs Falcons  In Pre-Season Game  .Basketball season
will open next Thursday, November 17; at  Western Washington college when
the Viking basketball squad  takes the floor against the Seattle Pacific
college Falcons in the  Western gym at 8:00 p. m. in a pre-season
non-conference cn-  ~ ; —• *gagement.  Hilltoppers Leading 
Intramural League  Several close games have marked  this week's intramural
play. The  Comets squeezed out a 26 to 25 win  over the Schmoos and the
Tramps  eked out a 35 to 34 win over the  Hoboes. The first place Loggers
lost  a game to the Has Beens by virtue  of a forfeit. League standings up
to  and including Wednesdays play are  'as follows:  "A" LEAGUE  Loggers 5 
this week's vY  Alley Cats 3  Winds 3  Has Beens 3  Daniels 2  Pet.  .833 
2 .600  2 .600  3 .500  4 .333  "B" LEAGUE  Schmoos  Hospice  Torpedoes
.......  Hoboes .......:...  Comets  Tramps  Stubbies  5  .4  ......~3 
........4  3  .......2  ,1  .714  .666  1600  .571  .428  .285  .200  1.000
 .666  .666  .500  .333  .166  .166  "C" LEAGUE  Hilltoppers 6  White Mice
.4  Hawnyaks .4  Columbians ...3  G-Chasers .2  Flunkies 1  Dirty Jerks ..:
JL  EASTERN TO ENTER RACE  Eastern's Sitzmark ski club is  planning to
enter racers in all Pacific  Northwest Ski association ski  meets'this
year. The ski club will  enter racers in the three divisions  of the
downhill and slalom events.  Nothing Down  5 Months to Pay  MEN'S SUITS, 
SUCKS, ETC.  d  1308 Commercial Phone 361  Starters for Coach Bill
McDonald's  Viking squad will be picked  from among the following men: at 
center, Dick Ravenhorst or Bob  Woodman, forward slots will be held  by Ray
Scott, Hal Norgaard, Jeff  Russell, Gayle Whitsell, or John  Crooks, and at
the guard spots, Tom  Green, Stan Peterson, Chad Johnson,  Norm Bamer,
Lauren Rainey,  or Dick Patterson.  Probable starters for the Falcons  will
be members of the squad who  BAND TO PLAY  Western's Viking band will be 
on deck for Thursday night's  basketball opener. The band, as  in past
years, will play for most  of the home basketball games.  dropped two games
to Western last  season. Magee and Howell will be  at forward positions,
Gordon Cochran,  center, and McCallum and  Donar at guards. Other members
of  last season's squad expected to be  on the traveling list are Michelson
 and Root. Magee was the Falcon's  high .point man in the first game  which
SPC lost 74-60. Mickelson was  high point man for the Seattle  group in the
second game which  Western won 68-39.  Officials for the game will be 
Earle Jewell and Hank Chamberlin.  Eat at  THE VIKING  Lee Stout, Western
senior playing  his last game in a Blue and White  uniform this Saturday,
has been an  important cog in the defensive machinery  this season. Stout
did ah excellent  job of holding Satterlee  scoreless last' week at
Central.  Women Leave  For Corvallis  Whoops . . . they're off. .The girls 
hockey team, that is. Yes, tomorrow  is the day when 15 Western femmes 
will join the UBC team at 8 o'clock  in the morning for the trip to
Corvallis.  Transportation #will be supplied  by Western's own band-wagon. 
Games will get underway when the  local gals play BJC frettin' eleven,  at
9 a. m. Saturday morning and  the the CWCE crew at 3:30 p. m.,  Saturday
afternoon/  The next game scheduled for  WWC is 8 a. m., Sunday morning 
against Portland. During their visit,  the girls will stay at sorority
houses.  There are also many social activities  planned. Among these are a 
banquet, a, hockey movie, and a  square dance mixer. Have fun, girls.  WRA
is organizing a regular  bowling league; all who are interested,  are urged
to turn out  for practice. Due to Armistice day  this Friday, there will be
no practice;  however, practices will continue,  after this week-end at 4 
o'clock every Friday afternoon.  / -  EVERYTHING IN  MEN'S FURNISHINGS 
Holly's Men's  Shop  106 W. Holly  Students Meet and Eat at  MASTIN'S DRIVE
IN  South of Bellingham on Samish Highway  We Point With Pride  . ' •
* • . "  A beautiful campus and a football team that wins—no 
wonder Bellingham is beginning to notice Western Washington!  ' '  Not
quite as spectacular but even more necessary is good  scholarship, and
DARIGOLD PASTEURIZED MILK helps you  keep right up there at the top.  at
your dealer's  Whatcom County Dairymen's Assn.  . Phone 314  Good
afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. It's a beautiful day. fpr^|oot-ball  here
in Ellensburg. And here come the Vikings onto the playing-field.(  They're
wearing white, trunks with blue robes. Cental is already-warming  up, the
lavender trunks they wear contrasting with their purple robes.  The referee
is calling the contestants to the center of the arenas—A "hush  falls
over the crowd as he gives them directions, his voice tense withw  emotion,
"Fight fair and square. No hitting below the belt. Watch the  crowd. When
they turn thumbs down, kicking and biting is acceptable.''  FOOTBALL OR 
"Red" Robertson, former Collegian writer, wasn't quite sure just what 
vernacular he should have used last Saturday at Central. There is 6nly  one
thing for sure, at the conclusion of the fifteenth round, or final gun,* 
or whatever it was, the Viks were victorious, 20 to 8. From the looks of , 
the squad it was a partisan crowd whb spent most of their timeturning 
thumbs down on the gladiators from Bellingham. Red was the announcer  for
KVOS who gave the blow-by-blow description and final knockout:  George
Yonlick, Roy Richardson, "Slats" Salsgiver, Al Weber, Howard  Brevick, Hal
Partlow, and the rest of the boys should start a '^We^Aviowr''  blood for
Central" club. v " ^ ...  TOUGH ONE NOW! ' : - v^r gt;  Tom Taylor came*up
with the philosophical observation of f the  week . . . "Well," he said,
"the practice games are over and now. we have  the real game." He was, of
course, referring to the CPS engagement next  Saturday. Coach Lappenbusch
has the hottest team in the conference, but fc  the Loggers are-going to be
tough. They have two reasons for wanting to  whip the Viks. One is because
the boys knocked them from, undisputed  gt;  first place last year by
defeating them, and, secondly, a win for them  will give them a tie with
Eastern for first place.  However, in the same vein, the Vikings are
determined to win, for if  they do, they are assured of sceond place, and
if St. Martins can upset  the powerhouse from Eastern they will have, the
championship. Qu|£e a«  lot riding on the next week-end. ,,.- 
Day after day at the. University  Store in Athens, Georgia,  as in college
shops throughout  the country^ you,can  always find University of  Georgia
students and ice-cold  Coca-Cola. For with students"  everywhere, frosty *
ice-cold  Coca-Cola is the favorite  drink—Coke belongs.  gt;  Ask
jor it either way. .^boths^m:  trade-Marks meaft^tke ^^!fMttg.l,  lOTTtfD
UNDW AUTHOTHff OF THE COCA-CC^cS^MNYM i  COCA-COLA BOlTtlNG COMPANY OF
BOLINGH^IyV  01949, Tho Cora-Cola CoMpany   



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Western Washington Collegian - 1949 November 11 - Page 5



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ikinaslnFinalAtL in col It Bowl  ©rid Win Over Wildcats Puts 
^tWestern in Second Place Tie  S^WteteiiilsVlking eleven put a damper on
the Central Washington col-  -r; lege Homecoming at Rodeo field in
EllensDurg last Saturday when they  ^.defeated a rugged Central Wildcat
team 20-8.  ^.V. In this rugged test which the Viking iron men described as
their  "toughest game of the season, team captain Tom Taylor spearheaded a 
** successful passing attack which set up two Western touchdowns. 
''-• gt;.::-Early in the first period Taylor threw two long passes
which were  completed to the Central one yard  jH line and Jerry KarnofsU
bucked it   lt;£ic-jpver  from there for the first West-tally.  'LINE
STEALS BALL  Central went on the offensive.  Then a hard-charging,
ball-stealing  Western defensive team grabbed up  a Wildcat fumble on the
Cat 43-yard  line. Western's offensive unit moved  the ball to the Central
9. From the  9 Norm Hash shoved the ball over  for the second Viking
touchdown  Clayton converted. Western took a  13-0 lead.  Central's only
drive came in  the second quarter when, after a  drive down field, Mickey
Naish shuffled  a two-yard pass to Central end  Jim Satterlee. The Cats
converted  to.leave a 13-6 half-time score.  .Western came back in the
second  half minus its two defensive stars  Howie Brevick and Richardson
bat  fired up with plenty of will to win.  Taylor connected to Hal •
Partlow  with a 35-yard pass. Partlow went  title rest of the way for
Western  touchdown number 3. Clayton converted.  ' • . • ; . '
• • • ' - . - •  ^Central's only score in the last 
jihjalf'was a safety gathered in the  four quarter. Art Svidran, deep in 
the Western end-zone attempting to  punt was unable to hold onto the  ball.
Svidran picked the ball up and  attempted to pass out of the end.  zone.
The officials ruled that the  ball had bee ngrounded in the encf  zone and
Central gathered in 2  points.  SHIRTS IN AT 9  OUT AT 4  2#5 Prospect
Street  Phone 66 or 67  Freshman, Jack Roberts, is one  cf the fireballs on
this year's de  fensive squad.  STATIONERY - PRINTING  'The Union Has I t" 
UNION  PRINTING CO.  1421 Cornwall Phone 1264  Parker Pens and  Pencils 
No. 51 and the New No. 21  dWENS DRUG  COMPANY  701 West Holly Phone 196  /
 H HSPORTING  GOODS CO.  Agents for  Spalding Athletic Equipment  1322
Commercial St.  Phone 4937  Back Karnofski  Named Player  Of The Week 
Jerry Karnofski, sterling back-field  performer on this year's  football
squad, was chosen player  of the week. Jerry was chosen because  of his
great performance  against Central last week-end.  This year is the last
time Jerry  will appear in the Viking line up.  Jerry has also been chosen
as co-captain  for this Saturday's game  against the College of Puget 
Sound Loggers.  U  Loggers Topple  Whitworth 47-7  Whitworth still groggy
from its  October 22 beating at the hands of  the Vikings, went down before
the  College of Puget Sound, 47-7, at the  Pirates Homecoming in Spokane
last  Saturday afternoon.  Big gun for the CPS Loggers was  Len Kalapus who
spear-headed the  Loggers to victory. Kalapus scored  two of the CPS
squad's seven touchdowns.  Both of Kalapus' touchdowns  were on long runs,
one a 53-  yard cake-walk and the other a 47-  yard intercepted pass
return.  The only Pirate score was a 50-  yard pass thrown by Ed Kertz to 
Sam Adams.  Public Dance  Every Wed., Fri. and Sat.  LEGION HALL  Chestnut
and Bay  BOB HEMPHILL    HIS ORCHESTRA  Bamboo Inn  CHINESE  FOOD  ALSO
AMERICAN DISHES  Open 11 A. M. - 2 A. M.  146 Samish Highway  George Wu,
Manager  HURLEY'S DRUG MART  ELMO T. HURLEY, DRUGGIST  Home Market Phone
434  HI KIDS!  try a Coke  At  Or Drop in for Breakfast,  Lunch or Dinner 
1306 Commercial  1B0RNSTEIN SEA FOODS -  ' .Largest Assortment of Sea Foods
in the Northwest  ' " ' ? - • ' '.•:-'-.'':'  CENTER OF HOME
MARKET PHONE  •"K....0 H R G H E i r i ( f i ^ C L H R K ' 5 
gt;«"•-•  ITE HOUSE mRRKET  F6lFF00D . . ; ALWAYS GO TO
BELLINGHAM'S MOST  POPULAR FOOD MARKET!  JLJ  Conference Title At  Stake In
Western-  EPS Tilt Saturday  Western Vikings pack their travel togs and
journey to Tacoma  Saturday.afternoon to make their bid for second place in
the 1949  Evergreen conference race. They meet the slightly favored College
 of Puget Sound eleven at Lincoln Bowl that evening at 8:00 p. nu 
Statistics show the Loggers have packed, tossed, and kicked the oral  for
99 points to be tied with our own Blue and Whites accomplishments  in that
respect. Defensively the Vikings have two t.d.'s and a try for point  more
against them than this Saturday's foe.  Coach Charles Lappenbusch is
staying with the platoon system for  this last fray of the season. Aside
from the usual bumps and bruises the  team is almost at full strength. Hal
Parlow has an injured back but is  expected to be at his position of end
came Saturday. Gerald Salsgiver,  who injured his eye at Central last week,
will be in the forward wall  when the referee blows the starting whistle.
Although the squad has not  been scrimmaging this week, so as to cut down
on injuries, John Moll  slipped and wrecked his knee while trying to catch
a pass.  Probable starting line up for the Loggers will be LaVerne
Martineau  at center, Bob Demko and Don Lee at guards, Hank Pond and Dick 
Hermsen at the tackle slots, and Bob Carlson and Dick Brown, a 205 pound  6
ft. 4 in. tall lad at the end positions. The backfield will include Mel
Light  and Len Kalapus, halfbacks; Bob Robbins, fullback; and Jack
Heinrick,  quarterback.  , Howard Brevik and Jerry Karnofski have been
chosen by teammates  to captain them, against the Maroon and White in this
.the last and all  important game.  Drink Milkshakes  HILLVIEW  DAIRY  1824
Cornwall Ave.  •  WE SERVE LUNCHES  AND REFRESHMENTS  Day's Gabardine
 SLACKS  Crease  Resistant  8 .95  Boch  139 W. Hdlfc  :tS#i



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Western Washington Collegian - 1949 November 11 - Page 6



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T^oBe Held November Id  The date set for the annual AWS tolo is
November 18. This year  it is called the "Autumn Frolic," and is guaranteed
to allow everyone  a good time. It is being held in the new Washington room
of  the Bellingham hotel. -  Tickets are $1.10 per couple. This price
includes refreshments.  Music will be by Bobbie Brown and his band.  A
rumor has been spread that every gal is out to get a guy for  this dance so
fellas had better*?*  be on the lookout.  The dance will be informal which 
means suits and street dresses.  Flowers will be optional for this 
occasion but seeing as how the boys  are the ones that are being invited 
maybe they should be the ones to  receive the flowers."  COMMITTEES 
General chairman for this affair  is Joanne Arsanto. Some of the committees
 appointed by her are as  follows: publicity, Dawn Thompson;  music and
hall, Ann Ansley;  decorations, Helen Wiik; refreshments,  Barbara
Harbison; check  room, Agnes Parent; and tickets,  Pat Graves. %  USGC
Breakfast  Event of Weekend  USCC met at breakfast at the  YWCA Sunday,
November 6, to discuss  final plans for their retreat  to be held November
10 and 11.  Approximately 30 persons enjoyed  the'breakfast, which included
pineapple  juice, bacon, eggs, fried potatoes,  and toast.  Willard
Threikeld" spoke on the  trip he and his wife, Sylvia, took to  Iowa this
summer. She spoke on  the work they did at a mental hospital  while there. 
,! -'...'- —S  DONT FORGET  NORMAN'S  FOOD CENTER  Ellis and Lake 
THOSE EVENING SNACKS  MEET YOUR FRIENDS  Kluane Girl Brings  Memento of
Trip  It's been mighty busy around here  lately. Lanny Stone surprised
everyone  by throwing herself a birthday  party with homemade cake and all.
 Then there was Hallowe'en. The  door-bell was kept ringing by enthusiastic
 trick - or - treaters who  made the girls reminiscent of the  time when
they could stay out late  enough to participate in the festivities.  Gripe!
Gripe!  Mary Jean Nelson was the only  representative from Kluane who
attended  the Ellensburg game. She  brought back a wooden form of a  Viking
football player from one of  the displays for a souvenir.  The favorite
pastime around  Kluane is the knitting of argyle  socks. Joan Bartlett,
Kappy Mc-  Mullen, and Lanny Stone are old  hands at the trade while Mae
Orchard  is an eager beginner.  Kluane is anxiously waiting for  the first
week in December to-roll  around. At this time we are planning  a dinner
dance at one of Bell-ingham's  well known restaurants.  FRESH  WHITMAN 
CHOCOLATES  * . - • • •  AUBERT DRUG  COMPANY  105 E.
Holly St.  Activities S^tifafeS  "To help students grow in the  Christian
way of life and to encourage  them to take an active interest  in the
student program pf the  church of their choice" is the purpose  of the USCC
(United Student  Christian Council), sponsoring an  overnight retreat this
week-end.  The group will meet at Edens hall  or the YWCA,,if more
convenient,  at 5:30 p. m. Thursday, November  10, to go to Black Mountain
lodge,  the Silver Lake Scout camp.  Requirements to bring, according  to
Andrine Pattison, chairman, are  a bed roll, warm clothing, bible, and 
flashlights. Transportation will be  furnished.  Vandals Cause  Commotion 
Much excitement was caused at  Senior hall last Monday night.. A  band of
juvenile delinquents, assailed  and were repelled by the girls. Helen 
"Bring em back alive" Piatt led the  Senior hall army.  Under her able
direction, Peggy  Boe, Rosemary Broderson, Frankie  Aldrich, Ethel
Lundgren, Ellen Staf-fenson,  Pat Graves, Alice Robbins,  Bev Cate, Shirley
Harrison, and Jo  Leighton, along with the police, successfully  rounded up
the culprits  who had been annoying Senior hall  and the surrounding
neighborhood  for some time.  Peace and quiet now reign; at least  until
the next battle.  Complete  Cleaning Service  "Our Experience and 
Equipment Is Your  Guarantee of Quality"  Vienna Cleaners  Inc.  206 East
Magnolia Phone 265  WHEN THEY  SAY . . .  MUELLER'S  THEY MEAN  PAUL
MUELLER  Bellingham's  Leading  JEWELER  Expert Watch Repairing  1305
Cornwall Ave.  Use  • —Cut Courtesy BellinKham Herald  AN EARLY
FALL BRIDE was Mrs. Charles Fitch, the former Marilyn  June Lennert. The
ceremony was a nuptial mass performed in the Church  of the Assumption.
Both Mr. and Mrs: Fitch are attending Western  Washington college where
they are in their senior and junior years,  respectively.  Here is the bra
for all your newest fashions! Cleverly'  designed for perfect control with
wide, deep separation.  And, of course, it carries the Goddess name,"so you
kriowj  it williit to perfection! r'? _J  Beautifully made in nylon taffeta
. . . white, sizes 32  to 40. ;..•
•,"•*'•::-..•'-  --•-•, yfjrr- 
•':~:~%* gt;r'\:-  •"•'• Wl  i37X:HESTNUTST, 
^^ERIDIANST.  FERISMLE  48HOU*^^  'ST.  EXPERT REPAIRS   gt;  ...4. S3
,r\



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Western Washington Collegian - 1949 November 11 - Page 7



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WhoancedbyClub  iP£n» Shiitter Bugs, WWC Camera dub,
presents the following rules  fortte 1949-50 photographers' contest: .  1.
EH*ibility of Contestants:  via. Registered students, faculty and staff of
Western Washington.Col-  ;^ lege of Education. . . »  2. C I M ^
(determined by negative size):  i{*t0penl(2% to 3%, and larger).  | b .
Miniature to 2% square arid fixed focus.  3^*KJime:_,'  a. Negative to be
made during the current school year.  Ijfc^rtnts to be submitted to the
Audio Visual department (room 216)  p- by Friday preceding closed week of
fall and winter quarter. Prints  [^ to be submitted for spring quarter by
Friday of the seventh week.  4. No limit regarding the number of prints
submitted by contestants.  5.J Suggested subject matter:  Human interest,
portraits, industrial, pictorial, nature, sports, table  tops, abstract. \ 
€. Print Qualifications:  a. Prints must conform to Salon standards
which are:  ^ lrMounted on a 16 x 20 salon mount board (pebble grain). The
mount  §*[: board will be displayed In a vertical position; so keep
this in mind  ^% "when mounting your prints.  K-:"2. Prints Should be
titled. No name or personal identification should  ^ a p p e a r on either
side of the print or mount. A number will be  assigned to identify the
work,  r 3. All work on, or leading to the final print must be done by the 
submitting contestant.  T. a. There will be ten qualifying prints chosen
quarterly in each class.  (Totaling 20 each quarter.)  b. Quarter final
prints to be Judged by vote of student body, faculty and  staff.  c. Number
of prints in final judging to be "sixty" or all quarter final  winners.  d.
Final winners will be Judged by a board of 5 Judges" of national  repute. 
i. Advertising photographer.  2. Portrait photographer.  / 3. Commercial
photographer.  4. Pictorialist photographer..  i 5. Magazine photographer.
*  •V Awards: •  IL Ribbons will be awarded all quarter
finalists.  2. The judges will select 5 place winners and 5 honorable
mention  awards in each class. -  a. Ribbon and a 'certificate will be
given each place winner.  3. Ribbons and certificates will be awarded the
print uvshow in each  class.  •.All prints which qualify for finals
are eligible for the club's traveling  salon in the Washington Counsel of
Camera clubs.  These rules are subject to approval by the Contest
committee.  Don Peterson Baby  Named Sophia Ann  Mr. and Mrs. Don Peterson
are  receiving felicitations on the birth  of a baby girl, November 2, at
St.  Lukes hospital in Bellingham. The  baby, named Sophia Ann, was born 
prematurely and will remain in an  incubator for two months. The  mother is
the former Sophia E  Schaffert. Both are seniors at WWC.  / v '  Daniels
Fireside  Daniels hall hadV housemeeting  last Wednesday evening and the 
committee members were chosen for  the fall quarter fireside which will 
follow the basketball game on November  19.  Chairmen for the various
committees  are: Ralph Wood, decoration;  Bob Lorenzen, arrangements; and 
Wayne Esbenshade, cleanup. The  two faculty sponsors for the affair  were
elected at the same meeting.  George Yonlick and Al Weber,  Daniels, two
representatives on the  football team, did a great job at  Ellensburg
Saturday but both received  injuries, although not too  serious. George is
sporting a black  eye, while Al is minus one thumbnail.  Two other athletic
casualties  were Stan Peterson and Bill Richardson.  Both boys spent most
of  last week limping around due to the  effects of sore muscles received
while  turning out for varsity basketball.  Daniels vice-president and
social  chairman, Bob. Ellington, left Daniels  hall Sunday evening. Bob,
who  is an art major, moved to an apartment  where he will have more room 
to work on his drawings. The boys  hated to see him leave, as he had  been
very popular and also. very  active In house affairs. A new vice-president 
and social chairman will  be elected this week.  Blue Barnacles Announced 
COLLEGIAN CLASSIFIEDS  Minimum charge 50c; 5c word on  first insertion; two
insertions, 8c  word; three insertions, lie word;  ten insertions, 30c per
word; 30 insertions,  80c per word; forty insertions,  $1.00 per word.
Deadline 10  a. m. Thursdayr:,  FOR SALE/ ~~"~  Handicraft ftojodel
suppliet; (tamps    "iioiljr. (C2-32)  gt;+..'•'•  College
textbooks, used books. Florence's  . .Book   Antique Shop, 1121 State St.' 
(CJ-43)  New, renewal   gift subscriptions, all  ntfwaxines.. Alyce
Magnuson, WWC  Aliijnna. Phone 1645. (C4-43)  y\\f'" .'l  U M . Remington
hammerless pump shot-  $35.00 Phone 2224-W, SOS Garden.  (9-F49-7)  VICES 
Freed) L. Streeter, TAILOR, Alterations  , -ft Repairing. All work
guaranteed. Ph.  1* gt;I, 13MJ4 State. (5-43)  - Precision watch repairing.
 : Terry; 1301 Commercial. "-•":  Milton E.  (8-F50-3J  TYPEWRITERS 
IfeWi and used, sales,  Griffith Printing Co.,  rentals, repairs.  1420
Cornwall.  C6-F50-1  EVERYTHING  You'd Expect  To Find in a  Good Drug
Store  STAR  DRUG  PHONE 224  STATE   HOLLY  Whether It's  Soup  Or Nuts 
THAT'S US  HIGHLAND  CREAMERY  FELLOWS...  LOOK TO YOUR  SHIRTS  For that
Smart  Appearance...  • FORM FITTING  • EXPERTLY FINISHED  48
Hour Service if Desired  CALL 126  THE PACIFIC  LAUNDRY  Sajep and Service,
air makes portables.  Herb Person, TJnderwood-Sundstrand,  e Spudnut Shop 
MADE FRESH DAILY  For Partis*, or Your midnight  shack.  Buy 'em in Hit
genuine  Spudnut sack.  FOUNTAIN and SANDWICHES  .- Open Daily 8 a. m.-12
p. m.—Sunday 10 a. m.-12 p. m.  Blue Barnacle turnouts were hel  
last Monday evening- after school  at 4 o'clock. Old members judging  were
Dotty Patterson, Shirley Sta-matis,  Mary Elbie, Barbara Butler,'  Mary Lou
Thomas, and Marilyn'  Morrison.  There are several requirements  for girls
to get into Blue Barnacles  and they must be passed with at  least a 7.0
average. Those girls who  passed the requirements will be invited  into the
organization and may:  participate as members. The girls  who passed the
requirements are as  follows: Norma McGrath, Mai^Mret  Keys, Shirley
McMicken, Rita OoW-ade,  Beverly Pustin, Alicia Legg,  Barbara Allen, Jean
Moen, Thyra  Freeberg, Helen Wiik, Jean Wilson,  and Joyce Elder. Other
girls being  let into the organization as neophytes  are Audrey Hahn and
Maureen  Beach. .  One of the new colors being used,  this winter to
replace the basic black  is taupe, in various shades and tints.  You find
it in dresses, coats, and  suits.  THANKSGIVING IS  HOMECOMING TIME  ...rrs
jfjp  Ttmetor  EXTRA COMFORT  EXTRA SCENIC REAUTY  EXTRA CONVENIENCE  by
GREYHOUND  Go home or to visit friends for Thanksgiving by Greyhound  for
less cost and more fun! This colorful Fall season is 
Take-a-Trip-Time—time to be up and away—to see more,  relax
more and save more by Greyhound. On all trips to and  from the campus
you'll find that Greyhound means extra  comfort and convenience—extra
economy in time and money  —extra sightseeing along the way.  ETRA
SAVINGS, TOO,  RY GREYHOUND  round trip  $175  12.7a  5.00  ;8.95  300L  S.
tax)  GREYHOUND BUS DEPOT  Magnolia   State - Phone 5009  W t L I N G r ^ 
from Bellingham one way  SEATTLE $1.50 v  SPOKANE .............. 7.00 
OLYPMIA..... 2.85  PORTLAND... ........;.. 4.95  VANCOUVER, B. C. . . . . .
. 1.65  ' • • (plus U.  i?f.a gt;»ff«ij'?ft



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Western Washington Collegian - 1949 November 11 - Page 8



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Apples, Exams Plague Schools  Remember a few weeks ago when, 
Associated Women Students set up  a table In the lower main hall and  set
themselves to work giving away  apples . . . to the tune of a nickel 
apiece? • . _.  University of Washington students  recently found
themselves in the  same predicament. Pi Alpha Sigma  pledges dawned the
traditional apple  day garb—jeans and plaid shirts—  brushed up
on their selling techniques  and started their apple sale.  plaguing
Gonzaga university this  week.  Br6%n#W^ to  erf Legion  Close of
mid-semester week found  Pullman students busy—busy attending  the
six or seven social functions  held that week-end.  While Western guys and
gals were  sitting in their dens earnestly digging  away into their books,
(any  resemblance to the truth is . . .)  Washington Staters debated
whether  to attend the Parmer's ball, the  "Gee Haw" barn dance, or-a
"Blind  date" fireside, to mention only a  few. ;  Maybe Westerns should
hop on  the train and inquire about the institution  over therein Pullman.'
 Turn off that radio, put aside the  funnies, forget that Saturday date 
and heave ho for your history or  psych book, is the advice to the wise 
since the mid-semester exams are  •Peace was pledged that day  in
1918—but a much greater  peace was wrought by One  who died on a
cross 1900 years  ago. That peace is for every  student of WWC who places 
his trust in the terms of the  Armistice as laid down in the  Bible, the
word of God. Learn  these terms for yourself by a  careful study of the
^ord and  a regular attendance at the  Christian    Missionary  Alliance
Church  * Garden and Holly Streets  Sunday School „..._. 
Mttr^fcWorship _..  rating People s .™:.„_.  ..^•P^ gt;
gt;,»i:,•:."..; ,\v» "• .'''.•£'£:
gt;•• .'••'•V.'. "  . 9:45  .11:00  6:3a 
7:30  , At least 250 frosh must be present  to elect a president, agreed
the two  contestants who came out. an exact  tie in the first election.
Another  meeting was held to determine the  victor in the election and the
first  man of the frosh class at Central  Washington college.  Local campus
musicians, the Bobby  Brown trio with Bob Brown and  Bruce Gillette,
recently heard in as*  semblies here, wish to announce  that they are
playing at the American  Legion Friday night. The occasion  is a special
dance to be held  downstairs in the club rooms.  All members, guests, and
prospective  members are invited. The trio is  also engaged for Saturday
nights  at the Riverside country club.  ue  Each quarter . Blue Barnacles 
sponsorsva swim meetj. This quarter's  meet will be held December ^2,  at
4:00 p. m. All organized houses  and clubs are urged to participate in 
this event. Turnouts for. different  organizations should start to get 
under way as a lfttle training is required  for these meets.  The girls in
Blue Barnacles want  every organization to show some  representation, even
if some of the  clubs have to double up, because"  they are sure that each
ciub has at  least one swimmer. — '  Bay Hyatt is the official
starter  for the meet, but the judges have  not yet been notified.  Any
swimmer who would like to:  be in the meet should give his  name to Miss
Aitken if he is not  with an organized group; otherwise  leave his name
with the president  of that group to which he belongs. "  Steps . . . Where
To?  Yes, you've climbed the steps to the Ad. building, to the library,  to
Edens hall, to MRH—BUT HAVE YOU RECENTLY CLIMBED  THE STEPS THAT LEAD
TO THE CHURCH OF YOUR CHOICE?  Your steps have been quick in the pursuit of
knowledge and of  pleasure—but how quick have they been in the
pursuit of everlasting  truth and faith? Now is the time to turn your steps
toward  the church of your ch6ice. BEGIN THIS NEXT SUNDAY.  Contributed by 
vs%  si  wh  • «•PPPPP