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     Western Washington Collegian - 1954 June 25 - Page 1

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pecial Ed Programs Popular  lelp Needed on  ummer Collegian  [Reporters are
needed for the  jmmerquarter student newspaper,  ke WWCollegian.  I
Interested persons should con-  Jet Dave Gay, MikeO'Sammon or  : gt;m
Manney in the Collegian of-room  126, "Old Main."  COLLEGIAN  Vol. XLVI-No.
33Western Washington College, Bellingham, Washington June 25, 1954 
i4W«SSSa
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 SSSS^^-SiWK-S   2v:¥: -.vS5j »  ECEIVE
MASTERS—Twenty ofthe graduates who receive Master's-de 
ees during Commencement Spring quarter are pictured above.They  ;e: front
row, left to right: Mandel I. Hilde, John R. Reid, John N. Fox,  rederick
A. Weihe, Jr.,William R. Hodgson, Miss Olga Amelia Hermann,  [iss Dorothy
Sarah Gross, Clarence M. Coye, WilliamJ. 6'Neil, James C.  Norris. Back
row: Dr. Irwin Hajnmer, chairmarf, administrative committee, 
Graduatedivision; Benton H. Helm, Henry Wastradowski, Cliff  ord W.
Johnson, Melvin A. Allan, Mrs. Jean MorerMullen, Richard W.  Valentine,
Alvin W. Howard, Robert L. Kirk, Leland S. Larrick, Jr., Mrs.  Beth Hankins
Priesell. \  President Haggard Welcomes  Summer Quarter Students  The long
lines of students regist-ing  last Monday made it easy to  optimistic about
the summer  larter. A good faculty and a good  ogramwithout a good student 
xly are not a good summer quar-r.  Of course, one cannot help as-iming 
that agood faculty and  good program attract a good  ;udent body,
especially in sur-   gt;undings conducive tosummer  ;udy. The enrollment is
signifi-tntly  above that of last year; it  ay equal or exceed the
highest•evious summer enrollment, of  hich we should be
very proud. It is  irident, in view of the current•end,
that some interesting years  re ahead.  We of the administration and the 
iculty welcomegenuinely the stu-ent  body to realize the maximum  I
professional growth and general  Jucation thissummer. It is hoped  mt every
student will take full ad-mtage  of the cultural opportuni-es  provided. We
are told repeated-r  that the programs offered on the  ;ries of Artists and
Lecturers in  le auditorium onTuesday evenings  jual those offered at any
college  r university. It is generally agreed  lat few areasprovide the
outdoor  icreational opportunties that there  re in this upper Puget Sound 
Duntry.  Wewelcome the teachers and  lose advancing their general edu-ation
 to a well balanced summer  n thiscampus. We are acquainted  rtih many of
the former students  nd we want to get acquainted with  s manyas possible
of those who  are here for the first time. It is  hoped that we are always,
regardless  of size,a small college in spirit  and tradition. 
• W. W. HAGGARD,  President.  June 22, 1954. 
WWCRegistration  Notes Increase  It looks like Western's Summer  quarter
enrollment has a good  chance ofshowing a "substantial increase  over last
summer," according  to Mr. Donald Ferris, Registrar.  Ferriscautioned,
however, that  first day figures could be misleading.  Final enrollment
figures will  not be in for at least a week.  Ferris also requests that all
persons  expecting to receive a degree  or certificate atthe end of summer 
quarter, who did not make application  at the time of registration, report 
to theregistrars office to apply.  Datelimi e..  Friday, June
25—All-College Mixer,  8-11 p. m., Rec hall.Saturday,
June 26 — Sightseeing  tour; Devil's Mountain hike. 
Tuesday, June 9—Photo Clinic;  A Lseries program, Lester
F. Beck,  8:15 p. m., Auditorium.  Wednesday, June 30 —
Evening  boat trip.Thursday, July 1—Mixed Rec, gym  and
rec hall.  Need ASB Secretary  A secretary for the Board ofControl is
urgently needed for this  New Courses  Offered  - Several new courses are
offered  this summerwhich are intended to  help the student, returning or
oth-erwise,  keep up on the modern  method ofeducation.  Education 400-11
is a review of  the research dealing with perception,  motivation,
mentalhygiene,  and group dynamics as related to  an understanding of human
behavior  and the learningprocess.  Education 427 offers a study of  the
interrelated natural resources of  forest, soil, water,fisheries, and 
wildlife of the Pacific Northwest.  The course involves extensive field 
work.  Teachingexperience or permission  of the instructor is a
prerequisite  for Education 466. It is a  study ofteaching methods suited 
to the education of children with  superior and special abilities. 
Education 522 is a seminar in the  Improvement of Instruction.
Prerequisite:  Graduate status.  English 415, SchoolPublications,  is a
course in practical problems  in the advisement of students responsible 
for schoolnewspapers, annuals,  and other publications.  English 425 is a
[course in the  teaching of the languagearts—  reading,
writing, .speaking, and  listening—at the elementary
school  (Continued #nlPage 3) .summer, Henry Howe, ASB president, 
announced this week.  Anyone interested in the $30 job  whohas had this
type of experience  is being urged to submit a.letter of  application to
the president.  "Theduties of the secretary,"  according to the Navigator,
"shall  be to keep a record of the minutes  of allregular and special
meetings  of the Board, to attend to Associated  Student Body
correspondence, tomaintain the files of the association,  to perform other
secretarial  duties and to act in such capacity  asthe Board of Control may
direct."  Applications may be placed in  the ASB mail box on the m a in 
floor. Opportunities for specialized  training under the guidance of
nationally  recognized experts are  againavailable to Western's Summer 
school students. A large number  of students are taking advantage of the
special educational programs,  according to Donald Ferris,  Registrar. 
ROOMS CHANGED  Twoof the classes in "The Improvement  of Instruction,"
under  Dr. Kimball Wiles, of the University  ofFlorida, had to be moved 
into the A-M building, where larger  rooms were available.  Another
eminenteducator, Dr.  Edgar A. Doll is conducting classes  in special
education. Dr Doll, who  worked with theBellingham school  district this
past year, is an authority  on the problems of teaching the  handicappedand
the gifted child.  The Director of Student teaching is  in charge of
enrollment for these  specialeducation courses.  RESOURCES STUDY  Several
items of interest and pertinent  plans are available to those  student
wishing to study the resources  of the state. A workshop  in Conservation
and OutdoorEducation  will include several field and  camping trips,
starting July 22. The  staff members will includespecialists  from various
of the college departments.  In addition to this, a laboratory-course 
inoutdoor education will be-conducted  at the county school-camp  near
Silverton.; Credits from  this will, byarrangement, meet;  part of the
student teaching requirements.  Ths lab course will be  available bothterms
of the summer.  i f lt; ews/ror  K-Vets: First -  Check; August  Dr. Marie
S Ruder, Director ofStudent Personnel services, stated'  that veterans
under Public Law 346  who have been teaching duringthe  past year must file
an official letter  from their school district to that  effect before any
payments canbe  made.  A change in the procedure for  Veterans under Public
Law 550 concerning  the pay periodhas also been  made, stated Kuder.
Previously  payments have been made every  month, but now a single pay
period  will be made covering the period  from June 21 to the end of July. 
The single check will beissued  about the middle of August.  Summer Edition
of The Writer'  Possible, Says Editor Gole  GeorgeCole, editor of The
Writer,  WWC's literary magazine, stated  that material may be submitted
for  possiblepublication in the summer  edition. This is the first time in 
Western's history that a summer  edition will be published. Realizing  that
many returning students have  creative ability, it is Cole's wish to 
provide themwtih a possible source  of publication, and thereby give 
recognition to their efforts.  Material may bedeposited in the  Writer box
in the Collegian office,  room 126. All material must be  typewritten,
doublespaced and the  estimated number of words given.  Material submitted
is the property  of the Writer andwill not be returned.  Assisting Cole is
Berniece Brown,  associate editor; Wil Knutzen, poetry  editor;Gary
Douglas, essay editor;  Dave Gay, short story editor.  Harold Ogden,
English, is the facultyadvisor.  There are a few copies of the  spring
quarter edition of The Writer  still available at theBookstore.

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     Western Washington Collegian - 1954 June 25 - Page 2

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Memo To Thm Student Body  Here is the first edition of your Summer quarter
Campus  newspaper, theWWCollegian. The Collegian will be published  every
Friday for the next seven weeks, in four-page tabloideditions.  In the
weeks to come, we hope to furnish you with the news  of the College, as
well asattempting to present articles designed  to stimulate and relax, and
information about the numerouspossibilities  for recreation and relaxation
in this area.  As always, the Collegian welcomes and solicitsLetters to the
 Editor, and Guest Editorials containing considered opinion on subjects  of
interest atWestern.  Welcome to Summer quarter at Western. We hope you
enjoy  your stay at the "College by themountains and the sea." 
—Dave Gay, Editor.  Collegian Columns Open to Students 
In line with theCollegian's policy of providing public service  whenever
possible, a section will be set aside each week, fordiscussion  of matters
of general interest outside of the immediate  circle of the College. 
Designedoriginally as an outlet for thought and comment on  and about
teaching and education, the hew feature willconsist  wholly of material
submitted by the general student body.  It will be published each week
there ismaterial and space  available, under the heading "Summer Comment,"
on page four  of the Collegian.WWCollegian  Friday, June 35, 1?54  Pag* 2 
The first, summer board meeting, last Wednesday, was nota departure  from
the G*e-I-wish-I-were-at-the-beach attitude that seems to  be so popular
this summer.No one appeared to want to shake the world,  but the meeting
suggested a greater interest in businesswith less emphasis  in idolatry of
recent TV stars.  Henry Howe, 1954 ASB president, is acting aschairman
again this  summer and Carolyn Crook is vice-*-
—-—.——
;. .
-————
 president.Board members returning  from last quarter are Dave Gay,  Wil
Knutson, Mike O'Sammon, and  Dr. VanAver, Miss Karsten and  Dr.
Critchfieldj faculty advisors.  Seven members were appointed  at the
lastSpring quarter meeting  to fill out the Board. They are  Carole Diers,
Megan David, J im  Simon, BillWaring, Bill Nehers,  and Al Evans.  DEBATE
MILD  Controversy* however was not  -absent amid all thispeace and 
tranquility. Bob Dunlap made the  motion to purchase, six copies of 
"Sturgis Code of.Parliamentary  Procedure," the oftieiar gutde ' lb  BOC
procedure. Dr. Van Aver  moved to amend this toread 14  copies, enough to
furnish one to  each, member of the Board. The  question in debate here
waswhether  the extra copies were worth the  additional $24.72, and if
there would  ever be a need for morethan six  copies. Debate was brief and
non-personal.  The Board decided to  purchase six copies.  LAKEWOOD PUSHED 
It cannot be said either, that the  Board lacks action this summer.  They
had notdiscussed a campaign  to play up the Lakewood property  three
minutes before Dunlap moved  to holdthe next regular BOC  meeting there.
The Student Center  is still ringing with the fervor of  the
legislatingthat followed: The  outcome: The next regular BOC  meeting will
be at the Lakewood  property on LakeWhatcom at 5  p. m. next Tuesday.  As
always, the meeting will be  open to ail interested students (butbring your
own food—it promises  to be a long meeting.) Henry Howe 
said that the key to cabin at Lake-wood  will be made available
•' to  Western picnickers. This will be  announced in a
later issue of theCollegian,  BUDGET CUT  In peace or war, through fun  and
folly, the budget must go on.  I rather doubtthat anyone ever  said this in
such a manner before  —and understandably so
—but it  seems to fit. Thetask before the  Board is to
cut the estimated expenditures  on next year's budget  by $6,269.39. This
is the excess over  estimated income for the same period.  There will be an
official report  next Week ofhow much has been  cut to date. In the
meantime all  unjustified expenses are being  eliminated. Thisweek they
worked  on the social budget.  There was a request for the Junior  prom for
$750. This is to be  compared with a loan of $150 for  the function last
year. One member  suggested that as this extra$600 was only working
capital, since  the prom is practically self-supporting,  it is, therefore,
deceivingto have it budgeted as an expense.  The Board reduced the budget
figure  to $150.  Work on the budgetwill continue  next week.  WESTERN
WASHINGTON COLLEGIAN  Since 1899  Member  IntercollegiatePress  Entered as
second class matter at the post office at Bellingham by virtue of the  act
of March 8,1879  Printed by Cox Brothers, Inc., Bellingham, Wash. 
Subscription rate, by mail, $4.00 per year, inadvance  Represented for
national advertising by National Advertising Service, Inc., College 
PublishersRepresentatives, 420 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y., Chicago, 
Boston, Los Angeles, San Francisco..Dave Gay  .Mike O'Sammon Editor _ -~ 
Assistant Editor „ ,, _„,  Business
Manager
-••••••
"•••:•••.-
Tom Manney  Co-Recreational Editors â„¢. ColleenSullivan,
John Bohng  Reporters-Tom Manney, John Boling, Sandee B a r t e e K a t h y
Troutner JanetVan  Aver, Rodger Williams, Wil Knutsen, Jim Simon, Colleen
Sullivan, Bob Dunlap,  Mike O'Sammon. « . . „
__  Adviser _ - - - - • P a t A , , an  Progress Near  As
Registration  |s Simplified  How wonderful it must have felt  to the 18th
century seaman when  the fiftieth and last stroke of the 
• t _, cat cutacross his lacerated back.  But just
because we live in the  twentieth century doesn't mean  that we
can'texperience similar  "pleasures."  For example: The completion of  the
last entry in WesternWashington's,  registration book affords  the same
feeling of relief. At the  very least, equivalent to thejoy felt  upon
completion of other horrible  punishments. Cat-o'-nine t a i l s,  maces,
scourges, and horsewhips  included.  But don't get the idea that Registrars
 design registration books  just to hecklestudents. The mdh*  strosity that
each student filled out  for 37% minutes last Monday is the  last of
theMohicans.. It's on the  way out. The end is in sight. No  more will
entering students be faced  with thisseemingly endless task.  No more
moans! No more groans!  Fall quarter starts the heviTorder.  Newbooks, that
is. NO more will  14' different cards be filled but. The  registration
books will have only 3  or 4pages to be completed.  "This is unheard of,"
said art old  grads when questioned as to his  reaction onths unbelievable
news  tidbit. "Now I'll have time to eat  on registration day."'  So .'. .
after noting thatprogress  is on the way, we will Just sit around  oft the
edge of bur chair arid wait  for it to catch up with us at Western  next
fall.  Vocalists Needed  For Summer Choir  With Bernard Regier as director,
 thesummer choir is well under way.  As yet, since there may be more 
members, music has not beenassigned.  Mr. Regier plans to have a  concert
at the end of the first term,  if possible.  It is not too lateto join the
choir  if it is taken without' credit. More  members are needed.  Haggard;
Ross,  Hammer GoTo Conference  Western is represented at the  Mountain
Conference, Mount Rainier,  this week.President W. W. Haggard  attended the
President's conference  Tuesday evening, meeting  with thepresidents of
Washington's  institutions of higher learning.  lt; -  Professor Irwin
Hammer, chairman  ofthe department of education  and phychology, and
Professor J.  Alan Ross will appear on Thursday'sdscussion program.  The
conference for school administrators  is sponsored jointly by the 
Departmentof Administration and  Supervision of the Washington Education 
Association and the Washington.State Department of Public  Instruction.  o 
Say, "I read your ad in the Collegian,"  when you patronizeyour 
advertisers.  Next A lt;S*L Program  Is Indonesia Today*  Western's Artist
and Lecture  series hasscheduled nine programs  for summer quarter, to
afford students  and faculty at Western opportunityto further extend their 
cultural experience.  Pianist Adele Marcus, winner of  the Naumburg Award,
andveteran  of numerous recitals at New York's  Town Hall and Carnegie
Hall, presented  the first program of the  series Tuesday evening.  BECK
NEXT  Dr. Lester '*?. Beck, professsor of  , DR. LESTER F. BECKCinema and
of Psychology at the  Unversity of Southern California,  will present his
feature length, colormovie "Indonesia Today" next Tuesday  at 8:15 p. m. in
the auditorium,  as the second program in theseries.  A consultant to the
National Institute  of Mental Health, U. S. Public  Health Service,
andauthority on  problems of mass communications,  and chairman of the Film
and Television  committee of the American  Psychological Association,. Dr.
Beck  was invited on an official mission,  by the Indonesian government and
 received cooperation from the Indonesians  in the making of the  film.  As
advisor to agroup of Indonesians  studying in the Unite  States, Dr. Beck
was able to receiv  much information which helped nil  in his work in
Indonesia.  Dr. Beck is a specialist in docu  mentary films, and is a
member  the Academy Award committee  Documentary Films.  FILM COLORFUL 
Taking the viewer through Sumatra, Java, and Bali, the filr  shows
the.modern Indonesia, alon  with native traditional dances an  otherviews
of life in the islands  Other programs during the sum  mer are as follows: 
July 6—Zvi Zeitlhijviolinist.  July
13—Katherine Flowers  Dancers; Bamboula to Bop, American
 Negro folklore dances.July 20—David Gram, leading 
bass-baritone with the New  York City Opera company, familiar  tothousands
through  coast-to-coast radio broadcasts  ando TV opera programs, and 
appearances withmajor symphony  orchestras.  July
27—Claire Coci, organ  virtuoso, official organist with 
the N. Y.Philharmonic society.  July 29-30 — Martin J.
Lange  veld, President of the Foundatio  of EducationalResearch, Universit 
of Utrecht, Holland, philosopht  and one of the best known an  most highly
respectedEuropea  educationists.  August 3—William
Masselos,  pianist-  August 10—Ellen Faull, soprano 
ofthe New York City  Opera company.  All programs will be presente  in the
college auditorium. The tim  ofthe lecture by Mr. Langeveld wi  be
announced. All other progran  will start at 8:15 p. m.  More
detailedinformation on tr  programs will be given in editior  of the
Collegian immediately pri lt;  to the program.LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS By
Bible

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     Western Washington Collegian - 1954 June 25 - Page 3

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Knapman Studies at  Oak Ridge Plant  Dr. Fred Knapman, physical sci-  ;nce,
returned to Western thisweek  'rom the Oak Ridge, Tennessee  itomic
laboratories, where he had  ittended a two-week session ofthe  Special
Training Division of the  3ak Ridge Institute of Nuclear  Studies.  At Oak
Ridge, Dr. Knapmanvorked with 32 other science teachers  selected from
colleges and high  chools throughout t h e UnitedStates in the study of
radiosotopes  md their application to science in-truction  in colleges and
highichools.  Radioisotopes are now available  or instruction and research
at the  mdergraduate college leveland for  ugh school classes," Dr. Knapman
 •eports. "Although precautions are  lecessary to
protectpeople from  •adiation damage, careful use of 
adioistotopes will permit students  o rapidly andaccurately carry out 
:hemical analysis, to trace the  :ourses of chemical reactions, and  o
gatherinformation concerning  ;he movement of fluids and the be-lavior  of
organs in plants and  inimals."  IEC TO TRAIN  Dr. Knapman reports that
Jtrain-ng  courses at the Special Training  Division have
providedinstruction  'or many persons in the fields of  nedicine,
industrial research, and   gt;ther research at thecollege gradu-  TRY OUR
DRIVE-IN  CASH AND CARRY  MILK PLAN  Sove 14c q Gallon  Hillview  Dairy1824
Cornwall "Avenue  We Serve Lunches  and Refreshments  ate level. The Atomic
EnergyCommission  is seeking to train teachers  at the college
undergraduate  and the high school levels.Organic and inorganic chemistry 
classes and classes in' biology and  physics at WWC will use theisotopes 
as a regular instructional program  during the 1954-55 school year,  the
professor predicts."The radioisotopes will be a most  important tool for
study in science  classes at Western," Dr Knapmansays. "We hope to train
teachers  to make use of them in high school  classes." 
TREMENDOUSPOTENTIAL  Dr. Knapman was most impressed  by the atomic pile at
Oak Ridge.  "The silent mass ofconcrete contained  a 24-foot cube of
graphite  and uranium has an energy-producing  potentialequivalent to two 
Grand Coulee dams," he says. The  pile produces nearly all the
radioisotopes  used in the United States.  Rigid controls of the purchase
of  radioactive materials beyond a very  low intensity ofradioactivity have
 been imposed by the AEC, Dr.  Knapman reports. Schools must  havee
trainedpersonnel and adequate  equipment before they may  obtain the more
active materials.  Safetyprecautions at Oak Ridge  include the wearing of
photographic  film badges which record radioactivity,and "dosemeters,"
which record  the quantity of radiation exposure  during a 24-hour period. 
Civildefense aspects of atomic  training, particularly for teachers,  was
stressed at the training sessions,  Dr.Knapman reports.  "Although we are
inclined to think,  of atomic piles principally as devices  to
producematerial for  bombs," he adds, "atomic piles can  also be used to
produce useful energy  and scores ofdifferent radioisotopes  to serve as
one of man's  most useful modern tools. Knowledge  and use of"these tools
can be  learned in the secondary schools  and colleges."  WWCollegian Page
3  Friday, June 25, 1954  STATE STREET  LAUNDROMAT  Washing, H how  Washing
and Drying, l t t houw  Phone27—Next to TMCA  VIENNA
CLEANERS, INC.  BELLI NGHAAA'S LONGEST ESTABLISHED ANDBEST EQUIPPED  206 E.
Magnolia Phone 265  Phone  7526  FLAMINGO CAFE  12 Block from CityCenter on
Hwy. 99 S.  BETTY and EARL ABBOTT  Chinese Foods, Sea Foods  American
Dishes  OpenWeek Days (except Monday) 5:00  p.m. to 2:00 a. m. . . . Sunday
12:30 p.m.  to 8:30 p.m. . Breakfast 6a.m. to 10 a.m.  Westernifces to 
Inspect Local  Industry Plants  Where do we find the source ofBellingham's
industrial wealth? In  Pulp? Paper? Pish? Dairy Goods?  Whatever the
answer, large groupsof summer students will be inspecting  these and many
other industries  this summer.  MANY EVENTSPLANED  Recreational Director S
t u a rt  Fresk, located in the deans' office,  pointed put this week
thatsummer  activities and trips have been planned  to meet the interests
of every  student on campus. Forthose interested  in learning more
about-local  industries, plans are being laid for  trips to the
Darigoldplant, several  mills, a cement plant, and perhaps  several other
local industries.  "Dates and places will be published  in" the Bulletin
from time to  time," Fresk said. "Plans for the  trips are under way, and
weare  looking for large numbers of students—  as we
have in the past."  SAMPLE OF INDUSTRY  Thesetreks most of which are 
guided, are intended to give the  students an opportunity to get a  good,
wellrounded sample of the  various types of industry of this  area. In past
years, there have been  times whenthe program included  more than one trip
per week.  One factor that may have some  bearing on the datefor a part of 
this program is the threat of a  timber strike. However, the rest  of the
program will continuewhatever  happens and students are advised  to keep
watching the daily  bulletins for information.Revised Hours  Announced for 
Lounge, Co-op  Offering in between class relaxation  and
eveningentertainment,  the college fountain and TV lounge,  under the
supervision of Mr. Louis  Earle, will have the following hours  during the
summer quarter: fountain,  7 a. m. to 10:30 p. m. Monday  through
Friday;Saturday, 9 a. m.  to 12 a. m., and Sunday, 5 p. m. to  9 p. m. The
TV lounge will be  open until 11 p. m.except on Saturdays,  when it is
closed.  Earle also announced that for the  benefit of those attendinglate
afternoon  classes the bookstore will  remain open until 5 p. m. Earle 
stated that this will be on anexperimental  basis and only for two  weeks.
If enough business indicates  that remaining open isworthwhile,  he will
continue the extended hours.  more new courses o  (Continued from p i l e
1)  level. 4 . English 471 is designed for students  who would like to
write but  need help in getting their materialinto a form suitable for
publication.  History 422 is a biographical approach  to American history
basedon an evaluation of the careers of  typical American leaders in
statecraft,  industry, and thought.  History 458 offers study of the
history  of the political, economic, social,  and intellectual developments
 inthe United States from 1900 to  the present.  Home Economics 312.
Prerequisite:  Home Economics 112.A study of  the newer synthetic fabrics
used for  clothing and household purposes.  Home Economics 475.
Prerequisites:  Home Economics 112 and 375,  is a study of traditional and
contemporary  furnitureand furnishings.  Music 400-2 offers students an
examination  of selected grades A, B,  C, and Dmaterials for various
instrumental  groups. Recordings of  this material are heard.  Music 400-3.
Anexamination of  selected, graded materials for choirs  and vocal
ensembles.  APPROPRIATE LIT.  Music452. A study of appropriate  literature
to be used in the elementary  school music activities of singing,
listening, rhythms, outside  reading programs.  Music 460 deals with all
the  phases of marching, bandorganization,  parade marching, and show 
routine.  Music 472, a study of methods and  devices to beused in the
teaching  of the' fundamentals of good tone  production in groups varying
from  small voiceclasses to large choral  ensembles are taught.  Music 474
is a study of the production  andtransmission of musical  tone. Emphasis is
placed on the  physical and psychological properties  ofvoice, string, and
wind instrument  tone.  Music 508 is designed to give the  school
instrumental director practical  techniques in arranging and  composing for
large and small ensemble  groups.  Music 512encompasses a wide  range of
new ideas, materials, and  techniques for presenting all types  of
musicalproductiona  Physical Education 410w is an  extra-class activity in
PE for girls.  Library AnnouncesSummer Hours  Miss Enid Karsten,
circulation librarian,  announces the following  hours for the library:7:45
a. m. to  5 p. m. and 7 p. m. to 9:30 p. m.,  Monday through Thursdays.
Friday  hours are 7:45 a. m.to 5. p. m. Saturday  and Sunday the library
will  open from 2 p. m. to 6 p.m.  The graduate readingroom will  be open
from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. The  evening hours are the same as the  libraries
regular hours.ffered  It includes the study of intramural  programs,
tournaments, play days,  sports days, and GAA forsecondary  school girls.
Prerequisite: Active  participation in the intramural program  of the
college.Psychology 466 is a course designed  to benefit the bright and
gifted  child. Prerequisite: Teachingexperience  or permission of the
instructor.  Science 410 provides opportunity  for the student to
gainsupervised  experience and develop independent  thinking in deciphering
the geologic  history of an area. The field  work of this course is devoted
to a  detailed analysis of one local physiographic  unit.Prerequisite:
Science  211 or equivalent.  Social Studies 451 is 'a practical  course in
the construction ofmaps  and charts for classroom use from  sources in
history, economics, geography,  socialigy, andrelated fields.  Sociology
447, a course which includes  the study of sociological and 
socialpsychological aspects of the  relationship among racial and cultural 
minority groups especially in  theUnited States.  Speech 351 is a course in
the  materials, organization, and production  of assemblyprograms in the 
elementary and secondary schools.  Speech 403, a course which
demonstratesdiscussion as a means to  better understanding and action in 
human affairs.  Speech 415 is designedprimarily  for teachers and
administrators,  and includes a study of radio and  television in the
school.Speech 505 is another course designed  for teachers and
administrators,  dealing with diagnosis andcorrection of speech defects.
Prerequisite:  Consent of the instructor.  Speech 506 is a coursepresenting
 procedures and used in diagnosing  and rehabilitating the aurally
handicapped.  Prerequisite: Consent of  the instructor.  VACATION NEEDS 
PRESCRIPTIONS  TOILETRIES  *  StarRextll  Drug Co.State   Holly, Ph. 284 
HANDW0VENS  SKIRTS, STOLES  GIFT ITEMS  JUST 3 BLOCKS DOWNFROM  COLLEGE 
CLAIRE NIX  510 State Phone 3607-R  Be Thrifty... SHOP  ENNEN'S 
ThriftwayMarket  HIGH and HOLLY  Open 9 a. m. to 9 p. m. Monday Through
Saturday

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     Western Washington Collegian - 1954 June 25 - Page 4

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Summer 'Get  Acquainted'  Mixer Tonight  "Getting acquainted" is the theme 
of the traditional summermixer,  sponsored by the faculty and ASB,  to be
held tonight from 8 until 11  p. m., in the "little gym"located  in the
south end of the main building.  Mr. Walter, band director, is  chairman of
the firstsummer dance  to be held this year. The early  part of the dance
will be given to  get acquainted gamesand the meeting  of old friends and
new will take  place. Following will be square  dancing and thensocial
dancing.  Refreshments will be served and  informal attire is expected. 
Those assisting Mr. Walterare:  Miss Ruth Weythman, women's PE;  Mr.
Maurice Grossman, art; Miss  Helen Gillham, CarolynCrook, ASB 
vice-president, and Dr. David McDonald,  education.  Op lt;  Adele Marcus  
gt;ensSummer  A6*L Series  Adele Marcus, pianist, opened the  Artist and
Lecture series at WWC  Tuesdaynight, June 22.  For her first number Miss
Marcus  played Beethoven's Sonata in F  sharp major, Op 78.Two pieces  by
Brahms followed, then Chopin's  Sonata in B minor, Op. 58.  Evocation by
Albeniz;Andaluza  by DeFalla; and Paraphrase on the  Blue Danube Waltz by
Strauss, arr.  by Schultz-Evler wereincluded in  the second half of Miss
Marcus'  program.  SPORTS and RECREATION  Recreation Activities Set for
Summer  The biggest problem that will face Western recreation seekers will 
be choosing which ofa multitude of trips and activities offered they  have
time and money for.  As far as this goes, money wontbe much of a problem
since many  activities are planned for a minimum of expense.  The Dean of
Men'soffice is headquarters for making and paying for  all reservations.
Dates and ticket* ~—  Buchan's  TheGOOD Bread 
Bellingfiam Baking Co.  2001 State Phohe 913  prices will be posted in the
official  bulletinand posted on the recreational  bulletin board.  The .
summer program includes  trips aroundWashington and the  Northwest as well
as activities on  campus.  Following is the schedule of  activities:All
College Mixer, Friday, June 25  —an annual
get-acquainted dance  in the recreational hall.  LocalSightseeing Tour,
Saturday,  June 26—Tour of Bellingham and  vicinity by
bus. Will include Chuck-anutdrive and Larrabee State Park,  the Lummi
Indian reservation,  Gooseberry Point and Lake Whatcom.Devils Mountain
Hike, Saturday;  June 26—Thisx will be a warm-up  hike
to start the summer.  PhotoClinic, Tuesday, June 29— 
Stuart. Fresk on taking pictures.  Evening Boat Trip, Wednesday,  June
30.Mxed Recreation, Thursday, July  1—In the college gym
with square  dancing in the Rec hall.Winchester Mountain, Saturday,  July
3—A trail hike to the Winchester  mountain look-out. 
Threedays among the islands,  Saturday, July 3, to Monday, July 5 
—A three-day cruise on Puget  Sound.Featuring: . . . 
COSTUME JEWELRY  F. STANLEY NORMAN Jeweler  Hotel Leopold Lobby Ph.
S74Motorview Theatre  FRIDAY AND SATURDAY  Miss Sadie-Thompson  Rita
Hayworth and Jose Ferrer"Cow Country"  SUNDAY - TUESDAY  //W2-- r \u  n 
Vice Squad  Tonight We Sing  HIGHWAY 99NORTH  Moonlight Drive-In  FRIDAY
AND SATURDAY  Snows of Kilimanjaro  Gregory Peck and AvaGardner  "Henna
Lee'  SUNDAY - WEDNESDAY  "The Robe"  First Drive-in Cinemascope  in 
theNorthwest  GUIDE MERIDIAN  MAKE YOUR TRAVEL ARRANGEMENTS  TROUGH YOUR
LOCALAGENT  Williams Travel Agency  Hotel Leopold Building  Telephone 7310 
Salmon Barbecue, Wednesday,  July 7_Barbecued salmon by Chet  Ullin.  Mixed
Recreation, Thursday, July  8-  Cruise to Victoria,Saturday, July 
10—Eight hours aboard- the "Virginia  V" with a
five-hour stop over  in Victoria, B. C.Church Mountain climb, Saturday, 
July llr-A conditioning hike  before Mt. Baker climb.  Steak Fry
atLakewood, Wedens-day,  July 14—A well-fed get together
 at the school property on  Lake Whatcom.Mxed recreation, Thursday, July 
15. .'.•..  Kulshan Cabin trip, Saturday,  July 17 to
Sunday, July 18 — An  overnight trip to the college
cabin,  at the timber line of Mt. Baker.  Evening Cruise, Wednesday, July
21—Through the San Juans aboard  the S. S. Discovery. 
Mixed recreation, Thursday, July  22.Vancouver bus trip, Saturday,  July
24—A day in British Columbia's  largest city.  Mount
Baker climb,Saturday,  July 24 to Sunday, July 25 — The 
climax of the summer hike • program.  Mixedrecreation,
Thursday, July  29.  British Empire Games, Friday,  July 30 and Saturday,
July 31—  Sports.events in Vancouver, B. C,  similar to
the Olympic games.  Hannegan Pass hike, Saturday,  j u i y3i_This is
another hike in the  Mt. Baker area.  All-day boat trip, Sunday, August 
1—A cruise throughsome of the  San Juan islands. 
Evening cruise, Wednesday, July  4. :*'  Mixed recreation, Thursday,August 
5.  British Empire Games, Saturday,  August 7.  Chain Lakes hike, Saturday,
August  7—A, view of the Mt. Baker ski  area from the
new Heather Meadows  chair lift.  Steak fry at Lakewood,Wednesday,  August
11.  Mixed recreation, Thursday, August  12.  Sky Line Ridge hike,
Saturday,August 14—This is the last of the  hikes this
summer.  Players Needed for  'Mural Soft Ball;  Sign Up inGym  Sam Carver,
Men's PE, announces  that players are now needed for an  intramural
softball league.The  teams will play Tuesday and Thursdays  at 4 p. m. 
Either teams or individuals should  sign up with Mr. Carver or Roy 
Richardson in the PE building.  Western Students  Can See Theatre  Under
the StarsWestern audiences will be given  the chance again this summer to 
attend the performances of musicalcomedies. Performances are given  by the
Theatre Under The Stars  players starting June 28.  Accordingto Stuart
Fresk, co-director  for the summer recreation  program, a bus will
transport Westernspectators to and from Bellingham.  A block of seats will
;be held  for the arrival of the group. The  datefor the first trip is
still tentative.  If you are interested watch the  daily bulletin for an
announcement.  Theprogram for this summer includes  a two week run of each
of  the following, starting June 28:  "NewMoon," "Sweethearts,"
"Briga-doon,"  and closing with an extended  run of "Oklahoma:"  . o  Read
theCollegian ads before  you buy. They help support your 
paper—give them your business.  WWcollegianPage 4 
Friday, June 25, t?54  Recreation For  Summer Varied  To^Please All  By
STUART FRESKDirector, Summer Recreation  Program „  We
feel that Western Washington  college has a programsecond to  none. It
provides a variety of diversions  from the regular schedule  of study.
Activities on andoff campus  are of such a variety that almost  any student
can find something  enjoyable to him.The college and student-owned 
properties are available to students,  and some equipment is rented at alow
cost, sufficient only to cover  depreciation and handling.  MOUNT BAKER
CLUB  Those personsinterested in climbing  to the summit of Mount Baker 
are required to identify themselves  early in thequarter and are required 
to take the conditioning  hikes scheduled for several" weekends 
precedingthe climb. These  requirements are set up to assure  the
department that all climbers  will be adequatelyprepared and  conditioned
to insure the utmost in  safety.  Climbers are required to clothe  and
equipthemselves properly for  the ascent to the summit. Special  equipment,
not generally found in  one'spossession, can be rented from.  the
Recreation Department. A list  of required equipment will be posted,and
publicized prior to the climb.  Holly's Men's Shop  SUMMER FURNISHINGS  for
MEN  106 W. HollyFormerly Al's Cafe  OWL PHARMACY  Helena Rubinstein 
Cosmetics '  Holly and Cornwall Ph. 723  youpay only for our food... our 
atmosphere ;costs ypu^\nothjng  COMPLETE, FULL COURSE DINNERSComplete with
Fruit, Shrimp  or Crab Cocktail, Soup, Salad,  Potatoes, Vegetable, Hot
Rolls  Home-madePie and Coffee. 1 .25  and up  Open . . .  8 a. m. to 10 p.
m. Daily  Noon to 10 p. m. Sunday's  210CHAMPION  SPECIAL TODAY  HOT OR
COLD  ROAST TURKEY  PLATE  Complete with Soup,Vegetable, Potatoes, Hot 
Rolls with Butter and  Jam, Coffee.  ONLY 95*  PHONE 7703