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Collegian - 1963 May 17 - Page 1



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IBB WESTERN WASHINGTON STATE COLLEGE  CPlUEinM  Vol. LV, No. 25 Bellingham,
Washington ;F r i d a y , May 17, 1963  'Anchors Aweigh'  Pinafore' Crew
Battens —  Down For Opening Night  By Bob Graham  "We
sail t h e ocean blue  . . . .," and t h e delightful  songs of Gilbert
arid Sulliv  a n continueto echo  t h r o u g h t h e A u d i t o r i u m -
 Music Building as "H.M.S.  P i n a f o r e " nears its finalweek of
rehearsals.  The "Pinafore," a combined  effort of the Music and Speech
Departments,  will"heave to" in the  Auditorium this Thursday night,  and
will continue through May 25.  Show time eachnight is 8:15.  .SOME TIME
before, the show  opens, Ralph Rackstraw, a common  seaman, has fallenin
love  with Josephine, the daughter of  CAROL FERCH hints at a dark secret
as Don  Richter looks onpuzzled in t h e combined speech and  d r a m a
production of H.M.S. Pinafore slated for.  Thursday, F r id a y and S a t u
r d a y in the auditorium.  Reserved seat tickets go on sale Monday in the
box  office.Admission is 25 cents with ASB card.  Fallout Found In  lake
Whatcom  By Ray Burke  "According to t he Atomic E n e r g y Commission, '
t he  radiological fallout particles found in Lake Whatcom  a p p e a rto
be fission p r o d u c t s stemming.-.from Russian  thermo-huclear tesjdiig
d u r i n g ^ I ) e e e m b e r16, 1962-,"  s t a t e d Dr. Charles JFlora;
Biology Professor and co-dir  e c t o r f o r t h e L a k e ^ v ^ at c om
Study^ -  THE FACT THAT theseparticle^  are* in* ^akie ^natcdih ^fe 
interesting, but the amounts are  not large. They are almost
infinitesimal,"  he reassured. "However,  what will have happened  10years
from how?" he questioned.  After water samples have been  taken from Lake
Whatcom, the  20-gallon samples are transported  to the laboratory, located
in th^  former food preparation center  in theWomen'sResTdence' Hail;"  In
the laboratory, the: water in  the 20-gallon plastic - 'garbage-can- 
type"containers is evaporated  in smaller pans placed in  the oven.  After
four days of evaporation  the residue from a 20-gallon sample  is
approximately 4.5 grams.  This sample is sent to the University 
ofWashington's radiology  S e e " F A L L O U T ' rP3  his commanding,
officer, Captain  Corcorcan.. Little .Buttercup, a  buxom peddler-woman,
has, in  turn, fallen-in love with the captain.  Class pride,
however,separates  the natural inclinations of  both couples. In the
meantime, the  captain has arranged forJosephine  to marry Sir Joseph"
Porter,  First Lord of the Admiralty,  Act I begins on the quarter-deck  of
H.M.S. Pinafore with  the crew in preparation for the arrival  of Sir
Joseph. The merry  atmosphere isbroken only by  Buttercup's hints of a dark
secret,  Dick Deadeye's misanthropic  grumblings, and.the lovelorn  plaints
of Ralph and Josephine.  WHEN SIR JOSEPH comes on  board, accompanied by
-his sisters,  cousins, and aunts, Josephine  finds him nauseating. Ralph 
makes one final plea for his suit,arid when he attempts suicide, she 
agrees to-elope. - ~ :  In Act II, Dick Deadeye warns  CaptainCorcorcan of
the planned  ^ejopem^nk^e.,capfeun catches  the lovers attempting to "steal
 ashore" and -isso furious, he  swears.., Sir Joseph overhears the  foul
word and sends him to the  dungeon. He then findsout that  his beloved
Josephine loves: a  common seaman, and orders  Ralph to the dungeon,
also.LITTLE BUTTERCUP then reveals  her secret. It ^seems that  when she
was "young and charm-  See"PINAFORE" P 3  Tickets On Sale Tuesday  For Josh
While Concert  J o s h White, w h o h a s beenacclaimed as the greatest 
folk singer of our time, will  appear at 8 p . m. May 26 in  t h e
Auditorium.White, who was born in the  South, learned his art from the 
early street singers, among them  BlindBlake, Blind Lemon Jefferson  and
Blind Joe Taggart.  WHEN WHITE was 11, he played  secondguitar with Taggart
in  Chicago. Three years later a record  scout offered him $100 to go  to
New York for a recording session.  He went, under his mother's  stipulation
that he sing only  spirituals, no blues (toreligious  southern people,
blues were sinful).  However, White soon ran  out of spirituals and sang a
few  blues under the pseudo-name,  Pine Wood Tom. Church groups  praised
his spirituals, but blues  records established his reputation  as a singer.
 Just after White launched his  career, he cut his right hand ona milk
bottle and was advised to  have three fingers amputated. He  refused, took
a job operating anelevator, and nursed his nearly  paralyzed hand back to
health.  After four years he landed a  part in aBroadway show, "John 
Henry" and the critics applauded  his .art. Engagements in  Greenwich
Villageand smart  east side supper clubs followed.  Franklin D. Roosevelt
heard  one of White's record albumsand  invited him to the White House to 
sing many times, including presidential  inaugurationceremonies,  WHITE
ACCOMPANIED Mrs.  Roosevelt, as her protege, on a  concert tour of
Europe.He.sang  to sell-out crowds in England,  Norway, Sweden, Denmark and
 Scotland.  When White returnedto the  States, he made three movies,  "The
Walking Hills," "All that  Time Is Running  Out For SeniorsCommencement is
i n the  air, as more t h a n 350 seniors  p r e p a r e for graduation  J
u n e 14.  Thisyear's program will again  feature the traditional "Walk" 
down Memory Lane, and a special  tri-faithBaccalaureate.  Prior to
commencement activ-  See "SENIORS" P 3  Money Can Buy," and
"CrimsonCanary."  White received an honorary  Doctor of Folk Lore degree
from  Fisk University in Tennessee forhis scholarly research into the 
origin and development of folk  songs.  WHEN THE HOUSE of
Repre-resentatives  Un-American Activities  Committee began casting a 
suspicious eye on the loyalties  offolk singers, White went before  it in
Washington and spoke, for  40 minutes. He told the committee,"Better than
most people in  this room I know the blemishes  on American civilization.
But a  folk singer, itseems to me, is the  voice and conscience of his time
 and audience He tries to put into  words and music what those  around him
feel. This I shall continue  to do, with God's help, as  long as there is
sufferingand  discrimination around me and  freedom and equality to be won.
 But that's not Communism, even  ifCommunists try to use it for  their own
foul ends."  Tickets for White's concert will  go on sale Tuesday inthe
Viking  Auditorium for $1.25 with  AS card. There will be no reserved 
seats.  JOSH WHITE,acclaimed the greatest folk singer of  our time, will
appear at 8 p. m. May 26 in the auditorium.  Ticketsgo on sale Tuesday for
$1.25 w i t h AS  cards. White, who was born in the South, has performed 
allthrough the United States and in England,  Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and
Scotland.



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     Collegian - 1963 May 17 - Page 2



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PAGE TWO THE COLLEGIAN FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1963  Graustark Whelmbottom,
president  of theYoung Socialist-Communist  Revolutionary - Radical  party,
will speak Tuesday in "VU  103 on "Why ILike Goldwater."  Remember , . . 
We Specialize in  Diamonds — patches 
Silyer.— Fine jewelry  Also— Jewelry
and  Watch Repair  Milton E. Terry  JEWELER  1305 Commercial  Scholarships
Open To FallStudents |  Many scholarships are being offered  to returning
resident students  for the coming year.Scholarship  applications are due
May  25 and should be turned in at the  financial aids office in OM213. 
Awards will be based upon academic  achievement, faculty recommendations 
and financialneed.  The .scholarships fall into 13  general categories and
are for  -tuition and iees, .unless otherwisenoted. The class indicated is
the  one in which the applicant will  be next year. '  Any sophomore
mayapply ior  I still think the .opposition is going pretty far to win
•  the produce section of ENNEl^S T ™
JF ^ £ X • g  HIGH AND BOIXY 
•'WHERE-EVERY CUSTOMER  IS IMPORTANT"  the Saga
FoodScholarship, that  may be continued during the junior  and senior
years.  - The .Bjellingham Art leagueoffers  two grants of..|75 for art
supplies  to upper division meii or  women. Examples of art work  must
accompany the application  to Ruth .Kdsey of Western's Art  Department. s 
Upper division-studentspreparing  . for
Library-science„may..ap-ply  for the Western Library
Scholarship.  v THe Claude C.Aqpert^^ Chemistry  Scholarship is open toymen
or  women,^URper ..division gheinistry,  majors."'"/"Bellingham Publishing
Company  offers an award to juniors  majoring in journalism and may  be
carriedforward until graduation.  Two senior women in teacher  education
will receive scholar-of  Bellingham.ships from the Sqroptimist Club  A
Geology Scholarship will be  offered •in-' memory of
Marie  Pabst toany upper division student.  Any student whose mother or 
father is ah aqtive member of  the ^Eastern-Star or jyiasonic  Order in
,t;h£ state, of .Wjshjpgton  is 'eligible^pr the ^ a ^ e r n
St^r  Scholarship.  TheDaughters of The Pioneers  of Washington is offering
$200 to  a woman who is a descendent of  a pioneerwho came to Washington 
before 1870 or to the Oregon  Territory before 1853.  Any upper
divisionstudent is  eligible for the Bellingham Tug  and Barge Scholarship.
 After an audition with the musicdepartment, music majors may  apply .fQr
the Bellingham  Women's Club Scholarships '"'•  Western
isalso offering several  scholarships to men or women  in teacher education
or the arts  and sciences.WESTERN DEBATERS wen two trophiesin Hawaii
recently. Among W[esternites who attended are(toiMour on plane ramp) Clark
$ 0 $ $ ^ Larry Engholm. At  ::';far\lefX-;is-^cH^^L^irty.
•.•.... • ; ^ - ^ - ^
: - /'---^ . •- •. , . .
• ' • ,,  DATE SETTERS DATE SET ?: 
.The:,College calendar Gpmjnifc;  i e ^ ^|li?jtneet a t 4- p. " /nu..^eMesi
 $ay, ',in jHag^ard ^Hallv Ropm ^68.i  kepres!enta|iveS: from ^ l^gjrgupS;.
 ^iii^e^di in se^c^ng^atps jgnd|  mcilfties during gt;ihe' coimngy!ear 
Uhould attend. '•'"'•
'--]'•"-''' •  # y Roger .^ibby 
Western's contingent of sun-tanned, successful and  e x u b e r a n
tdebaters r e t u r n e d from the University of  H a w a i i I n t e r c o
l l e g i a t e Debate Tournament thisweek  w i t h vtwb trophies, a first
in senior oration by Clark  Drummond and a t h i r d place in senior i n te
r p r e t i ve  r e a d i n g by K a r e n Bruno.  MM IS THE TIME EOR THAT 
Ǥm j p p $ ^  WESPECIALIZE IN FINE GRADUATION
PORTRAITS  You don't liave to wait for your £AP W GOWN,
WEHAV£  JUKES STUDIO  108 N o r t h Commercial  RE4-7240  This J
s the iirst year Western  has beeninvited to participate in  the annual
Hawaiian tournament.  COMPETITION was against  large teams fromthe U. of H.
 an^d mainland universities such as  Willamette,' Pacific Lutheran of 
Stockton, California, andWashington  State.  Five team members traveled  to
ihe land of sunshine and pretty,  girls. Westernmanaged to  place
'contestants in four final  rounds. | n addition to her third  Karen Bruno
made the finalsin  senior e^emporanepus speaking,  and Patripia Itobney was
included  in ine final round of juniorinterpretive^  reading.  THOUGH NOT
placing in the  finals of debate, both the junior  and senior debateteams
were  victorious over several highly  ranked debate teams. The senior 
debate team, composed ofMrs.  Bruno arid Drummond, beat the  first place
debate team from Pacific  Lutheran. Richard Luty andLarry Engholm
represented Western  in junior debate and several  individual events.  We
Feature  THEBEST  For the  CQLLEGE MAN  CHILLER'S  MEN lt;S WEAR  1324
Commercial  While in Honolulu, thedebaters  were able to take Saturday and 
Sunday to enjoy themselyes. A  highlight of their enfe$ainment was' a
nine:CQurse Chinese meal  at the banquet, where various  native dances were
performed.'  OnSunday the group toured the  island. They viewed such
landmarks  as Pearl Harbor, Buddha  Temples, a Samoan village and  the
sugar cane fields. They also  sampled the sweet, juicy pineapples  at the
DolePineapple  Plantation.  The results were pleasing, to  Dr. John
Spalding, debate coach,  who accompanied the debaters on  their jaunt to
the island paradise.  He commented: ''Western students  discovered
thatthere is  something other them the image  of Hawaii as a vacation land.
 Even among college students itis becoming a place of East-West  meetings."
 DRUMMOND- was happy with  the trip, especially from the beginning.  He
explains: "I was met  by a warm, friendly greeting  from a very attractive
Hawaiian  girl,who presented me with a  kiss and a lei. I later found out 
that she was to be my main competition,placing second in oration."  Mrs.
Bruno observed: "The  spirit of the tournament was different  from any on
the mainland.  The contestants enjoyed pitting  their speaking skill
against  others, but weren't just out to  win. They sincerely appreciated 
a good job that was done by fellow  participants, and were eager  to say
so."



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     Collegian - 1963 May 17 - Page 3



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FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1963 THE COLLEGIAN PAGE THREE  SJ30WN P O N D E S t t
f© ov r iHW m a ny diHfcufr xriifesgons: d s k i * iir t h e
"Viking  Fi unV' is" on© -6f-ii^^l^i^£^^ jaM:.f^^'li
- tf "   *~ erAitetirf Uilfet  c a p l a i m ' a W i e a m m e l   ^  :
(Smiribte'te^ml which'letf ait" the  half-tim^ ";;by a score of 16fcl4ft 
fell behind in the secoiifl Half, but  iiea gt;ly won witli a strong come-u
 idts a  (Continued irompage 1)  ities, senior's must add the finishing 
touchesto, their1 college ca-reersvThbse.  receiying aB1A. in  education
mustpay $8 at'thebusi-ness  officd for theiV certificates  and placement
bureau fees.The  minimum" fee of $5 does not entitle  them to placement
bureau  services.  Fees tiiiist be paicT atleast twof  weeks before the end
of the quarter!  At this time, students also  sign an oath of
allegiance.Business obligations taken care  of, seniors will begin their
.graduation  festivities with theBaccalaureate  at 4 p. m. June 9th in 
the. Viking Union. The featured  speaker will be the Rabbi-Singerof ther
Temple De Hirsch^; in Seattle.  The commencement exercises  at 1 p. mi June
14 in CarverGymnasium  will feature as guest  speaker Dr. Sterling M.
McMur-rin,  author, former U.S.Commissioner  of Education, and now 
Professor of Philosophy at ;the  University of Utah. Dr. McMurrin will
speak-on "American Individualism  and The Future."  Following the
graduation and  Memory Laneceremonies, the  college will hold a reception
in  the Viking-Union for the graduates,  their friends andfamilies.  \\ f
lt;.  r  If  (Continued froiirpage l ) : r  ing" she practiced
''baby'nfarm-,  ing'' (illegal adoption).At that  time she nursed two',
babbies, one  highly born, and the: other lowly,-  and somehow she;
mixedthemupl  Theone"th'at was highly'bornwas  Ralph" and the other was"
Captain  Corocbrcan. r  With thischange in their social  positions, Ralph
and the captain  can marry their true loves, Josephine  andButtercup.
Sir-Joseph  condescendingly agrees to marry  Hebe, his cousin.  The cast
includes JerryThompson  as Sir Joseph Porter; K-.C.BV;  Don Richter as
Captain Corcor-can;  Bill Williams as RalphRack  straw; Bob Graham as Dick 
Deadeye; Eric Lee as Bill Bob-stay,  boatswain; Rex Turner as  BobBecket,
carpenter; Kay  Zatririe as Josephine; Carol  Ferch as Buttercup; and Betsy
 Glover as Hebe.Assisting from the Music Department  are Delbert
• Simon,  choral and vocal director,' and  Dr.
PaulStoner, director of  "Pinafore's" orchestra.  Reserved seat tickets go
on  sale Monday in the box'office.Admission price will; lie". 25 cents  for
students with ASB cards, and  $1 for the public.  By Program  Anew system
of organization  has made it possible for the Program  Council to offer
several positionswhich have not existed in  past years.  AMONG THE NEW
positions  beiiig offered is that of activitiescoordinator which is
salaried.  The activities coordinator will  serVe as administrative
assistant  to theprogram vice president as  well as organizing the
Homecoming,  the annual Christmas Sing  andKiddies' Christmas Party, the 
Snow Festival, popular name  entertainment, the Viking Forum, 
andrecreation tournaments.  All candidates must have a 2.4  GPA and at
least three quarters  of residence atWestern by next  fall. The position is
open to a  man or woman.  THE FOLLOWING committeechairmanships are open:
Exhibits  committee, music committee, recreation  committee (the chairmanof
this committee will also be  the Grotto manager; salary is  approximtaely
$20 a quarter plus  hourlywages), social committee,  performing arts
committee, publicity  committee (two positions  available)arid public
affairs committee  (the chairman of this  committee will serve as liaison 
between the PublicAffairs: Commission,  previously National Student 
Association, and therPrp-gram  Council).Applications may be picked up, 
filled -out and returned to the  program council this week.  State
StreetLaundromat  NexiioYMCA  Save time! We wash, dry  and fold your
clothes  in 136 hours —  Just Wash,% hour
— no  need to wait!  Phone REgent 4-1650  The Northwest
AnnuaLTouring  ExHlBitibnycontaining 34 works:  fr6m/the 48 :
AnmfatJExhibitibn  of ift^westr Artists;, isT currenfriy  ondisplayatr.tne?
studior gallery  of the;Ari^ Builmn]* The-paint^  ings; in thK exhibit wbre
chosen  from" among the212'top entries in  the'annual.  '
• •
.-••;./-  Commenting onthe exhibition, 
critic ThelmaXehmanrt noted;,  "Whether Northwest artists^are  taking a
backward look in search:  of something moreto say, whether  they are still
breaking form  oii their  lt;wifr to the freest possible'  expression,
orwhether the jury  simply rejected' the more avant  garde works, all are
moot possi-bHiflesi"  Works fromAlaska, British  Columbia, Montana, Idaho,
Oregon!  and Washington, €39 in all-were  judged: by
afive-man jury  which inciuded artist Sam Black  from Vancouver B. C.,
sculptor,  Ray Jensen fromBellevue, arid  artist Writh McCoy, Spokane, 
Gordon Woodside, director of  "Fallout"  (Continued frompage 1)  laboratory
for analysis. In the  laboratory "the variety and abundance  of
radiological fall-but par-'  tides is studied," Flora explained.  . /'Soon
at Western, part of the  Physic's and Cheinistry Depart-'meiits, under the
direction of Di*.  Edward Neiizil, will be testing  the content of
radiological pair-iicles.Western has a multi-channel  analyzer that,
count's particle,  rates', aiicf tlie kinds of particlesemmitted frpm; the
radiological  material,^' Flora noted. \ ;  Seattle's, Woodside Gallery and
 RichardFulfer',; director' of the  Seattle1 Art Museum.  ;;",;_Y./-' / . _
• ; ; • ' - , • ;:  r
THE' GAIiLERY isopen frbni  8 p^ni. to 5 p^mV Monday through  Friday arid
from 7 p.m. to $ p.m.  Tuesdays and'Wednesdays. The  exhibit will run
through May 26.  Melgo# Wins Vik Forum  By Lyle Nichols  . , TheVikirig
Union lounge was filled to capacity  Monday nighl as over 300 s t u d e n t
s came t o w a t c h t he  final rounds of Viking Forum, Western's version
of  t h e General; E l e c t r i c College Bowl.  DR;HERBERT TAYEOfe,
professor  of anthropology, fired questions  to four finalist teams led
byCaptains "Austin "Ozzie" Miller,  Victoria  gt; Criscuold, Bob Helgoe 
and Noel /'Scotty". Cimino. Mffl-jer's.  and Criscuola teams were 
eliminated"-. in the, semi-finals,  which pitched .Cimino's and
Hel-goe's"teams against each other  in the firiar round. -  In a";
hard-fought battle, Hel-goe's.  group, with team7members  ^Richard Araway;
Kay Dever, and  :Nick Pettit, walked off with top  honors: arid $100 in
prizemoney  by/defeating; Cimino's group 240-^  2^5y In addition to leading
his  $eain to; yictory and the $100,first  prizi^ monCy, Relgoe won $lb for
 hffisdf: by being the highiest iri-dlvidual  scorer in the contest.  back
in the closing minutes of the  contest. Cimino, who is a sophomore  from
Edinborough, Scotland,  andhas only been in this country  two years,
answered nearly all  the questions on American history,including some
relatively  obscure facts on the presidency.  Coriipetitibn between "one of
 Western's all-star teams and a  team chosen' by Central will be  held at
7:30 p.m. Thursday in the  VU lounge. At thissame time,  another team from
Western will  be competing at Central.  WE FEATURE A  COMPLETELINE  OF  *
CONTACT LENS  "FIRST AID KITS"  * GREETING CARDS  * GIFTS  * PRESCRIPTIONS
•  S t a l e a n d H o l l y Streets  P h o n e HE 3-1213
 6t gt;^N 'TIL 9 P. M. DAILY  MB of C ScrambleGame No. X%  EARNS fNtJEREST
At 3^%  This is wHat you do wlieh you place money In tnft  bank. AnNBo'fG
savings account is just the ticket  ias' iTs^uldent's
"^cation—or any other activity of  purchase that require
money to be set aside.  NATIONAL BANK OF COMMERCE  B e l l i n g h am
Office: 128 E. Holly S t r e et  S h e r i d a n P. Gallagher, V.P. and
Mgr.  Young man needed for summer expansion. Work in production order 
department of large AAA-1 Company. .  S t u d e n t s showing a b i l i t y
may r e m a in w i t h company on part-time basis next  semester, arid m a
y qualify for company scholarship p r o g r a m / A p p l i c a n t s who 
qualify can earn an excess of $112.00 a week if accepted. For
appointmentplease call: - S t u d e n t Piacemeht Mamager at office nearest
your home.  Spokane Office  MA 4-9331Seattle Office  MU 2-6083



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     Collegian - 1963 May 17 - Page 4



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PAGE FOUR THE COLLEGIAN FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1963  to comfort the afflicted ; ; 
arid afflict thecomforted;  finster's frat row fun time  Mervin Finster. is
a Greek frat man  at Western. Merv is really "up"on all  the neat frat
things that frat men do.  He's got a frat pin with beautiful gold  letters
that say Stigmata Chi.. Mervin  feels that the pin really puts him in the 
inner circle of the elite at Western.  Mervinmemorized the Greek alphabet. 
Mervin is going to giye his frat pin t lt;5  Gretta Funge at the next big
fratdinner  dance. Gretta's a Geek Geek Geek;sorority  girl. She thinks
debutantes are  "cherry."  Mervinknows the secret handshake,  backwardsland
forwards, he even gets  at least we tried  After threequarters of probing^
questioning  and searching, The Collegian  must finally admit defeat.
AssociatedStudent President Mike Hyatt just  hasn't made any big mistakes
this year;  -All seriousness aside,however, we  would like to commend Mr^
Hyatt on  what we consider an.outstanding/• job  and
anoutstanding contribution to student  government here at Western.  Many of
the programs Hyatt hasintroduced  have met with success, praise  to touch
the sacred skull in the frat  drinking foom of jet atthe house.Mery  and
Gretta make a nice:couple. Mervin  has a briefcase with t^e/ch^ip|er
Jelters;embossed onthe^sMeWlfealsoJeaiTie an^  umbrella which is reaper the
. cpplest  thing because,^letfsfface 1 ^ , 1^  just cool. He really
jg|tsVeJre^q^^eye|y-time  the house goes ^ei* toQserariacle(Gretta's
sorority sisters. Mervin takes,  an active interest in canipus activities 
by supporting all thecandidates bis  house runs f or Legislature.Ivleryin
also  digs rockalid jroll—color Mervin sick. 
—RichardF. Simmons; ^; /  gt; gt; t  and approval from
every corner of the  campus. Through his efforts at; therecent  Washington
State Legislature,  Westernites were saved an estimated,  $80,000 in extra
tuitionfees next year.  HyattJias left a positive ahcL iridelible  mark on
student government, a mark  that will beremembered and referred  to for
many-years to come.  gt;  : 0nce a^iii,\;Mike; many thaiiiks for  a fine j
ob and affirm hand on Western's  ship of s t a t e ^ ^ F S. 
congratulations *o jjrc^raM council  The ProgramCouncil Has risen its  head
from the sludge of student government,  and inaugurated "Viking
Forum,"which promises to be a perennial draw-*  card.  "Viking Forum"
excited the interest  of at least 300 peopleevery night that  it was
presented, snowing that the Program  Council has finally clicked
indetermining  a worthwhile event. Gary  Gerhard, program vice president,
and  other sponsors predict that at least 60  teams will enter the contest
next year  to compete for t he $100 prize and qualify  forcompetition with
other state schools'  representatives:
'.-';••---  Whether or not t h e
originators ofG.E.  College Bowl had campus competition  in mind
originally, they provided the  impetus and t h eprototype for our "Viking 
Forum" and other similar programs.  This year's campus all-star team
willrepresent Western against Central sometime  later this month. We hope
they  will perform wrell and add to the success  of this well oriented
program.  —Noel V. Bourasaw.  TAYLOR APOLOGIZES 
Editor,The Collegian:/ : ,  I was remarkably impressed with the-perf
ormance  of the students participating in theViking Forum semifinals  and
finals and remarkably, depressed with the  performance of the moderator." I
n at least three instances, palpably bad rulings  were made by the
moderator which might havematerially  affected the outcome of some of the
contests. It  i s my belief that t h e best team won; Iwish that I could 
be sure thatjwere so. .'••..',  It was
s^rry perfprmarice on my part; theparticipantsI  and tne^audienCe have my
apologies. Sincerely,  ^^^^^\ - ; 1
••hr•••••'•
.Herbert Taylor  LOYALTY OATJIS ^ lt;-.  Edito, The CoHegiaiir- ^ ^
•*;  Afederal court lias upheld :-a  loyalty oath
forfaculty at state  coHegfes in Washirigton gt;State. This  is-anothet
cifepter ih-the centur-le^  old^ history ~ of such -negative'  ibathsv
;•••?;•
' .'- gt;•'*''"~%y-. •-  .Some sincere
citizens '-urge  them as a bulwark to the citizens  arid the nation, but i
s e »them  as ^ejgiatiye in\\:orm and value as  now used. /
'"•,"  History questions their efficacy.  From; thetime
of the Pelopon-riesian  .Wars, traitors have rushed  to take such oaths,
publicly and  withbreastbeating. We search  tfie record in vain to "see
where  siich path potions have forestalled  one colic in the body politic! 
History questions their wisdom.  During the protestant - catholic 
strugglesJn the 160p'sin England,  the momehtaily prevailing sides 
alternated- in requiring ever-in-creasing'numbers  of theopposite  faith
to^take oath after "contradictory.'  path. As late as reconstruction  times
in bur nation,,my  forebearers were; ordered to take  various oaths to
resume their  place in public affairs in the  south,and the TJ. S. Supreme 
Court had to nullify these vindictive  provisos. ^ -  Please,note 1 do not
opposeloyalty  oaths per se. I would that  your readers could support with 
me the delightful "and .penetratingoath of Realty used in the medieval 
kingdom of Aragon. Lewis  Mumford quotes it in Culture of  Cities:"we, who
are as good as  you, swear to you, who are not  better than we, to accept
you as  our king andsovereign lord, provided  that you observe all our 
liberties and laws; but if not,  then not."  HERB LEGG, Olympia, Washington
 SPEECH CpMPETENCY  Editor, Iffiie Collegian:  It is known that this
sublimelittle college is becoming more  'like a four story jiuthouse where 
all thp -tcrap' shifts down from  the top;but^the latest requirement 
placed upon some transfer  students is, by far, the biggest  'pile' yet..
Thosestudents: who  were so foolish as to have had  the audacity to presume
that  other collegiate institutions in  these United States are capable  to
teach speech competently have  now been ..informed that they  were sadly
mistaken.  I-am referring to one of the  daily bulletins of last week which
 informed transfer studentswho  had not taken a speech class at  Western,
but at some' other institution,  that they must now take a speech
competency test. One  can plainly see the inference in  this!  I am not
writing this letteFbe-cause  the requirement affects  me, for it does not.
I am irritated  by the insinuation made by some  of ourcollege
administration who  are responsible for this latest  requirement that other
colleges  areincompetent. F. A. Rowe  The Collegian  Editor-in-Chief 
Richard F. Simmons  Managing Editor NOELBOURASAW  Business
Manager.......'.DAVID P. BENSELER  Copy Editor JEANNE -SMARTPhotographers :
!.CAL COLE  BOB WITTMEIER  Sports Editor RAY OSBORNE-Feature  Editor
RAYBURKE  Political Editor........GEORGE P. TOULOUSE  Women's News... LINDA
KLEVE  Secretaries:SUE PLOTTS, KAREN GRANMO  Reporters: DAVE BRICE, FRED
DUSTMAN,  LINDA FINNIE, KENGEARY, RICK  HOMME, ROGER LIBBY, JUDY Mc 
NICKLE, SUSAN WEIR, LYLE NICHOLS.  (Question has arisen recently as to the
feasibility  of inaugurating a Cjreek fraternity and sorority system 
atWestern. In order to inform the students as to  the merits or demerits of
the frat system we have  includedin this week's issue excerpts from an
Associated  Press: poll which describes the position of  theGreeks in
today's society—Editor)  New York
(CPS)—That most venerable and most  debatedinstitution,
the American college fraternity,  is entering a significant period of
change, the AssociatedPress has decided.  Noting widespread debate on the
merits of the  Greek system throughout the U. S.educational community  this
year, the AP polled 150 campuses across  the nation to discover whatchanges
have been wrought  in the fraternity system as a result of the
controversies  of the past fewyears.  The debate, of course, has raged for
decades. The  Greeks will tell you that the fraternity is theinvaluable 
inculcator of self-reliance, the social graces, group  democracy, and
scholarship in theotherwise hapless  student masses. And the non-Greek will
tell you that  the fraternities are the last refuge of the bigots, snobs, 
and rich men's sons who need a crutch to get them  through school.  Last
year,Williams,College^ in Massachusetts, a  general liberal arts school
steeped in the ancient fraternity



     ----------

     

     Collegian - 1963 May 17 - Page 5



     ----------

     

FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1963 THE COLLEGIAN PAGE FIVE  Burke Receives  Cummings
Award  Publications r e p r e sentatives  from Western, Bellingham and 
Whatcom County crowded into.  Booth's ChickenDinner Inn last  week for the
College's annual  publications banquet.  Collegian reporter Ray..
BurkeSolons  Big  Budget  By Judy McNickle  A $100,000 budget won approval 
of AS legislator at their weekly meeting Monday and was passed  on to the
administration.  THE BUDGET, presented by  Stan Pownell,finance chairman, 
represents an increase of over  $14,000 largely due, according to  Pownell,
to theaddition of a  building contingency fund which  was instituted to
cover maintenance  and repair costs ofthe VU.  WITH THESE reasons for the 
increase in mind, Pownell expressed  his hopes for a favorablereaction by.
the administration  and noted, "The chances for approval  should be
relatively good."  Inaddition, the finance chairman  commended the
legislators  for the preparation they showed  indiscussing the budget, but
expressed  disapproval over their  decision to reduce the number  of
AS-sponsored dances from 18  to 14.  •
• •  Following passage of the decision 
by an 8-6 margin,debate  arose concerning the voting power  of AS President
Elect Neil  Murray, who had voted in favor  of the decision.  Presenting
his objections, Gary  Gerhard, program; vice president,  read a passage
fromRobert's  Rules of Order, which pointed  out that ho officer-elect had 
voting privileges.  Murray, whohad been voting  due to his position as
legislator,  accepted Gerhard's proof, retracted  his vote, butasked "I 
only wonder why it was brought  up now?"  • . .
• • •  ..Other
actions taken by thelegislators  while discussing the budget  included
approval of the reduced  -Klipsun budget. Thisreduction  which will result
in a  smaller, more compact annual  with a soft-back cover, was approvedby
a 12-2 margin and  backed strongly by Joel Lanp-hear,  legislator.  AFTER
HAVING looked into  thematter," Lanphear noted, "I  think it's really an
excellent idea.  The new annual will be more  than a bunchof
pictures—it will  have something to say."  Adding his
support to the legislators'  decision wasCollegian  Writer George Toulouse,
who  shortly thereafter was appointed  1963-64 Klipsun editor. 
•• •  Lead by
AS-President Mike  Hyatt, they approved a resolution  asking that
theadministration  keep rugby as an intercollegiate  sport.  received the
Nora B. Cummings  award for"Outstanding Service  to Journalism." The award
was  presented before a crowd of 60  students, faculty,local editors  and
publishers.  PUBLICATIONS Advisor James  Mulligan presented the
KlipsunOutstanding Staffer Trophy to  Linda Kleve and Barbara Sivie-- 
sind.  Collegian reporting trophies  went toNoel Bourasaw, fall  quarter;
Susan Plotts ^nd Jeanne  Smart, winter- quarter, arid to  Judy McNickle
forspring quarter".  Outstanding staff certificates  and pins were
presented to 30  reporters and writers byKlipsun  Editor Gary.Sirguy and
Collegian  Editor Dick Simmons,  CARSON BOYSEN, Synchysis 
editor,represented Western's literary  magazine. . • - .
.„  Dr. Alex Edelstein; of the University  ofWashington
communications  school, spoke On some of  the sociological aspects of
journalism  andcited a few' studies  made by the University.  Edelstein has
recently been  awarded this year's FulbrightScholarship in journalism. Only
 one scholarship is awarded to a  journalist a year. Edelstein will  leave
forCopenhagen, Denmark,  this summer. '  RAY BURKE/Collegian reporter,
receives " T h e Nora  B.Cummings Award for Outstanding Service to 
Jounalism," as James H. Mulligan, director of publicinformation at Western,
looks on. This award, along  with others gt; was presented at the
recentPublications  Banquet which was attended b y 60 s t u d e n t s ,
faculty,  local editors, and publishers.Dr. €. Innwerseif
 ometrist  Phone RE 4-7720  207^ East Holly Bellingham  RIGHT ACROSS FROM
THEROYAL  GENERAL EDUCATION  COMPETENCY TESTS  All seniors to be graduated 
this spring orsummer are required  to report to L-4 at 9 a. m.  on
Thursday, May 23, for the  general competencytests.  These people will be
excused  from classes from 9 to 12 neon.  The tests are the first step
inevaluating the Humanities program  at Western.  MOONLITE  Now Until
Tuesday — Dusk  MAW  WDIRKBOGARDE  COMING WEDNESDAY 
BUCK NIGHT  HORIZONTAL LIEUTENANT  Color  Jim Hutton, Paula Prentiss  also
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     ----------

     

     Collegian - 1963 May 17 - Page 6



     ----------

     

PAGE SIX THE COLLEGIAN FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1963  Coach Charles Lappenbusch and
h i s Vikinggolfers  w i l t t r a v e l toTJie I n d i a n Wells C o u n t
r y Club i n Spokane  t h i s weekend as t h e E ve r g r e e n Conference
champions  h i p and district finals conclude their season compet  i t i o
n . --. . , • y  The Viking putters will be out  to
defend their conference title in  this sport in the weekend oftournament 
play. Western is the pre-tournament  favorite, having compiled  an 8-4
record in golfcompetition  this year. The individual  golfers will be
shooting for a berth  on the conference team thatwill  travel tQ..the
National Intercollegiate  Golf Tournament in Kansas  City later this month.
^ .  TomBearmen is playing number  one for the Vikings and-has  shared
match medalist honors  with teammate Rich Weihe in  most of Western's golf
wink this  year. Bearmen, . who came to  Western "from GraysHarbor College 
last year, will be trying for a  return trip to the nationalJourney.  JOE;
RICHER, asqphohibre  basketball |tar for the ViKsVplays  number two on the
team and' has  displayed fine golf talentthis  year. Rich Weihe has been
third  man in Western's dueling trial  Weihe • started;
the season inposition  number one, but has since-]-the  fallen behind
Bearmen and Richer  in varsity competitioh. This Bell-ingtiam  putter, a
junior with great  promise, demonstrated, earlier  this seasofr that lie
can play the-sport,  as he shot a commendable  three uridier par 67 at the
Belling-ham  Golf and Country Club.  SeniorJim Jorgerison is the  old-timer
of the Viking squad,  having lettered in the sport three  years. He is a
solidgolfer and is  no stranger to winning, for he  made the 1961 team that
went to  the NAlA NationalTournament.  Ted King and Mike Strada  round out
the varsity squad, and  both of these men have beenproven'  consistent
performers for the'  Viks this year. King, a senior,  has been pushing the
leaders allseason. Strada came to Western  this year from Grays Harbor and 
has moved right into varsity action:"*". „ :
•- lt;• gt;  COACH LAPPENBUSCH has  his
golfers going in fine fashion,  as they havecome along steadily  all year.
Lappenbusch, who has  had no' golf training, has coached  team to
victory,and he has  won the respect of his team for  the drive that he has
exhibited in  his coaching effort thisseason.  VIKIN6 G b L F ^ R f , $ f r
t gravel to Spdl iie thi£ weekend to match irons for: top 
holttors ii{fte E y | ^ Tom Bearmen, Mike Strada,  T^d King#. J im ^ 
Winning second place : in  the NorthwesternInterMlegiate  '.'Singtehanded''
(penquin.class)  Sailing Regatta last wee fid was  Jerry Elfendahl,
'VikingYacht  Club commodore. . r  He placed/seoiond with an overall 
pointtotal of 43% in the regatta  heldon Lake Washington, Seattle.  Host
scfrbol for the regatta  was the University of Washington.Western's Jay
Hartland placed  third with an overall point total of  34. Herb Chatterton
from; the  U. W.placed first with 44%  points'"'(%• of'
apmiii over Elfendahl)  and Bill Gilbert from Reed  University,Portland,
with 33,  was fourth. "  -• Because of the Viking
sailors'  performances:c last r weekend,'Western qualifies for the
semifinals  of the Intercollegiate Sin-glehahded  CfiampionsKips for the 
"O'DayCup-' to be held iri Boston,  Mass! .Jun^ 22 and, 23^" Elfendahl 
said. "Jay Hartiahici will  represent.Western there." .;  "Actually,
Western had the top  6ver:aii place at l^e
NorthwesternIntercpUegiateRegatta last weekend  because we had the largest 
accumulation of poults of thecolleges  represented. ^  "This win for lis
also; makes; us  eligible, to represent the Belling-ha1m  area in the
North.American  'Mallory Cup' eliminations (the  men's championship sailing
 event) June 22 and 23 at the Corinthian  Yacnt Club in Seattle.  Hans'
Torklep, Larry knight ahd  I will represent: this area then,"Elfendahl
explained.^ "We_ hope  some Western students will come  down and cheer us
on."  The VikingYacht Club will be  conducting a car wash to raise  money
for thesfe trips! "The car  wash 'will be held,today from 2  to 7 p.m. at a
service station located  at the intersection of Garden  and' Holly
Streetsfor 75 cents  per car," Elfehdahl said. "We'll  let the owners,
spend the extra  25 cents for gas so theycan speed  down the freeway to dry
them  off,'' he quipped.  Ml:  $mmmm  By Jeanie Smart  The role ofthe
newspaper in the American society  is an important one! The newspaper
serves to  inform thepeople, influence them, and contributes  to the
economic balance of our society.  THIS FACT. WASbrought out. along with
several  others at a recent "Faculty Speaks" program in  which Richard
Reynolds,Director of Activities, and  Jamies Mulligan, Director of Public
Information, spoke  on the topic of the day,"Newspapers".  Newspapers are
an important source of information  and ideas, and they are well worthany
subscription  rate, according to Reynolds. "Where else  can you get news,
ideas and opinions for$2 a month?"  he asked.  Both speakers agreed that
newspapers have at  their disposal one of thegreatest means of influence 
available. "This can be done through newspaper items  which are slanted
andthrough editorials and opinions  expressed,1 along with subtle
application of layout  techniques whichmake some news more 'readable'," 
Reynolds noted.  , ALSO COMMENTING on the influence of thenewspaper,
Mulligan said, "Within a given set of  circumstances, the "newspaper can be
very influential; in other cases it may not be. The amount of  influence
will depend on „the reader's frame of mind,  Role 
RICHARD REYNOLDS—"Where else can  you get news, ideas
and opinions for $2.00  a month?"  'More People Read The Comics. 
background, and his ability to overcome,prejudice."  Mulligan, answering
acharge that newspapers  are all the same and lack origMaHty said/"Each 
paper will play a story in adifferent way. Editors  do not have the same
values and judgements when  it comes to news. You cannotexpect them to!" 
The discussion then moved onto, the importance  of advertising in the
newspapers. Thetwo agreed that  advertising is important both to the public
and to the  advertiser.''  "ADVERTISINGSERVES to keep the public  abreast
of new trends and developments in products  and at the same timecreates a
desire to buy. Business  drops off where newspapers go on strike," Reynolds
 said.  In answerto the criticism that newspapers print  too much
insignificant news, Mulligan brought out  the fact thatnewspapers are
printed for the mass"  audience; and that in every readership study it has 
been found thatthe mass will read the trivial or insignificant  rather than
the significant.  "People will read the 'light'features more frequently 
than the 'heavy nejvs," he said. "This is  not limited to the uneducated.
College graduates'  reading habits do not differ a great deal from those 
of lesser educated people."  PEOPLEWHO WISH:more detailed coverage,  more
opinion, and more 'class' appeal have a choice  of some 8,500magazines
published in this country, he  added.  In response to a question about poor
representation  of news by some newspapers and how they can  get'^way with
this, Mulligan had this to say:  "THIE ONLYCONTROLS exercised over news- 
'p'a^ers;are';-by'the'Federal Trades Commission, which)cq^^T
i'M^tSi^g-_Sid\-eTGsmg, the threat of libel  p^ertainSig; to personal
injury, and the post officeregulation's  against using the mails for
distribution of  porhb^aphic material."  , "I would prefer wetolerate this
sort of trash  on' the, Market, to an agency that would exercise* control! 
Once'a^government agency sets itself up in any  way to control the mass
media', you will wish it neverhappened," he continued.  Reynolds pointed
out that the reader can help  prevent misuse of the"newspaper by various
means.  "We should be oh our toes to criticize if it is misused,  and we
must do ourbest .to contribute what we can  by taking an interest,
criticizing, and1 writing letters  to the editor," hesaid.  Concluding the
discussion, Mulligan said, "The  press is not perfect—it
never will be, and the veryfact that it is hot is the evidence that it is
free."  "Magazines and Mass Culture" is the topic of  the next"Faculty
Speaks" program to be held at 4  p. m. Thursday in VU 11A. Featured
speakers will be  Roy I.Mumme, assistant professor of education, and 
Thomas P. Churchill, instructor of English.  JAMESMULLIGAN
— "I would prefer  this trash . . . to an agency that
would  exercise control."



     ----------

     

     Collegian - 1963 May 17 - Page 7



     ----------

     

FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1963 THE COLLEGIAN PAGE SEVEN  CincJerrnen Win TriiiiigMlar
Meet  The Vikingtracksters closed out their regular season  schedule
Saturday by overwhelming the University  of PugetSound and Pacific Lutheran
in a triangular  meet in Tacoma. Western piled up 93y2 points to 40 for 
PLUand 271/2for the UPS Loggers.  Western won nine of the 15  track and
field events of the afternoonclash. The distance men  once again made a
strong showing  as they, picked up three first  placefinishes and a total
of 35  points.  Distance man Dave Brown was  a double winner for the ,Viks,
as  hetook the mile aritf half-mile  events. Brown covered the mile 
distance in the time of 4:25.8.  TeammatesBob Summers, Ken  Coupland and
Jim Park followed  brown in that order as the Viks  took all four placesin
that event.  It was Brown who led -the waj  again in the half-mile, as he 
turned in a fine 1:57.5 effort forthe distance.  JIM FREEMAN was the
Western  victor in the two-mile. Freeman,  who has been aconsistent  winner
for the Viks all season,  made a bid for the Evergreen  SANDY AND VALE 
ShoeRepair  Join Lucky "7" Club  COLLEGE DEMANDS GOOD 
SOLES—KEEP THEM THAT  WAY  117-W.IIOLLY  (Next to The
toggery)  ,106 N. Commercial  ENDS $A^TOPAY  for Conference Title  3 y
JElayOsborne  Western's Tjaseballers ,cinched a first place finish  in the
Western division of Ahe Evergreen-Conference  last week as they defeated
the second place Pacific  Lutheran Knignts in a double-header atCivic
Field.  The first place finish earned the Viks the right to play  the
Eastern Washington Savages forthe conference  championship at Spokane this
weekend.  • THE VIKINGS came on strong  in the
latterstages of their regular  season action, as they won  in their last
five outings. Their  big win was a 2-1,ginning win  oyer the highly-rated
.diamond  scuiad from' the University of  'Washington. Kim Wilsqh'hurled: 
,-for ;fhe Viks, as Gary ^Axtell tallied  both ]ot :West^rn's runs! ' 
•••' Coach
ChuqkBan^all-s -team  clirichied a tie for ^the .diyisipn,  title !|ast
week ]y0?''.'£ ! ^ I ^N  h££der win
pveriHe,^n^r5iiy-,ipf:  J$0t Sound. "•' The/.' ^ s ^ ^ ^
r e c i  fpuf runs in the"firsr^nniilg -M  tKp. fitst contest
ipJEfX(^er^it-cher  Dennis Pe^rsopi'" z  lt;%fipy  shelled Peterson for
ir|tjqe gt;-.^Qre  runs in fee second,irimn^t^nd  T^rry ^Parker
"qpn|^|^.^Ke'-Jp^.  batters ^as the \^ijcs .won the '-7-3  decision. Bili
tfleeftqrpitched a  ..tii're^hjtter for Western in the  second game as the
tV4kings came  out 'on the top of a 2$s$ote.  John Skov pitched Western to 
victory in the crucial first game  of itlie douljie-header $fth
\£LU1JJe j»itclieii a ''t)^ee^U|ter at Jthe 
jfc^iglks. Gary Axtell got tyro Hits  in |j o at-bats, 3s the .yits .won 
2,-1. JVestern took the nightcap  and the division .title by a 4^0  score.
JThe Vikings showed a well  balanced hitting attack and they  played
errorless ball to back up  Ken Schulz' three-hit effort in  winning
ithecontest.  THIS AFTERNOON the Viks  .will''meet5 the Eastern division 
chanipions at Sopkane in the firsttwo games of a ,b^st;pf-three  series!
The baseball event is one  of the weekend attractions that  is takingplace
at Eastern Washington  State College, as they are  hosting the annual
sprjng s'portchampionships. Golf, tennis, baseball  and track will crpwn
their,  conference " champions, in thisweekend's action at Eastern. 
Centrales favored in the tennis  and track events, while Western  appears
tobe.the strong contender  for the baseball  gt;nd golf  titles/
':'".'•.  .... _:.cp«iT— f
::  STEVEMcQUSfeN  FOR THREE DAYS  Mm. ,WW  Ttmmm/nmim  '. Released thfu
UNITEDfflARII! gt;IS^'  —CO-HIT — 
BURT LANCASTER  JUDY GARLAND  in  "A CHILD IS  WAITING"  Conference record
"lorthe two-mile  distance and his time fell  just four seconds short of
the  mark ,as lie finished in 9:28.8.Summers took second for Western  in
this event.  In the sprints, it was Don Mer-rit  who carried the BigBlue to
 victory. Merritt ^on the 100 with  a time of 10 flat, and came back  to
take the 220 in 22.2. DonRie-land  backed up Merritt's effort  by taking a
third in the 100-yard  dash event and finishing second  inthe 220.  GALE
PFEULLER p l a c ed  strong in the hurdle events for  Western. He won the
high hurdleswith a : 16,3 clocking, and placed  second in low hurdle event.
Webb  Hejster,; after not placing in h" isstrong event, the highs, came 
back to take third in the lows.  -WESTERN PICKED up 36V2  points in
thefield events as they  shojyed: good; depth in every  event. Dick Nicholl
gathered 12  counters for the Viks.After placing,  fourth in the 100,
Nichpll pro-ceded  to the field events where  he picked up two firsts anda 
fourth place finish. The Western  strong man took the shot put with  a toss
of 49' 11M", and won thediscus with a distance of 135' 2".  THE BELLINGHAM 
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     ----------

     

     Collegian - 1963 May 17 - Page 8



     ----------

     

PAGE EIGHT THE COLLEGIAN FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1963  Crow Returns From Florida 
Dr. Lowell T. Crow,assistant  professor of psychology at Western, 
presented a paper recently  to the internationalconference on  "Thirst in
The Regulation of Body  Water" at Florida State University  in
Tallahassee,Florida.  The conference, first of its  kind on this particular
topic, was  attended by psychologists,medical  doctors, and biologists from
 many countries. Dr. Crow was  the only psychologist fromWashington  who
attended this international  symposium. The topic of  his paper
was"Subcommissural  Organ, Lateral Hypothalamus,  and Dorsal Longitudinal
Fasciculus  In Water and Salt Metabolism."  "I started the research on this
 problem when I was at the University  of Illinois," Dr.Crow  said, "when I
came to Western  in the fall I continued to work on  it, and last week I
presented mypaper to the conference."  Dr. Crow went on to say that  the
conference was a good chance  for peoplewith a common  scientific interest
to get together  and compare notes on a common  problem.  "Papers ofspecial
interest are  presented to the scientists by  people who have spent years
of  research on aparticular phase  of the topic," he noted.  "This was the
first such conference  in history, and we are  allhopeful that it will
become an  annual affair," He added.  •  KKK Soys Newby 
Negroes have t h e i rown c o u n t e r p a r t to w h i t e seg-r  e g a t
i o n a l i s t s according to Dr. Idus Newby, professor  ofHistory at
Western. Newby pointed this out last  S a t u r d a y on Al Swift's
television p r o g r amEmphasis,  on t h e local television station, KVOS. 
Discussing the topic "The Re  surgence of IdeologicalRacism,"  Newby and
four Westernifes,  Ralph Munro, Karen Davidson,  Frank Eaton and Joan
Stendal,probed into this problem which  has attracted national attention 
because of the tinderbox conditions  ofrace relations in the  South.  In
response to a question by  panelist Munro, Newby commented  on theBlack
Muslim  jnovement:  "There is ho fundamental difference  between the
ideology of  the BlackMuslims and the White  Segregationalists," he said.
"The  Black Muslims are the Ku Klux  Klan of theAmerican Negroes.  They are
as much against integration  as are the White Segregationists,  and
forsimilar  reasons, the only difference being  that they believe in Negro
supremacy  over the whites."Newby pointed out that this  movement, however,
has not gained  widespread /support from the  DR.FRANK D'ANDREA, chairman 
of the Music Department,  wil lead a discussion on "The  Taste of Music" on
KVOS "Emphasis"  at 3 p. m. Saturday.  American Negro, but that extremist 
groups on bothsides have  re-emphasized ideological bases  for their
segregationalist policies.  "ANTI-NEGRO groups, for instance,  using
intelligence' tests  as signs of Negro inferiority, have  established an
ideologicalrationale  for their belief in segregation,"  he noted. "Ultra
right-wingers  have supported these  racistscientists, even though 
psychologists, psychiatrists and  sociologists have refuted supposed 
scientificevidence c|f Negrci  inferiority."
:''•'•....'L-  "The Black Muslims
feave. done  this, also, by citing thesuperior  physical capabilities of
the Negro  as evidence of his racial superiority,"  he added.  The
panelconcluded that the  press sometimes "blows things  out of proportion"
when covering  racialdisturbances, and that  by doing this they are
violating  social responsibility. They also  noted that mostsouthern
scientists  have not accepted Negro inferiority  as a scientific truism, 
and that only a Jewscientists are  used as a source of quotation to  back
up the principles of "ideological  racism;"SUPERIOR  CLEANERS  8 lbs.
..:.„....l....:..$2.00  CLEANED   SPOTTED  ALSO  Finished
Garments at  Student Discount Laundry  Service.  STUDENTS  ESPECIALLY 
WELCOME  1140 STATE ST.Tozer's Prescriptions  316 E. HOLLY  STRETCH YOUR
EDUCATION  DOLLAR WITH US WHEN YOUNEED  DRUGS OR PRESCRIPTIONS  Phone RE
3-9260  FREE DELIVERY  The papers which werepresented  at the symposium are
now  being published in book form by  the Florida State Universitypress 
and should be available in about  90 days.  Notices  By publication of
these notices  students are deemed to  be officially notified of any 
events or obligations indicated.  FINAL EXAMINATIONSCHEDULE FOR  SPRING
QUARTER 1963  Classes meeting once or twice  weekly will holdexaminations
at  the last regularly scheduled session.  Classes .meeting three or  more
times per weekwill hold  examinations as scheduled below.  The last
regularly scheduled  classes will meet Friday, June7.  CLASS EXAM HOURS 
Monday, June 10—  ?;00 a;m. .-..9:00-11:00 a.m.  1:00
p.m. ------ 1:00- 3:00p.m.  Tuesday, June 11—-  11:00
a.m. . . 9:00-11:00 a.m.  2:00 p.m. -..----1:00- 3:00 p.m.  Wednesday,June
12—  8:00 a.m. . : . . . .9:00-11:00 a.m.  12:00 noon
..-._..1:00- 3:00 p.m.  Thursday, June 13-r10:00 a.m. . -.9:00-11:00 a.m. 
3:GO p.m. 1.-1:00- 3:00 p.m.  Philosophers To  Hear Tillich  "Religion
andthe Arts" will be  the topic of a speech to be read  by Dr. Stanley
Daugert, of, the  Philosophy Department, at a  meeting of the Philosophy
Club  at 7:30 p.m. May 20 in the VU  Lounge.  The speech was
originallygiven  by Dr. Paul Tillich, a noted philosopher  who teaches at
Harvard.  The general topic covered by the  speech is _the estrangement
between  religion arid art, and a  possible method of viewing
theirreconciliation.  By and large, it is an existentialist  analysis of
the problem,"  Daugert said. "The lectureshould  prove interesting to
humanities  students and especially to artists  and students of art." 
Daugerthopes the speech will  stimulate a lively discussion and  encourages
all interested students  to attend.EARTH SCIENCE  FILM SCHEDULE  May
16—"Great Lakes and  How They Were Formed" and"Glacier
Park Studies."  May 23—"The River."  These films will be
shown at  4 p. m. and 7 p. m. in H-348.  All earth science students and 
others, interested should attend.  Typewriter  and  Adding  MachineSales, 
Service  and  Rentals  We carry all makes of portables  and used machines. 
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Ferhdale, Wash.  Phone DU 4-1463  Go places gal—go by
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