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Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 1



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T l J E • WESTERN WASHINGTON STATE COLLEGE CalUBtiM THE 
FROSH  Vol. LVIII, No. 1Bellingham, Washington Friday, Sept. 17, 1965 
Welcome  to  Western  FRESHMAN



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page



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ONE-A THE COLLEGJ/VN FRIDAY, SEPT. 17  Students say, "We won't pay!' 
VANCOUVER, B. C.(Special)  Prices are going up and students  at the
University of British Columbia  don't like it at all.  The student body of
16,000 at the  campus will be asked to withold  their second term fees as a
protestagainst a recent hike in fees.  Byron Hender, president of the  Alma
Mater Society, the same asWestern's Associated Students,  said 40 student
leaders decided  on the protest after meeting with  theUniversity Board of
Governors  Aug. 11.  "The fee increase will cause  many students to make
afinancial  rather than an academic decision,"  he said. Basic fees were 
boosted $56 in May to $428." The Society has not decided  how students will
be advised to  withhold their fees. They pay the  first halfof their fees
when they  register in September and the  second half in January.  Hender
said the Board ofGovernors  was given a brief showing  that only 27.9
percent of male students  and 2.8 percent offemale  students earned enough
money to  fnance their university work.  Acting University President 
Dr.John McCrear said fees could  be lowered only if the federal  or
provincial governments increaseuniversity grants.  Last Spring at Western
and  other state institutions tuition  and fees were boosted $8 aquarter. 
Several students signed peti-tins  and letters to state legislators 
protesting the increase, but  to no avail. No further action was  taken by
the student body to protest  the matter.  THETp^ff AXtCmm  BELLINGHAM  The
raincoat that  takes a shine to any  kind of weather. The 
constantcompanion to  the girl who knows and  loves the impeccable 
tailoring and fine  fabrics of every LondonFog! Natural, blue,  ivory,
black, navy,  4-16 petite; 6-18 regular.  Rainwear, Second Flood  Men's
LondonFog Rainwear  Available in Our Men's Dept.  Store Hours 9:30 A. M. to
5:30 P. M.  Friday 9:30 A. M. to9:00 P. M. — 733-7270 
WESTERN'S COLLEGE Bowl team, pictured above, brought laurels home to
theHill. John Reeves  (left), Dick Araway, Karen Andersen and Don Des
Jardien won scholarships galore forWestern.  They also spread our name over
the country via national television.  kids great-back  East  Maywas a b a n
n e r month for Western as millions  of Americans watched the school's
four-member teamcompete in the nationally-tellevised General-Electric 
College Bowl.  May 16th the team of KarenAndersen, John Reeves, Don Des 
Jardien and Richard Araway  fought from a 70-point halftime  deficit tonip
Baldwin-Wallace  College 190-170.  The victory gave Western the  first win
for "a" team from the  Stateof Washington. Three previous  entries from
other schools  had failed to come out on the  bright side ofthe score.  '-:
The; team, coached by Dr. Herbert  G. Taylor, Dean of Research,  won a
cliffrhanger thesecond  week, defeating Randolphji^Gdrii1  College |90-185.
,• 7 f J- ••"-  TEA$
FAILS ;; \ gt;jPI_•'.'•  TheHhird time
proved'unlucky;  however, as they fell May 30th to  Rhode Island College,
165-100.  Araway, 21, from Ferndale,  graduated in June with a major  in
psychology. He is doing graduatestudy at the University of  Illinois this
fall. His shaggy beard  made him a unique member of  the team.Des Jardien,
22, a senior from  Everett, graduated with a history  major and political
science minor.Reeves, also 22, from Alder-wood  Manor, graduated with a 
double major in physics and  mathematics.  "Karen Anderson was the youngest
 member of the team. She was  Flora, Thompson take  New jobs afWestern 
Western has a new academic  dean and a new Education Department  head. The
Board ofTrustees appointed Dr. Charles  Flora of the Biology Department 
academic dean and Dr?" RalphThompson, a 15-year "veteran"  at Western,
Chairman of the  Education Department.  Both appointmentsbecame effective 
Sept. 1.  RALPH THOMPSON  This will be Flora's first administrative  post.
Springquarter  he was on a leave of absence to  develop a biology
curriculum, at  Sri Venkayeswara University in Southeast India.  A
specialist in marine biology,  he took post-graduate work in  limnology,
the study offresh  water, at the University of British  Columbia in
Vancouver.  Flora was instrumental in theestablishment of the Institute For
 Fresh Water Studies at Western.  He and colleague Dr. Gerald  Krafthad
been conducting a  study of Lake Whatcom for the  past three years, which
led to the  establishmentof the Institute.  Thompson acted as an interim 
head of the Education Department  prior to theappointment  CHARLES FLORA 
of Dr. Vernon Haubrich last  year. Now he is replacing Haubrich,  whohas
taken a post at  Teachers College, Columbia University,  New York. 
Thompson received hiseducation  at Dickonson College, University  of
Delaware and the University  of Florida. Flora holdsdegrees from Purdue
University  and the University of Florida.  a 20-year old sophomore. Miss 
Andersen,a whiz at the literature  questions, is probably best remembered 
for her muttered, "Oh,  damn!" as thecamera zoomed  in for a close-up
during a crucial  bonus answer.  MONEY, MONEY  The team broughthome $3500 
worth of scholarships for their  three.weeks on the show: $1500  for each
of their wins, and$500  as a consolation for their loss.  Western has been
staging its  lown "College Bowl" the past twoyears with teams competing 
locally against one another and  against other colleges in the state. 
Thelocal intra-mural competition  is held winter term and  virtually any
four-person team  can enter. The main qualification  is that they don't
mind looking  stupid in front of their friends.  Okay, Friosh, get in
line.Drummond holds  Local CCU N post  A Western student, Clark Drummond, 
was elected NorthwestRegional  Director of the Collegiate  Council for the
United Nations  in June. The election took placeduring a Leadership
Institute for  the United Nations at Sarah Law-erc-  nce College in
Bronxville,  N. Y.As the Regional kingpin, Drum-mond,  a graduate working
towards  a Bachelor of Arts in Educationdegree, will direct all  CCUN
activities in Washington,  Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Alaska.  The
CCUN"supports and promotes  the work of the United  Nations and awareness
of international  affairs,"according to  Drummond. There are 300 affiliates
 in colleges and universities  throughout the UnitedStates.  "Western is
highly respected in  CCUN for the work Dave Tre-main,  former regional
director  fromthis school, has done,"  Drummond remarked.  Drummond said
there are about  20 members of the clubon campus  and he is looking for
more  support. The CCUN offers many  programs, he said.  Westernwill have
representatives  at the model UN at Stanford  University in California 
next spring. "We'llrepresent  some country," Drummond said,  "but I'm not
sure which one yet."  Drummond is planning what he  claims is one of the
first "topical  conferences on Asian Affairs" on  the West Coast. The
conferencewould take place at Western next  spring and involve "name
speakers"  from San Francisco and  NewYork, Drummond added.



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 1B



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FRIDAY, SEPT. 17 THE COLLEGIAN ONE-B  "GEE, DAD, THAT'S SOMETHING" young
Richard Bunkeappears to be saying, as he examines  President Bunke's
medallion after the inauguration ceremony inFebruary.  Dr. Bunke
inaugurated  Under winter skies  By BOB GRAHAM  Collegian Managing Editor 
F ou r t e e n - h u n d r e d and fifty freshmen students will  begin t h
e i r first fall q u a r t e r at W e s t e r nt h i s September 
—and so will Dr. H a r v e y C. Bunke, n ew president of
 t h e 72-year-old college.Inaugurated as seventh president  of this
institution last February,  Dr. Bunke followed Dr.  James L.Jarrett, who
has taken  a position at the University of  California at Berkeley.  Nearly
250 representativesfrom  colleges and universities throughout  the nation
gathered in the  brisk winter air of Western tohonor the new president and 
march with him in procession  through the campus. .  Dr. Bunke,,a
42-year-old economist,  came to Western January  21.  The inauguration gave
Dr.  Bunke a platform toannounce his  plans for the college, and it also 
provided a symposium on the  "Economy of the PacificNorthwest,"  attended
by most of the  educators present.  "Education must indoctrinate  as it
liberates;it must change  men, make them more human,  more dependable, more
interesting,  more stable, and,if you like,  more aristocratic and more
egalitarian,"  President Bunke explained.  .  PLEDGE  Dr.Bunke asserted
that education  must fuse intellect and  emotion and he pledged to 
strengthen thefaculty, deepen  %mffi!M!Mm  0 J§/ 0'' 0  HAGGAR 
pre-cuffs  the most walked-about  slacks in town12.95  These are the famed
ready-to-wear slacks —  pre-cuffed to your exact length
so there's no  wait for alterations. Their fit is smooth and  natural;
their style, masculine and casual.  Long-wearing, premiumquality fabric is
blended  of Orion® acrylic and wool
worsted—refuses  to wrinkle, stays crisplycreased.
Charge yours  in olive, charcoal, brown. Waist 30-42, inseams  29-34. 
MEN'S SPORTSWEAR,street floor  the college's commitment to general 
education, add to the aesthetic  environment of thecampus,  and maintain
its individuality.  President Bunke has served as  teacher, administrator,
lecturer,writer and consultant to both  business and government. He has 
been senior price economist for  theOffice of Price Stabilization  in
Seattle.  Before moving to Iowa, he  taught economics at the Universityof
Tennessee and in 1960-61  he received a leave of absence  from Iowa to be a
visiting lecturer  atTulane University. He  also has served as consultant
to  the Iowa Commerce Commission  and to theGreat Northern Railroad.  The
new president is the author  of numerous articles and two  books. In
hisearly writing, he  dealt primarily with transportation,  both intrastate
and interstate.  As his approach to economics  widened, President Bunke 
concentrated on conflicting values  in modern life.  Last year, he wrote an
article  that has been widely discussed,  "Economics, Affluence and
Existentialism,"published in The  Quarterly Review of Economics  and
Business.  President Bunke's membershipsinclude the American Economic 
Association, Order of Artus, Skull  and Crescent, and Chi Psi. He andhis
wife, Margaret, were married  in 1947 and have three children:  Charles M.,
II, Richard and  Anna.STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP,  MANAGEMENT AND  CIRCULATION 
(Act of October 23,1962; Section 4369, Title 39, United States  * Code)  1.
Date of filing:. Sept. 1, 1965.  2. Title of publication: WesternWashington
Collegian.  . 3. Frequency of publication:  Weekly.  4. Location of known
office of  publication:Room 1, Viking Union-  Building, WWSC, Belling-ham, 
Washington.  5. Location of the headquarters or general business offices 
of the publishers: Same as No. 4.  6. Names and addresses of 
publisher,editor and managing  editor:  Publisher: Associated Student 
Body, WWSC, Bellingham, Wash.  Editor:Michael Williams,  Room 1, Viking
Union Bldg.,  WWSC, Bellingham, Wash.  - Managing editor: RobertGraham. 
Room 1, Viking Union  Bldg., WWSC, Bellingham, Wn.  7. Owner: Western
WashingtonState College, Bellingham,  Wash.  8. Known bondholders,
mortgagees,  and other security holdersowning or holding 1 per cent  or
more of total amount of  bonds,, mortgages or other securities: 
None.Average number of copies  each issue during preceding 12  months:  A.
Total No. copies printed  (netpress run): 4,500.  B. Paid Circulation:  1.
To term subscribers by  mail, carrier delivery or by othermeans: None.  2.
Sales through agents, news  dealers, or otherwise: None.  C. Free
Distribution(including  samples) by mail, carrier  delivery, or by other
means:  4,500 per week.  D. Total No. ofcopies distributed:  4,500.  i I
certify that the statements  made by me above are correct:  Don
Bothell,Business Manager.  WATCH FOR  D.O.C.



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 1C



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ONE-C THE COLLEGIAN FRIDAY, SEPT. 17  to comfort the afflicted  and afflict
the comforted  welcome,gang!  (The editorial printed below was taken from 
the Northwest Viking, the predecessor of TheCollegian, in
1932—Ed.)  With this, the initial issue of the 
Northwest Viking for fall quarter; we  wish toextend to all entering
freshmen  and transfer students a great, big, Ser  home-coated WELCOME . .
.  'We are very proud of our school. The  impressions that it has made on
us are,  and will be, lasting ones.The unique  setting of the school,
beneath t h e shadow  of Sehome, its picturesque campus,  the groveof trees
bordering the front  walk; between the Library and Edens  Hall, and many
other things have gonetogether to bring this school very close  to home for
us.  You will make friends, enter into  activities, andgradually enter into
the  for the freshmen  Life at Western can be fun. We hope  you'll discover
this whenthe chaos and  confusion of registration wears off and  you
realize that you are no longer in  high school,but in college, and to some 
extent, on your own.  We come to college to study (it says  here) but
theleisure hours can be filled  with more productive activities than 
merely beering time away at the local  tav. Clubs and committees at Western
 abound. For instance, there's the Chess  Club or the HomecomingCommittee. 
The latter can always use helpers and  is especially gearing its theme this
year  for freshmenand transfer students, according  to the committee
chairman,  fall and football  It has been said thatthere are two  ivays to
watch a football game. You can  either 1.) study the intricacies of play 
patterns,game strategy, and use of  such devices as platoon systems, sub* 
stitution, etc., or 2,) watch twenty-two  guys having a grand time beating
each  other to a plup.  \ We prefer the second, but that really 
doesn'tmatter. There's something about  a college football game that makes
it  unnecessary for a person to needa  reason for attending.  ; This is the
time of year for the usual  torrents of passionate pleas to get out  and
support your team. People get all  excited for no reason at all thinking, 
that we aren't going to takeadvantage  of something that's as American as- 
Pizza parlors or tennis shoes.  swing and tendencies ofthe Ifoxma-I 
school. And in your attempts at progress  in these directions don't forget,
the  WELCOMEmat is never takea in.  Yes, we must admit t h e teaching fieM 
is full and overflowing, hat tfterer i salways  rqprn for a GO0IK te ch e,
audi  that is the aimi and goal of the "Normal  by the Sea."  V, Thissheet,
t h e Northwest Vikings is-  YOUR paper and; youmay; take^ advantage  of
what i t has tc» offer through  its columns. We welcoi e student
opmv  ions and criticisms*  We also carry tfee advertising oftfoe  most
reputable business firms- M Bell-ingham.  And it should become one of  your
duties as astudent ti  support and  patronize ads appearing: in t h e
columns  of the VIKING—HolKsJv SfeddardvDick Marshall. 
The intra:mural program at Western!,  has always been good? and is
hrntprovmg  this year, thanks to the work of Dr.  William Tomaras. The
women have a  program too, run by the Women'sRecreational  Association. 
The weekends are also lively with  sports events, movies, dances andmixers.
 ^Western is your coHege and participation  makes it- a/better college.
'3||jjjJGg£-  is nothing rrioreerid^raging to^he'.Jpd--  irohers
for instance, than to see gt;lhe  stands filled with^Western fans.  So,
group, don't spend all your time  vegetating in your room or the library. 
You're only a college studentonce.  What is it about football? Is it
getting  lost in the crowd on a crisp fall afternoon,  inching your way to
a high perch  in the stands with vapor pouring from  your mouth? Is it the
blustering band  music, blown through cold brass horns  by huddling
musicians? Is it a roar of  voices, a few moments of excitement, asincere
hope that the guy being carried  off the field didn't break too many 
bones? Is it snuggling next toyour date  trying to keep warm, or the smell
of  pipe smoke from somewhere ^nearby?  Is it anticipation oft h e quiet
party after  the game? Do you just like to see a big,  happy bunch of
people?   gt;• We havea good team tfiis year; They  like
to see a big crowd more than anyone.  •'. '  Good luck
this year;Viksf  year of the escalation  For Western students* 1965 may go 
down in history as the year of theescalation.  Everything, most of it bad, 
went up, upv up gt;  The tuition fees were one of the first  things tcr
rise. They jxrmrjed a few doll  a r s for i n s t a t e students and; many
dollars  for poorrout-of-stater  Next came  t h e announcement of a. r a i
s e in dormitory  room, a n d board; By^jhis timestudents  were beginning
w-wo«ry.  However,, they retained their equilibrium  and didn't
threaten towithhold  their fees as the University of British:  Columbia
Alma Mater Society (equivalent  to the A.S.Legislature) i s asking its 
students to do:  Then matters got worse; The price of  cigarettes in
Washingtonwas raised  (oh, horrors!)' Wallets really began jj;p  get thin
and many students were thinking,  of notreturning in the fall.  President
Johnson helped them make  their decision by escalating the war in  VieUNam
and^ uppihg the draff quota.  Students resolved to return to- school  by
hook or crook*  But finallythrough the clouds ap?  peared a light.
Western's Board of;  Trustees at last raised the student pay  ratefrom a
paltry $llper hour to a gt; more  sensible $1.25.  The raise has been
needed for some  time andnow that it has come w e a re  only too gratefuit
Thank you, gentlemen.  The raise will enable somestudents  to return to
school, students who  otherwise could not have afforded another  year
incollege.  But, tew (Md you know i was a fresh man ?  ., Ito you; titer
Glass of 1969, I extend greetings and felicitations  from Western
Washington State- Colleger. Beginning today this is  your college, and of
this-moment it is pledged to serve you with  all its powers^ and-
resources. In return; it asks only one thing:that yotr as- att individual
develop- and fulfill your full potential.  €)n the surf
ace, this may soundsimple—1 assure you it is not. 
Indeed; it may well fee the most demanding test of your young life.
IShould: yo» pass- it; witfr honesty and merit; however, your
life will  forevermore he richer afid moremeaningful.  As-a student at
Western; you; would do well to countf your  blessings. You arefew
amongmany. Today, throughout this-great  land young men, and women sorrow
because they were rejected  bythe college or colleges of their choice. Not
only has full collegiate  citizenship been conferred upon you,but it has
been freely  granted by an institution of integrity and standing.  If for
no other reason, Western isunique for its singular  beauty. Nowhere in the
world is there a college which surpasses  the majesty ofsetting that favors
your college. Set between mountain  and sea, combining the power of
naturalgrandeur and human  creativity, Western's 135 acres and 27 buildings
will for the  next four years beyour physical, social, and intellectual
home.  You would do well to explore it, to become familiar with itsmany 
parts and dimensions, to appreciate its beauty, its strengths.  WIN AN
EDUCATION  But you werenot attracted primarily by Western's beauty, 
although you should be grateful for it. Your principal objective is to win
an education, with all that that word implies. Beyond  that, I hope that
you chose Westernbecause after talking with  your teachers, your friends,
and other college students, and after  carefulconsideration, you began to
understand the rich opportunity  that Western offers through a
superiorundergraduate program.  Ultimately, any course major or curriculum
can be no better  than the facultywhich gives it life. Here at Western you
will have  an opportunity to work with many able professorsrepresenting 
different disciplines and presenting differing and sometimes contradictory 
views oneverything from taxonomic methodology to  the nature of the
universe.  Your instructors will range from thevery young to the
experienced  veteran, from those who would charge you with flaming 
idealism tothose who would temper your vision with wisdom.  During your
stay, each of your instructors will havesomething  to contribute, but from
each will come something different. Do  not look for the same from all.Some
of your instructors reach  their finest moment before a class of one
thousand; others make  theircontribution through a day-by-day, tough,
Socratic discussion  method; while still others sparkle andinspire only in
the stark atmosphere  of a smaUi laboratory when- the discussion is
centered  on someesoteric subject qflife beyond the befief or comprehension
 of ordinary mortals.  Despite the excellence of.staff, do not be surprised
that everything!  you are taught is neither eternal, nor relevant nor
eveninteresting. When T was eMfe young, I resented with all my heart 
and-soul the rote learning of themultiplication tables. Only much  later,
did I learn that they are a perfect example of the contemplativepurity of
platonic idealism. Perhaps equally important is  the* fact that without the
powers given me bythese instruments  See'PRESIDENT'S WELCOME' p. One-D  the
collegian  ,. Official Weekly Newspaperof Western Washington State
College-,- Bellingham,Wash.  PHONE. 734-7600, EXTENSION. 269Second-class"
postage paid af tfellingrTam, Washington.  GQPÂ¥ DEADtlWB^Tuesday
t% NoonFOUNDING MEMBER? PACIFIC STUDENT PRESS-Affiliated  with United
States- Student PressAssociation, Collegiate Press-Service, 
Intercollegiate1 Press Service* Associated Collegiate Press-.Mifce
Wtfflfaras1, Editor  Managing, Editor; Bob Geafeant . Business Manager, Don
Bothell  Photo Editor,Lance Knowles News Editor, Bob Stark  Staff: Pam
Barber, Nancy Bowman, Bruce Delbridge, Sue Freder*  ickson, Carol Cottle 
Cartoonist: Douglas Tait  Our Leader: Phil McAuley



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 1D



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FRIDAY, SEPT. 17 THE COLLEGIAN ONE-D  'PRESIDENTS WELCOME'  (Cont. from
page One-C)  I amconfident that I would not be able to get through an
ordinary  day.  KNOWLEDGE — A WAY OF LIFEBut do not be
misled—do not believe that because the faculty  is
excellent and the programs are welldefined and clear, all you  need do is
attend class and, like new wine bottles, sit quietly  until you are filled
with a magical and intoxicating brew called  knowledge. If that is your
approach, I fear you will be gravelydisappointed here in your new home. For
Western, as all esteemed  institutions of higher learning,believes that
more important  than knowledge itself is the teaching of a mood,, of an
approach-indeed,  away of life. Above all the facts and figures, dates and 
places, dimensions and concepts, you should learnthat without  self
discipline, without a commitment to excellence, without the  inner strength
necessary fordedicated effort, there is no greatness  in this world. You
must learn the virtue x gt;f patience and tireless work and that repeated
failure is the soil which nourishes sweet  triumph. Those of you who would
reachyour fuE potential, those  who would develop the knowledge and skill
and those of you  possessed of thedesire to create—in
short, those of you who would  be more than
ordinary—must be extraordinary inmotivation and 
self-discipline. It is this commitment to the extraordinary that  Western
encourages and,from a willing few, demands.  ' The high standards and the
excellence of Western has not  gone unnoticed; many of you come from sister
states and beyond—  from foreign lands. With the
reputation that comesfrom success,  there also inevitably follows change.
Ten years ago Western  was a small school of1,700 students and a faculty of
little more  than 100. In those days, the students, after four years,
prettywell  knew most of the professors as well as virtually all of their
fellow  students who traveled the routefrom freshman to the graduation 
platform. All of this made for a sense of personal intimacy, 
andinstitutional loyalty. Today, supplementing these personal 
relationships is a new spirit of freedom as theaverage student  is expected
to be more self-reliant in finding his own way, for  solving his own
problems,for determining his own place in the  rich, multi-faceted college
community.  Yet, do not be deceived intothinking that the college is
unconcerned  about your welfare as a separate and unique human  being with
distinct aspirations and needs of your own. Western's  emphasis, as in the
past, continues to be theindividual student.  Our methods of advising, our
emphasis on good teaching, our  commitment to high-level counseling, and,
finally, the architecture  as well as the planning of the campus itself,
reflects acollege belief  in the need for making each student feel a part
of the full  academic community.  Such,then, are the faces of Western. As a
whole, they offer  opportunity at the same that they demand that youperform
 as civilized young men and women who are as jealous of their own  rights
as they are respectfulof the rights of others.  I wish each and every one
of you the very best for a most  successful and fruitfulyear.  New
medallion appears  Around Presidents neck  Persons a t t e n d i n g t h e
i n a u g u r a t i o nof Dr. Harvey  C. B u n k e as s e v e n t h p r e s
i d e n t of Western last F e b r u a r y,  s aw hangingfrom his neck a
shining silver and gold  medallion b e a r i n g a small f i g u r e and
inscription.  Themedallion was introduced  for the first time at Dr.
Bunke's  inauguration as a symbol of the  presidency. Itwas conferred upon 
him by Joseph Pemberton, chairman  of the Board of Trustees,  during
theceremony.  The medallion is cast in sterling  with a gold flame in the
center  and the name of the college is  engraved around the flame. The 
date of the founding of the college,  1893, appears across the  bottom.
Names of former presidents  are inscribed on the reverse  side.  GOLD FLAME
 The gold flame at the center is  emblamatic ,of the torch of learning, 
and combines the intellectual  and spiritual qualities ofillumination, 
enlightenment and inspiration.  Designed by Frederick Walsh  of Seattle,
the medallionis a bas-relief  of the new seal of Western  which appears in
this issue of  The. Collegian and is beingintroduced  in other college
publications.  MACE  Also used in the inaugural .ceremony  was a large
rosewood and  silver mace, a gift to the college  of the class of 1964. It
was used  only once previously— during  commencement
last June.  Designed by Norman Warinske;  of Seattle, the mace issurmounted
 with a silver casting of a Vi-.  king ship, emblamatic of Western 
Washington StateCollege. Below  the ship on the staff are three  circular
silver bands, the topmost  being engraved andinlaid  with blue enamel with
the name  of the college.  The second band bears six medallions, 
eachengraved with a  seal—the Great Seal of the United 
States, the Seal of the State  of Washington, theSeal of the  College and
three seals representing  Humanities, Education and  Science.  The third
bandbears the legend,  "The Gift of the Class of  1964." The bottom device
is a  silver cast flame symbolic of enlightenment.  The mace will be used
during  all ceremonial occasions at the  college while use of
thepresidential  medallion will be restricted  to inaugural events. Both
symbols  are on display in theMabel  Zoe Wilson Library.  THE PRESIDENTS
MEDALLION  The small racing sailboats  known as"Flatties," are so called 
because there is not a straight  line or plane area in them.  The  Toggery 
TheKings Kloset  Your entrance into the Halls of  Knowledge can be made
with confidence.  Let TheToggery or The  King's Kloset help outfit you in 
garments of the highest of fashion  and best of quality.  . .. as they have
been doing for  the most successful college men  for years.  THE  lt;; ~-^
gt; gt; lt;% gt;$ lt;%ifr~.~ - -3   lt;:.n-*^= gt; MEN'S APPAREL  Across
from the Bon MarcheMEN? APPAREL  Next door to Rathman's Shoes



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 2



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PAGE TWO THE COLLEGIAN FRIDAY, SEPT. 17, 1965  VIEW FROM THE COLLEGIAN
WINDOW  Theview from the Collegian  window looks out on the world,  and
that's what the Collegian  staff hopes to dothis
year—they  don't want to be confined in their  outlook. 
This page is like a recruitment  poster—wewant YOU. We
want  a large staff of clear-thinking  students who have something to  say.
Students who,like us, don't  want to be confined to expression  in limited
essays for professors.  The Collegian has much to offer  its staff.  The
experience gained working  on a newspaper, even a college  weekly, is
invaluable. Newspapers  are a part of our everyday lives.  By understanding
how they click  one can more easilyappreciate  the role they play in
society.  BE IN  When working for the Collegian  you are never "out"
ofthings.  You are aware of what is going  on around the campus, you meet 
interesting people (threeCollegian  staffers interviewed Peter,  Paul and
Mary last year.)  The Collegian gives you a  chance toexpress yourself
creatively,  if you desire to do so,  through feature stories.  The News
Staff class, Eng.211,  can be taken for one credit. You  can still add a
class.  Staffers, by diligent work, can  earnthemselves a paying position 
oh^he Editorial Board^  For those in teacher education,  the experiencewill
be doubly  invaluable. There are very few  qualified journalism advisors in
 high schools and apparentlyteachers with newspaper experience  are pounced
upon by the  school boards.  There are other fringebenefits  too, for
instance the Publications  Banquet held each Spring  quarter.  Previous
experienceis not a  must to write for the Collegian,  as we provide
"on-the-job training."  What is required is awillingness  to work.  There
are openings in all.fields,  from general reporting, to sports  writing,
towomen's news. If  you don't want to take the class  for credit and still
want to write  for the paper, this isfine. Headline  writers and proof
readers  are needed for Wednesday evenings.  So, come down to The Collegian
 office, Room 1 in the Viking  Union, any afternoon, today for  instance,
and meet the editors.  Ifyou're a clear-thinking student  and want to
distinguish yourself  from the masses, give it  a try andenjoy the view
from the  Collegian window.  SUMMER COLLEGIAN STAFF GETS WORKOUT
DON-THEFRIENDLY AD MAN  Helping prepare this year's 40-page Freshman issue
are from left to right, SueFrederickson, Bob  Graham, Pam Barber and Mike
Williams. Work for the special edition began inAugust, and the  typewriters
are still cooling off from the busy nights spent by these and other
frenziedwriters. The  year has just begun and things should be hopping on
The Collegian all quarter. If you want tojoin  the happy crowd, come down
to the office and we'll put you to work.  Don Bothell, Junior from Bothell,
Wash, (it was named after his  grandfather) is always smiling when he's
selling ads for The  Collegian. Not only is he a good business manager, but
he's an  artist as well and his works decorate The Collegianoffice.



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 3



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FRIDAY, SEPT. l £ 1965 THE COLLEGIAN PAGE THREE  BOB -THE
MANGLER  Bob Graham, Juniorfrom Bellingham, is our mangier, also called 
Managing Editor. . ,  181111"'  Williams is new editorThere's a maple leaf
in the Collegian office and the  staffers aren't too sure what to make of
it. MikeWilliams,  a Canadian resident, known as "The Maple Leaf"  or "The
Crusty Canuck," assumed theCollegian editorship  at the end of summer
quarter when John Stolpe  announced his resignation in order "to
concentrate on  studies." r  Stolpe edited the Collegian  spring and summer
quarters.  Williams, whohas difficulty;  concentrating on anything, was a 
Collegian-type last year. He served  in every positionfrom coffee  hoy
(where he exeled) to managing  editor.  A junior, Williams is an English 
major. Heattended the University  of Oregon during his  freshman year,
majoring in journalism.  He saw the lightand decided  to go into teaching. 
SEA-GOING STUDENT  Between Oregon and Western  he spent fourmonths aboard
the  University of the Seven Seas, the  sea-going school, and three  months
as a reporterfor a Vancouver,  B. C, newspaper, The  Sun.  "I sort of got
the Collegian editorship  by default," hesaid, "but  I promise to do my
very best.  The rag was rocked with scandal  last year and received
someblack marks. I hope to erase  them and give the students what  they
deserve: a better than excellentnewspaper."  The Associated Student
Legislature  was kind in giving the  Collegian a "very good" budget 
Williams added, so he said  he'll give thenv a paper to be  proud of in
return.  "This is the students'newspaper,"  the editor emphasized, "my 
door is always open and I welcome  visitors with criticismand  comments." '
 Williams announced his Edit-rial  Board as being: Bob Graham,  managing
editor;Pat Win-gren,  news editor; Jim Pearson,  sports editor; and Verh
Gies-brecht,  feature editor.  Staffmembers are still needed  and should
apply any afternoon  next week at the Collegian office,  Room 1,Viking
Union.  THE JEOPARDY BOYS  J. Thurston Hanson (left) and Jack Benedict are
the literary typesof the publications crowd. They  will edit and select
the'poetry, short stories, etc., that make up Western'sliterary journal. In
their  spare'time they read books, like this dictionary. Weak plot line,
fellows?  ThoseJeopardy boys  "Put yourself in, Jeopardy,"  was the appeal
of Jack Benedict  (right), new editor ofWestern's  student art publication.
 "If you can write, draw or  photograph, the editors of Jeo-  MissShoemaker
 to clear clouds  Storm clouds have been billowing  about the offices of
the college'syearbook, "The Klipsun,"  for two years, but the 1965-66 
editor, Charlene Shoemaker, plans  to clear theatmosphere.  Two years ago,
editor George  Toulouse produced a soft-covered  annual with a
uniquelydif-,  fereht format. Western students  didn't like it and
displayed their  emotions graphically.  They held abook-burnfng. The 
Klipsuns were excellent fuel.  Last year the Klipsun returned  to a
hard-cover under theleadership  of Lloyd Strong. However,  there was debate
over the use of  individual student "mugshots."The AS Legislature, it was
reported,  got very excited about the  whole situation.  Miss Shoemaker,
lastyear's  assistant editor, wants none of  that. Armed with a $15,000
budget,  five thousand more than lastyear,  she is determined to put out an
 excellent annual.  Strong and Miiss Shoemaker  gave Wdistern agood annual 
last year and did the work almost  without any help from other  students.
Miss Shoemakerwants  a large staff this year. Interested  students should
get in touch  with her in the Klipsun office,Viking Union basement.  pardy
would be pleased to have  a contribution, or several, from  you,"
Benedictsaid.  Featuring the work of Western  students, Jeopardy consists 
of short stories, poetry, art andphotographs. For the first time  this
year, the editors are offering  cash prizes to students for the 
bestcontributions in each category.  In addition to Benedict, the new 
Jeopardy staff includes J. ThurstonHanson as Assistant Editor.  Both are
juniors majoring in  English and both write poetry.  Benedict is anHonors
student  at Western.  Jeopardy is an annual publication  and is released in
the  Spring.  FREENOW  "Last year we published 500  copies and sold out in
short  order at 50 cents apiece," Benedictsaid. "This year we will  publish
double that number, and  a student needs only to show his  ID to receive a
copy," he added.  Anyone wishing to have their  work put in Jeopardy should
see  either Benedict orHanson in their  office in the basement of the VU 
building!  "Jeopardy was good last year  and we hope itwill be better this 
year," Benedict noted. "You can  help make it better with your  aesthetic
contributions."  CHARLENE SHOEMAKER  is the only female editor of the crowd
and she's planning on putting  out aspanking good Klipsun this year. Her
office also doubles  as a fallout shelter, so it has advantages.



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 4



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PAGE FOUR THE COLLEGIAN FRIDAY, SEPT. 17, 1965  Russ # DRIVE  Across From
Bellingham HighSchool  FEATURING  15 BEEFY  i  Mode With 1i00% Pure Beef  "
~~ ~ COUPON"  RUSS' ORIGINAL  Ifyou know  m swings— 
where to go!  Are you sick and tired  of looking at the same 5200  faces?
If so,why not go  down town and look at the  same faces in a different 
atmosphere.  A good start for the frugalfreshman is Bob's Drive In at  the
end of Indian. After an evening  of studies it's always fun  to jam about12
people from the  dorm in the only car that seems  available and go down and
absolutely  gorgeyourself on fattening  French fries and hamburgers.  When
you're a freshman it's  almost sure that yourparents  will be up to make
sure you  haven't turned into a beatnik,  stopped shaving, quit going to 
church, started smoking or drinking  beer. When the weekend of  the big
"check up" arrives and  you've madethe good impression,  you*.deserve a
free dinner compliments  of good ol' Mom and  Dad.  A good place to steer
them is  the Royal Inn on Holly and Railroad.  They offer steaks served  on
a sizzling platterand it's really  a novelty to have a waitress  serve you
instead of standing in  39 BEEFY  J FRIES Res53c  I SHAKE  I ONE PER
CUSTOMER  I GOOD SEPT. 17-18-19  | Cash Value 1/10 of 1%.  With ICoupon | 
WHEN A WESTERN-TYPE (over 21) wants to relax he goes and  hustles at a pub
like the Up   Up where Harry Arthur (left) is  shown with a friendlycored. 
a SAGA line for a half hour.  The Royal is also a fun place  to go for a
cup of coffee after  a play or foreign film. For a  15 cent cup of coffee
you can  sitfor hours trying to inhale  cigarettes.  If you survive the
General Ed.  courses and/or getting married  andreach 21, you've made the 
big time! With your precious  green and white Washington State  Liquor
Card,the "grown-up"  world of the UP and UP Tavern  (Holly and Commercial)
and  Shakeys, State St., is opento  you!  The Up and Up, also known as 
"the office" by many College  students who frequent it, has livemusic every
Friday and Saturday  night provided by the "Inter  hides."  Shakey's Pizza
Parlor has tworooms—one for the boys and  girls and one
for the men and  women (those over 20.) The beer  and pizzaare great, but
if you  don't rate, then pop and pizza  will suffice.  For those who like
spiders or  want to bedifferent, The Web is  open on weekends. The coffee 
house is run by the UCCF organization  and is alot of fun for the  poetry,
jazz or folksinging enthusiasts.  If you like to travel, Vancouver  is only
90minutes away with  its excellent movie theatres, res-turants  and
nightclubs.  So, cheer up, life isn't thatbad  and you can have fun, fun,
fun,  if you know where to look.  Open Sat. 10-1  Mon.-Thurs, 8:30-5
—Fri, 8:30-5:30  * 4% Paid on Savings Certificates  *
Parking and Drive In  * ThriftiCheck Accounts  A HOME OWNED INDEPENDENT 
FULL SERVICE BANK  NORTHWESTERN  COMMERCIAL BANK  MemberF.D.I.C.  BEN'S 
Men's Shop  w  E  L  C  0  E  $  All WWSC  Students   Faculty  And invites
you to shop Ben's for the latest styles in  name brand clothes at fair
prices.  Clothes for Young Men  and Men WhoStay Young  1331 CORNWALL



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 5



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FRIDAY, SEPT. 17, 1965 THE COLLEGIAN PAGE FIVE  ANGRY WESTERNITES
MARCHPEACEFULLY FOR PEACE  Protestors were out in force at Western last
spring as the "cold war" in VietNam suddenly got hotter and hotter. Here a
group of students set out from the campus for  Bellingham. Itwas an
ill-fated peace march as peace officers, deciding the demonstrators were
breaking the peace,arrested 47 students and Bellingham citizens. The 
charge was violating a city ordinance which stated that the Chief of Police
had to be informed of any "parades." Last spring was a popular time for
protests atWestern.  When the weather was bad the protestors picketed the
new juke box in the Viking Union CoffeeShop. 
i§||j||||||§iili  ?$?$0£i0.  NO PERMIT-NO
PARADE  When these marchers were arrested, thelaw required permission  from
Bellingham's Chief of Police in order to hold any such demonstration.  In a
recent meeting of the Bellingham City Council,  an ordinance was passed
requiring any persons wishingto have a  parade through the city to obtain a
permit from the Board of  Public Works.  By MIKEWILLIAMS  Collegian Peace
Reporter  A number of Western  students did a lot of marching  last
year,but they  weren't exercising, they,  were protesting. Twice,  once in
February and again  in April, the war in Viet  Nam came under fire from 
the pacifists.  The first march saw 47 students  and local citizensarrested
 by the Bellingham police for parading  without permits.  The marchers had
formed in  front ofthe Viking Union and set  off down High Street to Indian
 Street. Several carried signs of  the "Ban theBomb" movement  or
proclaiming, "Get out of Viet  Nam."  At Indian and Maple streets  Police
Chief CecilKlein warned  the demonstrators they would be  arrested if they
proceeded.  The undaunted demonstrators  pressed on and Klein, not one to 
go back on Jiis words, arrested  them. According to Rev. Lyle Sel-lards, 
Whatcom County President  of the American Civil Liberties  Union, the group
had the legal  right toproceed in a peaceful and  orderly manner.  The next
peace march, in April,  was much more peaceful.The  orderly group of 200
"angry young  men and women" marched quietly  through downtownBellingham, 
again protesting the U. S. position  in Viet Nam. v  When they reacned the
FederalBuilding they held a 20 minute  "silent vigil."  There was one other
peace demonstration  in the area, butit  only indirectly affected Western 
students. The "professional" demonstrators  came up fromCalifornia  to
participate in a peace  march on Vancouver Island,  B. C.  After they were
refusedadmittance  to Canada by Canadian  Immigration officals who tagged 
them as "undesirables," the three resolved to enter Canada illegally  at
Blaine.  PEACE CHORUS  Backed up by some Western  studentssinging "We Shall
Overcome"  the trio made their bid.  They initially thwarted by the 
Immigration officals and the  Royal Canadian Mounted Police.  Later in the
evening, however,  one of the three, Eric Robinson,  slipped into the night
and a Canadian  cohort whisked him to Vancouver.  So, another year
begins.More  peace marches? Probably, if the  weather's not too bad.



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 6



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PAGE SIX THE COLLEGIAN FRIDAY, SEPT. 17, 1965  SOLONS HARD AT WORK  The
life of a VikingLegislator is sometimes trying. Pictured at a  Monday
afternoon meeting are Linda Green (left), PhyllisCarr,  Terry Slmonis and
Tony Tinsley.  Blue Blazers at helm  Of Viking government  Blair Paul
headsKEEP OUT!  You really can come see us  if you want to.  As a matter of
fact we would like  to have you!*EVERGREEN MOTORS  Ph. 734-5320 
Bellingham's Authorized  Volkswagen Sales and Service  112SAMISH WAY  *
(Even if you don't visit us, others will)  Every Monday at 4 p. m. 17 
blue-blazered menand women  seat themselves at a long, rectangular  table,
scattered with  paper and cups of coffee andlemonade, in Room 208 of the 
Viking Union.  The blue blazer is a symbol of  Legislative office and
inRoom  208 the student solons, wading  through harried haranguings and 
parliamentary procedure,conduct  the business of that exauited  body, the
Associated Students.  According to the AS By-Laws"In all matters not
governed by  its Constitution and By-Laws this  organization (the Student
Legislature) shall be governed by  Roberts Rules of Order."  Although
"order" is the order,  disorder is often the rule.One  often feels the
battle cry of those  who guide the destinies of so  many student dollars at
Westernis, "Point of order!"  Seriously, the AS Legislature  means well,
and on the whole does  a better job thanmany college  governments.  The
Legislature is made up of  a President, who can only vote  in a
tie,Executive and Program  Vice-presidents, eight Legislat-ors-  at-large,
a representative  from each classand the presidents  of the Associated Mens
and  Womens Students.  There are also two facultyadvisors.  According to
the AS Constitution  the Legislature "shall have  supervision and control
of allbusiness and financial affairs,  properties, and activities of the 
Association" (of students.)  The ExecutiveBranch of the  student government
is made up  of the President, Vice-Presidents  and the Cabinet. BlairPaul
was  elected President for the 1965-  '66 school year. Ken Riddell is 
Executive Vice-President andBrent Hayrynen is Program Vice-  President. 
The Legislature meetings are  open to the public andstudents  are
encouraged to go and- see  what their Legislators are up to.  By CLARK
DRUMMOND  E n e r g y , insight and  friendly persuasion mark  this year's
student body  president, Blair Paul. Interestedand perceptive,  his
polished style has car gt;  ried him to many successes  in student
government.These include distinguished service  on the AS Legislature,
Public  Affairs Commission, Inter-  DormCouncil, Disciplinary Pro-! 
cedures Committee, Constitution-*  al Revisions Committee, and  others. 
Now, as the elected spokesman  of the Associated Students of  Western and
chairman of the  WelcomeStudents  Come in and browse through our  store
— completely stocked for your  shopping heeds. 
Wefeature—  • GROCERIES
• SUNDRIES  i • SCtlii^SUPPIil ES 
• COSMETICS  • YourFavorite
Refreshments  RAWLS' SUPERETTE  714 E. HOLLY  "THE BRIGHT SPOT AT THE TOP
OFHOLLY"  BLAIR PAUL  Legislature, Paul faces the difficult  task of making
student  government benefitthe students.  This he has. promised to do 
through such programs as an  improved freshman orientation,additional loan
and scholarship  aid, increased student activity in  the community,
improved committeestructure and effective  leadership.  Someone has said
that there are  500,000 useless words in thedictionary  and most of these
find  their way into campaign oratory.  Paul's success in creating
andadministering a tutorial program  for local Lummi Indian school 
children shows that his are more  thanvague promises.  ri% exciting fall
fashion  I c m i t e u f a-foot-textures!  ALWWAAYYSS
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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 7



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FRIDAY, SEPT. 17, 1965 THE COLLEGIAN PAGE SEVEN  Cars, security, busy
^Campus Cop'  ByCAROL COTTLE  Collegian Staff Reporter  Dysart Oliver
Maconaghie, prosecutor, lawyer and  judge, hasbeen Western's Campus
Marshall for five  years.  A thirty-year Navy man, he re-tired  as a Lt.
Commander.  ; Maconaghie has an impressive  background in law which
includes  positions as prosecutor, lawyer,defense council, and judge for
the  Navy.  During World War II Maconaghie  was assigned the task
oforganizing a security force. The  result of his efforts was a
well-organized  force that established  itself asone of the best.  For this
work he was honored  by an invitation to serve on the  New Jersey Board
ofIntelligence  —the only military man so honored.  When
Mr. Maconaghie retired  in 1959 he applied forthe job of  Campus Marshall. 
"Maconaghie stated that he has  a great respect for faculty members, 
forthe high quality of men  and women who are students- at  "Western, and
for their dedication  to whatthey are working  for."  SECURITY PATROL 
Along with Maconaghie, the  campus boasts a security patrol  of nine men. 
• "These men are all married  and of good character,"
said  Maconaghie.  There are three shifts a night  which check buildings,
dormitories,  and take care of traffic control.  There is also anight
marshall  who takes care of all the night  duties and heads the security 
patrol.  Maconaghie said,"The night  marshall is the one seen at any 
dances or college functions held  in the evening."  In the lastfive years
Maconaghie  has been "very satisfied"  with his job.  His student
assistants find gratification  in knowing that he is on  call at all times,
day and night.  Some responsibilities of the  Marshall are:traffic control,
security,  violations of any law on  campus, and making sure that  the
security ondormitories is  complete.  TRAFFIC HEAVY  "Now that the college
is growing  so rapidly," saidMaconaghie,  "traffic situation seems to be
the  most difficult, especially following  large dances, ballgames, and 
auditorium events."  Of course the problem is alleviated  some by student
assistantswho act as "traffic cops"  and who are in charge of "external 
security," directing traffic  and keeping awatch over the  campus.  The
most, important security  measure according to Maconaghie  is that
of"internal security"  which takes in checking the  doors, examining
buildings for intruders,  andwatching for fires  that could break out
during the  night. These jobs are also handled  by the securitypatrol. 
These patrolmen are all responsible  to Maconaghie who in turn  is
responsible to Dean MacDon-ald.  The Marshall is a deputized  member of the
Bellingham Police  Department but he feels that hispolice powers should be
exercised  carefully.  Furthermore, the reputation of  the college and the
studentsis  uppermost in his mind at all  times, he said.  "Few members of
the college  community have ever beentaken  to court in the county because 
severe disciplinary action takes  place with the campuscommunity,"  he
stated.  When asked how many tickets  he gives Maconaghie gave a big  laugh
andsaid, "I give about  5,000 a year."  Maconaghie said that he has  had
100 per cent cooperation  from theentire student body and  faculty, and
particularly the student  body, in resolving traffic  and parkingproblems
here at the  college.  "Out of this cooperation has  grown an orderly
parking pattern  that hasbrought favorable  comment from the Bellingham 
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wrongdoer.  James Mulligan is  hands out a ticket  The Bates shearling
lined boot . . .choice of the  Olympians! Designed for wear in all kinds of
winter  weather, this boot treats you to firesidewarmth in  the coldest
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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 8



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PAGE EIGHT THE COLLEGIAN FRIDAY, SEPT. 17  Want to be a joiner?  Selection
is large  Ey BOBSTARK  Collegian Staff Reporter  S t u d y i n g is only p
a r t of college life. Social life must  b ecombined with academic work for
a well rounded  curriculum. Western has a number of organizations  t ha t
can be beneficial, enjoyable, and r e l a x i n g to stud  e n t s . - ' 
Honorary clubs have a Greekstatus on campus. Students who  excell in a
given area and qualify  for the club's standards maybecome  a member. The
field of  fine arts is recognized in Alpha  Kho Tau. Delta Phi Alpha seeks 
torecognize excellence in the  study of the German language.  Kappa Delta
Pi represents an  honor societyin education. Pi Mu  Epsilon honors those
who have  reached a certain level of  achievement inmathematics.  Theta
Alpha Pi is related to the  allied arts and crafts of the  theater: Epsilon
Pi Tau is aninternational  honor society in industrial  arts.  HELPFUL, TOO
 Service clubs at Western areresponsible  for organizing and producing 
many of the beneficial  programs 'for students. Helmsmanis Western's only
coeducational  service club. Applications are  taken at the end of fall and
winterquarters.  Valkyrie is a college servica  club for women to which
members  are elected on the basis  ofinterest and participation.  Athletic
clubs, range from the  mountain tops to the ibottom of  the sea.Western's
Alpine Club is  for all students interested in hiking  and mountaineering.
A ski  club wasformed to co-ordinate  the efforts of students who ski  or
have a desire to ski.  The "W" Club is open to allmen who have earned a
letter in  one of the five major sports. It's  aim is to promote
goodsportsmanship,  WATER POPULAR  An opportunity to learn to sail  is
provided by membership in theViking Yacht Club. Skin diving  is promoted by
the Viking Sounders.  They aim to relate anunderstanding  of and the skill
of skin  diving to their members.  Blue Barnacles, women's swim  team,is
open to all women who  are interested in synchronized  swimming.  Those who
hail from Hawaii  areeligible for Hui O Hawaii.  60 first-year faculty 
Members begin this fall  More than 60 new facultymembers  are beginning
their first year  at Western this fall. They are:  Mr. Philip Ager,
AssistantProfessor  of Music; Mr. H. 0. Beldin,  Associate Professor of
Education;  Miss Barbara Bieler,Assistant  Professor of Home Economics; 
Miss Jeanne E. Bourgues, Lecturer  in Foreign Languages;Mr.  Thomas J.
Bridge, Instructor of  English.  Mr. Henrieh Broekhaus, Assistant 
Professor of German;Miss  Madeline Bronsden, instructor of  Anthropology;
Mrs. Nit-a Grace  Bunnell, Instructor of English;Mr. C. Arthur Dimond, Jr.,
Instructor  of Music; Mr. Leland W.  Farley, Instructor of English.  Mr.
GeorgeFigy, Instructor of  Geography; Mr. Richard J. Fowler,  Assistant
Professor of Industrial  Arts; MissGuadalupe Garcia  Barragan, Lecturer of
Spanish;  Mr. David Gustafson, Instructor  of Speech;Miss Nina  B. Haynes,
Instructor of English;  Its purpose is to further relate  Western students
to theculture  of the Hawaiian people.  The Young Democrats and  Young
Republicans' meet twice a  month todiscuss their political  views.  Mrs.
Alice K. Johnson, Instructor  of Library Science. (Documents  Librarian) 
Mr. Sam Kelly, Assistant Professor  of Education; Professor  B. L. Kintz,
Assistant Professor  ofPsychology; Mr. Mauriee M.  LaBelle, Instructor of
English;  Dr. William Laidlaw, Assistant  Professor ofPsychology; Professor
 George Lamb, Associate Professor  of Education; Mr. Roger  Lamb,Assistant
Professor of Philosophy.  Mr. Byron H. McCandless, Professor  of
Mathematics: Mr.Raymond  G. Mclnnis, Instructor of  Library Science.
(Reference Librarian);  Miss Florence McNeil,Instructor of English; Dr.
Robert  Meade, Associate Professor of  Psychology; Miss Jane
Merritt,Instructor of English.  Mr. Jacques Moisson, Lecturer  of French;
Mr. Wayne C. Muller,  Instructor ofPolitical Science;  Dr. Thomas H.
Napiecinski, Associate  Professor of Speech; Mr.  Gerald G.Newman,
Instructor  of History; Miss Karen Olson,  Teacher Associate, Third Grade; 
Mr. David M. Panek, Assistant  Professor of Psychology.  Mrs. Floramae D.
Phillips,  Education Librarian; Mrs. TrueSackrison, Assistant Professor of
•  Music; Mr. Thomas Schlotter-back,  Assistant Professor
of Art;.Professor Edward H. Shaffer, Assistant  Professor of Economics; 
Mr. James A. Smith, Assistant-Professor of Physical Education;  Mr. Robert
W. Teshera, Assistant  Professor of Geography.  Mr.Robert G. Tipton,
Instructor  of English; Dr. Colin E.  Tweddell, Associate Professor of 
Anthropology;Mr. John C. Whit-mer,  Assistant Professor, of Chemistry;  Mr.
Stephen L. Wilkinson,  Instructor ofEconomies;'  Mr. Grant R. Wood,
Assistant  Professor of Industrial Arts; Mr..  Andre Louis Yandl,Associate 
Professor of Mathematics.  Mrs. Edna Zoet, Part-time Instructor  of
Business Education;Mr. Phil McAuley, Publication  Advisor; Mr.Neil D;
Murray, Pro-,  gram Assistant; Mr. Leon Williams,Lecturer of Industrial
Arts..  Mr.Dwight Andrus, Lecturer of  Education; Mr.Tom Jenness, In-, 
slructor ofSpeech; Mr. William  A. Bultmann, Professor of History;  Robert
E. Shaw, Assistant  Professor ofIndustrial Arts.  The geographic center of
Wash-ington  State is in Chelan county.  10 miles SW ofWenatchee.  This
emporium's spicy mixture of fall  fashion in patterns, styles, colors and
fabrics  willwarm the hearts of many gentlemen  and gentlewomen this fall
season. Urgency  in choosing is urged,lest the best be gone  when you buy
at  Robert Burns, Inc.  Cornwall at Holly  Bellingham  Ph. 733-4320A large
selection is to be  seen — modestly priced  from 9.95
up.  Country set for the total look LadyRobert-  Burns presents a total
look featuring county  colors ond styles and fabrics for fall. Skirts 
shapedto f i t you and your budget, modestly  priced from 1 2 . 9 5 .
Sweaters to mix or match  from 1 2 . 9 5 andcomplete the total look with 
knee hi's.  the best look for fall need not twist the gentlemen 
orgentlewomen's pocket book. The proprietor is extending  the privilege of
your own charge account toWestern  Washington College students.  A large  .
selection  awaits  you from  4.95 up



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 9



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FRIDAY, SEPT. 17 THE COLLEGIAN PAGE NINE  Collegian hails new staff  I t '
s t h e b e g i n n i n g ofa n e w school y e ar  and everyone is eager, i
n c l u d i n g t h e Coll  e g i a n staffers, who a r e f u l loi ideas. 
H e r e a r e some of t h e t h i n g s t o look for  i n this y e a r ' s
Collegian.  Fall term will seetwo hew columnsinitiated;  "Faculty Forum"
will appear on the editorial  page. Each week a different faculty member 
win write a column on a recent controversial  evenf of local, national or
mternational scale.  Dr.Thomas Billings- will inaugurate tftfe: column 
next week-. His subject: The Los Afcgelesf riot.  N neyBowman will write a
"DiaiEyy iof a Stu-derrt  Teaeher'-for the other new doiaami Miss  Bowman
,.is-student teaching this quarter in Fern-daie'  aiid each week will r e e
o i ^ hW experiences  for the benefit offuture" student teachers;  F B ^ ^
U ^ ' A G C ^ T '
••••;,
gt; .  Th gt; accent of-.."a. weeklypaper sfto«l  he as  mtictt
on feaitures1  :as OH newsv A»iiewi f lt;femat is  being:
devekped foir the'featured wlSeiic will be  unvefied withitt the next two
weefcs. XOidei? Eeatuire-  Editor Vernon Geisfereehtinformative': and
interesting:  stories will be w r i t t e n e aA weefe, ;!- ;  I Feature
photo essays- byPnfctor Efl or Lance  Knowfes will also* toe published;
peprodieatly. The  emphasis on pictures this year,wiIF b e imagiriav  tion
and creativity.  The Collegian will again have its own cartoonists  this
year. Ed1Solem will feature a perceptive  cartoon each week and
occasionally  Douglas Tait will addi Ms talent.In the field of news The
Collegian editors  are pointing towards* more accurate coverage  than has
been:achieved ever before.  "Imagination" is^ a keyword in the Collegian 
off ice. this year. The editors arestriving to get  away from traditional
format that has been identified  with The Collegian in the last two orthree
 years;, „  NEW FORMAL  Oiie exampfer of the new format,
is the^ modi-fietf gt;  "down style"feeadsv (Myf the (first letters  of
proper nouns and the first letter oil each line  is eapitafizetf;instead
of: tfteiiMhsl letter of eaelt  word; , •  The layout: of
tnfe stories^ esp«ela% features  will b%{, it I s hopedfmore
pleasing to ihev eyev  Tti use of overKnes afeover; tile eratlmes in 
*wctittr6s~ makes-fopeasieriden*ili©atio» of the 
p/cturei '-.  .The Collegian- editorspfaw to na» a couple 
of^conteststhisyear^ as*£ fitope titer students win  look
forward • lt;**thenar,  Tlte^edito^s emphasize tha*
tfiis^is gt; your paper  andi all suggestions^ comsnente and
criticisms-will  be appreciated. The editors areusually in  the Collegian
office all afternoon each. day.  By BOB STARK  CoHegraw Staff Reporter  I n
d i a n s a n d saloons complete w i t h barmaids, set  t h e stage for
"Ricochet;" this y e a r ' s Homecomingfes-tivitiesv  The t h e m e w a s b
y Dick Marshall, c h a i r m a n for  Homecoming.  ! Tftte week of
Oct.24-3ff is filled  with numerous Homecoming ae^  tivities. It will begin
with the arrival  of Indians. They willbe  terrorizing the campus and
BeUingham.  Activities will include a square  dance; a jam session, ajazz
fes-tivaiy  faculty reception, skit  night, a hay ride, parade, and  house
displays.  CAMPUS QUEEN  IOn Wednesday of Homecoming,:  the students will
decide the fate  of the campus beauties. Thecoronation  will take place
that same  evening, followed by a reception;  : Friday of that week will
be''western attire day." Competition  will be directed between the  girls'
dorms. That evening theHomecoming bonfire will be lit  and a pep rally
heldi  Saturday, the last day of  Homecoming will includethe football  game
and the Queen's- Ball;  The Vikings will battle the East*  ern Washington
StateColleger  Savages. At the game, the Vifciftg;  team of 1951 will; be
honored.  After the game a;Ctaiefcwagow  Feas£ will be fteld
gt;. featuring  western dishes;  • Also?
^SaturdayistheHoTneeons*irfg. piarade: Instead^ of s gt; torcfe* 
lightparatfe, as ittthe'past,. there-will  be a daylight' parade; It
willprogress ifrom the camp^  through BeHinghatn,  M a r sM said* "Wtf-
want tfie?  parade to be something'wortft  watching."  The;theme:oltfie
Qite fs-Ball  is "Western Sunset." An old Wild  West Saloon will be inthe
ball  room.  "FANTASTIC"  "Music, decorations, and everything  are going to
be fantastic,"  saidMarshall.  A wild west theme was chosen  in
anticipation that interest would  develop in the freshman andtransfer
students. There will be  announcements for those wishing  to participate on
a HomecomingCommittee in the Daily Bulletin.  "It will give the new
students  an insight into how the student  bodyfunctions and a stepping 
stone to further activites," Marshall  said.  "And it'll be a helluva' lot
of  fun,too," he added.  Trustee appointed  From BeUingham  Burton
Kingsbury, lawyer, was  recently appointedto Western's-  Board Of Trustees.
 The board of Trustees is a committee  of five people appointed,  bythe
governor to administer the  affairs of a State-operated college.  Governor
Dan Evans appointedKggsbury on August 11 to fill  me post-vacated by Mr
Stephen  Chas^f Everett, in JuneV  The five boardmembers are  Joseph
Pemberton, -chairman,  Marshall Forrest, Bernice Hall,  and Kingsbury, all
ofBeUingham,  and David Sprague of Seattle.  MEETS MONTHLY  The board is
required to meetapproximately once a month during  the year and four times
a  year there is a meeting of the  Board ofTrustees from Western,  Central
and Eastern State Colleges.  The next regional meeting will  take place
November 10 in Seattle,  according to Kingsbury.  Mr. Kingsbury was born in
Kan-  THE LONG WAITFOR DINNER  This is what is in store for you, freshman,
if you live in a dorm.  Tfie students pictured herehave probably been
waiting in line 20  minutes at Ridgeway Commons. Impatient students always
get inline early so they won't have to wait long once the line opens. 
CAMERAS  Serving atti your,  photographic needs.  Paul Woods  CAMERA SHOP 
10? W, Magnolia 734-1639  SIFTS  v\m mm smm. wmem  THEMMJSWS ARC  WBMAMiS
JEWEUtY  1329% Cornwall Ave. Ph. 734-6060  "Where Our Specialty
IsPleasingTheCastomerrs"  sa  and attended school there until-  he received
his law degree in  1933. Hepracticed law in Kansas  until 1938 when lie
took up residence  in BeHingham. Except for  two years-daring the war
Kingsbury  has continued to practice  law in Bellingham.  Kingsbury is not
new to theposition of member of the board  of Trustees. He held the same 
position from the mid-4940's until  1957.SANDY AND VALE  Shoe Repair 
Courtesy Parking In  Front  COLLEGE DEMANDS
GOODSOLES—KEEP THEM THAT  WAY  ~ 117 W. HOLLY  (Next to
Kings Closet)  YOUR  'MINIMAX'SLAVE  Corner Holly at Commercial  THE HOME
OF THE    White  Frigidaire  Motorola- -CiE  MINIMUM PRICE  MAXIMUM 
QUALITY  MULHERN'S  Holly at Commercial



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 10



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PAGE TEN THE COLLEGIAN FRIDAY, SEPT. 17  Power and Beauty  Photo-Essay by
LANCE G.KNOWLES  Though only a child I travel along the  educational
speedways seeking the power  and beautywithout and trying to fill at  the
same tinge bringing forth that within.  ;
•'•%-.. •  Through
sight,sound, and touch I accumulate  experiences and before they stabilize 
within I thrust out carving withwhat  I have to what I want.  But, yet
before I die I will sense again,  again, and again that the infinity
ofnature's  poWer and beauty is limited for man  and has what I have not,
within . .  lt;



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 11



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FRIDAY, SEPT. 17 THE COLLEGIAN PAGE ELEVEN  The bowels of the Viking Union 
have beenbrightened toy a cheery  new face. Philip J. McAuley has  replaced
James Mulligan as PublicationsAdvisor.  McAuley hails from Casper, 
Wyoming, where he worked on  the Casper Star Tribune. His  firstposition
there was as a  reporter. McAuley then advanced  to 'assistant .city editor
and then  finally tostate editor.  Journalism^ has occupied the  past 15
years of McAuley's life.  He has written for papers inMissouri,  Illinois,
and Wyoming. He  got his biggest scoop while working  on the City News
Bureau in  Chicago.  WRH 5 years overdue  After almost eight years, five
of. Western's lost  l i b r a r y books havebeen found in an old t r u n k
in  Women's Residence Hall, according to Dr. Howard  McGaw, Director of th
e Mabel Zoe Wilson Library.  These books along with about  20 others were
found in an attic  during therecent renovation of  WRH for the Education
Department.  "Whether the books were stolen,  mislaid orjust lost no one
will  ever know but the books will  be reshelved soon for student  use,"
said McGaw.12.000 NEW BOOKS  Along with these 25 books there  will be some
12,000 estimated  new volumesbeing, put on the  shelves this year.  The
periodicals section of the  library will also be enlarged  since therecent
budget has been  raised for this section.  The library has been allocated 
$80,000 for their bookbudget and  $20,000 for their subscriptions budget. 
This is a raise of $20,000 in  the-book budget and$6;000 in the 
subscriptions budget over last  years funds," added McGaw.  Mrs. Flors Mae
Phillips,Prescient  of the Washington School  Library Association, has been
appointed  the new educationlibrarian.  This position resulted because  the
curriculum library has  been moved into the educationlibrary in the
upstairs, west wing.  There will also be a self-service  copier in the
periodicals  room where.copies can be made  for 10 cents a page.  An
electric typewriter will also  be available for 10 cents for 15minutes or
25 cents for 45  minutes.  The typewriters that were in  the typing rooms
have been removed because of the abuse they  received at the hands of
students.  "Of interest to Freshmen,"  said Dr.McGaw, "might be the 
Library Orientation course that  is being offered to acquaint students 
with theWilson Library."  "This course will give the students  practice in
reference book  materials, cardcatalogues, and  other library functions." 
PHIL MCAULEY  The numerous murders of  Charles.,-Starkweather provided 
materia! for a pri?e winning article.  McAuley got the Managing  Editor's
Awardfor the story.  TJjj^^award^gave-Jum^an -ajtd?  tnaiic nomination for
the Pulitzer  Prize. That year the prizewent  to a story on segregation. 
McAuley received his Bachelor  of Arts from Missouri Valley Col-1  lege,in
Marshall, Mo.- He got his  Master of Arts at the University;  of Kansas
City also in Missouri!.  • Hisposition as Publications 
gt;Ad gt;  Visor will give him reigns on two  journalistic effforts, the
Collegian,'and the Klipsun.  : McAuley will also take his  place onI the
faculty as a teacher  of English 210. Thisclass is to  advance those
students interested  in journalism.  I. D. RETAKES  , Those who
wishidentification  pictures re-taken should sign up  this week at the VU
desk.  Gsmsm  Meridian   TelegraphRd.  Off Freeway at  Lynden-Sumas Exit 
First Run Movies  STUDENTS $1.00 ASB CARD  HELD f.VER!One More Week  HELP! 
S«s:iS*JSSlSS:::jSi!*Ka  "BUT I DON'T want to pay/' this
unidentified fellowseems to be  saying as he plunks down his money for
Spring quarter 1965 registration.  This scene willbe re-enacted many, many
times Sept.  22 as over 5,000 students register for Fall
quarter.BELLINGHAM'S RED CARPET THEATRE  National General Corporation 
FOX-EVERGREEN'S  T.BAKER  1106 No. Commerclal-734-4950  Tha Colorful
Advantui  THE BEATLES ate mora Colorful than  /ALSO  McUNTOCK  STARRING 
John Wayne, Maurine O'Hara  STARTS SUNDAY 19th FOR 3 DAYSTwo Big Suspense
Hits In Color  VINCENT PRICE TAB HUNTER IN  "WAR GODS OF THE DEEP"COMPANION
FEATURE  MARK DAMON LUANA ANDRES IN  "The Young Racers"  Sundays "WarGods"
1 p.m.-^4:05—7:10—10:15  Schedule
— Young Racers
2:35—5:40—8:50  Mon., Tue. "WarGods"
7 and 10:10-r-Racers 8:35  STARTING WEDNESDAY FOR ONE WEEK  ALAIN DELON and
ANNMARGARET in  ii ONE A THIEFM  COMPANION FEATURE  JOANNE WOODWARD STUART
WITMANIN  "SIGNPOST TO MURDER"  COMING SOON! WATCH FOR DATES  "The
Collector" "Glory Guys"  'Ski Party" "How To Stuff A Wild Bikini' 
— SPECIAL TWO DAY ENGAGEMENT —  An
Evening With TheRoyal Baallet  program  for eggheads'  Believe it or not,
some Western students do not  feel challenged by a normal workload here. To
meet  t h e i r needs, an honors p r o g r am was developed for qualifiIend
 ,aaddnidti oen a gteor , thset u dreengtusla. r  courses of study, the
Honors students  are assignedtutors. Each  tutor assigns the student papers
 to be discussed at regular weekly  meetings.  Thestudent may write about 
his major field of interest or any  other topic mutually agreeable  with
the advisor.He is expected  to write papers totaling between  5,000 and
10,000 words per quarter.  All Honorsstudents participate  in evening
meetings of small  groups for discussing in depth  some vital idea or set
ofideas.  With the junior year, the Honors  student does this extra work in
 his own department of interest.The student must write a senior  thesis
before graduating with  honors. Much of the student's up-perdivisional 
work is devoted to  this thesis.  SELECT FEW  Obviously, only a select few 
may participate in the honors  program. There are four ways  in which a
student can join the  Honors Program.  A studentwhose scholastic aptitude 
tests scores place him in  the top five per cent of all Western  students
will be invited to  participate in the program.  Any Western student with
a,  year of residence who has earned I for graduate school.  a cumulative
grade point average  of 3.7 or better will be considered  for admissionby
the Honors  Board.  A student recommended by a  faculty member who believes
that  the student is agood prospect  may join, if the Honors Board is 
satisfied with his ability.  High school seniors of high)ability will be
considered by the  board through recommendation  of a teacher, principal,
or other  schoolofficial prior to the student's  enrollment.  Students in
the Honors Program  are expected to maintaintheir high standard of
scholarship  in all of their college work?  After two quarters in the
program  thestudent must maintain  a 2.9 average in order to remain  in the
program.  What is the end result?Probably,  it will mean a student with 
high ability has not been wasted  for lack of challenging workwhile  in
College.  To graduate "With Honors," a  student must be recommended by  the
Honors Board;have completed  at least six quarters of honors  work; have
completed at least  20 credits of Honorscourses; have  written a senior
thesis. An Honors  graduate will be well prepared  SiON DOC  Yes,Blackburn
Office Equipment is giving absolutely free a  typewriter table with the
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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 12



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PAGE TWELVE THE COLLEGIAN FRIDAY, SEPT. 17  Dean Mac says  'Hi' to
students..  'I would like toextend my welcome to all the incoming students,
 along with everyone else," he said, leaning back in hischair in the 
relaxed atmosphere of his office.  The deep, friendly voice belongs to C.
W. McDonald,Western's  Dean of Men. Those who don't know him personally are
usually  quick to recognize histowering form when he strolls across campus.
 To most of the students, he is known as "Dean Mac."Although he is one of
the busiest administrators in Old Main,  the dean is always ready to give
anyone alittle of his time. He  makes it clear that the main job of the
office of the Dean of Men  is "to help studentsadjust to the college and to
help them with any  of their, personal problems."  McDonald's duties do
notend here, however. In fact they just  begin.  MEN'S SUPERVISOR  One of
his chief responsibilities  is that of supervisor of all men  students and
housing. He tries to  see that all the men get a place  to live for theyear
and that they  don't get into too much trouble.  He is usually quick on the
scene  when the boys atHighland start  playing with the water balloons, 
McDonald is also in charge of  campus security. Aftermaking  their rounds,
both the campus  police and the night watchmen  report to the dean of men's
office.Serving as chairman of the Financial  Aids committee, and as  a
member of the Auxiliary Enterprisescommittee, he helps handle  such college
projects as the  planning of new dorms and other  smallerfringe problems
such as  CLYDE MACDONALD campus parking.  COLLEGE LIASON  Acting as a
liasonbetween the city and the college, McDonald  serves on the Bellingham
City Council and attends meetingsevery  Monday night at City Hall.  Despite
his numerous side duties, Dean McDonald's primary  eoncern is the students,
and he emphasizes the fact that the first  duty of the Dean of Men's office
is to giveassistance to anyone who  heeds it. -  Speaking of the class of
1969, he said, "They have a wonderfulopportunity—we will
help them in any way we can, but the main  job is to be theirs."  "There's
an opendoor policy up here," he added, "come in any  time."  ...and
Lorraine  Powers opens door  The Dean ofWomen's Office is a busy place at
the beginning  of any quarter and this fall quarter is no exception. 
Withthe lack of housing, Dean Lorraine Powers is still approving  off
campus living places for enteringstudents.  Their biggest problem is
getting towns people to take students  as boarders and roomers, shesaid. 
"The lack of adequate housing will remain a problem for many  years to
come," said Dean Powers,"but if people can't or won't  co-operate then we
will always have difficulty in finding adequate  housing lor a great many
students."  The students, through the Dean  of Women's Oiffice, have been
advised  tocontact any relatives,  friends, or other ministers in  town to
try and arrange for accommodations.  Thedormitories have been full  for
some time but there will be  some cancellations, which alsio  have
beentaken.  Dean Powers also makes suggestions  as to the type of
dormitories  suited to the womenstudents.  DORMS FOR GIRLS  The Ridgeway
dorms Beta and  Gamma have been transferred to  girlsdormitories and will
have  the names Sigma and Omega.  The addition of these dorms  has created
125new beds but  there is a lack of beds for some  new 900 freshman women
stu-  LORRAINE POWERSdents.  Dean Powers said, "Even as the building is
increasing so are  the number of new students and wedon't know when we will
ever  get caught up in the housing shortage."  Along with housing approval
DeanPowers helps the AWS and  other women's organizations on campus.  She
helped supervise the writing of the AWS Handbook and other  publications. .
 Dean Powers door is also open to any woman student who feels  that she
needs help or advice in solving problems connected either  with school or
her private life.  "I consider this is one of the more important jobs of
the Dean  of Women's Office and I invite any newfreshman women or women 
students to come and talk to me whenever she feels that she wantssomeone to
talk to."  welcome back, Western  welcome to Wahls  Sportswear, dresses,
fashionaccessories-plus  these departments unique for  their selections,
specialized services,  trained, expertstaff.  fine cosmetics, toletries 
Trained beatuy specialists and top brands  like Revlon, Charles of the
Ritz,  Bonne Bell cosmetics, fine  toiletries make our department unique. 
bras, girdles, lingerie  Fitters trainedby leading corsetry schools  assure
the fit and comfort essential  in under-fashions,sleepwear and 
finelingerie^  hair fashions by Maurice  Bellingham's finest salon, newly 
expanded, airconditjoned,redecorated,  gives you the latest hair fashion,
expertly  done in comfort.  knitting yarns, fabrics  Acomprehensive
selection of fine  fashion fabrics, patterns, sewing notions  and years,
with salespeopleexpert in  knitting, sewing.  books and stationery  Large
selection of better paperbacks,  books,references, stationery, gifts  and
greeting cards.  charge accounts  Inquire at the credit office,  on
themezzanine.  125 W. HOLLY, BELLINGHAM — 734-5100



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 13



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SPSS?*!?  T i l t : WESTERN WASHINGTON STATE COLLEGE  j § | Vol.
L V I I I , No. 1 Bel I ingham,Washington Friday, Sept. 17, 1965  SUMMER 
MAN -BUT IS THAT SUN NICE!!  It was fun in the sun thissummer, whether
smiling or sleeping, for Fern Schut (smiling) and Pat  Brewster (sleeping).
Though theweek before finals the girls felt a little sun would do them some
 good. It was a difficult summer forWesternites to study as the
temperatures sizzled into the high  80's and 90's. Fern is teaching at
HighlineHigh School this fall while Pat has returned for her senior i  year
on Sehome Hill. *' ,  Clyde MacDonald,Dean of Men, turned chef one day at
Lakewood,  the college's facilities at Lake Whatcom, this summer.The scene 
was one of the traditional steak fries put on during the summer'  by the
Saga Food Service.Dean Mac was reported to have been  as good a chef as he
is an administrator.  A CANVAS, A TREE, ALOVE  For some, the summer was a
time to get outside and record the glories of the world around.
Thisunidentified student found beauty on her doorstep, the Bird Sanctuary.
Too often we walk past theSancturay without stopping to really see it. The
Bellingham area abounds with magnificent scenery.  On aclear evening have
coffee at sunset on the patio of the VU Coffee Shop. Also be sure to take a
 look atSehome Hill behind the college when the leaves start changing
colors.  WHAT IS IT?  The high school kids in the Project Overcome program
constructed  weird, cardboard sculptures during their eight weeks
atWestern.  One night they distributed them in strategic corners of the
campus  for the students to behold in the morning. The weird objects 
brought reactions of laughter to perplexion from Western-types.SUMMER. . 
Time of Suntans. Swimming  and Painting at Western...  Days of Study,
Evenings of FunWHAT'S INSIDE  * Project Overcome  * Viking Union, Student
Hub  * Counseling Center



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 26



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PAGE TWENTY-SIX THE COLLEGIAN FRIDAY, SEPT. 17, 1965  Gail Bowman, left,
wears a houndstooth checked wool dress featuring three tiers, A dark green
rain coat, wool checks in fall tones, and a suedesheepskin jacket are 
while Brett Einarson and Helen Dora choose furry bear coats for casual
wear.sported by Brett, Villene Byron, and Bob Stark. (Sheepskin jacket
courtesy of  (White coat courtesy of J.C. Penney Co.) Robert Burns.) 
Gail's empire-waisted cotton  dress features contrasting lace,  a
fashionbonus in fall styles.  Brett and Helen'; relax on campus, Wearing
after  class clothes, suitable for Hondariding.  Villene wears a late
summer  cotton dress, perfect for more  dressy occasions.  Helens
two-piececamel wool suit features a  bright plaid lining and is set off by
her black  turtle-neck sweater. (Courtesy ofJ. C. Penney  Co.)  Brett views
Bellingham from the lounge's balcony  wearing a furry V-neck sweaterover a 
black and white checked sport shirt.  Bellingham Cycle  featuring  Suzukis 
Now with an exclusive12 month or 12,000 mile warranty.  WO/ discount- on
labor,  /O parts   accessories  to college students.733-4144 OPEN 7 DAYS A
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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 27



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FRIDAY, SEPT. 17, 1965 THE COLLEGIAN PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN  Bob's soft wool
gold V-necksweater tops a yellow and blue  striped, button-down sportshirt 
worn with tapered slacks and  loafers. (Allphotos by LANCE)  Small birds of
Tangiesneekie  are eaten as a rare delicacy by  their large neighbors.is 
'A Decorator's Delight'  139 West Holly  Phone 733-9176  Belltngham  Rattan
Baskets  For carryingyour books.  From  $ | . 9 5  Coffee Mugs  Unusual
Gifts  for all  occasions  Come in and browse.  Nancylowman Sri fashions 
Tetfal look looms big fall fashion  By NANCY BOWMAN  Collegian Fashion
Editor  Fa s h i o n conscious coeds  a r e looking to the great.  TOTAL
LOOK for t h e n ew  a p p e a r a n c e incampus fashions.  What is t h e
TOTAL  LOOK? It's head-to-heel  perfection, from the scarf  or hat tothe
loafers or  boots—everything is co-ord  i n a t e d to
make the imp  o r t a n t impact.  The mostexciting new feature  of the
Total Look is the addition  of stockings which match "or  blend with
yoursweater, creating  the all-in-one, jump-suit effect.  From knee-length
argyles  to waist hugging coloredhose,  stockings are focusing the fashion 
spotlight on the legs.  Texture is
all-important—nub-bytweeds and webbed knits are 
popular; patterns range from  bold hounds-tooth checks to ar-gyle  knits
tosolid and exciting  patterned nylons.  To match the stockings, sweaters, 
are being revived by the  trend-setters. Heavy knits, in all  colors and
patterns are available  to the "in-crowders" who dare  to be differentin
their gay turtle  neck-ribbed pullover and matching  stockings. Argyles,
checks,  plaids and solids areall making  their bids for popularity on the 
fashion scene.  What shape are the skirts in  for fall? Short andwith an
A-frame!  Smart knee-cappers  make the perfect go-between for  coordinated
sweaters, tops andsocks. While solids seem to be  the most popular,
interest is often  centered in the skirts texture,  ranging from suedes
through all  textures of wool weaves and  knits.  COLOR NEWS!  Color news
is being madeby  the big four: cranberry, loden,  camel and heather, all
great additions  to the fashion scene. Still  with us are the ever-right
blacks  and whites, checks, stripes, etc., look is achieved on an otherwise
 Watchfor lace trim on fall se- basic dress with the addition of  lections.
"A sweet old fashioned" I a collar ofembroidered wool lace  Men are
becoming more and more aware of the clothes they  wear andsalesKjbnscious
fashion promoters are doing their best to  meet the demand for style-right
clothing bycreating a gigantic  industry centered on male clothing.
„  The college man proves no exception to therule.
Entering  freshmen and returning upperclassmen alike are paying particular 
attention to the clothesthey purchase for the year ahead on campus.  What
kind of clothes will "make the scene" on the nation'scampuses this fall?
Most trends indicate that this year's campus  here will be decked out in,
for one thing,V-necked sweaters—both  long and short
sleeved—which will appear in a variety of textures. 
Theserange from fine wool knits to bulky orlons, and come in an  exciting
list of colors, topped by navy blue,wine red, and camel.  Cardigan sweaters
also rate high on the fashion scene.  SHORT SLEEVES^Underneath these manly
sweaters are worn short sleeved sport  shirts, "the most current favorite
beingthe guaranteed-to-bleed  madras plaids, a fabric returning again to
make a bid for popularity  this fall.Other sport shirt fashions point to
the button-down collar  gt; large  checks, stripes, masculine wool shirts
in dark stripes or plaids.  Above all, the shirts must feature-the trim,
fit found in tapered tail  models. , .What type of trousers will our
style-conscious campus man wear  for classes and casual dates? The wordfor
pants is still fairly  tapered, with belt loops and cuffs making frequent
appearances.  Levis are still seenfor the less formal occasions; beige
jeans are  the first color choice, with green and faded blues making for
strong  bids for second place.  Older style "hipsters" are being replaced
by higher waistlines,  which callfor belts, a sometimes neglected men's
wear accessory.  This year's belts will be wider, either in leather or
stretch, and  many madras plaid belts will show on campuses.  WING TIP
SHOES  Shoes for fall featurethe solid wing-tip style for the man in the 
know this fall. Coming in black, browns and in betweens, thisshoe  is
solidly "in."  The traditional loafer also rates high in the fashion set.
Worn  with dark socks, itcompletes the "look" for this year's college man. 
A final word on coats: a big newsflash in fabrics issuede,  leather, and
corduroy. The sheepskin promises to be a. trendsetter  among well-dressed
men. *The bear-look, popular also in "look-alike" women's styles, will 
make some appearanes on fall and wintercampuses, its furry  warmth very
welcome at nippy football games. Many fall jackets  feature hoods
thisseason.  The look in men's fashion is a carefully planned-out attempt 
to create well-dressed men.  incream or white. Often the  lace is repeated
at the cuffs or  extended for fashion accent  around the lines ofthe
bodice.  And speaking about bodices,  the newest and greatest in the  dress
line is an often seenempire  waist, this year rejuvenated  by the current
"mod" look, for  which we owe thanks to our  Britishfriends.  In fact, much
of what's hew  can be traced to European influences,  from the "mods"
ofEngland to the Courrege look, so  named for the French originator  of the
look. A definitely "continental" look is achieved by; the  new webbed
sweaters, bell-bottom  trousers, Beatle - inspired  caps, Frenchberets,
etc.  FUN, FUN, FUN!  A fun addition has been made  to the wardrobes of
many a returningcoed: the fuzzy, bear-looking  coats. These fur pile
hip-length  jackets generally feature  a parka-typehood, just perfect  for
those chilly footbali games  and looking so smart with slacks.  Madras, the
not-so-new "guaranteed-  to-bleed" fabric, remains  in sight in the form of
transitional  fall cotton dresses* Italso  makes the accessory scene
highlighting  belts, caps, purses, and  scarves.  Shoulder bag pursesare
solidly  "in" this fall, as are leather boots  and low-heeled shoes.
Speaking*of  shoes, the fall imagehas com-,  pleted itself with a
wide-heeled,  bowed, strapped, little girl lobk  (cr is it little boy
look?) in f6ot apparel.  The look for fall emerges as a  carefully planned
excitingly complete  image which will be seen  many times this fall on the
nation's  campuses.  Dreamers bsware! Psychologists  report that adreamer 
watches his own dreams by actually  moving his - eyes while  asleep. 
"Invite Us To Your Next Blowout'  SALES SERVICE  THERE'S NO ROMANCE ON A
LONELY ROAD  WITH A FLAT TIRE!  King  Daul Tire Co., Inc.  REPAIRING  
RECAPPING  Ph. 733-6230 1200 STATE ST.  WRA alive in WFroshwelcome  Among
the various campus organizations  offering membership  to freshmen women
ths yearis  the Women's Recreation Association,  better known as WRA.  The
purpose of WRA is to provideopportunities for recreational  and social
activities for all  women; to foster good citizenship;  to' fostercollege
spirit; to  inspire good sportsmanship and  a love for playing the game. 
The cost of belonging issmall,  50 cents a year or 25 cents a  quarter. WRA
has a cabinet consisting  of an Executive Board,Sports Manager, and a
faculty-advisor,  Miss Chappelle Arhett  of the Women's Physical
EducationDepartment.  WRA sponsors such programs  as women's intramurals,
inter-college  sports days, weeklycoeducational  recreation activities, 
and the highlight of the year, the  WRA carnival, held at thebeginning  of
winter quarter.  The speed limit on campus is  10 miles per hour.  HOLLY'S 
MEN'S SHOP  Tor the best dressed college male'  Welcome to Western and the
Bellingham  area. Visit us to see thebest in fashion, keyed  to the young
man's tastes.  1307 CORNWALL PHONE 734-5070



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 28



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FACE TWENTY-EIGHT THE COLLEGIAN FRIDAY, SEPT. 17, 1965  GRIDDERS GRAPPLE -
COACHBREAKS EM UP  This was a familiar scene behind Carver Gym  during the
past two weeks as the Vikings prepared  for the coming season. Keeping a
tight  rein on Western's big.boys with a busy whistle ishead coach Jim
Lounsberry (right). Practices'  were held twice every day.  "Hell Week'-uh,
it hurts  ByBRUCE DELBRIDGE  Collegian Staff Reporter  A kaleidoscope of
pain showed  on the sweating faces asthe  athletes swished toy on the
endless  journey around the track.  They knew the coach would ask  for more
sweat, more strength  and more pain later on, but now  they were concerned
only with  survival;survival of each of the  pains of "Hell Week" at
Western,  the first week of coach Jim  Lounsberry's twoweek football 
training program.  Hell week itself is so named  because it is one solid
week of  doubleturnouts, two gruelling  practice sessions a day designed 
to whip the gridiron hopefuls into  shape.  Bothpractices are usually two 
hours long and run accordingly:  A half hour of rigorous calis-thentics, 
15minutes of agility  drills (such as forward rolls,  sprints, walking on
all fours, isometric  neck exercisesetc.), a  half hour of dummy plays, a 
half hour of either scrimmage or  light contact and then 20 to 30minutes of
hard sprints.  SAME IN AFTERNOON  Approximately the same procedure  is
followed in theafternoon,  but often there is more  hard contact work. 
Sixty-seven gridders showed up  at campusSept. 5 and after briefing'by 
Lounsberry and his new  staff they spent their last blissful  night in
thesack. The next  morning they were herded on the  field in shorts and
started the official  "Hell Week"workouts with  traditional timing in the
100-yard  dash, an obstacle course and the  mile.
"-••'  In theafternoon the weary
Vikings  - donned the full gear and,  15 pounds heavier, proceeded to  go
through afull "Hell Week"  workout.  Tuesday dragged by, with two  more
of-the tiring sessions out  of the way, andthen Wednesday  Lounsberry gave
this roughnecks  a taste of action. A small scrimmage  Wednesdayprimed them
 for a full scale scrimmage Thursday  toefore the members of the 
Bellingham Lions Club.The  scrimmage was held after a full  workout that
afternoon and a  Open 4-10 p. m.  Weekends  12-10 p.m. Sun.  and Holidays 
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full workout in the morning.  PAIN,PAIN, PAIN  Friday two more sessions had
 dragged painfully by and then  Saturday Lounsberry turnedthe  troops loose
into the customary  Saturday scrimmage.  There was a look of true amazement
 onthe faces of the survivors  as Lounsberry announced  that they would get
their day of  rest. Sunday wasspent in luxurious  sleep or in the
affectionate  arms of the girl back home. But  just for a^day; theplayers
were  back at 'it' again Monday' morning  at 10 a. m.  It's not surprising
that the exhaustingroutine began to tell  on the group right away. Most  of
the players began to creak at  the joints like oldmen. Bodies  became
bruised and swollen and  many boys became so overly fatigued  that they
found it hard to  sleep at night. •_  Many players failed
to stand  up to the punishment as the week  draggedon, and the size of the 
squad quietly began to diminish.  Slowly at first then faster the  faces
began todisappear and the  six original teams slowly became  five and then
four. No:  body blames players forquitting.  Everybody on the team would 
like to quit and take it easy, but  the ones who make it through"Hell Week"
rarely quit the  team. .  - "Hell Week" is true Hell, but  there is a kind,
of satisfaction  inmaking it through such an  ordeal. The kind of
satisfaction  that binds teams together, and  makes themable to face even 
greater ordeals on the playing  field.  We Extend A Warm Welcome  To
WWSCFreshmen and  Returning Students  Visit our beautiful flower shop  and
receive your free certificate for  acorsage later in the year.  DELIVERY TO
ALL STUDENT HOUSING  I. V. Wilson  FLORIST  'Flowers ofQuality'  Use Our
Free Parking  Lot Behind Our Store  1426 CORNWALL AVE. PH. 733-7630 
MORESPORTS ON PAGE 29  WELCOME  TO  WESTERN  Let us help you with all  your
jewelry needs.Convenient terms  available.  PAUL MUELLER  JEWELER  1240
Cornwall Ave.  NEXT TO THE  LEOPOLD HOTEL



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 29



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FRIDAY,  :.7i? r".-vT;TT  SEPT. 17 THE COLLEGIAN PAGE TWENTY-NINE  Viks,
Canucks, premiereSat. eve  SOUTHPAW PASSER FIRES A STRIKE  Freshman Don
Meenach, from Freeman High  School. Spokane. Js one of Coach Lounsberry's 
candidates for the quarterback slot. Meenach,  a 5-11, 170-pounder, is
unique as he is a southpaw. 
-••••;'
 The. Vikings kick off the football  seasonSaturday night with  the
traditional Shrine Game  against the University of British  Columbia
Thunderbirds. Gametime at Civic Field is 8  p. m.  The T-Birds have lost
some of  their feathers, but plan to have  plentyof claws this year.  Coach
Frank Gnup has lost his  entire 1964 backfield through graduation 
orineligibility. However,  their forward wall is intact. This  includes
gigantic tackles Bill McLaughlin  andGeorge Brajcich.  Returning after a
three-year  absence is 250-pound tackle  George Turpin.  Alsoreturning
after a year's  absence is the T-Birds' 1963 quarterback,  Barry Carkner.
Carkner  had a try-outwth Saskatchewan  Rcughrders of the Canadan Football 
League this year. After he  was cut he decided to return to  UBC.  . The
T-Birds opened practice a  week before the Vikings did and  had 53
candidates in camp.  Last year, in a sparkling fourth  quarter finish, the
Vikings dumped  UBC 25-7.  BRUCEDELBRIDGE  a Viking out to get T-Birds 
PLANNING A PLAY DURING SCRIMMAGE  Assistant CoachJim Smith gives the
offensive team a-play during an intra-squad scrimmage last  week. Coaches
JimLpunsberry ,and Don Wiseman listen in. The team has been practicing for
two  weeks prepping fortomorrow's opener against UBC.  The famous 17th
Century admiral,  Lithcus Welleby, has been  notedby historians for the
fact  that he never refused a bribe.  The bugler at Custer's Last  Stand is
an ancestorof a Collegian  staff member.  Dr R. A. Workman-Dr. ft. H. Stone
 OPTOMETRISTS  Haskell Building1519 Cornwall Avenue  Phone 734-2870 
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Ferndale, Washington  SPECIAL CONSIDERATION TO STUDENTS  AND FACULTYHerald
Pharmacy  HERALD BUILDING  Free Delivery Ph. 734-4902  Put your money into 
"PreferredBlock/' Jantzen's  worsted wool cardigan.  It's the 'poor boy'
look  gone contemporary, in a giant  basketweave/ heathered sweater  in
fall's own colors. $11.00.  It matches the "Dominion" skirt,  a gored
A-line inthe same heathers.  8-16, $14.00.  just wear a smile and ajantzen 
1325 CORNWALL 734-5720



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 30



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PAGE THIRTY THE COLLEGIAN FRIDAY, SEPT: 17  WELCOME  WESTERN STUDENTS
ANDFACULTY MEMBERS TO  BELUNGHAM AND  ENNEN'S THRIFTWAY  WIDE MOUTH 
THERMOS  Pint Reg. $2.59  Now Just  IT'S  AT ENNEN'S WHE  TASTEWELL  GUT
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EVEREADY  FLASHLIGHT  BATTERIES  REGULAR 89c  IFREE COMB OF  BRYL  Pf



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 31



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FRIDAY, SEPT. 17 THE COLLEGIAN THIRTY-ONE  WORLD OF FINE  FOODS  E YOU BUY
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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 32



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PAGE THIRTY-TWO THE COLLEGIAN  "«"!.]•.' gt; J
j - ' J ^T  FRIDAY, SEPT. 17  Film  leringer likesmajority  (What exectly
is an art film?  Dr. Feringer was asked to de*-  scribe the purpose and
selectionprocedures of the Art Film Series  on campus. The following is his
 reply—Ed.)  There is good justification for  an art
film series on campus, as  film is becoming more commonly  accepted as a
serious art formused by competent artists. However,  the majority of
commercial  efforts are no more art than pulpmagazines are literature.  The
demand in any commercial  enterprise is to provide the largest 
passibleaudience with whatever  they will pay for, and this  fact must
inevitably resolve into  appealing to themost common  denominator of public
taste.  While one's taste for fine wines  can often be satisfied in amass 
economy, the effect of mass distribution  on films is disastrous.  One is
at the mercy of one ortwo local entrepreneurs. The  function the college
can serve  is to fill this artistic gap. It  therefore seemsentirely
apropos  to promote film art along with  painting, music and literature. 
PLANNING SERIESPlanning a film series is, of  course, not unlike planning a
 balanced collection of literary  works, paintingsor musical recordings. 
One seeks balance in  both subject matter and style.  The first winnowing
oftitles must  be made on the basis of excellence.  To carry out this
process  a meeting is called todiscuss  possible titles and assemble an 
acceptable list. The conversation  usually goes something likethis: 
"Frankly, I like "The Seven  Brave Tractor Drivers" directed  by
Eisenstos." ' 'Well, you have  to betrue about these things."  "Yes, there
was a certain rugged  earnestness that I found totally  irresistible. Inthe
great scene,  for instance, when the hero faces  the pigsty alone, .the
montage is  so wonderful due tothe imaginative  cutting. This is art in the
 highest sense." "You are just  reading that into it, I thought  itwas the
worst trash I have  ever seen." "It's great because  he senses the
resurgence of the  traditionalstress and habitually  uses angular
fragmentation to  consummate his all pervading  theme or hermeticanarchy." 
Eventually we feel pressed to  interrupt such a vital conversation  and get
down to cases. Allpersons are welcome to contribute  suggestions for
possible  shows, but they are further asked  tocomment personally, if the
film  is not well known, why they  thought it was good. Reviews by 
competentcritics are also filed,  and notes are compiled on all  candidates
(including shorts) and  final selections aremade from  this file. Several
titles which have  unanimous agreement are rejected  for having been shown 
every three months on TV (only  after their excellence had been  proven,
and when they are notcontroversial).  ORIGINAL LANGUAGES  All of the films
will be in the  language of their origin, and  non-English works will be
subtitled.  This is far preferable to dubbed  versions which never receive 
the care necessary for good translations.  It should be mentioned  here
that there is no intention  to excludeAmerican films. Often  the term
'foreign film' infers  either that all foreign films are  of better quality
thanAmerican  films, or that none of ours are  good. Make no
mistake—other  countries have just as muchnon-talent 
pointing a camera at any  quick draw, reclining wench, or  jpsychotic drunk
that happens  by.H. L. Menchen's famous quip,  "No one ever lost money
understanding  the taste of the Americanpublic," appears to apply
universally.  The problem of communication  is always difficult in the
arts,  even among the aficionados, and  when one is not too familiar with 
an art form this barrier becomes  almostinsurmountable. I wish,  for
instance, critical notes were  forthcoming at some art exhibits,  where
oneencounters all black  canvases, or piles of rusty gears  soldered
together. Critical program  notes areusually furnished  with films to raise
the general  level of sophistication for the  medium.  Hopefully,students
and faculty  alike will develop a greater interest  in film art. There can,
of  course, be noguarantee of satisfaction  and often the best works  of
art are the most disturbhg.  We can guaranteethat all of the  films chosen
have been produced  by first rate directors and most  have won
world-widerecognition.  Anyone wishing to get into the  act of suggesting
titles (students  and faculty alike) iswelcome to  do so.  Intramurals
undergo  Many major changes  The men's i n t r a m u r a l set-up at W es t
e r n has under  gone a d r a s t i c change, according to Dr. W i l l i am
Tomar  as, chairman of the. Ph y s i c a l Education Department.  The
changes have been made  in an effort to "try to get a  strongbasis of
competion within  the intramural program," To-maras  said.  For the first
time a regular  facultymember will supervise  the program. Jim Smith, a new
 faculty member from Madison  High School inPortland, Ore.,  will handle
the IM'is. He is also  replacing Tomaras as wrestling  coach.  'fSmith has
a"barrel of ideas,"  Tomaras added. Don Rieland will  be the student IM
manager this  year.  This yearleagues will toe set  up in dormitory and
independent  divisions. Previously, individuals  from all corners ofthe
campus  could get together itnd form a  team, but this year residents  must
compete within their dorm and non-residents will compete  in a separate
league.  Although dormitory students  are now slightly more limited in 
selection of teammates'they htay  enter as many teams as they  wish. At the
end of theseason  the winners of the dormitory and  independent divisions
will play  off for the campus crown.TROPHIES GIVEN  "Once this is
established, trophies  can be given to the winners,"  Tomaras
said.Dormitories,  for instance, will be able  to have trophy cases.  A
handbook is being written  this year forthe intramural program.  It will
explain rules of the  various sports, method for entering  teams
andeligibility of players.  A complete schedule of  events will also be in
the booklet.  The main events willbe offered  fall term, according to
To-aras.  Touch football will start  right away, followed by an
earlybasketball competition in mid-  October and the annual Turkey  Trot. 
STUDENTS MAY  STILL SEE  VIKS FOR FREE  Students wishing to go to 
tomorrow's f o o t b a l l game  against University of BritishColumbia at
Civic Field can still  get in for free, even though not  having Fall
quarter student  body cards.For the first game only Spring  quarter student
body cards or,  for freshmen, the $35 deposit  receipt willbe honored,
according  to Dr. William Tomaras,  chairman of the Men's Physical 
EducationDepartment.  Spouses of students should  purchase a special ticket
for  all the football and basketballgames, he said. For only $3  one can
see six .football, games  and 10 basketball games. Otherwisethe spouse must
pay the  $1.50 general admission fee.  The tickets can be purchased  from
the Cashier in Old Main.  "An Evening Of Fun" is^the  title o£
the first big eveninjg|of  events on -campus. • -^
• f , "Ther#wiil be a coh^i§Spthe  auditorium
that will includ%|olk-singing  followed by a dance  headlined bya 'big name
band', "  said Brent Hayrynen, AS Program  Vice President  The tickets will
be $l-'50 andthey will be sold in advance only.  Following this, on Nov. 8,
will  be singer, Johnny Mathis.  It is costingthe program council  $6,000
to bring Mathis here  so the tickets for this performance  will be sold
for$2.50 reserve  and $2.00 general admission.  The tickets for both of
these  events will go on sale inthe VU  lounge this first week of school. 
MOVIES  There will, of course, be movies  during Fall quarter and the first
 one will be free. It will be held  Sunday, Sept. 26 in the auditorium  and
it is titled "Under TheYum,  Yum Tree."  Following will be others: "The 
Unsinkable Molly Brown"  "Hud", "Bridge Oyer The River  Kwai", and
"Becket."  The cost of admission for these  films is 25 cents.  "All of
these events areplanned  by the program council and  any freshman that
wants to work  on the program council cancome  up and see me in the VU
because  there are jobs available,"  said Hayrynen.  VERTIGOANYONE? 
Hanging precariously from the wall of one of the new Ridgeway  dormitories
is a, well, a . . . Iflooking at this rather questionable  picture makes
you green, turn the paper over and look again.  in sameStudents who were ;
admitted i  to the College late, or didn^t come  to Bellihgham early to
find housingare being left out in the cold  this year. There is an acute 
student housing shortage in Bell-ingham  thisyear, according to  Gerald
Brock, Director of Housing.-  •  . H e said female
students were  beingaccepted in August only if  they could find
college-approved  housing. Many didn't.  Real estate agents inBelling-ham 
say nothing is available  for renting, although several  houses are for
sale^at an average  of$14,000 - 15,000 a shot.  The dormitories were filled
up  months ago and the limited off-campus  approvedhousing is also  filled.
 According :to College regulations  women students under 21  or having less
thanjunior academic  status must live in a dorm  or off-campus approved
housing.  More Honor  StudentsListed  BURBANK, CALIF.  Freshmen: Fry,
Lawrence  Waldron, 3.68.  SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.Freshmen: Gouldsmith, Susan 
Wynne, 3.86.  NEWARK, DELAWARE  Sophomores: Hastings, RichardAllen, 3.95. 
HONOLULU, HAWAII  Sophomores: Waiholua, Theresa  N., 3.53.  HASTINGS,
IOWAJuniors: Schroeder, John Robert,  3.72.  Western Professor  Succumbs
this Sept.  Dr. Thomas H.Grove, of Western's  Education Department, died 
early this month after a short  illness.  Grove was anassistant professor 
at Western and supervisor of  student teachers for resident centers  of
theEverett, Edmonds, and  Shoreline school districts.  He received his
Bachelor's,  Master's, and Doctor'sdegrees  at the University of
Washington.  Dr. Grove was a member of  the Christian
Businessman'sAssociation  and the Northwest Baptists'  Association in
Seattle.  He is survived by his wife,  Clarice;four children, Connie, 
Judy, Randy, and Rawleigh.  Freshmen male students must do  likewise. AH
others may live in  indepehdant housing „ if they  wish. 
TOO BAD  If there isn't enough approved  housing tomeet the needs, it is 
just too bad for the students.  The College is building dormitories  as
fast'as theycan, but  that's not fast enough to take  care of this year's
overflow problem.  Since 1960 the HighlandHall  addition, Higginson Hall,
and the  three phases of Ridgway have  been constructed. More dorms  willbe
completed by next year.  Miracle pops up;  Student rates rise  A miracle
has happened. Students,those long hard hours of  slave labor are now worth
$1.25  instead of the traditional dollar!  According toJoe Nusbaum, 
Western's business manager, the  Board of Trustees has approved  the 25
cent raise. Theincrease  was okayed this summer along  with the rest of the
budget.  The major problem lies with  thebudget. Legislators in the 
capital city appropriated five per  cent a year raise for salary
improvements.The college, in reality,  is using the improvements,  for the
next four years.  The deficiency is to beincorporated  in to the Federal
Opportunity  Act. The act provides  $34,700 a year and part of it will  be
used for student salaries. If  this method is adopted there will  not have
to be a decrease of  student jobs. Collegian Advertising Schedule 
Advertising deadline is Monday noon before publication.  Rates are
astandard $1.00 per column inch.  Classified ad deadline is Friday noon
before publication.  Don Bothell,Collegian Business Manager.



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 33



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FRIDAY, SEPT. 17, 1965 THE COLLEGIAN PAGE TfflRTY-THREE_  IT'S ALL MUD NOW^
 A cluttered lot on High Street will soon yield this modernistic,
nine-story girls women students. Designed by architectHenry Kline, it will
be ready for use by  dormitory. As part of a long-range building program to
help stayWestern's soar- fall of 1966.  ing enrollment, the hew
skyscraper-type dorm will provide living space for 314  A NEW ROOM-A NEW
YEAR-NOT BAD!  Relaxing quietly in the solitude of his room in one of the
newRidgeway dormitories, this Westernite  contemplates the coming quarter.
With the emphasis on comfort,the new dorms^ display excellent  lighting,
ample living space and a modern decor. Students will occupythe rooms
beginning this fall.  The Ridgeway complex will continue to grow during the
year.  More kids-noroom-  More dorms the answer  Student dormitories are
bursting  out all over on Western's  campus asthe administration  tries to
meet the problem of enr  rolling more and more students.  During
1964-65,1,300 men and  women were housed on campus.  This fall 1,650
students will be  living in dormitories and2,274  will live on campus in
1967.  Harold Goltz, assistant to President  Harvey C. Bunke;
anticipatesthat between 2,800 and 3,300 students  will be living in
dormitory  housing by 1970.  This summer, a444-bed dormitory  was completed
in the Ridgeway  complex, the western-most  section ofdormitories. The
project,  costing $2,387,500 will provide  housing for men as well as  an
addition tothe Ridgeway dining  facilities. Fred Bassetti and  Associates
of Seattle were the  architects.  DORMSCONVERTED  Two of the earlier
Ridgeway  men's dorms have been converted  for use as women'shousing.  This
was necessary when it was  decided to convert the 76-bed  Women's Residence
Hall toacademic  use.  Jerry Livermore of Bellingham  was the architect for
the conversion.  The EducationDepartment will  have the biggest use of WRH
this  fall, Goltz said, but the Speech  Clinic and the officesof the Ford 
Foundation Grant Administration  will also be housed there.  Western will
follow the trend  tohigh rise dormitories next year.  A nine-story dorm
housing 314  students will be completed by fall  of1966, Goltz said. The
architect  is Henry Kline.  The development for women  will include, among
otherthings,  two elevators. The students will  eat in the Viking Commons,
Western's  main dining hall.Another dormitory also designed  by Kline and
in the same  block on High Street, is being  planned for1967, Goltz said.
It  will also probably be for women  but a project is "under consideration"
 forconverting Higginsont  Hall and Edens Hall North, presently  women's
dorms, to men's  dormitories,Goltz added.  No tax dollars are being spent 
on capital construction at the  college," Goltz emphasized."All 
dormitories are paid for with  student fees and room and board  money. The
WRH project is beingfinanced out of the student's tuition."  -  The
Associated Students own a  Line-O-Scribe sign printingmachine.  Student
organizations wishing  to help in their publicity programs  can, for a
nominal fee, have signs made. A minimum  notice of three days is required. 
EEP! FORGOT ABOUT THESE  Trying to find a place for everything in the
confusion is Gerrit  Byeman, helping with the remodeling of the oldWomen's
Residence  Hall. When finished; the building will house the Ed Department 
and FordFoundation Grant office. (Photos by LANCE)  irs' at WRH-Out  go
Co-eds, in come profs  The Women'sResidence Hall  will never again echo the
pjtter  patter of feminine feet at all  hours of the night.  During the
summer WRH was  converted to academic use. The  Education Department has
moved  its offices thereand will have  access to the major part of the 
building, according to Harold  Goltz, Assistant to thePresident.  "It's the
old game of professor's  musical chairs," he said.  Prior to. this fall the
Educationoffices have been in the Humanities  Building and Old Main. 
"Moving the offices to WRH will  bring theEducation Department  together,"
he said.  It will also allow the English,  Political Science and
HistoryDepartments in the Humanities  Building and the Math, Economics  and
Administration areas  in OldMain to expand.  The Education curriculum
library  will be moved from Old  Main to the Mabel ZoeWilson  Library,
Goltz added. Only the  Education Department's Fifth  Year Advisement office
will remain  in the ivy-covered building.  The Campus School office will 
remain in the School.  The EducationDepartment will  share WRH with the
Ford Foundation  Grant office and the  Speech Clinic.  Space inthe former
dormitory  has also been converted for two  classrooms, a conference room 
and severalseminar rooms.  Behind the clearly identifiable 
responsibilities of college officials,  lies an implicitrespoiir  sibility
to use education where-ever  possible in preference to  punishment.  All
classrooms andoffice buildings  are closed to student use at  11 p. m;
weekdays and at 12  noon Saturdays. The Viking Union,  hours differ
considerably.



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 34



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PAGE THIRTY-FOUR THE COLLEGIAN FRIDAY, SEPT. 17, 1965  Web and UCCF
separate  close tocampus  Contrary to popular opinion,  The Web, an
espresso  house just below the Vis  i n g Union,is not a front  for a
conv^rsion-to-Ghris-tianity  movement.  Rev. Lyle Sellards, of the United 
CampusChristian Fellowship  house which sponsors The  Web, emphasized this
point in  an interview recently.The Web was started, he said,  ttnerely as
a coffee house where  fstudents could go on weekends.  Therethey can play
cards, checkers,  chess, drink coffee, talk and  pUfeten to the volunteer
entertainment.The "floor show" depends on  who wants to perform. It varies
ing to make religion relevant to  from folksingers to jazz combos  to
poetry readers. "Students are  given,a chance to express
themselvescreatively," Sellards said.  The Web is run on student donations 
in payment for the refreshmentsserved.  The UCCF organization is sponsored 
by the Methodist, Congregational,  United Bretheren,Baptist, Presbyterian
and Disciples  churches on campuses  throughout the nation.  However,
Sellardsdescribes  their program as "open" and they  try to reach as many
students  as possible, regardless ofdenomination.  Sellards believes, "If
you're go  place to go.  the student, you have to deal  with thecurrent
issues, many  of which are controversial."  This is done through several 
programs held at theUCCF house  each week. One of the most popular  of
these is the "Faculty  Speaks" series. Held eachThursday  at 4 p. m.,
beginning Oct. 7,  this quarter's topic is "The Importance  of
Skin"'—on thenecessity  of being human.  Other programs
are the Sunday  Seminar at 9:30 a. m., informalafternoon program at 2  p.
m, and the Book Study Group  at 4 p. in.  Sellards is from Centralia, 
Wash.,and attended junior college  there. After two years he  went to the
University of Oregon  in Eugene with a pre-med. major.  Spending more time
in the  Northwest Christian College taking  theology courses hegraduated 
with a Bachelor of Theology  degree.  Sellards returned to his home  state
and studied for ayear at  the University of Washington  while acting as a
minister to  high school youth for the UniversityChristian Church.  In 1951
he attended Lexington  Theological Seminary in Kentucky  and graduatedwith
a Bachelor  of Divinity degree. After  four years as minister to students 
at the University ofIllinois  he .came to Western in 1959.  Last summer he
began working  towards his Master's degree atthe University of British
Columbia  in Vancouver. "I just want to  get back to school;" he said.. 
C-l series offers  Music, drama, films  A varied offering of programs,
designed to entertain  and enrich, had beenscheduled for this year's
Concert-  Lecture and Film Arts series.  In the Concert-Lecture series, 
anattempt has been made this  year as before to achieve a balance  of
professional drama, concert  anddance, which this fall  includes two plays
and a eon-cert  by a noted pianist. The Art  Films provide avariety of
comedy,  heavy drama and some fantasy,  according to F. R. Fer-inger, 
Director of theExtension  service.  The Fall quarter Fine Art performances 
include:  Nov. 3 — Philip Hanson, aCompany  of one in
repertory. Mr.  Hanson plays 25 of Shakespeare's  comic and infamous
characters, including Richard III, Iago, Edmund  and Falstaff.  Nov. 213 ~
Marilyn Neeley, concert  pianist, willappear as guest  soloist with the
College Civic  Orchestra, performing Tschai-kowsky's  Concert No. 1.Nov. 29
— "The Tiding Brought  to Mary (L* Announce Faite A 
Marie).'" A play presented in  French by agroup of distinguished  actors
and actresses from the  Letreteau De Paris Theater Company.  Theplay is a
love story  which hovers between mystery  and fable and earthy and
spiritual  love set in amedieval atmosphere.  Art films to be offered
include:  Sept. 24 — "The Cousins."  (France,
1959).Winner of the 1959  Berlin Film Festival Award, the  film is a story
of the lost generation  grappling withthe new.  Oct. 8 —
"Lady With a Dog."  (Russian, 1962). This is a film  version of Chekhov's
story of anillicit love affair, lightly entered  into but which turns into
the  great hopeless passion of .the  lovers' lives."The Nose." (Russian,
1965).  An animated rendition of a story  by Gogoal, done with sensitivity 
andfeeling and fidelity to the  author.  Oct. 22 —
"Aren't We Wonderful?"  (Germany, 1958). A mirror  heldup to the German
people,  by themselves, exposing in a witty  and satiric manner their
fortunes  andmisfortunes from the  day of the Kaiser through the  Hitler
era to postwar.  "Happy Anniversary." (France,1961). A short comedy of a
nightmare  come true. The hero never  reaches his destination because 
ofone obstacle after another. [  Nov. 5 — "Sullivan's
Travels"  (America, 1941). Preston Sturges,  notedAmerican director,
screens  story of a Hollywood director who  goes out into the world to see 
what makes the common man  tick, and ends up in a chain gang,  Starring
Joel McCrea and Veronica  Lake.  "TheFatal Glass of Beer"  (America, 1933).
— A W. ;C.  Fields' gem from America's  "Golden Age
ofComedy.'"  Nov. 19 — "Nights of Cabiria."  (Italy,
1957). By the creator of  "La Strada," Federico Fellini,this is a story of
a woman who  is deceived by a movie star, a  charlatan and finally by a man
 who refuses to marry her.  "Hen Hop." (Canada, 1958). A  four-minute
whimsical animation.  Each film is shown twice,at  6:15 and 8:30 p. m. in
the College  Auditorium.  TJKHY f n AHE  ITALIAN HAND KNITTEDSWEATERS 
FULLY  FASHIONED  MANY  COLORS  AND  MATERIALS  TO  CHOOSE  We feature
thetop names in  cosmetics for both the "Man  on Campus" and the "Go-Go 
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MAX FACTOR,  YARDLEY, HELENA RUBENSTEIN, REV-LON,  WORTH, SHULTON, DOROTHY 
GRAY, DANA, BONNEBELL, CLAIROL,DUBARRY.  TAPE RECORDER  •
For Lectures • Parties  • Speech
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Desk Lamp, 4.95  3-Ring Clipboard Binder.  49£  14£ 
2.77  87£ Reg. 19.9514.99



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 35



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FRIDAY, SEPT. 17, 1965 THE COLLEGIAN PAGE THIRTY-FIVE  No room for PE?
Whaddya mean!  T h e r e a r e wide open spaces behind Carver Gym 
nowadays—and t h e y ' r e going to get wider before the
y e a r is over.  The second part of a three  phase, $300,000 project to
develop  Western's outdoorrecreational  facilities is now underway,
according  to Dr. William Tomaras  of the Physical Educationdepartment. 
The entire project includes the  construction of a new practice  field and
track, thedevelopment  of three new playfields, two of  which will replace
the old track  and field area, and finally, the  construction of eight new
tennis  courts next to Carver Gymnasium.  The new, multipurpose
practicefield and track are "essentially  completed," Tomaras said. "We 
will not use the field at all this  fall—we'lllet it
settle for a  while."  NEW TRACK  Trackmen next spring will be  running on
a new, six-lane,quarter-  mile oval, which surrounds  the practice field.
The track is  made of a red shale type base,  and certain field event
areas,  such as the broad jump and high  jump runways, are made of 
Grastex, aspecial asphalt-like  material.  Ending phase one of the huge 
outdoor project, the new track  and field cost $100,000^  The area, which
has its own  built-in sprinkler system, will be  ready for use by spring
quarter, and will be used for practice and  intramural sports only. "It
looks  like it will be a real fine field,"  Tomarasnoted.  Just beyond the
new track and  field- area, bulldozers are presently  clearing the way for
a40x90-yard auxiliary playfield.  "This is being done just to give  us more
space," Tomaras explained.  ^Soon to be eliminated are Western's  old
practice field and track.  In their place will be two moreplayfields, both
approximately  Anyone who's ever tried to make a good  grade-point learns
anotherlesson—the  management of moiney isn't easy. But
the  people at NBof C can be of great assistancewith this lesson. For
instance, a  simple and convenient NB of C Special  Checking Account is a
good way to keep  track of everything you pay for—books,
 supplies, room, board. You don't need to  maintain aminimum balance,
there's no  monthly service charge, and NBof C Special  Checks cost just a
dime acheck. To  open an NBof C account now for use at  the University this
fall, simply inquire at  your nearestNB of C office. And move to  the head
of the class!  Next Lesson: This is the best time to get  to know abank,
and vice versa. Once out  of college, as you begin to use more of  NBof C's
services—a savingsaccount, or  loans for a car, a home,
a business—the  banking relationship you make now will 
be mostimportant. Come in to any of  NBof C's more than 80 statewide
offices.  You'll find NB of C a good place tobank.  NBC  MMK QÂ¥
GOMMEKI MEMBER FEOERAt DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATIONUNIVERSITY OFFICE  N.E.
45th and Brookfyft Ave. N.E.  James L. NewschWander  Vice President
andManager «  Ctter offices Ideated conveniently throiignout
Seattle and Washington State  STADIUMOFFICE  fn University Village  John H.
McGraw, Manager  50x70 yards in size. These are  also being builtto give
additional  room to PE classes and intramural  sports. J  BIDS ARE OPEN 
Bids are presentlyopen for the  construction of eight tennis  courts/ the
third and final phase  of the project. They will belocated  directly behind
Carver  Gymnasium. "We are hopeful for  the courts to be poured by the  end
offall quarter and ready for  student "use by next April," Tomaras  said. 
The expected completion date  for the $300,000 recreational complex  is
fall of 1967. When the project  is finished, the presentsection  of 21st
street near the area  will have to be diverted to make  room for this and
any future ex-par  sion.  "It's something we really  need," Tomaras
commented,  looking over a large blueprint of  theproject. "The kids will
have  to bear with us. I hope they will  be considerate and keep off the 
newfield—it's still tender."  What is 'Saga'?  You'l!
see soon  Everyone chow down?  Saga Food Service isprepared  to serve you,
the  students.  The company has been feeding  students for 15 years. There
are 170 branches in 38 states.  Saga, also known as "Soggy?*  Food Service
was started by 3  collegestudents that took over a  food service that went
broke.  The Viking Commons is a  "beautiful unit"according to  Matt
Loughney, the new manager.  Loughney was previously at St.  Martins College
inOlympia.  "Saga is here to do business  with the college and that's it," 
said Loughney.  '•Our intentionis to be complimentary  to
the school;" he  added.  The food service caters to the  students,
faculty,parties, banquets,  and other occasions where  food is required. 
Thanksgiving vacation will begin  onNov". 24 at noon and will  extend to
Nov. 29..  The Women's  Apparel with the  'Young' ViewpointCuac' lt;X  f
APPAREL  109 W. Magnolia  Across from the Bon  Bellingham  Open Fri. until
9:00 P. Mv



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 36



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PAGE THIRTY-SIX THE COLIEGIAN FRIDAY, SEPT. 17  \ oitt 7 e S^**^
^°  4. Classic Moc OxfordOPEN FRIDAY NITE TILL 9 P. M



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 25



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SPORTS  Pages 25 and 28  • WESTERN WASHINGTON STATE
COLLEGE  •  iiii  Vol. LVI11, No. 1 Bellingham,
Washington Friday, Sept. 17, 1.9.65,  FASHIONS  Pages 26 and 27  ALRIGHT,
ALRIGHT,GETYOUR MAN!* H1ADSmm GAME COAAIN' MEN!  I t ' s a crowd-pleaser 
Goach J im Lounsberry isgoing to display at Civic  Field this year. As t h
e Viks  p r e p a r e for their football  opener against theUnivers  i t y
of British Columbia  tomorrow. Lounsberry has  been instructin g his
quarterbacks  Ralph Burba, Pat  B r e w i n and Roger Fisher  t o "open
up."  "I told them I wanted to see a  minimum of 20forward passes a  game,"
the resident mentor of  rock-'em and sock-'em said. All  couver, B. C.
Rossplayed at  Everett Junior College last year.  A bundle of injuries
caused  Lounsberry to tone down thepractices this week. The Vikings  look
like they've just returned  from the Mekong Delta in Viet  Nam.Two-year
letterman Dick Lay-zell  is out indefinitely with a back  TOM GUGLONIO 
three quarterbacks like to throw,  he said, unlike some of his past 
signal-callers.  Last season Lounsberry termed  a "rebuilding"year and the
team  finished with a 5-3-1 record. This  year the starting offensive team 
will have 10lettermen.  The lone rookie is Mike Ross,  a 6-4, 210-pound end
from Van-  STEVE RICHARDSON  injury.Keith Shugarts has a  pulled hamstring
muscle and defensive  halfback Bruce "The  Swede" Delbridge,has a sprained 
ankle. There is a rash of other  minor injuries as well.  ROUGH SCHEDULE 
The Vikingsschedule is rough  this year as they face Central  Washington
State College, Evergreen  Conferencefavorites, twice.  However, their
schedule is helped  by six home games and only three  away.  The
heavyschedule will put a  strain on senior halfback Bob  Gidner. The 6-0,
200-pounder averaged  better than5.1 yards per  carry last season. 
AllrCohference defensive and  offensive back Steve Richardson  will
bereturning to give Gidner a  hand and should have a good  year. 
Lounsberry is also expecting  good yearsout of: Delbridge and 
offensive^tackle Les Huntsinger.  Concerning the UBC game,  Lounsberry
isn't toosure what  to expect from the Thunderbirds.  He droye to Vancouver
with assistants  Jim Smith, GerryGehrmann  and Don Wiseman, last week to 
watch UBC take on the Seattle  Cavaliers, a semi-pro team.However, he
gained little information  as he felt the T-birds  were holding back.  The
starting 11 fortomorrow's  game are:  Sept  Sept.  Oct.  Oct.  Oct.  Oct. 
Oct.  Nov.  Nov.  18  25  2  9  16  23  30  6  13 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 
UNIVERSITY OF B. C. AT WESTERN  CENTRAL STATE COLLEGE  ATWESTERN  WHITWORTH
COLLEGE AT WESTERN  Western at Pacific Lutheran  PORTLAND STATEAT WESTERN 
UNIVERSITY OF PUGET SOUND  AT WESTERN  EASTERN STATE COLLEGE  ATWESTERN
(HOMECOMING)  Western at Central State College  Western at Whitworth  8:00
P.  8:00 P.8:00 P.  8:00 P.  8:00 P.  8:00 P.  1:30 P.  1:30 P.  1:30 P. 
M.  M.  M.  M.  M.  M.  M.  M.  M.  BOBGIDNER  Ends: Gary McCauley, 185
lbs.;  Mike Ross, 210.  Tackles: Les Huntsinger, 215;  DaveSwanson, 2i6. 
Guards: Larry Gidner, 195; Al  Divina, 205.  Center: Doug Patrick, 200. 
Quarterback:Ralph Burba, 181.  Wingback: Steve Richardson,  185.  Left
half: Bib Gidner, 200.  Fullback: TomGuglomo, 185.  "QUALITY AND CONVENIENT
 TERMS" . . . FOR  •WATCHES •
DIAMONDS•COSTUME JEWELRY  •ALL YOUR
JEWELRY  NEEDS  MILTON E. TERRY  JEWELER  1305Commercial Bellingham



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 14



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PAGE FOURTEEN THE COLLEGIAN FRIDAY, SEPT. 17  Indian teachers meet  For
summer workshopTwenty instructors of Indian children were enrolled  in a
summer institute at Western Washington StateCollege.  The course, held for
the first  time at Western, was also the  first one of its kind ever
offered  in the state. Its purpose was  to begin to prepare a eorps of 
well informed teachers to assist  Indianyoungsters to achieve their  proper
place in the American  social order while encouraging  them to retaintheir
unique cultural  identity, according to Dr.  Thomas Billings of Western's
Education  Departmentand workshop  chairman. «  During the first
three days of  the workshop, eight Indian tribal  leadersfrom Washington
discussed  the conditions of their fellow  people in the Northwest and
airedgrievances with public and  private agencies. In the second  phase of
the workshop experts  in the field ofIndian affairs were  brought to the
class to address  the teachers and be questioned  by them.  Expertsincluded
Wayne Pratt,  of the Bureau of Indian Affairs,  Dept. of jjjnterior,
Washington,  D. C; GordonGunderson of the  Bureau, of Indian Affairs,
Portland,  Ore. office; William Mur-dock,  U. S. PublicHealth Service, 
Indian" Service Dftvisfoh,  Seattle, and Charles McEvers,  American Friends
ServiceCommittee.  Seattle. '  DIVISION OF BULOVA  THE FIRST  10W-COST
QUAULY WATCH  $  AS LOWAS 10  USLIE-Ladies'water-,  proof* in stainless
steel.  Shock-resistant and anti-magnetic.  Precision jew-tied  movement
$15.95  Charge It  CALENDIAL  Teils time and date at »  Stance.
Precision jeweledmovement, waterproof*, and  with calendar window.
Shock-resistant.  $1.6.95  Charge It,  CARAVELLE isan ideal gift.  H ^ g p
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weisfields JEWELERS128 WEST HOLLY STREET  Watches you can buy with
confidence.  Student problems aided  Counseling provided  By CAROL COTTLE 
Collegian Staff Writer  Face it, College just isn't  College without its
shareof problems, whether they  deal with the opposite sex,  or that last
mid-term you  just ruined. These littletrials can really get a person  down
unless he can let  off a little steam to someone.  The CounselingCenter,
available  to all of Western's students,  is a facility offered where a
student  who finds he hastrouble  meeting these problems can go  for
counsel.  Dr. Frank Nugent, director of  the CounselingCenter, says, 
•'The purpose of the Counseling  Center is to facilitate
the : instruction-'  program bybeing avail-.  aMe, to students when they
are  haying problems- that interfere  with their:'learning." ^#ANY PROBLEMS
"  "The problems that college students  come across are many and 
variedespecially those of adjustment  to college in general, so at  the
Center we try and help the  studentsresolve there problems in  talking out
the problem with a  counselor," Nugent said.  It seems that one ofthe
commonest  questions asked by college,  students is the question of  "Why
am I here?"  Dr.Nugent stated, "This problem  often results in a conflict 
and this is where the Center can  be of use tothe student by involving  him
in a discussion session  so that he can see why he is  at college." 
TheCounseling Center has been  operating for three years now as  an
independent body. .;,, ~  The Center'sstaff is comprised  , of six members
who teach classes  as well as counsel students.  The counselors areDr.
Frank  Nugent, director; Dr. Evelyn Mason,  Dr. James Straughn, Dr. 
William McKay, Dr. ElvetJones  and a new addition to the Center's  staff,
David Panek.  All of these counselors teach  as well ascounsel and are
part-time  members of the Psychology  Department.  VOLUNTEER BASIS 
"TheCounseling Center offers  all services on a volunteer basis  and no one
is compelled to make  use of theseservices unless he  feels, that the time
spent with  the counselor would be of benefit  to him," said Dr.Nugent. 
• If at any time a student feels  he would like to return
to the services  of the Center, he may, for  his file is never closed as
these  services will always be available  to him.  vThe."; Counseling
Centeralong  with' offering individual counselling  has initiated a new
program  of group counselling.  Thestudent, of course, can  choose which
program he would  like to take-—either a vocational 
study or oneconcerning emotional  and personal problems. This  program was
begun early in the  new year andseven groups were  tried, each containing
from five  to seven people, who would meet  at a designated time and enter 
into group discussions.  "The staff felt that this additional  service met
with a very  favorableresponse from students,"  Nugent also added.  TESTING
 The Center also gives psychological  testing when the counselors  feel
that it will benefit them  in being able to help the student  more fully. 
But themain objective in the  Center is conversation, to be able  to talk
about a problem and resolve  it, so thetests are only a  help in possible
indication of a  problem.  ; The main objective then of the 
CounselingCenter is to help a  student make his own decisions  and gives
him no answers that  he has not begun torealize himself,  according to
Nugent.  Student Tutor Society  Reorganized at Western  , Need a littlehelp
with the studies? Tired of chasing  your prof across campus to get some
extra instruction?  Yourproblem could be solved ~ ~~  this fall.  A Student
Tutor Society (STS)  is being reorganized this year atWestern, according to
Richard  Reynolds, Director of Student  Activities. .,  The purpose of the
society will  be to provide an opportunity for  SLICK'S  Welcomes Students
To Western  WE SPECIALIZE IN:  *Shavers and Parts * Beauty Supplies 
• Gifts * Cutlery  * Leather Goods  "Quality Goods At
Reasonable Prices"  Corner of Cornwall and Holly Ph. 733-3460  a student
who is poor in a subject  to meet withone who is more  proficient. They
will work together  until the work is understood.  Students wishing to be
tutored  will fill out a form at the VU  main desk. The chairman of STS 
will pick up the form and select an appropriate tutor, who in turn  will
notify the student requesting  help.  3.50 GPA  To qualify as
tutors,students  must have a grade point average  of 3.50. Letters will be
sent to  these people asking if theywould  be interested in STS.  Students
in some majors don't  answer the call to become tutors.  "As aresult,"
Reynolds noted,  "we will have an abundance of  tutors in certain
disciplines and  a shortage inothers."  Welcome to Western  front 
JOHNSON'S FLOWER SHOP  Free Delivery to All Student Housing Individual
Friendly Service To ALL Students  "COME IN AND BROWSE"  PHONE 733-6600
Across fromthe Bon



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 15



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FRIDAY, SEPT. 17 THE COLLEGIAN PAGE FIFTEEN  VUB: hub of Western-  Where
the action is  TheViking Union is the  hub of student activities at 
Western. There, one may  relax in the spacious andcomfortable lounge, watch
 TV, play pool in the Grotto  or have a cube steak sandwich  in
theCoffee,Shop.  The VU is a four-story building.  In the basement are
located  the workroom, whereprojects  for activities such as Homecoming, 
can be built, the Collegian  and Kh^sun offices and theGrotto.'-'-' 
•:,-:'•.- = :
.•••;•-
 ( The Coffee: Shop," stomping  grounds : of;'", flunkingfreshmen,  is on
thfeL next floor. Also there  are*'fee' barber shop and candy  s t a n d .
' , .»••';.'  IThe lounge is
on tfte main floor,  as are th«e TV and music rooms.  Records
may be requested at the  V. U. office and heard in the  music room.  The
Associated Student offices  are located one flight up on thetop floor. If
you want to see the  A. S. President or one of the  Vice-Presidents, this
is the place  to go.The AS Legislature meetings  are held on this floor in 
Room 208 every Monday at 4 p.  m.EXPANSION PLANS  •
Richard Reynolds,. Director of  Student Activities, says plans for  the
expansion of the VU are continuing.  Surveyors are still working  on the
study of the site behind  the presentbuilding.  One of the problems, he
said,  is how to connect the old and  projected new sections. They arealso
trying to figure out how to  finance parking for 230 cars.  Reynolds hopes
this will he completed  byFall quarter, 1967.  Reynolds reported that a Pr
-  gram Assist^* has been hirjed  to work with him; Theassistant  is Neil
Murray" AS Present  two years agV fle b gt;g$n work  Sept.;, 1. Murray will
: occttpyReynolds office,'with the latter  moving to new quarters in the 
vu.'-:'"." :••' -•
;•':.•..••'-;••
•" gt;.:*;;  All ticket sales for plays, Films  and other
activities on campus  are beingcentralized at the VU  main desk this year,
according  to Reynolds. "It should work out  really well,"Reynolds felt. 
NEW FEATURES  One of the new features of the  VU this year is the Current
"Afr  fairsBriefing Center set up in  Room 10 on the Coffee Shop  floor. An
Associated Press teletype  has beeninstalled to bring  news from across the
country  and around the world immediately  to the students.  Aconference
phoneline has also  been put in. A call can be placed  frbna either Room Id
or the  lounge toany number of people  around the \vorld, Reynolds said. 
Students can talk to and listen  to them througha loudspeaker  system in
the lounge.  - This way, elaborated Reynolds,  students can talk to those
thatWestern 1 can't -.afford to have  speak•'; here, lot
are uhayailabl^.  Iter instance, if there were crisis  inBerlin, -
aTfeol^r%n^*J interview^  ffii^t bfe setu|»f wiferfhe  West
Germari C^^llor, a member  of the U.S. Stalk BeJ^-  ftaenf |nd ia memher^if
:.Wesj^}s  P^itical • Science i^^riia^ftt,  with the
students listening and  perhaps asking questions.  Reynolds also announced
that  Clark Drumimond has replaced  GaryClark, formerly Gary Bee-man,  as
the Night Manager.  Drummond will prowl around in  the evenings afterthe VU
closes  keeping students from breaking  in and Collegian-types from 
breaking out.  Females withaction  Wanted for recreation  "There's going to
be a change of policy this year,"  stated Dick Marshall,Grotto manager, "We
want  women.  College provides boats for fun  If the Pacific Northwest has
| afterschool begins there will still  its typical Indian Summer right | be
some time to take advantage  COLLEGECANOES' NEW HOME  of the college
facilities at Lake-wood  on Lake Whatcom.  The new boathousewas completed 
this summer at a cost of  over $3,000. The funds were provided  by the
AssociatedStudents  Legislature in April.  The boathouse will provide  room
for 2(N30 boats including  four canoesbeing bought this fall,  as well as
storage space for life  jackets, oars and paddles.  The present
facilitiesat Lake-wood  include a cabin, beach,  dock, three rowboats,
three canoes,  barbecue pits, fireplaces,yolleyballand badminton courts. 
SKI RAMP  By spring it is hoped that a  water ski ramp and dock will be
installed, according to Richard  Reynolds, Director of Student Activities. 
The parking will also probably be enlarged, Reynolds added.  Lakewood
facilities are open  to all Wesern students and keys  areavailable at the
Viking Union  "The Grotto is not a haven for  male students, nor is it a
pool  room,"Marshall continued. "It is  Western's chief recreational
facility."  The Grotto is located in the  basementof the VU building and 
features a number of games including  bilUards, ping pong, miniature 
bowling, shake bottle,  chess. and checkers.  ;i "It's a place for friends
to  get together and spend an evening  oropen moments between  classes,','
Marshall said. "We  hay^,- included ; females in our  work staff this"year
to accomy  modate the more timid of Western's  famed Femfatales," he 
added.  JOLLY STAFF"Patronage has been the clue  word in the hiring of this
fall's  staff," boasted Marshall, swelling  withpride over his new
administration.  "Notables on the  staff include such campus per^ 
sonalities asDenny Freeburn,  Legislator; Megan Jones, star of  such
Western productions as "The  Tiger;" RandyLidren, intraneural  College Bowl
star and  roomie of the manager; and Pete  Hammer, my favoritecontact  with
the Music Department"  POOLER ON THE BALL  An unidentified pool player
takes carefulaim at the ball  and the camera in the Grotto, basement of the
Viking Union ^  Students, mostly males,find it easy to while away the hours
 here. This year Grotto Manager Dick Marshall hopes the recreation room
will be "in" with the female set.  What's new there, a bar?  Costs of
almost everything at  Westernhave gone up this year,  but it appears that
the prices in  the Viking Union Coffee Shop  will remain thesame as iast 
year, according to Ralph Loge,  manager of the Coffee Shop.  "I don't want
to raise anyprices, if I can help it," he said.  "I like to keep the Coffee
Shop  to the kids' liking," he added.  "It's theirshop."  The popular
luncheon specials  offered last year will be featured  again this year, he
said. "Thestudents seem to enjoy them."  Loge is also thinking of a similar
 dinner special so the students  will stayon campus instead of  going
downtown for supper.  A new feature Loge is plugging  is a coffee bar where
the  water cooler and juke box are.  This, new addition would have to  be
approved by the college.  Therewill be more improvements  as the year goes
on, and  Loge welcomes suggestions from  the students.Coffee shop hours
this year  will be 7 a. m. to 11:30 p. m.  WELCOME . . .  THE UNITED
CAMPUSCHRISTIAN FOUNDATION  "Man's goal is to become more fully human and
this is a life-long religiousquest."  SUNDAYS— PROGRAM
AND ACTIVITIES  9:30 a.m. Sunday Seminars  I. Christian Faith andAcademic
Disciplines  II. The Radical Christian  10:30 a.m. Church Bus  (Attend the
Church of yourchoice)  2:00 p.m....Sunday Afternoon  Informal Program 
MONDAYS AND TUESDAYS  Book StudyGroup  (time to be determined)  I. "The
Sibyl" and "The  Art of Loving"  II. "The Gospel According  Peanuts" 
WEDNESDAYS—  7:00 p.m. Student Council  Meeting  OTHER
ACTIVITIES INCLUDE: New StudentCamp—Open
Forum—Freshman Council—Conferences
and Special Programs  THE CAMPUSRELIGIOUS CENTER AT
WESTERN—A place for study, worship, fellowship,
religious counseling andservice.  (An Ecumenical campus ministry and
program)  THURSDAYS—  4:00 p.m. The FacultySpeaks  "The
Importance of Skin"  (Being Human)  9:00 p.m. Student-Faculty  Discussion
Group"Symbolism"  FRIDAYS AND  SATURDAYS—  10:00 p.m.
-2:00 a.m.  "THE WEB"  (Espresso CoffeeHouse—Basement 
of the Foundation—Folk Singing,  etc.)  THE REV. LYLE D.
SELLARDS, Minister-Director  530 Garden Street (Just below the Viiking
Commons and Viking Union)  Telephone 733-8702OPEN DAILY AND WEEKENDS 
EVERYONE WELCOME



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 16



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PAGE SIXTEEN THE COLLEGIAN FRIDAY, SEPT. 17  jj  Welcome to "Western"! The
Seafirst Bankers in Bellingharn invite you  to come in and get acquainted!
Seattle-First National's modern BellingharnOffice provides many banking
services for "on-the-go" collegians.  • We're within
walking distance fromthe Campus at 112 East Holly St.  •
Seafirst Economy Checking Accounts . . . a big help in keeping arecord of
your expenses throughout the school year . . . . and you  pay only for the
checks you actuallyuse.  • Drive-In Banking Window . . .
for quick and easy deposits and withdrawals.  • Free
andeasy Parking . . . our Supervised Parking Area is a real  time-saver. 
If you're from out of town, ask your"home branch" to transfer your  funds
to your new account with us — There's no charge for this
service.For sound financial advice—anytime during the
school year—call on  your Seafirst Banker in
Bellingharn.  Ifouie aUvcuft cvelc HC at. . .  BELLINGHAM BRANCH  112 EAST
HOLLY STREET  SEATTLE-FIRSTNATIONAL BANK  MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE
CORPORATION  ^Fmi^



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 17



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FRIDAY, SEPT. 17 THE COLLEGIAN PAGE SEVENTEEN  Haubrich claims  Qualified
teachers avoidJobs in depressed areas  Education is r e a c h i n g a "time
of crisis" regarding  schools in culturally-deprived areas, according to
Dr.  Vernon Haubrich, formerly of Western's Education  D e p a r t m e n
tHaubrich made the statement  July 22 during a four-day conference  on
"Social Conflict in  Education"held at Western.  Few teachers like to work
in  depressed areas, he said, and  there are four main reasons for  this: 
The teachers lack the preparation  for working with the culturally- 
deprived.  They fear thehostile students  in these schools and they don't 
know how to cope with them..  By leaving these schools they  make the-
situation worse.  There is a lack of recognition  for teachers who work
with difficultchildren. "Like most human  beings, teachers are anxious  for
a pat on the back," Haubrich  said.DEFENSIVE ATTITUDE  Parents develop a
defensive  attitude toward the school. They  ignore the teacherbecause the 
school is the agent that tells these  parents they are inadequate,
according  to Haubrich.Teachers, Haubrch said, must  become involved in the
style of  life and learning' of the culturally-deprived. It must be done
even  if it means living in the slums  of East Harlem or the hills of 
Kentucky, headded.  The problems are many but  they can be solved,
according to  Haubrich. First, the teacher mustleave the classroom and
"extend  a hand which goes beyond the  blackboard," he said. 
VERNONHAUBRICH  . . . gone to Columbia  A long look should be taken at  the
relationship between thecolleges  and the public schools, he  said. Just as
the teacher won't  participate in the depressedculture,  neither will the
college professor  "leave his cocoon" and see  the world around him,
Haubrich  said.  Schools of inquiry should be  set up, he said, where the
professor  and teacher can meet anddiscuss problems in education.  STRICTER
CHECK  Haubrich said he felt a stricter  check should bemade on who  enters
the teaching profession.  "It is not a job for one trying  to find an easy
route toprofessional  status," he added.  A longer internship and a more 
realistic link with the public  schoolsare needed. He said perhaps 
teaching should be postponed  until after the graduate  level.  Finally,and
perhaps most im-iportantly,  he said the public  school system must be
responsive  to a wider area ofresponsibility.  They must discover what it 
means to integrate schools and  what it does to the children.They must find
out how deep  the chasm is between the teacher  and the culturally-deprived
 child. Thesystem must be "loosened  up," he said. New ideas  must be
tried.  "Teachers owe it to their tradition  of patience, understanding 
and humility to make an effort  to. do these things,". lie said.  Haubrich
came to Western in  January, 1964, from Hunter Col-lege.  New York, where
he trained  teachers for work inculturally-deprived  areas. This fall he
will  assume a new position at Teacher's  College, ColumbiaUniversity,  N.
Y.  Student Bill of Rights posted  All students required to appear  before
a disciplinary board shall  be notified as to why their appearance  has
been requested.  In all disciplinary meetings, thestudent shall enjoy the
right to  speak on his own behalf.  Any decision of a disciplinary 
committee is final unless the student  punished wishes to appeal  the
decision to a committee comprised  of either theDean of Men  or Dean of
Women, and the  President of the College and the  Chief Justice of the
ASBJudicial  Board.  Under no circumstances shall  a student be made to
feel that  refusal to renderinformation will  of itself increase the degree
of  penalty.  A student penalized by a civic  authority shall not be
re-examined  by a disciplinary board, unless  the civic violation can
justifiably  be construed asone of  major consequence.  A student shall not
be brought  before the Disciplinary Committee  whichcompletely lacks
student  representation unless the  student wishes to waive the
studentrepresentation.  All students shall be made  aware of what kinds of
actions  are deemed irresponsible bythe  college and the possible
consequences  of these actions.  The actions of the DisciplinaryCommittee
shall be kept confidential,  except from those directly  concerned, to
protect thestudents  from any ill effects within  the college community. 
All students have the right to  participate indisciplinary policy  changes
through any orderly channel.  The above provisions shall be  guaranteed
bvthe administration  of the institution and shall not  be altered in any
way without  the consent of thestudents through  their elected
representatives.  CHAR-BROILED STEAKS  \\ Probably the Best n  Friday11:30
a. m. 3:00 a. m.  Sunday^ Noon - 8:00 p« m.  EASY TO FIND - TURN
LEFT FROM HOLLY TOCOMMERCIAL STREET  COME IN FOR THE BEST IN DINING  Profs
anxious-  Results near  The last leg of t h e Independent Psychology prog 
r am is about to begin w i t h e n t r a n c e of manysophomore  students
this fall.  At the end of Spring quarter  next year the program that was 
started fallquarter of 1963 will  reach the final evaluation stage.  The
Independent Psychology  Program is anexperiment to see  whether students
are as successful  at independent study as students  are inclassroom
instruction.  Dr. Peter Elich, director of the  program stated that "the
first  two years of theprogram and  their results had been favorable  but
we have initiated almost a  total change in the programitself,  that is, in
the course work to be  offered."  The Independent Psychology  course can be
describedas a  four-area course which has the  use of the college resources
and  equipment under guidance. It issupported by lectures, reserved 
readings, discussion and consultation  with faculty members.  Elichsaid
that the evaluation  thus far points out that some students  can obtain the
necessary  objectivesneeded for an educational  psychology course by using 
the method of independent study.  "Theprogram is aimed at identifying  the
character of students  who are successful as well as  being
self-disciplined persons,"  said Elich.  The Independent Psychology 
program is available to any  sophomoreteacher education student  who is
willing to accept the  responsibility of completing the  course.  Newstudy
guides have been  writen and improved and there  will be new reading
material,  some of which isbeing written  by the instructors of the
Educational  Psychology program.  The initial group that took the
Independent Psychology program  will be seniors this year.  Of the total
350 students first  admitted tothe program in 1963  200 are left.  Elich
said, "The students who  have dropped out of the program  haveeither
transferred, changed  their major or have dropped out  of college."  Out of
these 350 students 50  per cent have completed the  whole course of study
and the  ones that are left will complete  their finalseminars in the next 
year.  Last fall approximately 350  students again entered the program. 
All or acombination of the  facilities may be used by students  during
their program.  Competency tests aregiven  throughout the year in which a 
grade of "C" or higher must be  achieved.  Exams may be taken atany  time
the student feels he has  completed the necessary study  and application to
pass theexamination.  Of course, if the student  fails the exam he is free
to  take the test again when he findsthat he has filled the gaps in his 
knowledge.  We Feature A  COSMETIC HEADQUARTERS  For CollegeGals 
• DOROTHY GRAY  • ELIZABETH ARDEN 
CONTACT LENS SUPPLIES  AUBERT I; DRUGCO.  PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 
Bellingham National Bank Building  Cornwall and Holly Ph. 734-4340  3
Blocks From City Center  DOWNTOWN MOTEL  Mr. and Mrs. Alton Sandmann,
ProprietorsPhone 733-7050  AAA APPROVED  Beauty-Rest- Mattresses  611 E.
Holly St. Bellingham



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 18



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PAGE EIGHTEEN THE COLLEGIAN FRIDAY, SEPT. 17  JACK TRAYLOR-A SINGING
SHEPHERD, HISEAGER FLOCK  It is said that a happy people are a singing
people. During their stay at ers in song. Many sunny afternoons they were
seen sitting in the Bird Sanctuary  Western this summer the ProjectOvercome
kids were both. One of the instruct- singing. Traylor even wrote a special
"Project Overcome"ballad. _ _ . . . „ _ ,,  ors, Jack
Traylor, formerly with the Gateway Singers, often led the high school-(All
photos by LANCE)  CLAY AND IMAGINATION  The Art class was one of the most
popular for thestudents.  Here, for the first time many found a way of
expressing themselves,  their feelings anddesires. Their fertile minds,
dulled by  years of despondency, sprang to life in the refreshing
atmosphere.STUDIES WERE STIMULATING  First rate instructors guided the
students in students were eager to learn and 10 of the 50  their classes.
Here Dr. Charles Flora emphasizes achieved a grade point average of 3.50 or
better  a point in a Science class discussion group. The during the eight
weeks.



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 19



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FRIDAY, SEPT. 17 THE COLLEGIAN PAGE NINETEEN  HO HUM, 45 MINUTES LEFT  But
all was notfun and games. Even the  most interesting classes turn dull
sometimes.  These students obviously aren'tthinking about  logarithms. The
warm summer days made studying  hard for everyone, even the Projectkids 
who, on the whole, were quite conscientious.  SOME FOUND THEMSELVES 
Project Overcomewas a deeply moving experience for both  the faculty and
students. In moments of solitude some of thekids  discovered themselves and
resolved their lot in life for the first  time. They returned to their
homeswith a new outlook and reason  for living. (Photo by Bob Peterson) 
HAPPY HOURS AND SMILES  Atfirst it was felt the students would be  home
sick at Western, but, happily this was not  the case. Manykids didn't want
to go home for  the July 4 holiday and tears were shed openly  at the end
of the eight-week session. But they  have memories and can look forward to
returning  next summer.  year's classwill serve as tutors  to the new ones,
said Billings.  And they are well qualified, for  10 of the 50 achieved"cum
laude"  standing for the eight weeks.  ; On Sufcday, Oct. 3 at 9 p. m., 
KVOS-TV will present a filmon  the project, Entitled -'If I Am  Nt Lved,"
it was filmed by  Dwayne Trekker.  Overcome kids brightenThemselves; campus
too  : A chance. . . . .  Fifty youngsters, mostly from  the Seattle-Tacoma
area,received  this at Western this summer.  They were part of Project
Overcome,  the brain-child of theEducation  Department's Dr. Thomas 
Billings, a program to help prepare  "culturally-.deprived" highschool
students for college.  Financed by the Office of Economic  Opportunity,
Project Overcomeoffered eight weeks of intellectual,  cultural and
recreational  stimulation to the 50, Caucasians,Negroes, Orientals and 
Indians, who will enter their senior  year of high school this fall. 
Contact will bekept with these  students during the winter by the  Overcome
staff and they will return  to Western nextsummer.  Then, after more
preparation,  they will enter Western in the  fall.  If the program is a
successhere  the OEO will recommend that  most colleges and universities 
make it a permanent part of theirsummer programs. The result  would be that
students all over  the United States who hadn't  receivedintellectual
stimulation  at home would have a chance to  go to the summer schools and
enrichthemselves enough to be  able to enter college.  Dr. Billings termed
the first  phase of the program atWestern  an "immense success."  "Its
success was far beyond  what we had hoped, and in ways  some of us had not
even thought  about."  DAILY CLASSES  The boys and girls went to  classes
each morning, studying  English, history, math, science  and art. The art
program was  very popular and one morning the  regular summer school
students  found cardboard and wood sculptures  scattered around .the.campus
 by the "Overcome" kids.  (See picture, page 13.)  Besides the class.
instructors,  severaltutors worked with the  kids. The tutors were either
upper  division students or graduates  of Western,according to Billings. 
Next year the project will  double in size as the year's 50  plus an
additional 50students  come to Western. Some of this  NOTICE  You Can Order
Your  one  at the  lone Trailer  parkedat the  Campus School  i. 20 - Fri.
24  8:30 A. M. - 5:30 P. M.



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 20



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PAGE TWENTY THE COLLEGIAN FRIDAY, SEPT. 17  Lakewood bad problems 
Boathouse blunders big DAN GULLICKSON  . ex-Facilities Chairman  By BOB
GRAHAM  Collegian Managing Editor  I t was hotthis summer. Stud  e n t s at
Western went to class  for weeks on e n d u n d e r w a r m J u ly 
skiesand members of t h e summer  Board of Control boiled in the  heat of t
h e i r own a r g u m e n t s over  aboathouse.  .Last winter quarter the
AS Legislature  approved plans for the construction of a  newboathouse at
Lakewood, Western's  waterfront recreation area on Lake Whatcom.  The
estimated costof construction  for the project was $4000.  This summer the
boathouse was completed,  but when thebill reached the  desks of BOC
members, it read $5200,  a full $1200 more than the estimated^ 
price.People were unhappy in the VUI  building.  Dan Gullickson, Facilities
Chairman  and manager of Lakewood for the summer,  was called before a July
20 Board  of Control meeting and received the  brunt of thatorganizations
wrath.  Charges of "hasty decisions" and  "boathouse blunder" were fired at
Gullickson  by Finance Chairman Dave Go-forth  and AS Legislator Clark
Drummond  at the lively meeting.  BAD LABOR  Gullickson defended himself by
explaining  that he had not spent more  money for the boathouse in"haste"
but  had spent it only because undependable  student labor had forced the
hiring of  professionallabor at a higher cost, to  complete the boathouse
in time for summer  use.  "Students would only showup for  work at Lakewood
when they wanted to  because of the low rate of pay—one
dollar  an hour forwork that pays more  in Bellingham," he said.  Although
a controversy over the boat-house  raged on, theappointed summer 
legislators passed a motion authorizing  Goforth to spend up to a total of
$5700  forfinishing the boathouse. Gullickson  said the boathouse needed
painting to  make it complete.  At the endof the meeting the legislators 
asked for, and received, Gullickson's  resignation.  Because of
theboathouse. controversy,  Goforth introduced a motion for a committee  to
make recommendations forfuture  construction of student-owned buildings  to
be referred to the fall quarter  AS Legislature.Summer BOC was lively for
once  This summer was a time  of unusual activity for  Western's Board
ofControl.  The BOC is a non-elected body  of students which serve as the 
AS Legislature during the nineweek summer session.  The peak of activity
for the  BOC came when the cost of a  DEAN FOSTER  . .BOC Chairman  A Warm 
Welcome  to Students  Fagii'  from the closest  to campus  Star Drug 
TheRexall Store  Open 9-9 Sun. 6-9  STATE   HOLLY  newly constructed1
boathouse at  Lakewood, thestudent owned recreation  area on Lake Whatcom, 
exceeded the estimated; cost of  construction by$1200.  The result of this
added expense  was a lively BOC meeting  during which Dam
Gullickson,Western's Facilities Chairman  and manager of Lakewood, was 
accused of numerous "blunders."Because of this controversy,  Dave Goforth,
BOC Finance  Chairman, introduced a motion  for a committee to make
recommendations  for future construction  of student owned buildings  to be
referred to thefall quarter  AS Legislature.  A motion was passed by the 
BOC for a committee of two  legislatorsappointed by Dean  Foster, BOC
Chairman, to make  future recommendations.  MORE ISSUES  Anotherhotly
debated issue this  summer was the problem of toilet  and sink facilities
at Lakewood.  The problemwas centered around  the specifications, .cost and
construction  bids.  The Whatcom County HealthDepartment had issued an
order  that lavatories be installed in the  near future.  The use of
Lakewood forprivate  organizations, other than  college sponsored groups,
was  also discussed.- According toGullickson,  a private religious group 
on Lake Whatcom had. created  problems loading and unloadingsupplies and
guests, and parking  cars in Lakewood's parking lot,  creating a jam. 
Legislator Tim Devorebrought  up the point that the college has  a
responsibility to the students  and should avoid allowinggroups  outside
the college to use Lake-wood.  In other business, the legislators  voted
not to allowFacilities  Chairman Gullickson a vote oa  the Summer Board of
Control.  Gullickson retorted, "There have been voting Facilities Chairmen 
on the Summer BOC since 1959.  Why shouldn't I get a vote thissummer?" 
Delicious Doughnuts  made fresh daily  GARDEN STREET  Doughnut   Coffee 
Shop  A fullline of dairy products  at the dairy drive-in.  GARDEN AT HOLLY
 WE KNOW SHELL LOVE  Bay andChampion  FREE DELIVERY  Phone 733-2610  Attend
Church Every Sunday.  ...ride the Church BusLEAVE CAMPUS - 10:35 a. m. 
(for South-side)  Ridgeway-Highland, Women's Residence Hall 
Edens-Higginson,  * "United Campus Christian Foundation  COOPERATING
CHURCHES  SCHEDULE  LEAVECAMPUS - 10:25 a. m.  (for Downtown) 
Ridgeway-Highland, Women's Residence Hall,  Edens-Higginson,  * "United
Campus Christian Foundation  COOPERATING CHURCHES  SCHEDULE  To Church
ToCampus  10:30 a.m. Central Lutheran  10:35 a.m. First Presbyterian  10:38
a.m. Garden Street Methodist 10:40 a.m. Unitarian Church Fellowship 
10:42sa.m. * First Baptist 12:15 p.m.  10:44 a.m. * FirstChristian 12:10
p.m.  10:47 a.m. * Assumption Roman  Catholic 12:05 p.m.  10:49 a.m. *
United Church of Christ 12:08 p.m.  (Congregational)  10:52 a.m. Broadway
United Presbyterian  10:55 a.m. St. Paul'sEpiscopal  Shared Cost - 10c each
way  EVERY SUNDAY  * Return Bus from these Churches only. Other Churches
will provide return transportation by car.  **UCCF coordinates this
service. Direct any questionsto The Reverend
Sellards—-733-8702.  To Church  10:45 a.m.  10:47 a.m. 
10:49 a.m.  10:51 a.m.  St.James Presbyterian  "Sacred Heart Roman 
Catholic  :::A!dersgate Methodist  Our Saviour's Lutheran  ToCampus  11 :50
a.m.  12:00 noon



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 21



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FRIDAY,-SEPT. 17 THE COLLEGIAN TWENTY-ONE  Curtain gets workout  On summer
stage  Dramatics flourished during the  Summer quarter at Western as  five
plays and an evening of  opera scenes werepresented.  Two one-act plays by
Murray  Schisgal, "The Typist" and "The  Tiger" were the firstperformances 
given. The plays were  directed by Dr. Byron Sigler, of  Western's Speech
Department.There were only two characters  in each play. "The Typist"
starred  Roger Keagle and Diane Mc-Cormack while "The Typist" billed  James
Walker and Megan  Jones.  MUSICAL  Western's Speech and Music  Departments
co-operated in presenting  the musical fantasy, "The  Fantasticks." William
Birnerof  the Speech Department directed  the play.  Delbert Simon was.
musical  director and Casandra Lawyer  was choreographer. The cast included
 John Stout, Dick Hastings  and Prudy Keeler. The comedywas presented in
conjunction with  the Summer Concert-Lecture  Series. .  The final offering
of theWestern  Players for the summer  was "Krapp's Last. Tape" and  "Aria
da Capo." John Stout, a  seniorat Western directed both  plays.  He also
had the only role in  "Krapp's Last Tape." Starring  in "Aria daCapo" were
Kath-erine  Boysen, Clark Drummond,  Cassandra Lawyer, Charles Summers, 
and AndyYackley.  An evening of opera scenes was  presented for the first
time at  Western. Both comic andserious  opera were under the direction  of
Thomas Osborn.  Scenes were taken from the  "Cosi fan tutte"by Mozart, "II 
Trovatore" by Verdi, "La Tra-viata"  by Verdi, and "La Bohe-rae"  by
Puccini. A specialchamber  opera "There and Back" by  Hindemith concluded
the program.  Ford Foundation smiles$490,000 now ours  SCENE FROM SUMMER
PLAY  A $490,000 grant to develop  a new graphic artscurriculum  in
colleges and  public schools was awarded  to Western June 28 by the  Ford
Foundation.The grant, largest ever received  by Western, will be used over
a  three-year period to build and testcurricula that will train both 
specialists and teachers in the  graphic arts.  Dr. Ray Schwalm of
Western'sGraphic Arts Department will  direct the project.  "The problem of
converting  machine language to humanlan:  guage and vice vensa is becoming
 more complei," Schwalm re-,  marked in explaining the project."While the
need has been understood,  opportunity has been  limited for the student
who is  interestedin a comprehensive  program in the graphic arts," 
Schwalm said.  If the program is successful,  collegesand public schools 
throughout the country will be  Western calls  Again to grad  Neil Murray,
Western'sAssociated  Student President two  years ago, has returned to
college  from the big, bad world.Murray, who graduated in 1964  with a
Political Science major  and B. A^ and B. A. in Education  degrees, took
over the new.position  of -Program Assistant Sept.  1.  Murray said his
general duties  will be toassist Richard  Reynolds, Director of Student 
Activities. He will also be working  in the social andrecreatonal  phases
of student programming.  Last year Murray taught ninth  grade Social
Studies andEnglish  in Longview, Wash. While he admits  he "liked it" he
also says  he is happy to be back atWestern.  A. S. President Murray was 
instrumental in many programs.  Among these were theformation  of the
Course Evaluation Program,  the Student Tutor Society  and the Disciplinary
Bull ofRights.  encouraged to establish similar  curricula.  Specifically,
the curricula to be  developed are brokeninto four  parts. These are: 
—A two-year pre-vocational  program for grades 11 and
12.  —A special 12th grade program  for students
planning to enter industry  after high school.  —An
improved two-yeargraphic  arts technology curriculum  for community
colleges and for  Western.  —An improved
teachereducation  program to prepare the  "new breed" of graphic arts 
teachers.  SENIOR HIGH LEVEL .  Thesenior high school program  will include
heavy orientation  in science and technology of graphic  arts forstudents
planning  to enroll in a technical institute,  community college, or
four-year  college.  Thecommunity college curriculum  will prepare students
for  work in such fields as advertising  production,graphic design,
commercial  and industrial photography,  television and motion picture 
graphics,printing and production  control, and other types  of jobs
involving the planning,  preparation ,andproduction of  visual information.
Those wishing  to enter a four-year college will  be able to do so
withoutloss of  credit.  At the four-year college level,  the curriculum
would be written  in such a way that thestudent  who completes the first
two years  could go directly into industry or  continue on to earn
abachelors  degree in some phase of visual;  communication or in teaching. 
FIRST PHASE  The first phase of the project  will get under way this summer
 when.a group of faculty members  representing 12disciplines in the  social
sciences, physical sciences,  and humanities meet for three  months to
develop a curriculum  for Western:  During the summer of 1966,  teachers
and administrators from  schools wherethe curriculum will  be tested will
meet for nine  weeks at Western with college  faculty members. Their job
will  be to refine the curriculum and  have it ready for testing in, the 
fall.  Curricula will then be tested  and evaluated during the following 
two years. in schools hi Vancouver,  B. C, Bellingham, and  Seattle.We Wish
To Welcome All The  Western Washington Students  We invite you to drop in
and look  us over.Our prices are geared to f it  college student's budgets.
 YOU'RE ALL WELCOME AT  HOWARD'S CHAR-BROILER  SERVING COMPLETE DINNERS 
SHORT ORDERS  FOUNTAIN SERVICE  On Cornwall nextto Pay'N Save  FF Bus Stop"
to  HH this fall  Two plays will be performed  on campus this fall,
accordingto  William Birner of the Speech  Department.  "Bus Stop," a play
by William  Inge, will be performed Oct.21-  24. Donald Adams of the Speech
 Department will direct.  A play for older children, "The  Magic Horn,"
will be presented  Nov. 18-20 under the direction of  Mr. Birner. "The
Magic Horn"  was written by AnnNicholson  and Charlotte Chorpenning.  106
WEST HOLLY STREET  DRESSES  COATS  SUITS  WhereFashion and Value Meet  the 
CHAMBER of COMMERCE  of  Bellingham—The Red Carpet
CityEXTENDS WARM GREETINGS TO  Western Washington State College  Its
Faculty And Its Students



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 22



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TWENTY-TWO THE COLLEGIAN FRIDAY, SEPT. 17  WELCOME VIKINGS from your 
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GREETING CARDS 9 a. m. to 1 p. m.  SWEATSHIRTS  STATIONERY  BRIEFCASES -
ATTACHE CASES  TRADE BOOKS  TEACHING AIDS  TEXT BOOKS  MAGAINES  BE  OPEK
Saturdays  lememSiH  COLLEGE OUTLINE SERIES  presents the essentials of
entire courses incapsule form.  Perfect for learning and reviewing . . .
truly the  "Student's Private Tutor."  rf\r  You'll reallyscore with 
COLOR-BOUND NOTEBOOKS  National's colorful collegiate notebooks  with
circular plasticbindings  are the sharpest items on campus.  TfTsmart to
tote COLOR-BOUND notebooks with the color.1  ful covers and modern plastic
circular bindings.  ) COLOR-BOUND goes modern with the really newplastic 
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how COLOR-BOUND combines all the  qualitythat always teams up with products
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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 23



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FRIDAY, SEPT. 17 THE COLLEGIAN TWENTY-THREE  Social Conflict' headed  Menu
for summerprogram  Western's summer quarter curriculum  included special
programs  as well as the regularcourses. The fields of education,  both
mental and physical, were  dealt with in the programs.  _ The major summer
conference  feature was "Social Conflict In  Education." Conference leaders
 were Dr. Harvey C.Bunke,  president of Western, Dr. Vernon  Haubrich, then
Chairman of the  Education Department, Dr.Robert  Coles, psychiatrist at
Harvard  University: Health Services, and  Dr. Robert Havignurst,professor 
of education at the University  of Chicago.  Seminars were held to discuss 
the impact ofsocial class arid  : equality of educational opportunity, 
integration problems, and educationalproblems.  SOCIAL STUDIES COURSE  A
short course in teaching the  social studies was offered. Dr.Emlyn Jones,
the chairman of  the Department of Curriculum  and Instruction at the
University,  ofWisconsin, conducted the  course for both elementary and 
secondary teachers.  Dr. Elizabeth Drews,professor  of education at
Michigan State  University, lectured at a special  seminar for the
education ofgifted  children.  Individualized reading instruction^  was
directed by Dr. Lyman  Hunt, head of thedepartment  of elementary education
at the  University of Akron.  A conference/ on elementary  schoollibraries
emphasized the  present trends in education and  new educational media was
con-ducted  by Dr.Alice McGuire,  past president of the American 
Association of School Librarians.  Mr. Stan Le Protti leada physical 
fitness workshop. Le Protti  is associate professor of physical  education
at Western.FIELD HOCJKEY  Field hockey for girls and women  was taught by
Caroline Upton,  member of thedepartment  of physical education at the
University  of Massachusetts. Miss  Upton was formerly acoach in  England. 
A workshop in teaching Indian  children and youth was led by  Dr. Thomas
Billings.The workshop  was designed to prepare a  corps of informed
teachers to  assist Indian youngstersachieve  their proper place in the
American  society.  The hallowed grounds where  stupid angels fear
totread—the  President's Honor List —
was  reached by 209 students at Western  spring quarter. Thisbreaks  down
to 55 freshmen, 42 sophomores,  47 juniors and 65 seniors.  Of these, 28
achieved a 4.0or  straight "A" average. To be eligible  for the honor list
a student  must achieve a 3.5 grade pointaverage in at least 14 credit 
hours during the quarter.  Listed below are the 144 frosh,  sophomores
andjuniors who  achieved honors.  ABERDEEN  Sophomore: Baumgardner, Sharon 
L., 3.53.ALDERWOOD MANOR  Freshmen: Copley, Catherine  Lynn, 3.68. 
Sophomores: Foster, Pamela  Dee,4.00.  ANACORTES  Freshmen: Palmer, Dennis 
Wayne, 3.70; Strandberg, Joyce  Kay, 3.53; Zoet, CarolJane, 3.80.  Juniors:
Thomas, D. June, 3.64.  AUBURN  Freshmen: Knapp, Robin Dee,  3.78. 
BELLEVUE  Sophomores: Ward, Linda Ellen,  3.68. \  Juniors: Cole, Nikki
Adele, 4.00.  BELLINGHAM  Freshmen:Bratcher, Melva Carol,  3.88; Bruland,
Kenneth  Wayne, 3.68; Hand, John Davis,  4.00; Mattson, CarlGustav, 3.68; 
Reinholt, Rose Ellen, 3.71; Treck.  er, Terri Wynn, 3.78; Trethewey,  Candi
Louise, 3.70;Zuanich,  James Paul, 3.60.  Sophomores: Amundsen, Darrel 
Walter, 3.72; Bell, Victoria Lau-rene,  3.88;Ellis, Kay E. Wiggins,  3.57;
Fausten, Dietrich Karl, 4.00;  Hudson, Mary Patricia, 3.81;  Johnson,
MaryAlice, 3.71;  Martin, Karla F., 3.76; Means,  Penn Olivia, 3.57;
Palmer, Sharon  Beth, 3.68; Skarbek,Antoine  M., 4.00.  Juniors: Bowman,
Nancy E.,  3.80; Clark, Cheryl Mae, 3.62;  Dalton, Steven Richard,3.60; 
Fiser, Kathleen A. Hansen, 3.87;  Flaherty, Gladys C, 3.71; Ford,  Janice
M., 3.68; Gerken, William  Eugene, 3.78; Jepperson, Robert  W., 3.70; Mac
Beth, Paul R., 4.00;  Randall, Beatrice Wanger, 3.53;Watkins, Karen Blyth,
3.62; Williams,  Michael Carey, 3.50; Yori-lick,  Anne N., 3.83.  BLAINE
;Freshmen: Bobbink, Michael  Burnet, 3.86.  CAMAS  Freshmen: Piller,
Jennifer Rae,  3.58.  Juniors:Cooper, Dennis Wayne,  366; Kennedy, Kathryn
Ilene,  3.80; Tucker, Frances Priscilla,  3.83.  COOK ' "~ Freshmen:
Cairns, Susan Eileen,  3.62.  COSMOPOLIS  Sophomores: Birch, Carol Mae, 
3.80.  See'HONORS' Page 24  Operation Headstart  Starts at Western  Western
Washington State Collegeplayed an integral role in  the Pacific Northwest's
participation  in President Johnson's War  on Povertythis summer.  In June,
Western was used as  a training center in "Operation  Headstart," a key
programdirected by the Office of Economic  Opportunity.  The goal of
"Operation Head-start"  is to give some600,000  pre-school, culturally -
deprived  children an eight-week headstart  on more fortunate children
prior  to entering kindergarten.  In two years, $200,000,000 will  be spent
so these children will  not be leftbehind the others in  nursery school
because of their  culturally arid home lives.  25 TEACHERS  Twenty-five
teachers spent the  week of June 21-26 in concentrated  study at Western
before going  to work atthe Child Development  Centers throughout
Northwestern  Washington.  They sometimes studied 13hours a day, according
to Stewart  Van Wingerden of the Department  of Education, who supervised 
the program.  Miss Emma Harris, an expert  from the University of British 
Columbia in Vancouver, wasbrought in to handle the training.  She is in
charge of the nursery  school at UBC.  Mrs. Pat Burks, ofBellevue, 
described by Van Wingerden as  a "master nursery school teacher,"  also was
brought toBelling-ham.  DEMO CLASS  An eight-child demonstration  class was
set up and the trainees  observedwhile Mrs. Burks taught.  The class
received instruction  from Dr. Lawrence Douglas of  Western'sSociology
Department,  Dr. Vernon Haubrich and Dr.  Thomas Billings of the Education 
Department, apediatrician  and others, Van Wingerden said.  Both Haubrich
and Billings  have had long experienceworking  with the culturally
deprived.  At the end of the week, the  trainees returned to their centers 
inEverett, Ferndale and Skagit  County. There they worked, us-usally  under
the sponsorship of  the localpublic schools, with the  culturally deprived
youngsters.  Van Wingerden said Western  hopes to runanother clinic next 
year.  "The Education Department  has been moving towards nursery 
schooltraining for some  time," he said.  Teacher placement difficult 
Placement of teachers is becoming  more difficult. Frank  Punches,
Placement Director at  Western, states that the shortage  of teachers
hasalmost ended.  The "war babies" are now studying  to be teachers.  Due
to a state cut in education,schools have reduced in the hiring  of
teachers. According to  Punches about 80 per cent of the  1965graduates in
teacher education  have been placed. The re  maining 20 per cent are
working  in otherpositions or in the service.  Oregon and British Columbia 
are among the best placement  areas out ofthe state. British  Columbia
certification for teachers  is easily obtained by Western 
students.Placement in the elementary  level is less difficult than at  the
secondary level. There is a  shortage oflibrarians, primary  teachers, and
girls P. E. teachers.  "Girls have a tendency to get  married," Punches
said.  FAMILY FUN!  SHAKEY'S Wet****** TO WESTERN'S PIZZA CAPITAL AND 
REFRESHMENTCENTER  We hove been students' HOME AWAY FROM HOME for
generations now! Join your collegeancestors  here! College isn't complete
unless you've been to  * Atmosphere  ir Live Music  * 100Varieties of Pizza
 ir Your favorite liquid refreshment  OPEN DAILY 4 P. M. ON  SHEETS PIZZA
PARLOR YE PUBLIC HOUSE  PIZZA TO GO  1234 STATE ST. Ph. 733-3020  Phone
Your Order In, It Will BeReady  When You Get Here!  FRI., SAT., AND SUN.
from NOON  167909



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     Collegian - 1965 September 17 - Page 24



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TWENTY-FOUR THE COLLEGIAN FRIDAY, SEPT. 17  'HONORS'  (Continued from page
23)  Juniors:Smith, Barbara Jane.  COUPEVILLE  Sophomores: Willhight, Ora
Lee  C, 4.00.  DES MOINESFreshmen: Poolman, Diane  Kay, 3.56.  EATONVILLE 
Juniors, Butler, Joyce Elizabeth,  3.60.EDMONDS  Freshmen: Anderson, Nola
Jan-ine,  3.58.  Sophomores: Brill, Linda, 3.58;  Stansfield, Gerald T.,
3^66.  EVERETT  Juniors: Dodd, Nina Joy, 3^81 ;  Ellis, Alma Irene, 3.55;
Erland-  - sen, Due Anne,3.57.  FERNDALE  Sophomores, Mauler, Karen Jo  :
Anne, 4.00.  Juniors: Braithwaite, Edwin  Stanle,3.52.  FORKS  Juniors,
Anderson, Joan Kath-  . ryn, 4.00.  KELSO  Sophomores: Gilmore, Gayle  -
Marie, 3.56.  KENT • /  Freshmen, Sonju, Douglas Meli- 
.vin, 3.94.. . 1  Juniors, Calvert, Janet Lee,  8.84.KIRKLAND  Juniors:
Bauman, Milton  James, 3.68.  LONGVIEW  Freshmen: Schafer, Sharon  Lee,
3.56.Sophomores: Marques, Steven  Leroy, 3.82.  Juniors: Mottet, Arthur L.
Jr.,  3.73.  MALAGA  Freshmen:Courtney, Anne,  3.94.  MOUNTLAKE TERRACE 
Freshmen, Lindblom, Sharron  Louise, 3.50. Parker,Linda Gail,  3.73.  OAK
HARBOR  Freshmen: Lane, Diana Sharon,  3.68; Liles, Rebecca Lee,
3.80.Juniors: Eerkes, Gary L., 4.00.  OLYMPIA  Freshmen: Armstrong, Leslie 
Harold, 3.87.  PORT ANGELES Sophomores: Loftus, Mary Judith,  3.53; Phipps,
Mark Jefferson,  3.53.  Juniors: Cox, CherylBarbara,  3.75.  PUYALLUP 
Sophomores: Knesal, Janice  Kay, 3.62.  Juniors: Murphy, Kathleen
Ann,'3.72;
'••'•.•'-••
 RAYMOND  Juniors: Jennings, Dawn Dean-na,  3.50.  RENTONFreshmen:
Feldmiiler, Joyce  E. I.', 3.87.  ROCHESTER  Juniors: Joyce, Twila Jean, 
3.80.  SEATTLEFreshman: Boucher, Linda Joy,  3.65; Brandenburg, Richard A.,
 3 50; Bryan, Jonathan Wintoh,  3.56;Campbell, Judith Knudt-son,  3.53;
Cowe, Lynn Mayvonne,  3.61; Miller, Gayle Ellen, 3.57;  Ramey,Nancy
Lucille, 3.87; Savage,  William, 3.71; Sjolund, Kath-ryn  Faith, 3.82;
Tamarin, David,  3.71;Thompson, Judith Anita,  3.50; Tracy, Lloyd Radford,
3.62;  Wiitala, Stephen Allen, 4.00; Williams,Gary Milton, 3.64. 
Sophomores: Bartlett, Sandra  D., 3.80; Cordell, Christine Anne,  3.57;
Greenway,Dana Lynn, 3.70;  Hanby, Ramon J., 3.64; Hayden,  Sandra Lee,
3.50; Howisey, Marilyn  Ingrid, 3.88;Lidren, Randolph  E., 3.53; Mac Leod,
Norma  I., 4.00.  Juniors: Akita, Patricia Ann,  8.50; Finnie, Linda Ann,
3.75;-  Holert, Uta Ingrid, 3.64; Lewis,  Elizabeth Marie, 3.81; May, 
Stephen Van, 3.50.  SEDRO-WOOLLEY  Freshmen: Jones, Magan Lucille,  3.50. 
SEQUIM  Juniors, Wangen, Lawrence Edward,4.00.  SPOKANE  Sophomores:
Lennen, Edward  J..; 3.66.  SUMAS  Freshmen: Lade, Susan Carol,3.88: 
SUMNER  Freshmen: Divina, Alvin Victor,  357.  TACOMA  Freshmen: Berreth,
Diane  Gwen, 3.50,* Dillinger, Patricia  E., 3.86; Nolen, Cynthia Kay, 
3.61; Pasic, Terry Ellen, 3.73;  Piff, David Michael, 3.68; Schuch-man, 
Linda May, 3.50; Van Leu-ven,  Margaret Ann, 3.58.  Sophomores:
Blankenship,  SandraJean, 3.66; Johnson, Lynn  Louise, 3.78. ^  Juniors:
Bruner, William E.,  3.62.
"•'••  VANCOUVER 
Freshmen: Roberts, Cynthia  Lena, 3.53.  Juniors: Meredith, Terry L., 
3.50; Morecroft, Maria Mae, 3.58. VASHON  Sophomores: Philbrick, Julia 
Frances, 3.53.  Juniors: Snyder, Stephen Karl,  3.53.WASHOUGAL  Freshmen:
Huffman: Sharron  Lee, 3.50.  ANCHORAGE, ALASKA  Sophomores:Krogsettg,
Karen  Ann, 4.00.  CORDOVO, ALASKA  Sophomores: Davis, Diann  Marie,
3.85.WRANGELL, ALASKA  Sophomores: Sharnbroich, Ter-t  y E . , 3.68. 
ALDERGROVE, B. C.  Juniors:Schmahl, Dennis F.f  3.94.  CLEARBROOK, B. C. 
Sophomores: Giesbrecht, Vernon  David, 3.78.Juniors: Giesbrecht, Norman 
Abe, 3.84.  MISSION CITY, B. C.  Juniors: Mils, Helen Leslie,  3.52.  AGood
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