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 1971_0413 



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     Western Front - 1971 April 13 - Page 1



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\  TUESDAY  APR. 13th 1971  BELLINGHAM  RECYCLE ALL PAPER  s  Black 
Culture  Week:  BusyAgenda  - See p. 8  PROUD BLACKS: GREGORY McDUFFIE AND
VICKIE SMITH  April  Showers  Bring May  Flowers  Photos By LOREN BLISS 
State Committee Takes Action  to Curb Campus Violence  -Story Page 3 
WESTERN WASHINGTON STATE COLLEGE, VOLUME 63, NUMBER 45



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     Western Front - 1971 April 13 - Page 2



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2 Western Front Tuesday, April 13, 1971  INCENSE LOVE OILS  LEATHER GOODS.
SANDALSTAPASTRIES TIFFANY LAMPS  JEWELRY  CLOTHING  TYE-DYE KITS  SMOKING
PARAPHERNALIA^ WF WILL SELL YOUR CRAFTS O/V CO/VS/JAWi£7VT: 
LATHAM'S SERVICE  Major and MinorTuneups  All Needed Accessories  Service
On All Cars  THE LOWEST PRICED|GAS IN TOWN!!!  Gardenand  Holly streets 
ino's  PIZZA  SMORGASBORD  Wednesday 4 to 9 p.m.  [ALL YOU CAN EAT FOR$1.50
(tinder 10-half price)]  111 E. Magnolia (next to Pay 'n' Save) 734-9365 
"The Experimental Film"PRESENTS... .  underground films..  Five of the best
of the Underground Films: "Entr'acte"  by Rene Clair; "The Life   Death of
a Hollywood Extra'  by Robert Florey; "Optical Poem"by Oscar Fischinger; 
"DogStar Man"by Stan Brakhage; and "Scorpio Rising"  by Kenneth Anger. 
Performances: Friday, April 16  7and 9 p.m., Lecture Hall 4  Students $.75;
General $1.25  Faculty Council Reviews  Curriculum Report  By RON GRAHAM 
Managing Editor  Faculty Council  The Faculty Council decided Thursday that
it  wouldexercise review authority and summarize  the material on the
controversial Curriculum  Commission Report coming out of other 
decision-making bodies.  The council decided to refrain from discussion  of
the report except for those portions which  other councils and committees
miss.  "Let others do the spadework,"council  member Robert Teshera,
assistant professor of  geography, said.  Richard Levin, assistantprofessor
of  mathematics, had urged that the council involve  itself in discussion
since there is so littletime and  the issue is so important.  Flora, in
contrast to his earlier statement, said  that he would "try to"present his 
recommendations to the various governing bodies  of the college after he
makes them up.Previously, Flora had said that after the May 1  deadline for
input the report was solely in his  hands.  Thecouncil also discussed the
question of a  faculty forum. One had been scheduled for April  29, but
Levinrecommended that it be moved up  to April 15. The council turned the
question over  to the council'sExecutive Committee which  decided a forum
will be held at 4 p.m. Thursday in  Lecture Hall 2.  FacultyChairmen  'Go
slow' was the approach taken by faculty  chairmen to the Curriculum
Commission Report in  a two-hour meeting they had with President Flora 
last week.  Faculty chairmen were very concerned that  action will be a
little too precipitous, Dean of  Western Fred Knapman said.  The attitude
of the chairmenwas that by  over-reacting to budget concerns the curriculum
 programs might be hurt, Knapman said.Faculty chairmen were concerned that
the  curriculum proposal may be pushed through by  theadministrative action
without faculty support,  he said.  The chairmen believe the academic
reformproposed in the report needs careful analysis,  Knapman said.  "It
terrifies them that they'-re expected tomake a decision by May or June on
such a crucial  matter," he said.  Knapman pointed out that Westernhas a
great  academic tradition and drastic changes could cause  a lot of damage.
 What the facultychairmen are saying is that it's  fine to discuss but we
must be very careful what  comes out of this,according to Knapman.  Faculty
Opinion  Faculty opinion on the Curriculum  Commission Reportcontinues to
be divided. Many  are in favor of parts of the report but most have  strong
reservations."Generally I'm in favor of it," George  Cvetkovich, assistant
professor of psychology,  said.  "I think it doeshave a few things to be
worked  out," he added, "but I think the commissio did  this so they
wouldn't begiving us something cut  and dried."  "I don't think we should
reject the whole thing  out of hand," W. L.Barrett, assistant professor of 
physics, said.  "I think there are some good ideas in it despite  the fact
that that seems to be an unpopular faculty  position," he said.  "One idea
I particularly like is thespecialization of specific institutions," Jeffrey
 Fang, associate professor of business and  economics,said.  "But it would
take a long time to implement,"  he pointed out.  Wayne Lobue, lecturer in
generalstudies,  considers the report "unsatisfactory from a  number of
points."  The report contains "curricularchanges  generated not be faculty
. . . not generally  representative of a cross section of faculty," he 
said.  William A. Bultmann, chairman of the history  department, cautioned
"I think it's trying to do  too muchtoo soon."  "There may be some good in
it," he said, but  "it's trying to compress time an awful lot."Provost
Opinion  "I think the college community is shocked,"  Provost Frederick
Sargent II said of thereaction to  the recently-released Curriculum
Commission  Report.  Many faculty are rather concernedabout the 
implications of the report, Sargent said.  Sargent, chairman of the
Curriculum  Commission,pointed out that the committee  "didn't deal with
the possibility of groupings  concentrations or setting upspecific degrees.
 "These are details that lay further along the  road," Sargent said.  A
task force of facultyand administration  would be appointed to make
specific decisions on  the basic proposals of the report,he said.  "The
next step after that is to write a catalog,"  he concluded.  Faculty Calls
For  Debate on Lay-offs  The Faculty Professional Union voted  Wednesday to
present President Charles J. Flora  and ProvostFrederick Sargent II with a
petition  calling for an open debate.  The petition, formally presented
Friday,asks  that Flora and Sargent defend administration  policy in an
eight-hour debate before the collegecommunity.  The union presented the
Board of Trustees,  with a petition at their April meeting in
Olympiacalling for the drafting of lay-off procedures.  Raymond McLeod,
president of the union, said  that thetermination of 18 faculty members,
was  "premature" since the State Legislature has not  yet passed thebudget
calling for a 2.5 per cent  reduction in the faculty formula.  McLeod said
that hopefully not onlyfaculty  cuts but also the Curriculum Commission
Report  can be explained.  "We have to get a rallyingpoint," McLeod said. 
Flora is the only person who can call an  all-college assembly and if he
refuses, theeffect of  the Faculty Union and the individual departments  is
negligible, McLeod said.  Flora had notresponded to the petition at  press
time.  Trustees Approve Tenure  for 12 Faculty Members  The Board
ofTrustees has approved a  recommendation that would give promotions to  10
already tenured faculty, givepromotions and  tenure to 28 faculty members,
and give tenure  only to 12 faculty.  The Board made itsdecision Friday in 
Olympia, but the changes in rank and tenure status  will not be effective
until July 1 forthe 50 faculty  members.  Tenured faculty to be promoted
from associate  professor to full professor areRoss C. Ellis,  geology;
Annis J. Hovde, Fairhaven; Debnath  Mookherjee, geography; David B.
Schaub,music;  and J. Joseph Veit, physics.  Tenured faculty to be promoted
from assistant  professor toassociate professor are William J.  Dittrich,
physics; A. Hugh Fleetwood, philosophy;  Lawrence Hanson,art; Boyde Long,
men's  physical education; and Walter F. Wegner, art.  Faculty members to
receivepromotions to the  rank of associate professor as well as tenure
status  are Thomas Schlotterback, art;LeVon A. Balzer  and David E.
Schneider, biology; John A. Weyh,  chemistry; Donn D. Gilbert, educationand
William  C. Keep and Knute Skinner, English.  ' ' \ Others' on the list,
are.Heleri Goldsmith, French-Robert W. Teshera, geography; Myrl E. Beck Jr.
 and Maurice L. Schwartz, geology; Barry Gough,history; Jane E. Roberts,
home economics; Gail H.  Atneosen, Sara J. Kelley and Richard G.
Levin,mathematics.  Phillip Montague, philosophy; William L.  Barrett and
Donald L. Sprague, physics; Walter J.  Lonner, Laurence P. Miller and
Christopher J.  Taylor, psychology; Claude E. Hill and Michael 
Seal,technology.  Raymond G. Mclnnis, Wilson Library; David T.  Mason and
Constance P. Faulkner,Fairhaven; and  Herbert H. Webber, Huxley.  Given
tenure status are Helen Darrow,  professor ofeducation; LeLand Farley,
lecturer in  English; Richard L. Francis, associate professor of  English;
William E. Elmendorf, lecturer in Russian;  Vladimir Milicic, assistant
professor of Russian;  Roscoe L. Buckland,professor of general studies  and
Nita Clothier, lecturer in general studies.  Barton Frank, professor
ofmusic; Edwin M.  LaBounty, associate professor of music; Henry  Schwarz,
professor of political science;Marvin L.  Olmstead, associate professor of
speech and  Marvin A. Southcott, ' associate professor of 
..,technologyv.._,._, . , . ,
•••. gt;.-
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     Western Front - 1971 April 13 - Page 3



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Tuesday, April 13, 1971 Western Front 3  Higher Education Committee Demands
 Dismissals forAdvocates of Violence  JOHN STOLPE  Editor  State colleges
and universities should  not hire employeeswho, directly or  indirectly,
advocate that this country  should be overthrown by force or  violence, the
state legislature's Joint  Committee on Higher Education  demanded this
week.  In a report on student unrest,the  committee ordered all state
institutions  to conform to the following procedures: 
—To review andupdate employment  practices to insure
that the advocates of  violence or those who have encouragedunlawful
disruptions at other  institutions should not be members of  the faculty or
administration.  —Todraft and publish a set of rules 
which will clearly spell out that  violence, forceable occupation of
anyschool property, intimidation of  students, administrators or faculty,
and  the disruption of any class or the destruction of any school property,
 shall be cause for expulsion from the  school or dismissal from
thefaculty.  — To establish definitive and  workable
procedures, including where  necessary, the use of courtinjunctive  r e m e
d i e s and/or the use of  " a p p r o p r i a t e " law enforcement 
agencies, to enable the institutions to  act promptly in cases involving
acts of a  violent or disruptive nature from  whatever cause.The
committee's 112-page document  noted that the body feels that existing 
laws concerning campusdisruptions are  adequate, but recommended that the 
presidents of each institution should  apply the open rap session or the 
ombudsman approach to preventing  issues from "reaching the point of no 
return."  Inaddition, the report calls for the  enforcement of the various
codes of  conduct being established at eachschool  and ordered that persons
who engage in  violent conduct must be subjected to  criminal charges.STATE
COLLEGES  The report noted that the campuses  among the various state and
communitycolleges followed "peaceful and widely  supported protests" last
spring, pointing  out that damage orphysical injury at  those institutions
was minimal or  non-existent "probably reflecting both  the smallersize as
well as the absence of  radical students in sufficient numbers to  initiate
such incidents." It added: "The absence of large violent  protests is
indicative of the fact that the  generally more moderate studentsin  very
large numbers felt deeply enough  to want to demonstrate their 
disagreement with the Cambodian decision and the events at Kent State  and
Jackson State."  Each state college and university'sinvolvement in last
year's student strikes  and related protests were carefully  enumerated by
the report.Man-in-the-Street  Informal Poll Reveals Few  Aware of May 5th
March  DEBBIE HUDSON  Front Reporter Editor's note: The Front, in the first
of our  new "man-in-the-street" series, sent reporter  Debbie Hudson to the
Viking Union earlier this  week with one question to ask a number of 
students: Would you participatein the planned  May 5 peace march from the
campus to city hall?  A majority of students on campus seem  unaware of a
planned May 5 peace march, but six  of the 26 students the Front
interviewed said theywould definitely participate in the demonstration 
against the Indochina War.  A sampling of the responses:  "I don't know." 
"I hadn't thought about it."  "Ask me on May 5."  "What peace march?" 
Barry Frediani, asenior education major from  Ketchikan, said he was tired
of being involved in  radical politics.  "I'vebecome disinterested," he
explained. "It's  not apathy. I don't know what it is."  Bob Cordell, a
junior mathmajor from Seattle,  said he did not plan to march, saying that
his main  goal was "Jesus." He added:  "Ihaven't seen any results from the
marches  against the war, and they have the tendency to  polarizepeople . .
. but if a march can bring love,  then do it."  Sheila Smith, a Tacoma
freshman, expressedsurprise over the fact that a demonstration was 
planned. She was undecided because the thought  has"just flashed to her." 
Len Robertson, a graduate student in history,  said he would march because
"it hasbeen a while  since I have been to one."  Mary Hague, a junior
elementary education  major from Seattlesaid she definitely plans to 
participate in the demonstration. She said:  "Yes, I'm going to
march.Especially since  Nixon has said he is not going to listen to
students,  or whatever they do. All he does istalk."  Cecelia Rolfe, a
Seattle senior, will join the  May 5 march to city hall, and explained, in
a  hurnorous gesture, that she'll be there "taking  pictures of the FBI." 
— Indochina War Speaker — 
KenKirkpatrick, a spokesman for the American Friends Service  Committee,
will speak on the Indochina Warat 2:30 p.m. tomorrow  in the Viking Union
lounge. Kirkpatrick has travelled in North  Vietnam as a guestof that
government and recently returned from  Paris. His visit is being sponsored
by the AssociatedStudents.  The Bellingham People's Coalition will hold a
meeting at 7:30 p.m.  tonight at the CCM Houseto discuss plans for the May
5 peace march,  which has been tentatively approved by the city Board
ofPublic  Works.  ROBERTSON CORDELL  HAGUE ROLFE  SMITH FREDIANI  Third
World Calls Passage 'Discriminatory'  JIM THOMSON  Front Reporter 
Representatives of the Third World  Coalition havecharged the Northwest 
Passage, Bellingham's "fortnightly  journal of ecology, politics, the arts,
and  goodhealthy livin' " with discriminating  against minority groups. 
Coalition members say the Passage,  being anon-establishment newspaper, 
should take responsibility for  publicizing minority problems, and that  t
h e y are not fulfilling that  responsibility.  The campus group is asking
to be  allotted four pages in everyissue of the  Passage to publish their
own news.  "Third World people have been'  getting shafted by themedia for
years.  We want to make the public aware of  our problems," Jim Forsman, an
officer  of theAmerican Indian Students Union,  said Thursday.  Mike
Kerwick, speaking for the local  undergroundpaper, said Thursday night 
that the paper is the product of a  number of individual writers who 
contributeto it and help put it together,  and that no section of the paper
is going  to be turned over to a specialinterest  group.  "There is no
permanent editor at the  Passage and no set editorial policy the 
paperfollows..Everybody who works on  'the- paper helps decide' which
'direction'  it's going," Kerwick said."We'd love people to contribute 
minority stories, but if the Third World  Coalition wants to publish as
abloc, and  be given a certain amount of space, they  may as well start
their own paper," he  said.Palestinian-born Zahi Haddad, a  member of the
Coalition, also alleged  that the Passage intentionallydeletes  articles
about minority groups from its  coverage.  "They say they are not
responsible  forgathering Third World news,"  Haddad, a junior political
science major  frdm Jordan, said:' " " " » « "
"• " " • •
«  "We sent them an article on  Palestinian refugees and another
on  Americancontributions to racism in  South Africa. They turned the
Palestine  article down and claim they 'lost' theSouth Africa one," he
said.  With reference to the story about  American support of
apartheid,Passageman Kerwick said that the  paper's office is "pretty
disorganized,"  adding that, "It's hard to keeptrack of  anything around
there."  "Anyone who wants to write for the  paper and come down to the
officeand  help out is welcome," Kerwick  Yeitefated/^aYihdlvMua'is^''
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     Western Front - 1971 April 13 - Page 4



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4 Western Front Tuesday, April 13, 1971  Front Editorials....  »
To comfort the afflicted and to afflict thecomforted"  Curriculum Report  A
knock-down, drag-out fight looms  ahead for the CurriculumCommission's 
revolutionary plan to restructure the entire  college, and it looks as if
many students aresiding with the administration to combat  mounting faculty
opposition.  While a student-administrationalliance  may be a case of
strange bedfellowism, it  must be remembered that students have 
beenlaunching campaigns to reform higher  education for many years and that
they are  now willing to gamblefor a sweeping 
change—any change.  It has been an educational
experience  observing tenuredsharpshooters taking  their turns on the
firing line and squeezing  off pot shots at a swiftly advancingenemy  which
seeks to destroy the fortress that has  been protecting them for decades.
But  facultyopposition in this decisive battle  may be less effective than
a .45-caiiber  pistol-which is a good weapon.In an  elevator.  The
administration has carefully chosen  to side-step formal routing of the 
documentthrough the Faculty Council.  The faculty knife treatment to the
Daugert  Proposal for an all-collegegovernment  undoubtedly displeased
campus higher-ups.  There are, though, some serious  questionsraised by the
Curriculum  Commission report which must be  satisfactorily clarified or
rectified beforePresident Flora dumps the final draft into  Trustee laps.
The original report is laced  with vagaries andapparent errors.  One
respected and tenured faculty  member has asked:  -After several years
ofdevelopment of  graduate programs, and the recruitment of  faculty based
on those programs, is it  prudent to cut these programs suddenly  and
drastically? Could Western students  under the new program beadmitted, if 
otherwise qualified, to the distinguished  graduate schools of the nation? 
-Are we to increaseour emphasis on  teacher training, reversing the trend
of at  least the past decade, and in the face of apoor job market for
teachers? Does the  report, as some suggest, propose a return to 
Bellingham Normal?  -Most faculty are strongly associated  The
controversial Curriculum  Commission Report will bediscussed in an  open
meeting at noon tomorrow in the  Viking Union lounge. Members of the 
CurriculumCommission will be at the  meeting to answer questions.  with a
discipline and a department. What  effectwill -the proposed changes have on
 faculty morale, teaching effectiveness, and  research productivity other
than in  interdisciplinary projects?  -What faculty size does the plan 
contemplate, compared to thealready  reduced size for 1971-72? Using the
1,400  course plan with three courses per faculty  memberfigures to only
467 persons. The  plan evidently proposes many additional  dismissals.  -Do
some facultymembers hold legally  binding contracts which the new plan 
might violate?  The professor's points are well taken,  and each deserves
an authoritative and  comprehensive answer.  Others, including students,
areasking:  —Exactly what changes will have to be  made
to the plan if the State Legislature  orders allschools onto the quarter
system,  denying this college a proposed change to a  semester-like system?
 - I n detail, how and when will the  change-over take place? One
administrator  says "not before fall, 1973,"while a  student member of the
commission says  "probably in stages beginning next f a l l " if  it
isapproved by the Board of Trustees this  summer.  -Should not such a
report deserve more  than a 30-dayperiod for reaction? Why was  it made
public at a time when students and  faculty are bogged down tryingto 
comprehend the Daugert Proposal and  another important document dealing
with  non-instructionalbudgets?  -What will happen if the Board of 
Trustees refuses to adopt the synthesized  document? Wasone professor right
when  he charged, "Would you give a heart  transplant to a person ailing
with merely atoothache?"  Time is running out for the report's  critics.
Student opposition to the plan has  been minimal,and besides, it's spring.
Will  the faculty save age-old traditions? Will the  dragon be slayed? Will
boldheart capture  fair maiden?  Let's clear up the opposition's 
thoughtful questions and get on with thereformation, Prince Charlie! 
—John Stolpe  The report will also come before the 
Academic Council as an Ad Hoc  Coordinating Committee will be reviewing 
reactions and suggestions to the report at 4  p.m.today in Lecture Hall 3. 
EDITOR: John Stolpe  MANAGING EDITOR: Ron Graham  ASSOCIATE EDITOR: Bob
Taylor  PHOTO EDITOR: Dave Sherman  ASSOCIATE PHOTO EDITOR: Loren Bliss 
COPYEDITOR: Jim Austin  ASSISTANT COPY EDITOR: Marie Haugen  SPORTS EDITOR:
Larry LemonSTAFF REPORTERS:  GENERAL ASSIGNMENT: Glen Jones, Jim Thomson,
Pat Brennen, MarileePethtel, Dianne Jacobs. ADMINISTRATION:  Sm Austin Ma V
Peebles Adele Saltzman, Scott Anderson.FEATURES: Steve Johnston, Sue Gawrys
Dan Tolva.  CLUSTER cilLL.EGES: Debbie Hudson, BrianMorris, Gary Wahl, Joe
Daggy. MINORITIES: Tony Gable. Mike Dugov.ch  gen^enkin^DePaney
Jenkins.CAMPUS GOVERNMENT: Jackie LawsonJim Brook,.Mary ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 1 -  r* J
i_i _™„ m n/i Ml IN ITY-Mickev Hull Lvn
Watts Jeff Town. GRADUATh Arl-AIHi. BOD layioi. s r u n i o.  Gordon
Homme.COMMUNITY. Mickey Hull^ Ly ^ • Madison.
ENVIRONMENT: Debbie Hudson, Mane  Jack.e LawsonKe nt fherwood Lyn vvatt, ^
^ N M E ^ , T : B o b B u r n e t t , Bob Hicks, Ken Ritchie, Stephany
Bruell.  S u ^ O N ^ JaV Eckert. HUMANITIES: Pau.ette Martinis, Becky
Firth.  GRAPHICS: Phyllis Atkinson. ,BUSINESS MANAGER: Les Savitch  AD
MANAGER: Mike Pinch  STAFF ADVISER: R. E. Stannard Jr.The Western Front is
the official newspaper of Western Washington State College. Editorial 
opinions arethose of the writer. ooooc T I , . c^nt ic rpnrpwnted  Entered
as second class postage at Bellingham,Wash.ngton 98225. The Front is
represented  by NEAS New York and is a member of the United StatesStudent
Press Association.  Published on Tuesdays and Fridays. Composed in the WWSC
print shop and printed at the  LynEpr7op%nL gt;HONE 676,3161, v , %
^ADVERTISING PHONE 676-3160  Circular File by steve Johnston  INTERESTING
SUBJECT, PORNOGRAPHY. Western is planning  to devote a wholeweek to it at
the end of April . . . . What is obscene  is anybody's opinion. Lenny Bruce
used to say hewould rather his  kids watched a good stag movie than a war
picture. His reasoning was  that no one evergot killed or beat up in a stag
movie and they always  had a happy ending. Thinking back, believe he
wasright.  *****  SMUT IS WHERE YOU FIND IT, like the lady who wouldn't let
 her kids watch The InvisibleMan because whenever he was invisible,  he was
also naked.  THE SAGA(Students Afflicted byGastronomical Atrocities) 
Committee will continue to check out the local eateries upon  recovery . .
. .,,,.,-,  WHEN THINKING ABOUT THE KIWI bird, you should think  about the
female. Poor creature is thesame size of a chicken, but lays  an egg eight
times bigger.  *****  HANGING OR FIRING SQUAD? Theseare the two choices 
offered a condemned man in Utah. The last execution by firing squad  in
that statewas in the mid '50s. Understand there were over 100  applications
from sportsmen to fill the squad's ranks.  REPORTS SHOW that Salvo and Dash
detergents contain the  highest amounts of phosphates (47grams per average
load) while Cold  Water All (liquid) and Ivory Flakes contain none.  MORE
ONECOLOGY A new group has popped up called  Washington State Job Savers
which opposes "the do-gooders  ecologists" . . . . Interesting to note the
leader is a son of a lumber  company owner. Seems thecompany has been
warned four times in  the past year abaut its air and water pollution.
Other membersinclude  a steel plant owner and a contractor.  AND STILL MORE
. . . . Same people in Colorado havestarted a  new program to fight the
growing problem of highway litter. This  anti-littering group passes
outpostcards and anyone seeing trash being  dumped out a car window takes
down the date, time, place and license number of said offender. When the
main office jn Denver gets  the card, they send out a letterasking the
person not to do it  again . . . . Included with the letter is a litter
bag.  NIXON AND THE NEWMORALITY: A reader voices dismay over  Nixon
rescinding an order to liberalize abortion in the military onthe  grounds
he "cannot square with my personal belief in the sanctity ot  human life,"
while he hasseemed to square himself nicely with the  My Lai affair.  ****
*  OUR MALE CHAUVINIST-IN-RESIDENCEreports the women's  lib is moving into
the children's book market Says the ladies plan to  put out a bookabout
"sexism at the racetrack."  AND WE MISSED IT DEPT. Channel 4 treated
viewers to a movie  called The Sheriff which "deals with racism in a small
Western  community . . . and focuses on the efforts of aBlack sheriff and
his  White deputy to nail a White insurance salesman who raped a Black 
collegestudent." Now there is a little of something for everybody in  that.
 Questions and comments ar,ewelcorned. Address them to: Steve Johnston, c/o
 The Western Front, Viking Union 315, WesternWashington State College, 
Bellingham, Wash. 98225



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     Western Front - 1971 April 13 - Page 5



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Tuesday, April 13, 1971 Western Front  Letters from our readers  All
letters to the editor and guesteditorials are welcome. Please keep your 
remarks within 250 words. All letters must be signed, but wewill withhold 
your name upon request. The editor reserves the right to edit your letter
for  iibel. Letters may be hand delivered or mailed to the Front editorial
office in  the basement of the old Viking Union.  Students Favor Curriculum
Report  Editor:  The report of the Curriculum  Commission which was
released  r e c e nt l y to the College  Community offers the students  of
this campus an opportunity  for real reform ineducation for  the first time
in the history of  the school. Not only does the  proposed plan place
greateremphasis on undergraduate  education, but it offers to do so  with
far less hassle, red tape and  expense.Last Tuesday, the AS  Legislature
declared itself in  favor of the proposed reforms.  The faculty
howeverseems to be  against the report. Their reasons  for opposing it are
not clear, but  it is interesting to notethat all  department chairmen save
one  are in opposition to this plan  which would abolish all  departments
and therefore the  positions of authority that they  hold. This faculty
opposition is  serious to those of uswho favor  reform because the faculty,
 being organized, may easily be  able to bury the plan if thestudents do
not act now to bring  about its adoption.  I therefore urge all students 
to make themselvesaware of the  contents of the report. Copies  are
available in President Flora's  office (Old Main 115). Readit  thoroughly
and make your views  known to the administration.  Finally we h # e a
chance to  bring about a real change in our  rigid, dreary education
system;  let's not lose it!  David P. Stoebel  SeniorPsychology  Editor: 
The problem-centered  curriculum which Western is  considering really makes
somegood common sense. Not only is  it designed to give students a  truly
broad and liberal education  but onethat could be in depth  also. Have you
noticed, for  example, that it would be  possible to construct yourown 
major out of all those electives  as well as have a liberal approach  to a
concentration? Or you  couldgraduate without such a  major if you wanted
to. You  certainly wouldn't have to  follow a rigid programsome  department
dreamed up for you.  No more nonsense about  having to worry about adding
upcredits; no more grades as such;  no more final exams; better  feedback
instead of grades. You  couldfinish college in three  years by going to
those  intersessions and then take one  summer session. And,best of all, 
maybe, is the possibility of  making your own selection of  general
education courses.Western really promises to be  a great place when this
goes into  effect.  Jim Ryan  Senior  Politicalscience/history  Editor: 
There are approximately  9,000 students at Western, and  450 faculty.
Thismakes for a  student-faculty ratio .of 20 to 1.  That doesn't sound too
bad does  it? Well, how manyclasses of  only 20 students have you had?  Not
too many I would suspect.  Do any of you know why? It is  because of this
College's  graduate programs, that's why.  Fellow undergraduates, it is us 
who aremaking it possible for  graduate students to have such  small
classes. Now just who is  this schooloriented toward  anyway?  If the above
upsets you  somewhat, you should be  supporting the report of theCurriculum
Commission; which  intends to substantially deflate  the graduate programs
and put  moreprofessors back with the  undergraduates- which are  Western's
first priority.  David M. Johnson  StudentMember of Commission  Concerning
the Campus Bookstore  Editor:  P e r h a p s it was an"irresponsible"
action of the  Bookstore Board to try to pay  working bookstore managers 
more than some faculty and  administrators who could reason  themselves to
be worth more  than those managers.  Theboard lost touch with  reality in
not anticipating the  warm student/faculty reaction  and the veto of
thesesalary  increases by higher authority.  We have at least been spared
the  t r a u m a t i c experience ofreviewing our decision because  the
salary actions were simply  vetoed.  The "legal" basis for the veto  c ha n
g e s the power and  effectiveness of the board. The  board is now
"responsible  jointly to the presidentof the  Associated Students and
through  him to the Associated Students'  legislative body, and to
thecollege administration."  The word "responsible" in  this quote from an
April 1966  d o c u m e n t meansSalary  determinations of the board  (and
all other actions?) can be  vetoed by this more responsiblehigher
authority.  Well, then, two things should  happen:  1) The "higher
authorities"  should formallyapprove salary  a c t i o n s of the board.  R
a t i o n a l e - o t h e r w i s e these  board actions are always in 
jeopardy.  2) Bookstore personnel  should come under the college  c i v i l
s e r v i c e system.Rationale-the "incentive" pay  approach won't work
anymore.  Incentive pay meant thatemployees/managers started at  low
salaries and had to show  their worth by performance.  This game isover and
the  civil service approach of  evaluating the job (not so much  the
individual) is now in effect.  Now that the comparisons of the  bookstore
and college employees  is inevitable, the civil service  systemshould be
extended to  the bookstore.'- '• .'-_' ' - ' . '
'• '-' '• '  My resignation from the 
board givesme the satisfaction  of pointing with pride to the  past
bookstore operations. The  appointment of KayBurke to  replace me has
significance to  me. It seems to mark a more  political appointment
(I'mbusiness oriented), and perhaps  this change will characterize the  new
bookstore board.  KermitKnudtzon  Controller  Western Washington State
College  Editor:  I believe Mr. Bromley's letter  in theApril 6 edition of
the  Front requires a response, not to  deal with the validity of his 
statements andassumptions, but  because his letter reflects a lack  of
understanding of the  bookstore's operations andthe  role and
responsibility of  management.  Such a lack of understanding  and
statements like thosecontained in the letter generate  negative attitudes
on the part of  the college community and thus  reducethe ability of the 
bookstore to effectively serve  the needs of the students. It  disturbs me
that a speechmajor  or a major in any other  department, would make such  c
h a r g e s w i t h o u t first  investigatingcarefully whether  his
assumptions are correct or  providing some evidence to  support the
statements.Salary and wage levels in the  bookstore do not affect the 
prices of books. Nearly all  c a m p u sbookstores sell  t e x t b o o k s
at publishers'  suggested prices. This includes a  20 per cent markup
(onretail  price) to cover operating costs  and shipping charges.  A new
textbook sold to a  student for $10costs the  bookstore $8. To my memory 
the bookstore has never used a  different markup in the past 12year's;
even:,thdugly., salaries.,'ant}-.  other costs have risen. If the  student
takes reasonable care of  thebook and it is used the next  quarter he can
resell it to the  bookstore for 60 per cent of the  price he paid. The
markup on other items  in the bookstore is generally  below suggested
retail markup  and in mostcases is lower than  the markup used by other  c
a m p u s b o o k s t o r e s in  Washington. These arenot  c h a n g e d b
e c a u s e of  contemplated salary or wage  adjustments.  Generally, the
expectationis  that increased efficiency and  economies associated with a 
growing sales volume and  improvedcontrol of operations  will cover the
salary increases  without adversely affecting  earnings.  Salary levelsare
better judged  by their cost per dollar of sales  rather than by their
absolute  level alone. One campusbookstore in this state reports  salaries
and wages take 20 cents  of each dollar of sales. At  Westernthey are less
than 12  cents per dollar of sales.  Contrary to the opinion  expressed in
the letter, salaries in  no society, that I know of are  determined by
whether or not  the recipient "could easily do  well on evenless money than
 they are now getting." Will Mr.  Bromley or anyone accept this  as a guide
to his ownsalary  determination?  Remember also there have  always been
students appointed  by the AssociatedStudents on  the Bookstore Board.
These  students have always been  active, energetic and greatlyconcerned
that the bookstore  serve the students efficiently and  economically. They
deserve  ' p r a i s e ,consideration by  Associated Students and support 
from the student body, not  castigation. I have neverserved  with one who
was not able and  willing to argue cogently on  matters of policy.  Howard
E. Mitchell  Chairman  Bookstore Board  "\daniors lt;  1fej
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     Western Front - 1971 April 13 - Page 6



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6 Western Front Tuesday, April 13, 1971  TICKETS-  $3.00 V.U. DESK  MAIN
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     Western Front - 1971 April 13 - Page 7



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Tuesday, April 13, 1971 Western Front 7  IN CONCERT  WITH THE BALLADS AND
FUNK EXPERIENCE CARVER GYM  THURS. APRIL 15 8 PM  $3 ADVANCED STUDENT/$4 AT
THE DOOR  i » » v v iNy".» » v
» V v



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     Western Front - 1971 April 13 - Page 8



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8 Western Front Tuesday, April 13, 1971  •» 
SPRING  CLEARANCE  of our lovely ^-^-% FORMALSA selection of styles and
colors  await your choice  Regularly Priced From $29 to $49 | _ _ , ^  $ 1
0 HfiiSchedule  NOW  TO $30 OUR NEW SPRING FORMALS ARE IN  REALLY GROOVY!! 
Monday 'til 7 P -m . _ - * ^ | ^ ^ Fridays 'til 9 p.m.  306 Champion
Bellingham  / free dry/  ... ON ALL WASH DONE IN OURWASHERS!  Smith
Cleaners   Laundry, Inc.  State   Boulevard Always Open  MUSIC!  MUSIC! 
MUSIC! BeHingham's lew Complete  Music Store  CAPITOL  MUSIC  104 North
Commercial Street  Next to Mt.Baker Theatre  GRAND  OPENING  SPECIAL SALE! 
Bring this ad for  your complimentary  copy oftheme from  "Lore Story" 
.(Where Do I Begin)  '/a PRICE ON MANY  BOOKS—Thru April
17th  CapitolMusic will be  happy to supply all your  sheer music needs. 
BROWSERS WELCOME  Black CultureWeek  Begins Second Day  The Chambers
Brothers Concert headlines the  entertainment provided byBlack Culture Week
at  8 p.m. Thursday in Carver Gymnasium.  The group will be backed up with
TheBallads  and Funk Experience. Kelly-DeYong provides  sound for the
concert.  The Black Culture play"Dutchman" kicks off  the week's events at
7 p.m. today in the Music  Auditorium.  Directed by AnthonyHill of the
University of  Washington Drama Department, who has been  involved in Black
culture plays forseveral years,  "Dutchman" depicts Black life-style in
America  today.  The film "Up Tight" with Black stars Julian  Mayfield,
Raymond St. Jacques and Ruby Dee will  be screened at 7 and 9 p.m. tomorrow
in theauditorium.  Tickets for Thursday's Chambers Brothers  Concert may be
purchased at the Viking Uniondesk for $3, or at the door for $4.  Alex
Haley, who edited the autobiography of  the late Malcolm X, willspeak at 3
p.m. Friday in  the Viking Union lounge.  Saturday's events are highlighted
with a dance  from 9 p.m. to midnight in lower Saga to the  music of
Butterball and the Vibratones.  Black Culture Week endsSunday with a Soul 
Food Dinner and a Fashion Show during regular  evening meal hours in
VikingCommons.  New Committee Expected  to Choose Dean by May  If at first
you don't succeed, try, tryagain.  President Charles J. Flora has decided
that the  next Dean of Western will come from within thecollege after a
selection committee had spent  nearly two years in an unfruitful search for
a dean  fromelsewhere.  Robert Monahan, chairman of the Selection 
Committee recently resigned and Floradischarged  the old committee.  A new
selection committee was appointed  yesterday by Flora and theFaculty
Council  Executive Committee.  Executive Committee member Mel Davidson 
predicts that a newdean will be appointed by the  middle of May to relieve
Acting Dean of Western  Fred Knapman.  "It willprobably be a 30-day thing,"
he said.  Flora told the Faculty Council Thursday that  persons who
havecome to the college for  interviews "have turned around and run when
they  saw the whites of our eyes orwe've turned and run  when we saw the
whites of theirs."  Flora also told the Council that it is time thecollege
quit spending money on travel and  communication to select a dean from
outside the  college.  The applicants can see the flux the college is  now
in and perceive that "it's no better here than  back home,"he said.  Flora
told the Faculty Council that it would  not do to continue operating with a
temporary  deanbecause such a dean acts differently than a  confirmed one. 
HAPPENINGS By MARILEE PETHTELFront Reporter 
Concert—Arlo Guthrie will appear in concert at  Hec
Edmudson Pavilion on the Universityof  Washington campus at 8 p.m. April
16. Tickets can  be purchased at the Bon Marche for $3.50.  Radio -"Get
Together," a program produced by  Western students will be presented again
this  quarter. Theprogram consists of news, editorial  comment, and
bulletin information. It is presented  by students inSpeech 441, a class in
production  and direction of radio and television. The program  can be
heardTuesday nights on KGMI at 7:05,  KGVM at 8, KPUG at 7:40, and on
Wednesday  nights on KERI at12:15, and KARI at 1:20.  Sculpture
Exhibit-"Whirlybird," and four other  electrical sculptures are now
ondisplay in the  Viking Union Gallery.  Driving
lessons—Free driving lessons will be  sponsored by
theTechnology Dept. People  interested must sign up in room 105 in the Arts
 building. A driving permit isrequired.  FOREST H i l l  FIRES B U R N l l
l  MORE mm  THAN M  TREES i f f  ©
JnimGymkhana—A road skill race will be held  Saturday,
April 17, at noon. Interested students  should meetin parking lot 17-B,
behind the boiler  plant.  Art Film—A number of
underground films will be  shownFriday, April 16 as a part of the Arts and 
Lectures series. "Entr'acte," "The Life and Death  of 9413,"Optical Poem,"
"Prelude: Dog Star  Man," and "Scorpio Rising" will be shown in L-4  at 7
9p.m.  SpeechTest—Students wishing to take the Speech 
100 exemption test must sign up now in the  Speech office,College Hall. The
written part of  the test will be given April 27, and the oral portion  on
May 4.  SkiClass—A free day of skiing for members of the
 college ski class will be held Saturday, April 17.Students should sign up
for the bus in the  Women's P.E. Dept.  Concert—Chambers
Brothers, Columbia Records  recording stars, will be presented in concert 
Thursday, April 15 in Carver Gym. Also featuredwill be Funk Experience and
The Ballards. The  concert will start at 8 p.m.  Movie-"Uptight," a film
featuring Black stars  Julian Mayfield, Raymond St. Jacques and Ruby  Dee
will be shown at 7 p.m. April 14, in the music  auditorium.  Plays-Two
plays depicting Black life will be  shown tonight at 7, in the
musicauditorium.  Speaker—Alex Haley, who helped to
write the  autobiography of Malcolm X will speak at 3p.m.  April 16 in the
Viking Union.  Mama Sunday's Coffee House-Friday, 7  the coffee house. 
gt;t••'••
lt; • • ' / ' . ' . •
' ' ' ' '  p.m. in



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     Western Front - 1971 April 13 - Page 9



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Tuesday, April 13, 1971 Western Front . 9  classifieds  10 MISC. FOR SALE 
K-2 Elite Skis with bindings,  $50. 734-0239.  11 CARS AND CYCLES  Wrecked
764 Corvette. Will sell  parts. Call 733-6496.  20 FOR RENT  Rooms, all
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PERSONALS  A position is mow open for a  person skilled in graphicswith 
artistic ability. The job entails  advertising make-up. Call  Mike,
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RECEIPT  Flora DefendsDeadline  President Charles Flora defended the short
time  he has given for feedback on the CurriculumCommission Report by
emphasizing the  "biennium of unparalleled budgetary reduction"  which the
college will enter July 1, 1971 before  the Faculty Council Thursday.  His
remarks came as a response to arequest by  the Chemistry Department though
other  concerned elements of the college had expressedsimilar views. The
Chemistry Department had  asked Flora to remove all deadlines for 
consideration of the curriculum proposal and  further asked that Flora
clarify his stated plans for  affecting academic reform asoutlined in his 
covering letter to the Curriculum Report.  Flora stressed the short time
left for changebefore July 1 and told the council "1 must go  forward to
the Board of Trustees with as many  soundrecommendations as possible to be 
implemented within the biennium as early as  possible."  He set June 1 as
the latest date he could  present "a wide variety of recommendations and 
informational statementsas to how this office  believes we can best meet
the budgetary crisis  before us."  The CurriculumCommission Report is one 
model for change with a specific focus, Flora said,  but other approaches
are"urgently needed."  Flora pointed out that the unfortunate part of 
focusing upon savings alone is thatnecessary  adjustments now will last a
long time into the  future.  The academic reform advanced by thereport  can
be rejected but "it is important to me that you  clarify the focus as you
see it, and that, further, you recommend ways in which we can affect 
reductions in time with that focus," he told the  council.The May 1
deadline Flora had set for  consideration of the report provides sufficient
 time "to decide thebasic fate of the Commission  Report," in his words. 
He posed the following questions to the  council:  - Is it a model for
reform worthy of further  discussion?  -Are parts of it worthy for further
discussion?  -Areparts of it available for implementation?  Flora urged the
council members not to judge  hisrecommendations before he even knew what 
they are going to be.  One of the basic guidelines for thedocument  he
would present to the Board of Trustees would  be that "it must, insofar as
can beaccomplished  within the awful press of time, be consistent with  the
views of the official mechanisms ofthe  college."  Flora reviewed the
economic crisis the college  faces for the coining biennium to set
theground  • for an imperative need for changes which
will save  money.  Whether the college comes under the governor's  budget,
"which is the best we can expect," the  House version, "which is worse," or
the"awful"  version of the Senate Appropriations Committee,  substantial
reductions in the operating costs for Western must be made, Flora said. 
"And when I say substantial, I am not simply  talking about hundreds of
thousands of dollars for  the biennium, but rather millions of dollars," he
 said.  Flora referred to therecently-released  Kjarsgaard report which
includes "a myriad of  recommendations for change" in thenon-instructional
areas of the college as one  approach to the budgetary crisis Western
faces.  Yet, thechanges proposed in the Kjargaard  report, even if fully
implemented "will not be  sufficient," Flora said.The Curriculum Commission
was charged last  fall to "find and recommend' better ways to carry 
forwardthe instructional program of this college  at less cost."  Even if
the report were followed as is "it would  not, in itself, come close to
doing the job from the  financial viewpoint," Flora said.  "It is clearly
not radicalenough to accomplish  the savings necessary," he told the
Council.  New Grading System  BeingReviewed Today  A new grading system
that would eliminate all  letter grades will be considered by theAcademic 
Council at its meeting today.  The proposal, prepared by the Council's 
Ad-hoc Committee onGrading, would replace the  present system with four
grades: C (credit), CD  (credit with distinction), NC(no credit) and K 
(incomplete).  These changes according to the committee's  report, were
prompted by afeeling that "what  matters is the accumulation of credits." 
"Accordingly," the report continues, "theCommittee decided that a logical
extension of the  College's responsibility to certify and accredit
itsstudents would be to adopt a grading system for  public, reportorial
purposes that directly  acknowledgedthis fact."  But, in order to recognize
superior  achievement, the committee created a symbol for  creditwith
distinction. "Such a symbol should be  used only for the student whose work
is so  outstanding that it exceeds all usual standards of  performance."
The report adds that,the student  receiving this grade would be a likely
candidate for  advanced study beyond bachelor's degree.  In creation of the
no credit symbol,the  Committee decided that "the no-credit symbol  should
be defined in such a way that it could not  bemisconstrued as being
equivalent to an F or  fail."  The Committee felt that, since the
accrediting  functionof College requires it only to count the  number of
credits accumulated toward graduation,  a "no credit"symbol was not really
needed. But  one was included to assist the student and his  advisor in
evaluatingthe student's progress toward  the degree requirement.  The K, or
incomplete, grade would be similar  tothe present K grade. However, since
the register  finds the present system of reminding both the  studentand
his advisor that a K must be removed  within one quarter too cumbersome and
costly,  the move toremove a K, under the proposed  system, would be from
the student, and the  maximum time allowed forremoval would be  increased
to one academic year.  The Ad-hoc Grading Committee, established by 
theAcademic Council on the recommendation of  the Pass/Fail Committee,
considered the problem  of arevised grading system from the following 
points:  -What purposes grades of all kinds serve and  whomthey serve. 
-The detrimental as well as positive effects  which accompany the use of
any and all gradingsystems.  -The reliability of grades in all contexts;
ways  to eliminate the use of grades as a tangiblereward  or punishment;
ways to eliminate anxiety about  grades.  -The attempt to develop a new
system of  student evaluation that would fulfill the above  requirements
and would continue the feedback  educational function but eliminate the
stigma and  anxiety of a permanent record.  The committee was chaired
byRichard Francis  and included members from several departments.  Nate a
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     Western Front - 1971 April 13 - Page 10



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10 Western Front Tuesday, April 13, 1971  SPECIAL!!!  SHEAFFER'S Reg. $1.00
Value  CARTRIDGEPENS  while the supply lasts  AND RECEIVE 7 FREE
CARTRIDGES!! 49*  Play Ball!"  F/ourescenf NiteBall  CLOSE-OUT!!  Reg.
$1.00 25 lt;  Used Paperback Books  LIMITED QUANTITY  Values from $.65
to$2.95  NOW...  TUDENTS STORE  KVKRY ACTION TAKEN BY COMMISSIONERS  OF A
PUBLICUTILITY DISTRICT  IS IN AN OPEN MEETING.  Evc-rv policy decision is
subject to full public scrutiny. The State  Auditor checks the books of all
PUDs and examines the financial transactions.  This public"fishbowl" method
of operation makes certain that each dollar  spent is for the benefit of
the consumer-owner of the PUD.  The PUD law itself obligates commissioners
to hire competent  managers to staff andrun the PUD strictly in the public
interest.  And, the ureal final judge in a Pl'D district is the voter
liimsclf,who can endorse or reject the actions of the P l 'D commission
through  his ballot. This must be anefficient system, for consumer-owners 
of PI'D.i in W'ushitiiiton enjoy electric rates nnum» the lowest
inthe nation.  WASHINGTON  Paffle\}tffyUi5ttM  ASSOCIATION C.K. JOLLY.
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ST..BELLlNGHAM, WASHINGTON 98225  Y STOCKWELL 734-1860  NEEC Aims Toward 
RestructuringSystem  The Northwest Environmental Education  Center (NEEC)
is a complex organization aimed atmaking a new value system available to
the public.  NEEC is working on an education program for  thepubiic schools
that would combine  environmental education with all other facets. "All 
education isenvironmental education" is the  premise from which they work. 
Bill Stocklin, NEEC director, said, "We're giving education an overall
purpose—relating to the  environment and the world
around us. Studentsneed to understand relationships, and not just 
individual topics."  This new type of education requiresspecially  trained
teachers, restructured systems of learning,  new programs, new facilities
and theacceptance of  new ideas.  The value system and the education system
 have been geared in how to make a living. Now we  are trying to teach
students how to live, Stocklin  explained.  Bobbie Ryan, assistantdirector
of NEEC, said,  "We're trying to give people choices that they've  never
had before in dealing witheach other and  understanding their relationship
with the world.  Environmental education would give ussome  sound options
we've never had before."  A student coming out of one of NEEC's-type 
schools would have:  -An ecological ethic awareness, perspective, 
understanding and appreciation.  —A world
view.—A holistic view.  —A problem
oriented mind.  —A solution oriented mind.  -A thorough
understandingof relationships  and consequences.  —An
ability to project.  -An understanding of systems. 
—Anunderstanding of time.  Community education is an
important part of  any introductory program, accordingto Mrs.  Ryan. The
community and the administration  must accept the changes, she said. 
Stocklin saidhe anticipates problems at the  school level, with the
"traditional people fighting  the nucleus of NEEC-trained teachers. That
will be  the big hurdle to get over."  "Survival is the issue; and how we
can getthings in order so the human species does not  become just another
organism that occurs in  geologictime," he added.  $11 Billion In Public
Funds  LLOYD MEEDS  Congressman  Every so often thePresident and Congress
get  into a scrap that goes to the very heart of our  Constitution. Usually
thedispute involves either  the Bill of Rights or the powers delegated to
each  branch of the federalgovernment.  President Nixon has impounded more
than $ 11  billion in appropriations already voted byCongress. Senator Sam
Ervin, the constitutional  watchdog from North Carolina, has been holding 
publichearings to find out if the President's action  defies the letter
and/or spirit of the Constitution.  The Ervinhearings were prompted in part
by a  growing chorus of outrage from the nation's  mayors, governors
andother local officials who  need the impounded funds to meet pressing 
situations at home.  Included among the frozen funds are $200  million for
urban renewal, $200 million for water  and sewer grants, $192 millionfor
public housing,  more than $750 million for various rural programs,  $6
billion for highway constructionand almost $1  billion earmarked to improve
our airports.  "Look here," say the local officials, "PresidentNixon tells
us that with 'revenue sharing' we can  ease our financial pressure. Why
doesn't he releasethese impounded funds to help us right now when  we need
assistance so desperately?"  I have had apersonal experience with Mr. 
Nixon's action. Last year Congress passed the Drug  Abuse Education Actof
which I was the chief  sponsor. Six million was sppropriated to fund the 
Act through the fiscal year thatends on June 30.  Yet the Administration
had decided not to  spend any of the money until after the newfiscal  year
begins!  Senator Ervin and the legal scholars point out  that ours is a
Constitution thatemphasizes  separation of powers. They say the impounding
of  funds is not a new phenomena, but that it represents the continuing
erosion of Congressional  authority.  The Constitution vests all
legislativepowers  with Congress. The greatest of these powers, and  the
most potent of all checks on the President, is  the power over all money
spent by the  government. Article I, section 9 of the  Constitution says
that"No money shall be drawn  from the Treasury but in consequence of 
appropriations made by law."  ThePresident can veto a bill, and he can make
 recommendations. But the Founding Fathers never  intendedthat he defy the
express will of Congress.  For example, last summer Mr. Nixon vetoed an 
educationappropriation bill. Congress passed it  over his veto. Yet he
impounded it for a long time.  No one will argue that the President should 
withhold money when it is in excess of needs. No  one complained right
afterWorld War II when  President Truman held up Air Force  appropriations
that were no longer needed.  I feelthat when the President holds up funds 
specifically earmarked to meet pressing needs, he  is exercisingan "item"
veto, a total veto. This is  legislating. It is contrary to the direction
of Article  2, section 3 of theConstitution which commands  the President
to "take care that the laws be  faithfully executed."  In theweeks and
months ahead, Congress will  search for new ways to re-establish its power
of  the purse. Ibelieve that this is essential to restore  the proper role
of Congress and to invigorate  representativedemocracy.  Building Program
Depends  on College Growth Needs  The future of Western's buildingprogram
is  dependent on the governor's and the state  legislature's interpretation
of the growth needs ofthe college, Harold A. Goltz, director of campus 
planning, said.  The college's needs are greater thanthose  projected by
the legislature, he said.  The legislature estimates includes the projected
 enrollment,tuition and normal school fund,  acquired through the sale and
rent of endowed  public school land.  In thepast the building fund included
money  from a state general fund, the building authority  and federal
grants.  The legislature doesn't see a steep increase in  enrollment and
bases its estimates on that. Campusplanners at Western say that even if the
enrollment  stays fairly stable the college will need $2.6  millionmore
than the legislature's estimate.  Planners see a maximum enrollment of
12,000 to  15,000 for thecollege in the future.  A social sciences
building, additions to the  music building and a NorthwestEnvironmental 
Studies center are among future building projects.  There won't be money
for equippingthese  buildings, though, if the school doesn't get some  more
money' Goltz said.  The legislature hasdeferred various projects  that are
needed now, Goltz said. The scarceness of  money has already retarded the
acquiring of lands  for future building. Commercial apartments are  being
built on some of the landprojected for  college expansion.  There isn't
even enough money to do essential  renovating of Old Main,Goltz said.



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     Western Front - 1971 April 13 - Page 11



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Tuesday, April 13, 1971 Western Front 11  Record-tying vault: Western's
Bill Long on his way over the barto tie a school pole-vault record of 13-8.
 Viks Wallop Eastern  It was a cold, wet miserable day at CivicStadium
Saturday, but at the end of the afternoon  Western's tracksters left soaked
and happy.  EasternWashington's cindermen just left . . . wet.  The reason
for the opposite reactions was that  the Viking hasjust walloped the
undermanned  Savages in an Evergreen Conference (Evco) dual  meet, 102 -38
. TheViks won 12 of 17 events,  breaking one school record and tying
another in  the process.  The 10 individual events won by Western, 
excluding the two relays, were won by 10  different Viks, while three
Savagesaccounted for  Eastern's five blue ribbons.  The Vik win was
highlighted by Mike Vorce  and Bill Long.Vorce, a sophomore from Murdock, 
set a new 440-yd. intermediate hurdles record,  running a :55.4
whicheclipsed the old :56.8 mark  set by Brian Ingerson in 1968. Vorce was
the state  Class A hurdles champas a senior at Lyle High  School.  Long, a
junior transfer from Everett  Community College, tied the schoolpole-vault 
standard of 13-8, which was set by Barney  Thompson in 1970. Thompson, a
junior, ispresently ineligible, and the two ought to provide  stiff
competition for each other next season.  Easternwas led by the double
victories of Bob  Maplestone and Ed Fisher. Maplestone, a freshman  from
Cardiff,Wales who won the NAIA national  indoor mile last winter, took the
880-yd. run in  1:56.1 and the three-mile in 14:46.1.  Fisher took the long
and triple jumps with  flights of 22-4 and 43-6!/2, respectively. JoeRoss 
furnished the only other Savage win with a 4:14.3  mile. Ross' time was
only two-tenths of a second behind the Evco mark of 4:14.1, set in 1969 by 
Whitworth's Jerry Tighe.  The single dark spot for theVikings was when 
their top sprinter, Mike Page, pulled a hamstring in  the 100-yd. dash.
Page finishedsecond behind  Western's Jim Magee, and was later scratched
from  the 220-yd. dash and mile relay.  Vik track coach Dick Bowman was not
overly  concerned with Page's injury, however.  "We don't think it's
tooserious," stated the  Vik's mentor, "more like a cramp. We just didn't 
want to take a chance using himwhen we really  didn't need him."  Bowman
was satisfied, though not particularly  overjoyed, with the win."It was a
good win with  some good performances, especially for a day like  this." 
Western's next meetwill be Saturday at Civic  Stadium against the Vancouver
Olympic Club with  field events starting at 12:45a.m. and running  events
at 1:30 p.m.  Edwards Attacks  Racism in Sports  Harry Edwards  blasted
racistattitudes in sports at a "Sports and  Society Teach-In" at the
University of Washington  Friday.  He saidthe greatest accomplishment of
the  Black movement has been the Black athlete's  awareness of
hisresponsibility to it.  "Despite Negro administrators and coaches,  Black
athletes always press forward," he said.  Edwards said that most Black
coaches are  puppets. He said the Black coach's only duties are  torecruit
Black athletes; say his school's racist  image is false; and, when
rebellion occurs, become  theathletic staff's apologist.  "Prior to 1967,
there were no Black coaches at  any major school on the PacificCoast," he
said.  "Now most have at least one, plus a Black  administrator. But rather
than find the bestcoaches they could, these schools go into their  own
ranks and say 'Now who is a nigger with a  goodattitude?"  He said these
Black coaches are "nothing more  than spooks who sit by the door." 
Edwardsreasoned that good Black coaches are  needed because most conflicts
between Black and  Whiteathletes are made by coaches.  These conflicts come
from such practices as  "stacking"-having manyBlacks fight for one 
position—or making other positions, such as the  center,
guard and quarterbackspots in' football,  unavailable to Blacks.  Thus, he
said, when a coach is confronted by  Black athletes forracist policies, the
coach looks  to his White players for support.  For those who wish to dodge
theproblem by  not recruiting Blacks, Edwards said, "You can  forget about
winning with an all-White team."Edwards labelled American athletics 
"overextended financially and politically," and  said they are
"morallybankrupt."  "The sports establishment is in a coalition with  other
degenerates," he added.  Edwards called "ridiculous" an article in the 
Jan. 18 issue of Sports Illustrated (SI) on the  superiority of the Black
athlete.  "Blacks have come to dominate athletics  because it is one of the
few fields open to the 20  millionBlacks in this country. Considering the 
situation, it's a wonder all athletes aren't Black."  Edwardsattacked an SI
contention that slavery  weeded out the weak.  "It was intellectual wit
that kept slavesaround  when the situation got tight," he said.  In
summation, Edwards called the SI article  "insulting" and said "It's only
saying Blacks are  closer to animals than Whites are."  Edwards, a
sociology professor atthe  University of California at Berkeley, was a
leader  in the 1968 Olympic Games boycott and the  author of two books on
Black athletes and Black  students.  Heroin  is moving  to the  suburbs. 
The spread ofheroin addiction is  discussed on pages 22 and 23 of the
Federal  source book: "Answers to the mostfrequently  asked questions about
drug abuse."  For your free copy send in the coupon  below.  For a copy of
the Federal source book:  "Answers to the most frequently asked  questions
about drug abuse"  writeto: Drug Abuse Questions and Answers  National
Clearinghouse for Drug  Abuse Information  Box 1080Washington, D.C. 20013 
Name:  Address:  City: State: Zip:  * ^  and £Ai .,. -fJie.
neurit dock aioot.Rejdfcfe and, Ao^fc. Qu kcL and  zmootfifedW corrklna m. 
Gm  and chtx e, uowa iodau,  B r I  e j ^ tfoumart, into  MINN  BUSH  Red,
White and Blue  Brown, Elk  Blue Denim  $18.95  . IO ivOiVkVv»
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     Western Front - 1971 April 13 - Page 12



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T2 Western r-rom I uesday, April loJ, i y /1  Campus Briefs  OCIC Presents
Music Forum  TheOff—Campus Interhouse Community (OCIC)
is planning a  "Sound Forum" music festival to be held incoordination with
the  Blossom Time Festival this May.  The group wants to make the forum a
two-daybenefit to help such  organizations as the Crisis Clinic, Whatcom
County Housing Union,  Bellingham DayCare Center and others.  OCIC hopes to
have various local rock, folk, soul, jazz and variety  bands perform at the
forum.  Anyone interested in helping with the forum or any groups 
interested in participating maycontact OCIC Vice-President Bob  Burnett at
the AS Housing Commission office or may come to theOCIC meeting at 7:30
p.m. Tuesday.  Debaters Place High  Western's debate team of Richard
Spillman,senior, and Randy  Ebberson, junior, won a gold medal for placing
in the top ten per cent  in traditionaldebate at the Pi Kappa Delta
National Debate  Tournament in Houston, Tex.  The pair competed in
eightrounds of competition and finished  with a record of seven wins and
one loss.  In the same event,Western's team of Terry Kehrli of Cathlamet 
and Don Fernandes of Port Townsend, both seniors, won arating of 
excellent, which denotes placement in the top 20 per cent.  Fernandes also
won an excellentrating in interpretive reading.  Western's four man
delegation competed against 160 teams  representingnearly 150 colleges and
universities throughout the  nation. In overall competition, Western's team
wasrecognized as  excellent in the sweepstakes category of the convention
held March  22-26.  In otherforensics activities, Michael Bartanen of Pasco
and John  Wolfe of Seattle, both freshmen, placed first insenior division
debate  at the Puget Sound Forensics Conference March 9 in Seattle. Seven 
colleges anduniversities from the Puget Sound area competed in the  meet. 
Dick Marshall, senior, of Bellinghamplaced first in impromptu  speaking and
second in salesmanship at the Tournament of Champions  heldlast month at
Linfield College.  Curriculum Report Savings ?  How much money will be
saved if theproposed Curriculum  Commission Report is put into effect? 
That's the question a six-member task forcewill face Saturday  when it
studies the report to determine the economic advantages of  the
proposedcurriculum changes.  The Curriculum Commission was charged last
fall to find better  ways in whichinstruction could be carried on at a
lesser cost. The  meeting Saturday should determine how much thatlesser
cost could  be.  "We will try to come up with some concrete figures then,"
Provost  FrederickSargent II, a member of the task force, said.  Other task
force members include Western's RegistrarWilliam  O'Neil, Business Manager
Ernest Sams, Director of Computer Center  Robert Holz, Director ofSystems
Analysis Leo Dauenhauer and  Robert Brown, professor of English and former
academic dean.Dorm Occupancy at 72%  Occupancy in college residence halls
is leveling out at about 72 per  cent thisquarter compared to 89 per cent
last quarter, according to  director of housing Gerald Brock.  This
loweredlevel of occupancy resulted in the closing of two  floors of Edens
Hall North, one floor of Ridgeway Kappaand two  towers at Fairhaven. Brock
pointed out that this is the first time parts  of dorms have ever
beenclosed during the regular school year.  Brock attributed this to the
fact that, although some studentsusually move off campus spring quarter,
there is usually a backlog of  students trying to get into thedorms.  Ed
Association President  A Western student has been elected president of the
2,000-memberStudent Washington Education Association.  Randy Roberts, a
junior in English from Montesano, waselected  president of the professional
organization for college students who  plan to teach at the group'stwo-day
convention at Central  Washington State College.  Jeopardy Editorship Open 
Applications for theeditorship of Jeopardy, Western's annual  magazine of
creative writing and art, are now being accepted bythe  Committee on
Student Publications.  Application letters and any relevant supporting
material must be submitted to committee chairman Gerald Kraft in Haggard
Hall 353  by Friday, April 23, Interviews andfinal selection for the
1971-72  editor will be held at 5 p.m., April 28, in Humanities 215. All 
applicantsmust attend in order to be considered.  Competition is open to
any full time student regardless of major or writing background.  Indian
Week Ahead  Western's first annual Indian Week festivities will be held
thefirst  week in May, sponsored by the American Indian Students Union 
(AISU).  Tentatively, the AISU hasscheduled an arts and crafts show and 
trade fair to initiate and carry through the week beginning May 3.Official
activities will begin Thursday evening, May 6, with the  judging and
selection of an Indian princesswho will reign over the  festivities.  Other
events scheduled include films, slides and a light show,  fashionshow,
dance in Red Square, authentic salmon bake, Indian  dinner at Saga, Indian
games and a series ofspeakers dealing with the  subject of Indian rights
and the Indian movement.  weisfteld's  â„¢ gt;Mg$. Q^Paul
who?  Tonight:  Arouse  itizensin  ^ Concord  and Lexington.  Now there's a
special Late, Late Rateon 20C for every minute after
that—when  out-of-state Long Distance calls you dial you
call between 11 at night and 8 in  yourself. Just 350 for your first
minute, the morning, any day of the week.  PacificNorthwest Bell