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     Western Front - 1972 July 18 - Page 1



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The  Vol. 64 No. 55 Western Washington State College Tuesday, July 18, 1972
 Action Army acceptingapplications  The Army advertisement on the 
billboard at the corner of State and  Laurel reads "We'll payyou $288 a 
month to kill."  It used to read "We'll pay you  $288 a month to learn a
skill," but  a groupcalling themselves the  Bellingham Chapter of the
Citizens  Committee for Honesty in Billboards  decidedthat was false
advertising, and  so sometime late Sunday night it was  changed.  The Front
was informedof the  planned sabotage when a person  sounding very much like
Donald Duck  called the office Sundayevening, and  asked to speak to the
editor.  He identified himself as a member of  the Bellingham Chapterof the
Citizens  Committee for Honesty in Billboards,  and stated that "a
billboard on State  Street is guiltyof false advertising, and  is being
rearranged to make it more  honest."  He asked the Front to drive downState
Street early Monday morning, and  to look for the altered board.  A
reporter and photographer wereon the scene .early yesterday, and 
discovered that the Army adjust off the  corner of Laurel and State had
been  changed by blacking out the unwanted  letters with some type of
paint.  The Bellingham ArmyRecruiting  Office hadn't heard of the
Committee's  work when the Front inquired, but said  that the "work of
vandalism" would be  removed as soon as possible.  The alteration of the
billboard may  have beenprompted by a rash of attacks  Photo by JAY ECKERT 
on Army billboard advertising which has  beenoccuring recently across the 
nation, and has been reported in several  newspapers including Bellingham's
Northwest Passage.  According to the Passage article, the  Citizen's
Committee claims chapters in  28states, all actively altering billboards 
to represent what they see as the truth.  According to the Passage,the 
Committee notes that "modified  billboards are being repaired," but says 
they'll correct this situationas fast as  possible.



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     Western Front - 1972 July 18 - Page 2



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2. Western Front Tuesday, July 18, 1972  Front editorials...  What's George
gonna do  in Round Two?What's George got up his sleeve for Round Two? 
Round One was, in the end, no contest. With a superborganization lobbying
for him at  every democratic caucus and primary, McGovern entered the
DemocraticConvention the  odds-on favorite to win. And justly so, for he
knocked all other contestants out of the ringin one ballot. George had
correctly sensed the political mood of the people in the primaries  and
theconvention, and emerged as the darling of the Democratic party.  George,
really had his shit together inRound One.  But Round Two is going to be a
bit more of a challenge for the man from South  Dakota.McGovern is entering
the political ring against an old pro with a one win, one loss  record j n
pastpresidential races. George therefore has a distinct disadvantage from
the  beginning: his lack of experience in political infighting.  George is
going to have to learn a wide assortment of jabs and barbs in a very
shorttime  if he's going to stay in the ring with the champ.  George is
going to have to learn to duck and jab from the center, because this old
pro is  reputed to throw a mean right hook at anything coming at him from
the left.  George is gonna have to jab viciously at the weak links in Big
Dick's armor, trying all  the while tokeep the champ back on his heels. 
Rhetoric is really vicious at times like this, if applied properly.
Wordslike Economy,  Corporate Power, Taxes, Democracy, and Vietnam could
bring Dick to his knees if applied  in liberal doses.  But first and
foremost, George is going to have to maintain the charismatic
personalityexuding confidence and honesty which he currently enjoys. The
champ can only appeal to  his past record of deception and lies, George can
point to a prosperous and peaceful future.  Keep your guard up,George, and
smash him one for me. LYTM WATTS  McGovern.. some fresh air or  lots of
stale cigarsmoke?  After the "safe and sane" opening speech delivered by
Democratic Party Chairman •  LarryO'Brien, the acceptance
speech by George McGovern was like a firecracker going off  in our
hands.O'Brien had said this was the year to stop the rhetoric, be open and
honest with the  American public, totry and restore America's faith in the
political system by not  promising things that can't be
delivered.McGovern's speech was in direct opposition to the party's
chairman. He promised  things that will bedifficult, if not impossible, to
deliver. McGovern proposed a grandiose  scheme for bringing the
soldiershome from Vietnam after stopping the bombing on  Inauguration day.
George may have something to sayabout when the bombing stops and  when our
soldiers return, but how can he promise that the POW's willcome home at the
 same time?  He promised jobs where none exist today. Will he have to fall
back on the old  Democratic solution of artificially stimulating the
economy to fulfill that promise? He  promised welfare reform. How can he
keep that promise, when it's been made before and  couldn't be kept? His
was aspeech liberally sprinkled with "I w i l l " and " I shall." These are
 words that imply promise. Nothingdefeats credibility faster than empty
promises.  If McGovern is to maintain the support of his backers andgive
the voter a real  alternative, he is going to have to do more than emulate
the old style politics.  STEVE NEFF  |50VggSUaERj L"— IN
CONGRESS THIS MORNING, THE PRESIDENT ASKED FOR FORMALDECLARATIONS OF WAR
AGAINST BRAZIL, PERU.AND CHILI - A S  ^AMERICA'S LATIN AMERICANWAR MOVES
INTO  ©SToawittBtfSS wineosMnwD mjBB  Supertankers  Oil and
Puget's perils  byDAVE SHANNON  The tanker had the best in navigational
aids and steering; she also  carried 118,000tons of crude oil. She went
aground in broad daylight  with good visibility on a well-charter shoal. 
She isbetter known as the Torrey Canyon and her tragic spill on  the
English coast in 1967 put the oil industryinto the spotlight of  public
opinion.  What has happened in the five years which have passed since
theTorrey Canyon disaster? Have clean-up procedures improved? What  about
navigational aids and strengthof hull construction, have they  improved? 
These and many other questions are troubling the people of the Puget Sound
region. There are now four refineries within the confines  of the sound. 
Texaco and Shell are at Anacortes, and Mobil and ARCO are  located near
Cherry Point. Also, Standard Oil owns land nearCherry  Point, and will
probably build a refinery there someday.  To determine the probability of a
spill inthe sound, we must  examine the tankers that will transport crude
oil.  ARCO's tankers which will makethe Valdez-Puget Sound run, will  weigh
120,000 tons and carry 940,000 barrels of crude oil from theNorth Slope.
They will have single bottoms, not double bottoms, and  will have
single-screw drive.  Single-screw, or single-propeller drive gives a ship
less maneuvering  ability than a double-screw drive. This is animportant
consideration  since the tankers must pass through Rosario Strait to reach
Cherry  Point. Thisstrait narrows to a width of one and a half miles at one
 point, and is never more than six miles wide at any location.  Add to this
the fact that the ARCO tanker has a minimum  stopping distance from cruise
speedof about one mile. This distance is  achieved by "slaloming" the ship
from side to side in order to increase the drag. Due to the narrow
characteristic of Rosario Strait, this  "slaloming" may not be possible and
thedistance needed to stop  would then be increased. Tidal currents and
weather also affect  stoppingdistance.  Maneuvering speed of the 120,000
ton tankers would be about 5  knots, and thus the stoppingdistance from
this speed would be less  than that from cruise speed. However a ship which
has beensuccessfully stopped is then quite vulnerable to tidal currents,
which  can exceed 2 knots in RosarioStrait.  The list of tanker
shortcomings and possible dangers of oil  transport goes on and on. By now
youcan tell that the problem is one  of immense magnitude which will not
"go away."  It might appear thatsmaller tankers are a lesser danger, since
they  are more maneuverable and carry less oil. Not so, saysKerryn King, a 
vice-president of Texaco.  . He claims that a few very large tankers would
be safer thanmany  smaller tankers. The more tankers required to transport
a given  amount of oil,- the greater thechance of .a.spill, according to
King, -  His point is well-taken,. however the facts still remain
thatsupertankers are single-hulled, difficult to maneuver, and carry about 
thirteen times as much oil as the T-2 tanker in common use today. In  fact,
if only one oil storage tank in the ARCO supertanker were to 
spill',approximately three million gallons would be released; this is 
one-half of the total carrying capacity of a T-2 tanker and ten times  the
amount spilled in the spring of 1971 at the Texaco refinery in  Anacortes. 
1suppose the decision to use supertankers has been made by a  cost-benefit
analysis, but how did anyoneput a price tag on the  precious biological
bank of the Puget Sound? The sound is essentially  a closedsystem, unlike
the ocean, and if a major spill were to occur,  oil could remain within the
sound for years,hampering biological  activity and recreational usage.  The
stakes are high in this game and the oilindustry needs to be  strictly
controlled by responsible government agencies on both sides  of the border
ifthe Puget Sound is going to survive the effects of  man's addiction to
oil products.  Finally, after severallocal oil spills we are starting to
see  government action; but we should continue to see more action.
Themeeting of Washington state Governor Dan Evans and British  Columbia
Premier W. A. C. (Wacky)Bennett was healthy, but has  absolutely no legal
significance since the national governments were  notinvolved.  Unlimited
liability is a badly needed, but absent, feature of oil  laws. With this
type of liability theoil companies would be required  to pay the full cost
of an oil spill, no matter how high these costs run.Man has no right to
jeopardize the health of the Puget Sound in  the name of an expensive and
dirty habit. Editor's Note: This is the second article in a series of
three—next week  spill clean-up procedures will
beinvestigated.  Western's award-winning Front  EDITOR: Lyn Watts  MANAGING
EDITOR: Marie HaugenCOPY EDITORS: Kathi Sandboe  Steve Garvey  PHOTO
EDITOR: Jay Eckert  PHOTOGRAPHER: DaveShannon  BUSINESS MANAGER: Terri
Whitney  AD MANAGER: Steffi Bruell  GRAPHICS: MerileeBeckley  Janis Brown 
^ R T ^ S f ^ n ^ f n c ^ ^   V v n Beorse. McKinney Morris, Nei,  Mullen,
Steve Neff,Sandi Rouse Lysa Wegman , _  The Western Front is the official
newspaper of Western WashingtonState College. Editorial opinions are those
of the writer.  Entered as second class postage at Bellingham,Washington
98225. The  Front is represented by NEAS, New York.  Regular issues are
published onTuesdays. Composed in the Western  orint shop and printed at
the Lynden Tribune.  NEWSROOM: 676-3161, VU 313, VU 309  ADVERTISING PHONE:
676-3160



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     Western Front - 1972 July 18 - Page 3



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Tuesday, July 18, 1972 Western Front 3  Where are the Hitchies now? 
Hitchies are criss-crossing thecountry, and enjoying the  scenery from
Illinois to San  Francisco.  What is a hitchie? It's a  woodenreplica of a
hitchhiker  created by John Ramm, a  ' Western art major.  When hitchhiking
was  legalized inWashington on May  23, Ramm started 12 hitchies on  trips
to various destinations in  the United Statesand Canada.  The hitchies have
a pocket  full of postcards on their backs,  and people who give them rides
 are asked to send Ramm a card  informing him of his offsprings'  progress.
 Ramm said presently he has heard from eight of his hitchies.  Naomi Grunt
got to San  Francisco a week after she left  Washington.Senworthy is 
resting in Evanston, Illinois after -  a long ride across the nation.  Drew
spend a week at anauto  body shop in McCleary,  Washington learning the
trade.  , Ernie is on the Trans-Canada  Highway.He crossed the border  at
Sumas and evidently had  quite a bit of trouble proving his  citizenship.
Rammsaid the card  he received states that Ernie had  - "quite a hassle"
crossing the  border.  Ramm said he isvery much  against the new referendum
to  once again make hitchhiking .  illegal. He said he is thinking .about
making a "whole bunch"  of hitchies as caricatures of  political figures
like President  Nixon andChicago's Mayor  Richard Daley.  Letters to  the
editor  Prof. Hicks  gives reply  Editor, The WesternFront:  The story by
your reporter  Lysa Wegman in your issue of  July 11 on the Faculty Geyser
isnothing if not sophomoric. She  may be Miss (or is it Ms?)  Worldly
Wise-woman of the  Campus, but sheshows precious  l i t t l e understanding
of the  complex workings of the  government of the college.  As amatter of
fact, the  Faculty Council's request of  June 5 that the Board of  Trustees
call for the resignationof President Flora—an action 
taken only 11 days after the  council's decision to poll the  f a c u l t
y—was indecently  precipitate and represented the  b a n
k r u p t c y of educational  statesmanshipamong the small  majority of the
council that  voted "yes."  The decision to poll was itself  of
dubiouswisdom. The  circulation of petitions among  the faculty might well
have  prompted the council to set upmachinery for negotiation  between the
president and the  faculty. The results of the poll  a l l the more c le a
r ly  demonstrated the need for such  machinery. Instead, the council  with
amazing shortsightednessvoted in the final week of the  academic year to
vacate the  office of the president. One may  well wonder ifthe council had
 any awareness that Western has a  future, not to speak of a past.  C o n f
l i c t betweenthe  president and the faculty is no  new development at
Western. I  have myself lived through two  periods of such conflict. In
each  of these the faculty through its  leaders initiated negotiations 
with the president,and the two  parties managed to establish a  modus
vivendi that did not  disrupt the administration of the  in s t i t u t i o
n and in itself  represented something like a  meeting of minds and a 
resolution ofgrievances.  The more recent of these  conflict situations
occurred  during the first year of James L.Jarrett's presidency in the
winter  and spring of the academic year  1959-60. Only two of the  members
ofthe Faculty Council  of June 5 were on the campus at  that time. This
fact may explain  in part the woefullack of  f o r e s i g h t and
especially  hindsight in their action. The  Faculty Council should have 
Group to seek info  on Council request  The circumstances leading to  the
Faculty Council's request for  theresignation of College  President Charles
J. Flora will be  investigated by an ad-hoc  committee of the All-College 
Senate.  The Board asked the Senate,  the principal campus legislative 
body, composed offaculty,  students and staff, to investigate  the facts
leading to the Faculty  Council request.  The Senatedecided during its 
meeting on July 10. to form a  nine-man committee of five  faculty members,
including a  professor emeritus, two students  and one member each from the
 staff and administration.  The methodof choosing the  . members of the
committee was  not decided.  It was agreed by the Senate  that thetime for
researching the  report will extend past the date  of the Board's meeting
in  August.  Theformulation of the  committee was to be concluded  at the
special Senate meeting on  July 17.  Photo byRON GRAHAM  known that in
1959-60 the new  president showed a perverse  ingenuity in alienating
hisfaculty and by the middle of the  year had created a crisis in  faculty
morale.  Something had to be done.Expressions of hostility by the 
circulation of petitions were not  thought of, though hostility to 
thepresident was rampant.  There was no suggestion of  polling the faculty
or requesting  t h e Board ofTrustees  t o fire the p r e s i d e n t. 
Instead, the existing machinery  of negotiation between thepresident and
the faculty was  brought into action. A special  meeting of the AAUP
chapter  was held onFebruary 8, 1960 at  which a fourteen point  statement
of grievances was  presented and debated and acommittee appointed to
discuss  the morale question with the  president. On March 2 the 
presidentappeared before a  meeting of the chapter and  entered into
fruitful dialogue  with a large and representative  group of the faculty.
On May 24  the Faculty Forum passed a  resolution to take up questions  of
tenureand promotion with  the president. On June 6 a newly  elected Faculty
Council met,  organized, andreadied itself for  negotiation with the
president.  By Commencement Day the air  had already begun toclear and  the
machinery for continuing  negotiation with the president  had been set up. 
By the opening of Fall  quarter 1960 the president and  the. faculty were
able to take up  the work of the new academic  year in a cooperative
spirit, and  this hard won relationship of  h a r m o n y and mutual 
understandingprevailed until the  e n d of Dr. J a r r e t t 's 
administration four years later.  Notable in all this strugglewas the
resolution of both  president and faculty to resolve  it without recourse
to the Board  of Trustees,which in my  opinion should be appealed to  only
as a last resort. The Faculty  Council of June 5 grosslyerred  in going to
the board as a first  resort.  Arthur C. Hicks  Emeritus Professor of
English  THREEDOORS  SOUTH  OF  SHAKEY'S  ON ~-  N. STATE ST.  AARDVARK 
Backs   Arts  The Prisoners ofSex Ms.$1  The Foxfire Book Back to Eden  The
Mother Earth News In Time With The Infinite  The Lotusand the Robot  open
till 9 p.m. every week night  Fast Paced Fun-Filled  SHAKESPERIAN
COMEDYWestern Theatre Summer Stock  Playing at Sehome High School  July 19,
20,21   22 8:15 p.m.  Ticketsat V.U. desk  Reduced rate Season ticket at
V.U. desk.  All seats reserved in advance Ph. 676-3873BELLINGHAM MALL 
733-2860  NEW  IMAGE  9731GHWW00D =  SU 3-2277 =  How's your protein?1950*s
which brought us Sputnik   the World of  Space also bequeathed us the
knowledge that the  hairwas 97% protein   not as it was previously 
supposed - cakfr"«n While our-astronauts   spacescientists were
receiving accolades for their  acheivements, men like Dr. Linus Pauling of
the  Cal. Inst, ofTech.   Dr. Fred- great strides in knowledge of  . erick
Sanger of Cambridge  were receiving Nobel awards in Chemistry for their
studies  of Protein and the tracings of  sequence of certain Amino  acid
changes.The acheivements  of these men while less  newsworthy than those of
their  fellows in space were noless  important, utilizing the study  of
men, science has made  the structure of hair and in  compoundingits
products that,  are chemically compatible  with the protein structure of 
hair. Modern chemistry hasthus made it possible for us  at the INjiWlLfaAGE
to literally  .reconstruct daritaged de-  gt;  pleted hairstructure; and
keep  it in- a strong healthy state  through the use of scientifically 
compoundedproducts^ '  S  E  S  m  s  I  m  • * ,  I  =We
Use And Recommend RK Aci  {Balanced Organic ProteinPro  50*OFF ON ANY 
LARGE  OR  GIANT  PIZZA  EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT WITH STUDENT I.D.CARD 
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Portland /77-1461  L ~^S  West 6th   Grant.  Eugene 343-6113



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     Western Front - 1972 July 18 - Page 4



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4 Western Front Tuesday, July 18, 1972  San Juan beauty ever-changing 
Photos and story  by SANDIROUSE  People from all over enjoy  the beauty and
peacefulness of  the San Juan Islands each year.Some make their homes 
there. For the rest of us there  are several ways to enjoy the  islands.
You cantake a tour  from the air, spend a leisurely  afternoon
island-hopping on the  ferry, or if you're lucky travelon your own boat. 
Regardless of how you travel,  take a camera and plenty of  film. You may
be luckyenough  to spot a pod of killer whales  diving in the waves. That
brown  "log" that keeps bobbing under  the water close to shore can  easily
turn out to be a sea lion  fishing.  The changing combinations  of
islands,water and sky create  scenes that challenge anything  Hollywood has
to offer. And  you haven't seen asunset until  you see the San Juans  s i l
h o u e t t e d against the  red-orange sky.  Fish, clams,oysters, crabs 
and shrimp are plentiful and fun  to catch. The salmon fishing is 
world-famous. If you catch  anything unfamiliar, it is usually  a good idea
to check it out with  one of the local fishermen  before youeat it.  Since
there are 172 islands in  the San Juans, it would take a  long time to do
everything and  seeeverything they have to  offer. However, there are a few
 places you don't want to miss  when you start out.  San Juan Island is the
home  of the famous "Pig War," where  in 1858, the shooting of a pig  owned
bythe Hudson's Bay  Company by an American settler  almost started a war
between the  United States and Britain.  The old English and  American
campsites have been  made into a National Historical  Park. Thisyear is the
hundredth  anniversary of the settlement of  the dispute.  The islanders
are celebrating  it with a "Pig War" Centennial,  which lasts until
September,  with events every weekend. One  of the highlightswill be the 
Rendezvous, which will be held  July 29, at Friday Harbor.  While . you're
in Friday  DeceptionPass-Spanning Fidalgo and Whidbey Islands. Just over
the bridge is the entrance to the state park.Harbor, a nice side trip is a
visit  to the University of Washington  Institute of Oceanography.
Theirlaboratories are maintained for  teaching and research in marine 
biology and related fields.  It is knowninternationally  for its scientific
program.  Scientists and students from all  over the world gather
here.During the summer session, it is  open to the public from 2 to 4  p.m.
on Wednesdays and  Saturdays.Across the channel from  Friday Harbor is
Orcas Island,  the largest of the San Juans.  Mo ran State Park, with an
area  of more than 4,000 acres is  located here.  You can drive t o i h e
summit  of Mt.Constitution, the highest  point in the San Juans for an 
unparalleled view of the »San  Juans, theCanadian Gulf Islands 
and the Cascade Mountains on  the mainland.  Cascade Lake, which is in
thepark, offers some of the best  trout fishing in the state. Picnic 
areas, campsites and trails are  abundant.If you travel to the islands by 
ferry, you will stop at both San  Juan and Orcas Islands, plus  Shaw
andLopez Islands.  The ferry leaves from  .Anacortes on Fidalgo Island. To 
get to Anacortes, take the Mt.Vernon exit on Interstate 5 and  then take
State Highway 536 to  the Anacortes Ferry Terminal.  CampusBriefs  Student
advisors needed for fail  The 1972 Orientation Committee is putting
together the StudentAdvisor staff for next year's freshmen.  As an advisor
you would: get to know the fifteen-or-so members ofyour freshman group,
serve as a general counselor and sounding board,  facilitate registration,
introducefreshmen to their new environment,  provide academic advisement
during the year.  The job will beginduring the September 23-26 Orientation
days.  There will be optional contacts with group membersthroughout the 
year, particularly during pre-registration time each quarter.  In order to
help advisorsthemselves feel comfortable, three  training sessions are
planned-July 18, August 1, and September  2 3 -t o further delineate
responsibilities and to provide needed  resources.  It's a challenging job,
and peopleare needed. Those interested  should contact the Assistant Dean
of Students Office, OM 2.  Seattle CityLight tour of Ross Lake sponsored
Sunday  A Western-sponsored Seattle City Light tour of Ross Lake will take 
place this Sunday, July 23.  The tour bus will leave from in front of the
VU at 11 a.m., and will  return at approximately 8 p.m. The tour cost of $5
includes dinner,  transportation and the boat tour of RossLake.
Participants should eat  a late breakfast or bring a sack lunch as dinner
will be served in the  lateafternoon.  Tickets will be on sale this week at
the VU desk.  "Much Ado About Nothing" startsWednesday  Western Theatre is
presenting William Shakespeare's "Much Ado  About Nothing" tomorrowevening
at Sehome High School's little  theatre. The play will run through
Saturday, July 22.  "The basicmotivation of the play is youthful," said
director  Dennis Catrell in reference to the strains of playful love and
energy of  "Much Ado."  The story unwinds through a series of false
accusations, suspicions,  andrevelations towards the climax.  "Much Ado
About Nothing" is a well-told love story, and telling  the storyis
Catrell's primary concern.  You may see some familiar faces from "Guys and
Dolls" in "Much  Ado" buthopefully not the same characters. Tickets are
available at  the Viking Union information desk and theticket office.
676-3873.  Events  Friday Harbor, San Juan Island-Canadian and American
flags fly side byside at the customs dock.  TODAY-  12:30 p.m.: "Born
Free," Lecture Hall 4, 25 cents.  TOMORROW-8:15 p.m.: "Much Ado About
Nothing," Sehome High School, Summer  Stock, tickets at VU informationdesk.
 THURSDAY-  7 p.m.: "Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors," Lecture Hall 4,
students 75  cents,general $1.25.  8:15 p.m.: "Much Ado About Nothing." 
FRIDAY-Noon  and 3 p.m.: Children's Play,Theatre Guild.  8:15 p.m.: "Much
Ado About Nothing."  SATURDAY-  8 a.m.: Boston Basin Back Pack,overnight,
meet at Outdoors Program, VU  304.  Noon and 3 p.m.: Children's Play.  8:15
p.m.: "Much AdoAbout Nothing."  SUNDAY-  6:30 p.m. and 9 p.m.: "Last
Summer," Lecture Hall 4, 50 cents.  Ross LakeTour, see VU information
desk.



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     Western Front - 1972 July 18 - Page 5



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Tuesday, July 18, 1972 Western Front 5 i  Computer staff to quit over
salaries  by LYN WATTS  Fourmembers of the  Computer Center staff including
 the director have announced  their resignations, and to at least  three of
them inadequate salaries  played a major role in their  decisions to leave.
 Computer Center Director  Robert Holz; Assistant Director  for
Administration Dave  Schlecht, Programmer Jack  Veenstra,and Systems
Analyst  Doug Winterburn have all  indicated they will be vacating  Dave
Schlecht, assistantdirector of the computer center.  Jack Veenstra,
programmer at the computer center.  Mr. Toad strikesagain  "The Art and
Artistry of Toad and Company," is the title of the  second discussion of
the book of the quarter, "The Wind in the  Willows," by Kenneth Grahame, at
4 p.m. tomorrow in the library  presentationroom.  Panel members include
Lois Meyers, children's librarian for the  Bellingham Public Library;
HowardHarris of the anthropology  department, Gene Vike of the art
department and William Scott,  documentslibrarian and moderator of the
discussion.  their Computer Center positions  before next January.  Holz
who has been the  Center's director since 1967, is  resigning effective
Nov. 1.  "I'm just tired of the job,"  saysHolz, who has been  struggling
for several years to  raise the salaries of the  Computer Center staff.
Hesays  "it's time for me to step down  and give someone else a chance"  to
tackle the salary crisis.  Holzcites lack of support  for higher education
in the state  government at Olympia^ as a  s p e c i f i c reasonfor the 
inadequate salaries in the  C o m p u t e r Center and  throughout Western,
but also  s a y s hebelieves some  administrators in the college  hierarchy
may hold some  responsibility.  He says thatwages outside  the college in
the computer  p r o g r a m m i n g field have  skyrocketed in recent
years,and  "we haven't been able to keep  pace." This he says, coupled 
with a dim financial future for  Western,could be the cause for  the
announced resignations in  the Computer Center, and also  for
otherresignations which he  expects will soon be announced.  .Holz will
continue to work  part' time at Westernafter his  resignation becomes
final,  probably working on Can-Am I,  a proposed computer system  linking
Northwest Washington  and some British Columbia  colleges.  Schlecht, who
has been at  Western since 1963, states that  part of his reason tor
leaving is  because Holz is.  "I've planned to resign for  some time, but
Bob's (Holz' )  resignation caused me to act,"  Schlect said. He said he'd
only  planned to stay atWestern for  about 10 years when he first  came.
"I've been here nine years  already " he said.  Schlechtalso says a major 
reason for his decision to resign  is inadequate salaries. "It's been  a
sore point for acouple of  years. . . . It's been a year and a  half since
we've had a substantial  raise."  A l t h o u g hactually an  a d m i n i s
t r a t o r , Schlecht is  currently being paid a civil  service wage, and
is beingpaid  l e s s money a c t i n g as  administrator than several of
the  people working under him.  "Anytimeadministrators make  less than the
people they  administer, something's really  wrong," he says.  "I thinkthis
money problem  is the college's fault. . . . there  seems to be money
around for  new programs, butnot for  raising salaries."  Schlecht plans to
go into the  real estate business, mainly  because "I've wanted to have my 
own business for a long time."  Jack Veenstra says he's  leaving Western
for several  r e a so n s . No room for  advancement in the Computer 
Center as it now exists, the  resignation of Holz andlack of  a substantial
salary have all  convinced him to find another  job.  Veenstra also says
there is nolonger any room for innovative  work in the Center, because the 
360 computer is being used to  itsmaximum level, and there is  no chance of
the Center  obtaining a new machine in the  immediate future.He will be
leaving for  Boulder, Colorado to work on  what he calls a "statistical 
package" for NEODATA,and  will be getting "about a 20 per  cent raise" in
wages in the  process.  Systems Analyst DougWinterburn has also announced 
his resignation, but is currently  on vacation and unavailable forcomment. 
Robert Holz, director of the computer center.  Photo by LYN WATTS !
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     Western Front - 1972 July 18 - Page 6



     ----------



6 Western Front Tuesday, July.18, 1972  Health center negotiates 
relocation at St. Luke's  by BRYNBEORSE  Unsatisfactory facilities,  . more
effective use of available  funds and changing student  r e s i de n c e
patterns have  motivated the probably move of  Western's health services to
St.  Lukes.  However,the move is not  scheduled soon, according to Dr. 
Kenneth Jernberg, director of  health services. Though"active 
negotiations" are under way, the  clinic in Edens Hall will be. open  as
usual this fall.  The Edenshall facility has  been found to be
architecturally  unsuitable for use as a clinic  because of its
lowearthquake  resistance, inadequate running  water and ventilation,
reasons  related to the fact it was never meant to be used for medical 
purposes.  Dr. Jernberg called the  facility inadequate to handle
thepresent number of patients, as  well as unsuitable for practicing  the
best possible health care.  But withinthe $106,000 a  year budget of the
health center,  few alternatives are available.  Rental of space at
St.Luke's,  where x-ray and lab facilities  already exist, is favored by
Dr.  Jernberg. Duplication of these  andother facilities on campus  would
be avoided and personnel  would be available more hours.  He said
theprospective  college clinic at St. Luke's would  still be free to
students and  separate from the publichospital  organization.  Concerning
student access to  the new location he noted the  movement of themajority
of  s t u d e n t s off campus  concentrating just north of the  college.
St. Luke's would be  closerto many of these people  than the present
location.  In addition, a shuttle bus is in  the planning stagebetween the 
campus and downtown. If it  materializes, access would be  i m p r o v e d
for on-campusstudents.  Western's health services are  funded at
approximately half:  the per-student levels of Centraland Eastern
Washington state  colleges, and even a smaller  beHingham  business 
machines  1410Commercial 734-313?  Dr. Kenneth Jernberg bandages Robert
Walker.  fraction of the University ofWashington's expenditures.  That's
$10-11 a year for Western,  and $23-24 for Eastern and  Central perstudent.
 One full time and two part  time doctors are paid out of  Western's health
budget, along  withregistered nurses and  receptionists. The facility is 
supplied as best as possible.  Antigens (allergymedicine) aire  kept in a
refrigerator without a  h a n d l e that was found  somewhere in Edens
hall.Jernberg said he doesn't feel  Western's level of funding for  health
services reflects the  Photo by JAYECKERT  proper priorities of such an 
institution.  Those who have waited in  line there may agree.  . Atpresent,
after your wait  you can get "treatment of acute  problems, preventative
health  measures andhealth education,"  if you are a student who pays  full
tuition at Western.  The Edens' clinic waiting  roomhas a colorful collage
on  the wall, a suggestion box, lots  .of magazines and a scavenged  couch.
It isfriendly and  cheerful, mostly the work of the  staff, and often
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$.75; General$1.25  Program notes available at the V.U. I nformation Desk



     ----------



     Western Front - 1972 July 18 - Page 7



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Tuesday; July 18; 1972 Western Front 7  Have a drink on science  Photos and
story by  KATHISANDBOE  Some people's dream would  be to sit around for a
couple of  hours in the afternoon and havesomeone buying them drinks.  If
you are one of these  people then Corbin Ball will  make your dreamcome
true.  Plus, he'll pay you for it.  B a l l is co n d u c t i ng 
psychological experiments on  the effectsof alcohol on  learning. The
experiments are  looking for physiological  correlates on how learning
isaffected by alcohol.  The experiment takes  two-and-one-half hours for
two  consecutive days. Thevolunteer  spends the first hour drinking an 
alcoholic beverage and an hour  and a half taking tests.  Thesubject is
kept naive  about what or how much he is  drinking for the sake of the 
experiment.  While thesubject is drinking  electrodes which lead to a 
polygraph machine are attached  to certain parts of thesubject's  body: the
scalp, the forehead,  ear, thumb and fingertips.  The polygraph takes
several  p h y s io l o g i c a l graphs  simultaneously. It measures 
brain waves, heart rate, heart  rate variability, palmsweating, 
respiration and the amount of  blood in the fingers. All these  responses
are measured forphysiological changes.  The e x p e r i m e n t s are 
supported by a grant from the  National Institute onAlcohol  Abuse and
Alcoholism and are  under medical supervision.  Directing the experiments
is  itsoriginator, Dr. Lowell Crow,  of the psychology department.  Ball
was asked by Crow to be his  researchassistant because of his  interest in
the polygraph.  Subjects are paid $6 to  participate in the experiment.
Screening requirements include  that the subject is 21, and that  he has
had experience with  alcohol. I.D. is required.  Great care is taken with
the  subject. He may stop drinking  any time he wishes. "Ourprimary concern
is for the  subject's welfare; the experiment  is secondary to that," Ball
said.  Subjects are always driven  home and are required to stay at  home
for at least four hours, or  until the effect wears off. A n y o n e
interested in  participating can contact Ball  through the psychology
office or  at his office, 400 Miller Hall for  more information. 
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     Western Front - 1972 July 18 - Page 8



     ----------



8 Western Front Tuesday, July 18,1972  Western to join computer  link-up if
finances allow  Western,along with 13 other  colleges and universities in 
W a s h i n g t o n and British  Columbia, is attempting toset  up a
computer network, FM  radio and helicopter link.  T h e U n i t e d States 
government is beingasked for  $7.5 million to set up the  p r o g r a m ,
called Project  Cam-Am-I. Western hopes to  attainoperational costs for the
 first five years through the U.S.  Office of Education, or a  separate
appropriation.  Advocates of Can-Am-I say  that the participating schools 
will be able to take over  operative costs in the sixth year  the program
is functioning.  The computer network and  radio station would enable 
schools toshare computer-a  s s i s t e d instruction and  educational
broadcasts. The  helicopter shuttle servicewould  allow freer movement of 
professors, guest speakers and  learning materials.  Over 64,000
studentswould  benefit from the program,  hopefully scheduled to begin 
this fall. Herbert Taylor, dean of  facultyresearch, said that  September
would be the earliest  date funding could be obtained.  Taylor said hehopes
the  shuttle service can begin this fall  on a trial basis with borrowed  i
helicopters.  Experimentalcourses can be  operating one year after funding 
is obtained, Taylor said.  Conceivably, the project couldbe running at top
efficiency by  September,-1974.  T h e t e c h n i q u e of  computerized
teaching is more  effective in teaching subjects  t h a t r e q u i r e
much  memorization, Taylor said.  "For example, astudent can  learn to
speak a foreign language  m o r e q u i c k l y using  computer-assisted
instruction.We make no pretence that this  by itself can become higher 
education, but we do say it can  handle thematerial that depends  on drill
and rote learning,"  Taylor added.  The FM radio station, to be  located
inBellingham, will be  able to broadcast over a radius  of 65 miles, Taylor
said.  Transmission towers couldbe  built on one of the San Juan  Islands. 
Included in the plan with  Western are the University of  BritishColumbia,
Simon Fraser  University, the University of  Victoria, Vancouver City 
College, Capilano College, Douglas College, Camosun  College in Victoria,
Malaspina  College in Nanaimo, and  Washingtoncommunity colleges  in
Ferndale, Mount Vernon, Port  Angeles, Everett and Edmonds.  Taylor said
thatputting the  project into operation would be  a major step toward
cutting  waste of money and space."Ultimately, what we're  really concerned
with is that  t h e r e are universities and  colleges so close toeach
other  who communicate very little, if  at all," Taylor said.  Mental
Health resources available•P9*PPP9*a  ETT  EDMONDS  The
ages 18 to 21 may be the  most confusing period of a  collegestudent's
life; a time  when many students feel they  need the help of one of the 
campus referral services. The problem of mental  health and the college
student  was investigated last quarter by  Margo VanWinkle, a Huxley 
College environmental health  graduate.  For a project in health  education
sheinterviewed Mary  Robinson, the associate dean of  s t u d e n t s ; the
Rev. Paul  Mangnano at theCampus  Christian Ministry house; and  Saundra
Taylor, director of the  counseling center.  Thediscussions went on the 
premise that everyone is  susceptible to ups and downs-in  t h e i r mental
state. The  counselors all agreed that these  types of mental anxieties
were  ' normal and natural occurrencesof any human being.  Basically, the
ministers at  CCM point out to the student  that they cannot solve
hisproblems for him. A student has  t o do it himself, Father  Mangnano
said.  Saundra Taylor refers to theages of 18 to 21 as a transitional 
period. "Students start settling  down in their sophomore and  junioryears
and start asking  themselves about their future."  It is a common complaint
 these days to find outthat  friends who recently graduated  with bachelor
or master's  degrees are now working at low  payingjobs, with a high school
 education as the maximum  requirement.  Although the discussion with 
MaryRobinson was confidential,  she also agreed with the  counselors that
too much  emphasis is put on beinghappy,  content and very sure of a 
position in society.  This tends to depress a  person who is questioning 
himself because he may think  there is something wrong with  him.  A person
is not going to be  happyuntil he recognizes that it  is necessary to reach
out in order  to achieve a good mental  attitude. A personmust become 
involved insomething other than  himself, he said.  Of the cases seen by
the  counselingcenter last year, the  majority were emotional  problems
followed by vocational  and educational problems. The counseling center 
provides a resource for students  who want to examine more  thoroughly "who
they are and  where they are going, Taylor  said.  "It's important that
college  students realize everyone feelsdown at times. People have to  stop
thinking these problems are  their exclusively. Everyone goes  through it,"
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