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     Western Front - 1998 October 30 - Page 1

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iNSMmmmmmiB^mm  WESTERN WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY  FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30,1998 
VOLUME206 ISSUE 10 BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON  George Gerschwin remembered 
Front/Erin Fredrichs  Leon Bates plays piano at "Gershwin By Requesf'We^ 
was accompanied by Bass-Baritone BenjaminMatthews and Soprano Sebrbneite
Barnes. vfh^ trio has performed  in more than 150 concerts and willtour
dozens of states for its 10th season. The concert was part of  the
Performing Arts Center Series,which includes eight events throughout the
year.  Minimum-wage hike gets support  By Matt Williams  The Western Front 
A meager crowd of 17 trickled into  Wilson Library Presentation Room at 7 
p.m. Thursday night for an Initiative 688  speech.  The presentation,
sponsored by Cesar  Chavez Student Organizationfor Labor  Solidarity and
the Peace Resource Center,  featured President of the Whatcom Labor 
CouncilDavid Warren and Community  Organizer for United Farm Workers of 
America, AFI-QO Anne Atkeson."The workers in this country are just  getting
screwed," Warren said, setting  the atmosphere for theevening.  1-688 aims
to raise Washington state's  hourly minimum wage from $4.90 to  $5.70 in
1999 andagain to $6.50 in 2000.  The minimum wage would, from 2000  on, be
linked with the Consumer PriceIndex, which measures the cost of living, 
Warren said, meaning that the minimum  wage will rise in unison with the
cost of  living.  "The whole nation is watching us,"  Warren said.  This is
the first time anyone has tried  linking the minimum wage and the CPI,  he
added. -'-, •  The opposition to 1-688 comes from the
Restaurant Association and the  Independent Business Federation. Small 
business owners andrestaurateurs claim  that 1-688 will indirectly hurt
workers by  raising inflation and causing layoffs,  Warrensaid.  Warren
disagreed.  "Business is extremely shortsighted. If  you can pay (workers)
more, they will be  able to put more into the economy," he  said. 
According to literature provided at the  presentation, theWashington state
minimum  wage is $4.90 per hour, and the federal  minirnum wage
— applying tobusinesses  that sell products outside of
the  state — is $5.15 per hour.  "Washington state has
thelowest minimum  wage of' the. entire west coast,"  Atkeson said. 
Visuals displayed during the program stated that between 1980 and 1995,
minimum  wage increased 37 percent while  the CPI increased 85percent and
executive  pay increased 499 percent.  Minimum wage earners do the real 
work in thiscountry, said Jenny Martin,  coordinator of the Peace Resource 
Center.  "If everyone earning minimumwage  called a strike, this country
would be  screwed," Martin said.  'If d come to a screeching halt in
15minutes," Warren added.  1-688 will be on the ballots this Tuesday  and
absentee ballots must bepostmarked  before Election Day.  Newt receives 
mixed welcome  By Mia Penta  and Arvid HokansonThe Western Front 
Republicans greeted Newt Gingrich Tuesday night  at Bellingham's North wood
Hallwith a hearty chant  of "Newt, Newt, Newt ... " while a small but vocal
 group of protesters braved the rain,chanting "Stop  Republican war on the
family."  Gingrich's fund-raising trip to Bellingham pulled  in morethan
$12,500 for 2nd Congressional District  Rep. Jack Metcalf, who is in a
tightly contested race  withDemocratic opponent Grethe Cammermeyer. 
Gingrich and Metcalf attended a private reception  andcharity benefit at
the Best Western Heritage Inn  before the campaign fund-raising stop,
bringing in  $7,500 for the Skagit Community Action Council and  Whatcom
Opportunity Council.  Nearly 500 peopleattended the Metcalf fundraiser, 
including most of the Whatcom County Republican  candidates for
stateoffices.  Gingrich entertained the crowd for about 25 minutes, 
admitting at one point that his WifeMarianne  owns a shirt that proclaims
her "speaker of the  Gingrich house."  He spoke about politics,
too,claiming Republican  victories for accomplishments  such as the
balanced-budget  agreement and overhaul of  the Internal Revenue Service 
and welfare.  "Do you believe that if the  Democrats had stayed incontrol 
that we would have balr  anced the budget?" Gingrich  asked.  The audience
responded  with aresounding "No!"  Throughout his speech,  Gingrich
stressed traditional  Republican values, includingcutting taxes.  "No one
should have to pay more than 25 percent  of their income in state, federal
and local taxes combined,"  he said.  Western student Justin McKay came to
see Gingrich  and Metcalf because of their support of lower taxes  and
benefits for veterans. The event was McKay's  first political rally. 
"I'mhere for the experience. You never get the  whole speech
— just snippets on TV," McKay said.  Gingrichalso called
for modernization of government  technology, which he claimed will bring
efficiency  togovernment offices, and a funding increase  for the war on
drugs.  See Gingrich, page 3  GingrichUniversity presidents vow to fight
alcohol  ByNickHaney  The Western Front  Several presidents ofWashington
state universities and  government officials gathered in Olympia Wednesday
for a  ceremonydeclaring their commitment to combat alcohol  abuse among
college students.  The signing was attendedby state university presidents 
from Western, Central, Eastern, Washington State,  University ofWashington
and Evergreen State.  Representatives from the backbone of the new program
—  thePrimary Prevention and Wellness Center
— also attended.  Western President Karen Morse hosted
the signing of a  document that was created to address problems caused by 
the "inappropriate, unhealthyand illegal use of alcohol and  other drugs by
students," according to the Prevention and  Wellnessmission statement. 
Lieutenant Governor Brad Owen joined Morse and university  representatives
in aday-long meeting sharing ideas  and practiced theories in controlling
campus drinking.  After the officialsigning at the Legislative Building in 
Olympia, attendees were invited to a luncheon to gather  and discuss
effective abuse-prevejjtion practices.  They came together in the state
capital not to approve and  supporta fight against drinking, but to be
"vocal,  visible,and visionary" in their efforts to help students make 
andsustain individual decisions about their own alcohol  and drug abuse. 
"We view it as a public health issuerather than a legal  issue," said
Patricia Fabiano, director of the Primary  Prevention and Wellness Centerat
Western.  Fabiano said the center is absolutely not involved with  the
recent police crack-down oncollege parties. She said the  message the
police department is giving the public is that  Western'scommunity is a
bunch of uncontrollable drinkers.  The Prevention and Wellness center puts
its focus onthe  flipside of .a crackdown.  Fabiano said the center is more
interested in students'  progress in classesand prevention of causing harm
to themselves.  Western started its campaign almost a year ago; itfocuses 
on students' awareness of their own drinking habits as  well as common
misconceptions abouttheir peers' drinking  tendencies.  Last year, the
center was awarded a two-year $271,816  grant from theUnited States
Department of Education for  comprehensive alcohol and drug prevention
projects. ,  Sincethe grant was awarded, the center has noted a  change in
student behavior.  See Alcohol, page 5

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     Western Front - 1998 October 30 - Page 2

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2 • THE WESTERN FRONT NEWS October 30, 1998  Campus
Police:  Oct. 21, 5 p.m.: A studentreported the theft of her backpack and 
textbooks from the Student Co-op Bookstore. Her backpack andall but one of
her textbooks were recovered.  Oct. 23,12:52 a.m.: Officers responded to a
report of anintoxicated  person in the 600 block of High Street. The person
was transported  to the hospital by anaid crew.  Oct. 23, 10:50 a.m.: An
investigation of the theft of cash from a  Birnam Wood resident'sbedroom
lead to the arrest of a suspect.  She was issued an arrest citation for
theft in the third degree and  was released on her signed promise to appear
in Whatcom  County District Court.  Oct. 23,12:23 p.m.:The window of a car
in lot 4R was broken and  a car phone was stolen. The damage is estimated
at $150and the  stolen property at $150. Police have no suspects at this
time.  Oct. 23,12:32 p.m.: The window of a car in lot 4R was broken and  a
CD player was stolen. The property stolen was estimated at $300  andthe car
damage at $100.  Oct. 24,1:49 a.m.: A suspect was stopped for suspicion of
DUIin  the 2600 block on Bill McDonald Parkway. He was cited and  released
for the DUI, and his vehicle was impounded.  Oct.24, 4:20 a.m.: A young man
was reported to be intoxicated  and inside Stack 5 of Fairhaven. The man
was not a Western student.  He was confronted and became abusive toward an
officer;  he was arrested forassault in the third degree, disorderly
conduct  and indecent exposure. He was booked into WhatcomCounty Jail. 
Bellingham Police:  Oct. 23,2:19 p.m.: A suspect reported having trouble
with her son-inviting  several people to the house while she was at work.
She  requested all juveniles be given a trespasswarning if they are on  her
property when she is not present. Officers contacted the  woman and gave
herthe trespass slips.  Oct. 27,9:44 a.m.: A woman reported her purse and
$20 was stolen  from her unlocked car parked in front of the courthouse on
the 200  block of Lottie Street. Officers advised her to call herbank. 
Oct. 27,10:19 a.m.: A suspect was arrested for assault in the second 
degree based on an earlier incident in the 2800 block of  Douglas Avenue.
The suspect was booked into the County  Detentionfacility.  Oct. 27, 3:17
p.m.: A suspect was contacted at Railroad Avenue  and East Magnolia Street
andwas informed he was in violation of  the city's ordinance prohibiting
sitting and lying on the sidewalk.  Thesuspect was warned about the
behavior and the possible  results of future violations.  Compiled by
RobinShillings  religion. Several other inaccuracies from this story are
detailed in a letter to  IDENTIFICATIONSTATEMENT  Publication's Title: 
Statement of Frequency:  Authorized Organization's  name andaddress:  The
Western Front •  Published 2 x Weekly  The Western Front 
Western WashingtonUniversity  College Hall 110  Bellingham, WA 98225-9100 
Experience faculty art  "Review/Preview," awide  range of work representing
concepts  the art department faculty  has been pursuing in its ownstudios 
and exhibiting in venues  across the country, is showing at  the Western
Gallery.  Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 4  p.m. weekdays and noon to 4 p.m. 
Saturdays while the university is  in session. Thegallery is not open 
during holidays or holiday weekends.  Admission is free. For more 
information call650-3963.  Get a shot, not the flu  Flu shots are available
from 10  a.m. to 2 p.m. through Nov. 13 at  theStudent Health Center. 
Individuals must be 13 years of  age or older. Tickets must be
pre-purchased  for$10 at Western's  Plaza Cashier. For more information 
call 650-3400.  View local artists' work  VikingUnion presents  "Untitled,"
a juried student exhibit.  The exhibit is juried by  Bellingham-based
artistsC.A.  Scott and Patricia Zahorsky. An  opening reception will be
from 5  to 7 p.m. Oct. 28 in the VikingUnion Gallery. Gallery hours are 
Monday through Saturday 11 a.m.  to 4 p.m. Admission is free. Formore
information call 650-6534.  Viking volleyball vs.  Saint Martin's College 
Tiie^Viking volleyball team will  play Saint Martin's College 7:30  p.m.
Oct. 30 at Sam Carver  Gymnasium.  Village Books hostsHalloween festivities
 Village Books will host its second  annual All-Night for Literacy  event.
It willinclude live music,  games and Halloween candy  beginning at 10 p.m.
Oct. 31. A  minimum donation of$25 is  required. For more information  call
671-2626.  Jewish memories honored  The Northwest Center for  Holocaust
Education has organized  a memoriam of the 60th  anniversary of
Kristallnacht from  7 to 8p.m. Nov. 9 in the Viking  Union Main Lounge. It
will honor  the first night of violence aimed at  the Jews inGermany and
Austria.  Survivors of the Holocaust living  in Whatcom County will honor 
the memories offamily and  friends who perished.  Refreshments will be
provided  during the discussion following  thememoriam.  Group sessions
offered  Western's Counseling Center's  fall groups will include 
"EliminatingYour Self-Defeating  Behavior," Tuesdays from 3 to 5  p.m.;
"Meeting the Challenges of  Attention DeficitDisorder and  Learning
Disabilities," Tuesdays  from 12:15 to 1:45 p.m.; "Setting  New
Boundaries:Assertiveness  Training," Wednesdays from noon  to 2 p.m.;
"Stress Management  and RelaxationTraining,"  Wednesdays from 3 to 5 p.m.
For  more information call 650-3164.  Course teaches how tosafegaurd
property, home  "Burglar-Proof Your Home," an  adult-enrichment program
from  BellinghamParks and Recreation,  will be from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Nov. 10 
at the Fairhaven Pavilion. Learn to  evaluateyour home and take the 
necessary measures to safeguard  your home and property. The program 
isinstructed by Michael  Scanlon, Bellingham Police  Department Crime
Prevention  Officer. Pre-register byNov. 3. For  more information call
676-6985.  Election Day approaching  The Legislative and CommunityAffairs
Council will sponsor a  democratic rally at 3:30 p.m.  Sunday at Sehome
High School.  Originalplay performed  "The Good Person of  Szechwan,"
adapted by Tony  Kushner, will be performed at 7:30p.m. Nov. 6 at Western's
 Performing Arts Center Concert  Hall. The story portrays the dilemma  of
thehuman struggle: it is  pleasing to be kind, but only mercenaries 
prosper. Western's Mark  Huntzdirects, with original music  by faculty
member Lesley  Sommer; dance movement is by  faculty memberMelissa Rolnick,
 with masks by Gregory Lawrence.  For reservations call 650-3876. 
Admission is $10general and $6  students.  Get in Halloween spirit  "Rocky
Horror Picture Show"  will show at 7 and 9:15p.m. Oct.  30 in Fraser Hall
4. Admission  with a costume is $2 and $3 without  a costume. For
moreinformation  call 650-6130.  Compiled by Nadja Kookeshh 
||||HiB!iS®!M^8l  S^plIBiiili^Hliiiliii  WWUOfficial
Announcements  Deadline for announcements in this space is noon Friday for
the Tuesday editionand noon Wednesday  for the Friday edition.
Announcements should be limited to 50 words, typewritten or legibly
printed, and  sent through campus mail to "Official Announcements," MS
-9117, via fax to X/7287,or brought in  person to Commissary 113A. DO NOT
SEND ANNOUNCEMENTS DIRECTLY TO THEWESTERN FRONT.  Phoned announcements will
not be accepted. All announcements should be signedby originator.  PLEASE
POST  BIOLOGY ADD CODES must be picked up in Bl 315 Nov. 12-13 and usedby
the date on the add code slip or the add  code may be given to someone on
the class waiting list. _INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS AND EXCHANGES WILL HOST a
session on the International StudentExchange  Program at 4 p.m. Wednesday,
Nov. 4, in VU 408 and a National Student Exchange session at 4 p.m.  Nov. 5
in VA 461. Questions may be directed to X/3298 or stop by OM 530E. 
MATHPLACEMENT TEST. Registration is not required. Students must bring
picture ID and a No. 2 pencil. A feeof  $10 is payable in the exact amount
at time of testing. The test is timed for 60 minutes; however, allow90
minutes  for full administration. Testing will be at 9 a.m. in Old Main 120
as follows: Mondays — Nov.2, 9, 16, 23, 30, and  Dec. 7;
Thursdays — Nov. 5, 12, 19, Dec. 3 and 10.  AUAP IS
LOOKING FORPEOPLE who want to spend time with students from Tokyo
University's Asian University. As  "communityfriends," volunteers invite
exchange students into their homes once a month for four months
toexperience  different American lifestyles. For more information, call
X/3297.  BIKE SHOP CLINICS willbe held at the Outdoor Center Nov. 5, 9 and
17. For moreinformation, call X/7533.  THE MILLERANALOGIES TEST (MAT) will
be given at 2 p.m. in FR 4 on Nov. 17 and Dec. 15. Registration is
requiredin OM 120 or by calling X/3080. A fee of $35 is payable at the time
of the test. Testing takesapproximately 1V2 hours.  NEW SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM
FOR NON-TRADITIONAL STUDENTS.Eligible for this scholarship are displaced 
homemakers, dislocated workers, students who have been outof school at
least five years, students with dependents,  and students with disability.
Application deadlineis Nov. 16. For other eligibility criteria or more
details, see the  Scholarship Center, OM 260, or callX/3471.  TETEP (TEST
FOR ENTRANCE INTOTEACHER EDUCATION) will be given at 9 a.m. Monday,Jan. 4,
in FR_4.  Registration is required in OM 120. A $25 fee must be paid in the
exact amount at timeof registration. Testing takes  approximately 2Vi
hours.  WRITING CENTER SERVICES ANDRESOURCES are now available both in
person and online. Students may drop by  the center in WL 342,to the left
of the third floor reading room; sign up on the schedule; make an
appointment by  phone bycalling X/3219; or visit the Web site,
http://www.ac.wwu.edu/writepro.  JUNIOR WRITING EXAM. EffectiveJune 1,
1998, the Junior Writing Exam was discontinued. Students, however, still 
need to take a writingproficiency course to fulfill the graduation
requirements.  On-campus recruiting  Target Stores, Monday,Nov. 2. See
binder in Career Services Center library and submit resume and sign up for
interview in OM280.  K Mart Corp., Tuesday, Nov. 3. Submit resume in OM 280
at signup for interview.  Pacific CapitalResource Group, Tueday, Nov. 3.
Submit resume in OM 280 at signup for interview.  Andersen Consulting,
Thursday, Nov! 12. Preselect deadline for submitting cover letter, resume,
unofficial trascript andcompleted  application form to OM 280 is Nov. 3.

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     Western Front - 1998 October 30 - Page 3

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October 30, 1998 NEWS THE WESTERN FRONT • 3  What a drag,
man!  A bride-to-be suffered anervous  breakdown the night before  her
wedding on the Greek island  of Crete when she discovered the  groom,
dressed in her wedding  gown, in the arms of his best  man. The future
husband and  wife werecelebrating at separate  parties when the bride's
friends  asked to go see the wedding  dress at thecouple's home.  When they
arrived, they found  the gown-clad groom in a passionate  embrace with
thebest  man. The young woman has  been treated at a clinic, and the 
wedding has been canceled.Excuses, excuses  A man was •
sentenced last  week to two years in prison for  faking his death
threetimes to  beat drunk driving charges.  Peter Gentry was first arrested
in  1991, but an official-looking  death certificate sent to authorities 
said he had died in a Los  Angeles auto crash, and the case  wasdismissed.
In 1994, he was  arrested again and sent in another  death certificate. A
year later,  Gentrywas again arrested and  supposedly died this time of 
"denzor hemorrhagic fever" in  Africa. No suchdisease exists.  Convenient
Store?  Police in Fort Collins, Colo.,  charged Steven Peterson, 32, 
withrobbing the same 7-Eleven  twice in one day, telling the clerk  after
the second holdup that he  would beback in a few hours to  rob the place a
third time. True to  his word, he returned and was  arrested bydetectives
still in the  The Western Front takes a look at the weirder side of the
news  store investigatingthe second  robbery.  Unusual punishment  Larry
Blanchfield, 31, an  inmate serving a life term at theDelaware Correctional
Center,  was crushed to death when he  tried to escape in a garbage 
truck.Authorities explained it is  standard procedure for truck drivers  to
compact the trash they  pick upbefore leaving the  prison.  Death race 2000
 Tamika Ross, 26, is being held  for trial on charges of themurder  of
Nathaniel Davis. Apparently  Ross ran over Davis' hat with her  car. When
Davis confronted thedriver, a dispute erupted and  Davis allegedly hit
Ross. That's  when the mother of five took  matters intoher own hands and 
ran him over with her car, killing  him. When questioned, police  quoted
Ross assaying, "He hit  me, so I ran him down."  Clinton acrobatics 
inspire paintings  Indian artist Mohsin Shaikh recently painted the White 
House in blue, because the new  color represents President Bill 
Clinton'sintimate encounters  with Monica Lewinsky, he said.  "It (White
House) now resembles  a place ofpornographic  activities. That is why I
have colored  the White House in blue in  my painting," Shaikhtold 
Reuters. v  The 11-painting exhibition  depicting Clinton's affair with 
former White House internLewinsky is on display at a  gallery in New Dehli.
 One rendering depicts the  White House in blue, with anaked Clinton and
Lewinsky  embracing in the foreground.  Several of the paintings show 
Clintonconsumed in "wild  imaginations" about his former  intern. 
Clinton's behavior has been an  embarrassment to women all  over the world,
Shaikh said.  Backseat lover  At Vistahermosa, which means 
"beautifulview," visitors weren't  looking out over the ocean. About  50
people were peering into a  parked car towatch a naked couple  in the back
seat having sex.  Two officers waded through the  crowd and askedthe
42-year-old  man and an 18-year-old woman  to knock it off.  The lovers
covered themselves,  got out of the car and allegedly  hurled verbal abuse
arid fists at the  officers. Reinforcements showed  up, and thelovers were
taken  away in handcuffs.  Your brain on beer  A Kentucky man who
accidentally  shot andkilled his best  friend with a 22-caliber pistol 
when he took a dare to shoot a  beer can off his head isbeing held  on
murder charges. Witnesses  told police two men had been  drinking when the
friend posedthe dare and the victim took him  up on it.  He's a soul man 
Karim Lackey of Philadephia  was acquittedlast week of fatally  shooting
Philip Shirdan, 42, after  his lawyer claimed that Lackey  had been the
victimof "mistaken  identity." Two of Lackey's alibis  claimed they were
with him  watching the "Soul Train Music  Awards" on TV at the time 
Shirdan was killed in a lounge.  Lackey went free despite the fact  that
the"Soul Train Awards"  were not aired on TV that night.  Got a shoehorn? 
The new "baggy" condomproduced  by Mayer Laboratories in  Oakland, Calif.,
went on sale in  the Netherlands in May, butcompany  president David Mayer
said  it will be at least a year before it  gets FDA approval for sale
inthe  United States. The condom is  tighter at the base but otherwise 
much looser than currentcondoms,  providing "more sensation,"  Mayer said,
and sells for  about twice as much.  Compiled byDarcy Spann  HI8it 
|didh^t||;i^dS^€fss^  ffi^udmg?;'^^  ;;*aih|frhj^ 
lfgt;eopJe^f£^^  Ig/l'G^g^•|f^hge|:)Ki|l  p e
{ i o n | ;^  !|prea|t:B^  Established 1986  RAINBOW AUTO SERVICE  Larry E.
Watson Your Volvo Is My Specialty  Used  New Parts  (360)734-6117  Credit
Cards Accepted  Towing andShuttle Service  CHESTNUT--FAMILY PRACTICE  904
E. CHESTNUT ST. BELLINGHAM WA. 98225FAMILY HEALTH WOMENS HEALTH. SPORTS
MEDICINE  CONVENIENT TO WWU CAMPUS (A TBOTTOM OF HILL)  WE ACCEPT MOST
MEDICAL HEALTH PLANS.  PHILIP M.. ANDRES JR., DOBOARD CERTIFIED FAMILY 
PHYSICIAN  L.  BARBARA BALFOUR. ARNP  FAMILY NURSEPRACnONER  (360)671-4400 
JANA WILLIAMS, ARNP  WOMEN'S HEALTH  CARE  Jl via  VOTE THISTUESDAY...  AL
JENSEN  Candidate for the 42nd District House-DEMOCRAT  "Education is my
numberone priority. I am committed  to providing the necessary  resources
to ensure that  Washington Statestudents receive the quality  education
they deserve from  kindergarten through 
college."TSBBSS88B8SBSK8BKSSBB8BS8SS8R  . •. because
EXPERIENCE counts!  PtMJbrbyttu Cum.«fiitoBttMJtian 
42ndDi*rict, 3lt;*e JUrrtxtttrt*. toOion 1. Dtnocnt  POBox 112 -rtmUt. WA
98248 •384.1419  £9  SHOP  Creepy .costumes/
masks and  props. Not for the squeamish.  S eM° m A *w, ag e
752-9396 Near AW  WESTERN  F R O N T  SELLING  WITH DISPLAY  ADS MAKES 
DOLLARS  $ 650-3161

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     Western Front - 1998 October 30 - Page 4

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4 • THE WESTERN FRONT NEWS October 30, 1998  Candidates'
forum  As a prelude to Election Day, Nov. 3, The Western  Front contacted
candidates by e-mail, fax and phone.  Part two of a three-partseries
addresses some  issues of importance to the Western community.  United
States Congress, 9thdistrict  Grethe  Cammermeyer (D)  Jack  Metcalf(R) 
Western Front: The cost of public  higher educationis rising at a rate 
more than two times the rate of inflation.  If elected, would you work to 
keep collegeeducation accessible,  and if so, why?  Grethe Cammermeyer.
Yes, I will  stop cuts to student grants andloans  to make college
accessible to more  students. I will support an increase in  the minimum
wage sostudents .don't  have to work full-time to survive.  And I will
support President  Clinton's Direct StudentLoan program  that has saved
students thousands  of dollars. I will fight for this  because I
believeevery person  should have access to advanced education.  Jack
Metcalf: As a former school  teacher, Iunderstand the importance  of a good
education. That is why I  voted to increase Pell-Grants and  lowerinterest
rates. Interest rates for  student loans will be the lowest rate  in 17
years. I also voted to create the  HOPE scholarship tax credit and the 
Lifelong Learning tax credit. These  tax credits will help lower costs for 
students in colleges and universities.  WF: Many college sjtudents worry 
about their job prospectsafter they  graduate. What will you do to 
increase job opportunities in  Whatcom County and Washington state? 
Cammermeyer: To increase job  opportunities in Whatcom County  and
Washington, I will support local  leaders' plans for economic development 
by giving them support for  their plans at the federallevel. I will  also
make sure that our borders  allow trade and commerce to flow  freely. This
will takevigorous leadership  that we currently no not have.  Metcalf sent
no response.  WF: Do you believe thestate public  colleges are overfunded
or underfunded,  and what do you think  needs to be done inrespect to the 
school's budget and operation?  Cammermyen In general, the federal 
government doesnot fund the  operation of the colleges and universities  or
public schools. However, I  support funding fortechnology  training
programs and other federal  programs that will provide seed  money for
programs thatwill support  Whatcom County and  Washington state.  Metcalf
sent no response.  WF: Some may sayyoung people  are apathetic in regard to
politics.  How would you propose increasing  young adults'involvement in
the  political process and ensuring their  voices are heard?  Cammermeyer.
Not only arestudents  and young adults apathetic  toward politics, but
almost two-thirds  of our voting populationdoes  not participate in our
electoral  process. Young adults have so much  to lose if they don't
participate.  Many seniors are worried about  social security, but if s the
young people  who should be mostconcerned  about Congress using the trust
fund  to pay for tax breaks, like the vote  that just occurred onSept. 26.
The  Trust Fund is solvent for 30 years, but  ifs your future retirement
benefit  that they arespending.  Also, its your environment that is  being
threatened and the course of  the economy you will live under that  is
being shaped. The leaders of today  will affect the lives of those under
the  age of 40 morethan any other segment  of the population. These are 
facts they don't teach you in civics  class.Metcalf: I would encourage,
students  to get involved in the political  process and understand that
theirvoice does count.  WF: Would you propose any solutions  to help
alleviate college students'  financialburdens?  Cammermeyer. I will stop
cuts to  student grants and loans to make college  accessible tomore
students. I  will support an increase in the minimum  wage so students
don't have to  work full-time to survive.  Metcalf: Since the early '80s,
the  cost of higher education has spiraled  at a rate of two-to-three times
that of  inflation every year. Consequently,  the cost of quality education
is.  becomingunaffordable for many students  and families. That is why I 
voted to increase Pell Grants and  decreaseinterest rates. This will help 
make quality education a reality for  more students.  WF: Students often
have problems  getting the classes they need in order  to graduate on time.
How would you  address thisproblem?  .Cammermeyer: This is a state and 
administrative issue. I cannot affect it  on the federal level.Metcalf sent
no response.  WF: Many students make minimum  wage. Do you support 
Initiative 688,which would increase  the state minimum wage from $4.90  to
$5.70 in 1999 and to $6.50 in 2000?  See9th district, page 5  Fridays  ll 
Jump into it!  The Outdoors Page  The snow covered slopes of Mt. Baker to
the waters of  Bellingham Bay and the Strait of Georgia set the backdrop 
for a wide variety of outdooractivities in Whatcom County.  But before you
go out make sure you check our  Outdoors Page every-Friday. It is your 
guide to all the outdoor happenings  in our area.  Check it out before
going out  THEBELLINGB HERALD  Call 676-2660 or 384-0878 to subscribe  On
Campus Interviews  Tuesday  November 10, 1998  InterWest BankiBk  And Its
Subsidiaries,  Recruiting for:  Staff Accountant  Internal
AuditorManagement Trainee  Mortgage Loan Officer  Transaction Services
Assistant III  Info SystemsProgramming Specialist II  Info Systems Network
Admin/Team Leader  Info Systems Programmings TeamLeader  Info Systems
Technology Team Learn  Financial Analyst  Sign-ups required.  To review
jobdescriptions  and schedule an interview,  please contact  the campus
Career Services Center.  InterWestBank is an Equal Opportunity  Employer
and supports workforce diversity.  BW!WHW!WH^^

     ----------

     Western Front - 1998 October 30 - Page 5

     ----------

October 30, 1998 THE WESTERN FRONT • 5  minimum-wage
earners should meet at least thedesignated  | ® : | y ^ h i n g
^  Doctors and patients should have every means available
to;:rnajny';:;p^enfe^  toeaiment ifet t h ^ 
•:;ti;:.evi^e^  marijuana has a negative effect. To
determine themedicinal  i v a l ^ f^  : ^ ; / ^ ^  Western combats alcohol
abuse, from page 1  According to the outcome ofrecent  studies, Western has
experienced a 7  percent drop in students who drink  since 1996. 
Currently,based on the same study,  about 77 percent of Western students 
said they consumed alcohol in thepast month. Twenty-two percent said  they
had not.  Most colleges nationwide report 15  percent of theirstudents have
not had  a drink in the past month — which  says
something about Western studentsand the culture here in  Bellingham,
Fabiano said.  "This data is not simply collected,  published and puton a
shelf; it is  taken and focus is emphasized on targeted  interventions,"
Fabiano said.  "We know we have 27 percent of  our students that drink at a
rate that  causes us to be concerned about theiracademic persistence and
social consequences,"  Fabiano said.  For the 22 percent who do not 
drink,emphasis is placed on ideas  such as substance-free residence  halls.
 . In the fall of 1993, 6 percent ofstudents  lived in these substance-free
 residence halls. In 1998, that number  has jumped to 20 percent
— limited  only by space availability, Fabiano  said. 
For high-risk consumers — people  who drink more than
five drinks in a  short period of time when they party 
— the prevention center depends on  referral."We have
found that neither of the  two groups discussed are affected by  the
prevention center's socialnorms  campaign," Fabiano said. This campaign  is
powered by advertising in  The Western Front andbulletin  boards across
campus that give percentages  of students who drink four  or fewer drinks
whenthey party.  Front/Nick Haney  President Karen Morse signs Western's
declaration of commitment tocombating alcohol abuse at the ceremony in
Olympia Wednesday.  Fabiano said newspaper ads will  notaffect either of
these groups.  Those who do not drink will not start  now due to seeing an
ad; high-consuming  students are not influenced  by the social-norms
campaign, either.  Non-drinkers, too, havemade a  decision to live a
different lifestyle on  campus, and they are not targeted by  this
campaign, shesaid.  The campaign is targeted at the 51  percent that drinks
moderately,  Fabiano said.  "These are theswing voters; these  are the
students that we are after,"  Fabiano said.  A year after a "high dosage"
of the social-norms campaign, the number  of students who drink heavily has
 fallen. This makes the campus asafer  place, Fabiano said, giving people 
who do not want to drink a place to  go and gives heavy drinkerssomeone  to
look to for help.  "We want to show people, here is  how you can do what
you want to do  and graduate; here is how you want  to do and not hate
yourself the rest of  your life or wake up the nextmorning  after making a
terrible mistake,"  Fabiano said, discussing the benefits  of her program. 
yoursights  on Target.  In a field of ordinary jobs, set your sights on a
great career at Target. We're one of thelargest and most  successful
upscale discounters in the U.S; With 812 stores in 39 states, we are
apremier retailer with a  proud reputation for quality, value and service,
committed to providing our guestswith the highest quality  goods at low
prices. Currently, we are searching for career-minded collegestudents to
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INTERN  The chosencandidate will be a dedicated, motivated Junior or
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weeks of position-based training. You will earn $30,000 plus full benefits
while  gaining the retail know-how you'll need to competein our competitive
industry.  To qualify, you'll need a college degree and the determination
to succeed.EXECUTIVE TEAM LEADER OF  TEAM RELATIONS/HUMAN RESOURCES  The
chosen candidate willoversee the recruitment of well-trained, focused team
members to provide quality  guest service whileinterpreting company
policies and ensuring fair and consistent application of personnel 
policies andprocedures. You'll receive 4 weeks of Business College training
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benefits.  To qualify, you'll need a college degree in Human Resources
orCommunications and the determination  to succeed.  ASSET PROTECTION TEAM
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strong organizational, administrative, communication and  interpersonal
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Lisa with any questions on these exceptional career opportunities.(360)
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     ----------

     Western Front - 1998 October 30 - Page 6

     ----------

6 • THE WESTERN FRONT ACCENT October 30, 1998  Front/Erin
Fredrichs  Tim McHugh is known on Vendors' Row. However,  his musical
talent lends another avenue for fame.  By Robin Skillings  TheWestern Front
 Spreading his compassion, charm and love of life from  Vendors' Row to the
main stage,Tim McHugh tantalized  Boundary Bay brew connoisseurs with his
grassroots rock  music with a folk flareOct. 22.  Unknowingly, we pass him
by on Vendors' Row as he  offers a simple wave and charming smile. McHugh,
born in Olympia, has lived in Bellingham on  and off since 1979. Graduating
from Western in1984 with  a degree in English and creative writing, McHugh
finalized  his teaching certification in 1989.In 1991, he searched for
other musicians to share his love  of music and formed a powerful rock
trio. Itgrew, with  numbers of members and community appreciation, into 
the band Tim McHugh and the LostPoets.  After playing with his band for six
years and producing  two amazing CDs ("You're Not Alone" and"Edge of 
Forever"), things started to fall apart around him.  "I'm really proud of
what we did, but when wegot discovered  and signed by a promoting agency to
advertise the  band to label companies, it wasalmost like the beginning  of
the end," McHugh said.  A conflict arose between the band and the
promoterdue  to differing ideas of representation, and the band eventually 
split apart. McHugh, not wanting tobow down to constraints  or control, had
ample slack time to put his dreams  talent on  Vendors'  andaspirations
into perspective.  After one year of contemplation and no outlet for 
expression, McHughrealized that he wanted to be a song  writer and
guitarist versus a bandmember. However, he  hasn'tcompletely ruled that
option out.  "Music is very sensitive," McHugh said. "The artist's 
relationship to it isimportant because music can be poisoned."  Since the
Lost Poets disbanded, McHugh has beenworking  religiously on his solo
album, "Fools Like Me," which  will hit local record stores aroundJanuary. 
McHugh has also kept busy this past year writing — not 
an autobiography per se but acomedy novel.  "It tells the absurdity of
typical musicians trying to make  it in the modern world," he
said."Everywhere I look I see irony. I treat my art seriously,  but I don't
treat myself seriously ... I think thatpeople are  too serious in all the
wrong ways," McHugh said sadly.  Performing solo at Boundary Bay withan
acoustic guitar  and powerful lyrics, McHugh left his large audience 
wanting more of his self-expressive music written and  composed from the
heart.  He opened the evening with the title track, "Edge of  Forever,"
from the Lost Poets final album. He intrigued his  audience; who in return
helped feed hisinspirational passion  with loud clapping and cheering. 
After his second song, "You're Not Alone," theaudience  found it more
difficult to sit blankly listening to the funky-style  rock twang; heads
started to boband feet were definitely  beginning to pick up the beat.  His
aura on stage was enough to entertain —well-worn  blue
jeans, a plain white long-sleeved cotton shirt and paisley-  printed
corduroy vest.fashioned his persona along  with his long hair and goatee. 
As the crowd grew, chairs were pulled fromthe woodwork  to allow stragglers
to catch the show, and those who  had no chairs stood contentedlywith brew
in hand.  "I'm kind of a recluse; I spend a lot of time outdoors 
backpacking ... It's about thesame feeling as the greatest  gig ... and
living around here," McHugh said with compassion.  During"Redemption," a
song from the Lost Poets album  "Edge of Forever," McHugh proved his
mastery of theacoustic guitar. The chatter in the room, now packed to 
capacity, lowered as he broke loose with hisinterlude of  sensationalism.
His fingers picked along the 12 overworked  strings of his guitar quickly
and precisely while  the audience sat dumb-founded.  An improvisational
addition to McHugh's gig was JanRow Peters, a new  local musician  who
fascinated  M c H u g h ' s  already awestruck  audience  withhis expertise
 of the Irish  bouzouki, a tradi-  . tional Irish guitar related
stixirnming instrument.  Noaudience member could sit still as the jam duo
busted  through the muffled voices Of the audience.McHugh's show ended with
two talented and passionate  musicians doing what they do best:expressing
themselves  through music, the one true form of expression.  "It's a real
catharsis for me; Ilove to share that with the  audience," McHugh said. 
With aspirations of gaining a larger audience,McHugh's  ultimate goal
involves art and activism. "I would use my  influence as an artist for
socialchange," he said.  McHugh has a gig Nov. 14 at Stuart's Coffee House.
If  given the chance, all shouldexperience his amazing attitude  toward
life and his devotion to what he loves to do —  not
justentertaining his audience, but allowing them to  delve into the release
he personally feels from his music.Front/Justin Hall  Tim McHugh recently
enthused a crowd at  Boundary Bay Brewery.  By KayleyMendenhall  The
Western Front  Black cats, pumpkins desecrated with ghoulish faces and
mounds ofminiature  candy bars can only mean one titjp^^^^^^^r^^jdci. to do
the  Monster Mash. This year, Oct. 31 f a U s j | ^ a | ^ | ^ | i ^ ^ ^ ^ ^
^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ t e ^ e d ^ . i na  Bellingham at the fifth annual H a U o w i
^ ^ B ^ . i ^ K i ? ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ R ^ e n 4 s °f  Lesbians
and Gays. /.^P'SS^^SSv^K^^^^^B^^^R'''''  The festivities willtake place f r
o m : : 8 ^ | n j g | ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ i ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ | : : U n i t a r i a n
.  Fellowship,-1708 I St. Dancing and • ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^
^ f t e ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ i i n k ^  and snacks will be sold, said Pat R
o ^ ^ | ^ ^ S 0 ; |g ; f ^^e^||U^^fenittee.  'We do like to raise money for
these ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ s e ^ B , ^ u t mostly we j  to-havea good party with
live m u s i c . ^ ^ | l | | | | | | l ; i | | ; - j§  Carlson
and Chambers, a localregga^fi|]|jac|i|H£  the event again this
year.  'It's just a really fun time," Rose said||  group. Last year,between
400 andl§plt;!pl  The dance floor was packed all night lohp  The
costume contest is a highlightof the night, according to Rose. The 
categories include Best Overall, Most Original, Best Couple orGroup,
Funniest, Best Celebrity Look-alike, Scariest, Best  Female Drag and st
Male Drag. Committeemembers  pick four judges to determine which witches 
deserve the honor of most  wicked in the westand, alternately, which
jack-o'-lanterns will turn back  into pumpkins at the end of the night. 
"(The judges)take an oath of impartiality at the beginning of the dance,"
Rose  danced.  . P r i | l § | | §^:rn(fents;fi^^^S 
Ipmake enougnl|  is a national org£  |he health andi  farmlie 
FlaglSlI  T h e l  to P-Flagisl1i§  "It isn't r e a l l y p l l
lf  ^f|3JI:ps.m.  limited from several local establish-  The Newstand,
PepperSisters,  illmerchants.  |5cket for the dance," Rose said. "We  | | |
| hd give P-Flag a donation."  Isecurecivil rights for all people and  Ian,
bisexual and transgendered perls  to Hands Off! Washington, and P-pul  ages
are welcome. A $10 donation  ider 12 are free.  Hds' event," Rose said. "If
parents want  to bringtheir kids and make it a family outing, thaf s fine."
 For more information about the organization, theNorthwest Washington
chapter of P-Flag's help line  may be reached at (360) 733-1500, or visit
itswebsite at www.pflag.org.

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     Western Front - 1998 October 30 - Page 7

     ----------

October 30, 1998 ACCENT THE WESTERN FRONT • 7  the
ultimate  returns...  By Scott LaMont  TheWestern Front  Halloween is a
time  when the horrors of the .  supernatural world come j  out to play: It
isa time fil|fj  with people dressing up s i ^ ^ ^ ^ S i i | | p M M | ^ ^
^ ^ : We are introduced to the leader of theconvention,^!!  in attempts to
scare o u i e 3 ^ ^ ^ ^ q l i ^ i n l | c | ^ ^ | ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ / /Swe'et
Transvestite from Transsexual, Transylvanj^B  rapid consumption of s u ^ ^
I ^ e ^ ^ f f o w e v e f r W n ^ ^ n a m e d Dr.Frank N'
Furteri;5ra^s,played perfectlyl||||  this night arrives, some choose to
spend it not with Tim Curry("Clue," "Ijllllte^^^pjfc^gathered every-ghost, 
goblin or monster, but with a transvestite named  Dr. Frank N'F u r t e r ^
^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ .  Yes, the g r a j | | ^ | ^ B | ^ ^ | | | | | | | | : f i l
m s , "The Rocky  Horror P i c U r r j J ^ ^ ^ g ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ p m at Western,
and  conservati;^^^jQ|e.: : ! ; : . J h i l l ^ ^ ^ ^ . , your average  H o
l l y w oj ^ ^ ^ ^ f i ^ p l i i ^ p l ^ i ^ ^ ^ ^ c t e r s full of  A m e
r i c a ^ ^ ^ p ^ ^ V m u ^ s ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ S ^ 6 8 °^Doris 
Day or Ju1lPA^dfewlssafe missmg'IIPWrion and the  songs are not ones to be
heard at a church;,:|f||t|f-i^p  Grandma. ' ^iiillllilUl^Bi^^^  Yet as
risky and sometimes s h o c k i n g r J ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^audiences have
continued to fill t h e a j ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ d J | e ..-11^^"'"  world every
Saturday night atmidnigfe^^^^^glilpS  years. IfliilfcllSSJ'Sffllfffil  Now,
thanks to Associated Studinlilir^dWWns  Films,Western
studentsi;:hav§:i5the chance to see 'The  Rocky Horror j g H ^ ^
^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ k - i t s best form: onHalloween, a | | | | | p ^ | ^ ^ ^ j f j
^ b y crazed college  students, i n j ^ l p ^ i f f l l f t a i o ^ ^ ^ b o
dthrowing and  toilet p a p j l f l | | ^ ^ traditions. 
AsideJ||f§|||^^ showing,  ASft§|fl|s^^ at^llildj  m 
one tounveil his g r ^ P ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ f e c u l a r monster  named
Rocky H o j ^ ^ ^ ^ M t e s p ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ i f e thatvery  night. Things ^ ^
^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ J a n e t are  stripped to t h ^ ^ ^ p j l | i
^ i p i | | ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ karound  the castle all n ^ ^ ^ l ^ ^ ^ ^ i l ^ ^ ^
^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ r v a n t s .  This ultimate wr6ng-place-at-the-wrong-time plot
is  extremely fun to watch, even if you are not into the cult  aspect of
the film.  For thoseconfused  by the term "cult"  aspect, this is the  best
part about  Them:vj Rocky  1 ^ ^ ^ ^ , o r  l l i i l l l l lta e  minid 
pie contmueflBWeifeaeKJ  to the movie time and t i m e ^ a g a W " ; ' 
Ever since it was abox-office failure in 1975, as all cult 
|i§|§||§sJend to be, "Rocky Horror"
continued to grow in  9:15p.m., and an early show tomorrow at 9 . , | ^ ^ d
l ^ ^ ^ ( ^ ^ when it was shown at midnight Friday andshowings will take
place in Fraser Hall 4. ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ g h t s . Theater; owners
began to see^atrend:  ThT^fiTrnlis1 about a'ybung'couple
— ' j ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ p l e came'every time,
even dressedas the  (Barry Bostwick) and Janet Weiss ( S u s a n | ^ ^ ^ ^
| | i | | j | ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ e film. This started atrend that continues 
one of her first roles) — who are
aiter^^^^^mri^^^^^^^^^^^^na. surely be witnessed atFraser Hall  of their
old school friends. Brad, with r^MP:i^^ii^^"'wis weelcelffiP^Rocky Horror"
fans dress incostumes  from a friend, gathers his wits and promptly asks
for (not only on Halloween, but everySadturda^  Janet's hand in marriage,
proclaiming the famous line,  "Damnit, Janet! I love you!" in song,
ofcourse. She  accepts, and the overjoyed coupje agrees they should  visit
their t e a d i e r - f r | e j p ^ | ^ ^^ ^ f c | e l l him about the  big
day. ,: ^ ^ ^ ^B  props such as. rice and toast to t h r o w ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^
^ n  themovie and interact with the fiJ^tt^^^^^M^;,  ence-particrpation
lines. • j ^ ^ ^ ^ p r ^ ' W ' " " ' ' 5 * ^ ^^  Don't
get irate if people a r e j ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ i ^ M ^ ^ ^ S  you can't hear the
film; t h i | ^ ^ ^ ^ f e ^ f c p | ^ ^ ^ ^ ^pause in the entire film; it's
 part of what makes the  experience unique.  These lines are usually 
vulgarand lt;4jrffflfeSltat  "Rocky H o ^ ^ ^ S ^ ^ ^ ^ J  ly for p e g ^ ^
^ ^ ^ ^ p ^ ^ J  age. F^o^^^^^^'iips^ffl^  e v e ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ f f i m | f i s
| | ^ |  and^BiBoJlte^PlftNttf1  the narrator has no neck  whenever he is
on screen.  Doesthis sound a bit too  strange? Still want to go but 
nervous about looking  odd? At the "Rocky HorrorPicture Show,"
being^gttpjS;  mails not n o r m a y | ^ ^ ^ J^  Those w h o J I ^ ^ ^ ^ ^
^K  crazy anddr|p|l|§|ipQr1i::ip:  a public | | i ^ B | ^ ^ p :
i t h i | i:  film is. " s j ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ f]  ly in t h e ^ ^ p ^ ^ i
^ M ^ is dressing like some of the  characters in the film loads  of fun,
but it will also save money.  As part ofthe promotion of the "Rocky Horror"
tradition,  ASP Films is charging $ 2 ^ p ^ | ^ ^ ^ ^ c h o o s e to
benormal and .$2 for those j ^ ^ ^ l ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ r "Rocky  Horror"
fashion. A S ^ ^ ^ ^ p i i ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ g R o c ky Horror" costumes, b u j ^
^ ^ ^ ^ ^ m ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ are  As another i n c e n ^ ^ i i i ^ ^ p | g ^ ^
^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ a l  gift for those who aflteWffiifflndween. m^llSy^be  candy
or possibly props, but certainly something fun.  ASPFilms recommends early
arrival for the midnight  Halloween showing as it has a history of selling
out.Props: don't  W^^WW^S":m^^^^^m.  By Scott LaMont  The Western Front 
Photo courtesy of 20th CenturyFox  Surrounded by his servants, Riff Raff
and Magenta, Dr. Frank N' Furter prepares  to feast on a veryspecial kind
of meatloaf— namely, Eddie.  This is where all the fun
starts. While it may presently  soundlike a normal musical, things get a
little strange  from here on out. On t h e u ^ - ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ J P r .
Scott,Brad  and Janet get lost and t j | ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ o w o u t . Not 
knowing what to d o , ^ : B ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ we pass a  castle down
the r o a d ^ ^ ^ ^ l e s l ^ c l ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ h e y have  a telephone we i
r | ^ ^ ^ ^ | ^ i ii ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ f c i g you  are. The castle, i ^ ^ ^ i |
^ S i ] ^ S | i | | ^ ^ ^ ^ | n i n c h  of weirdos called^illte  forsome
sort of convention. Brad and Janet are quickly  led inside and stuck in one
of the craziest nights ever to  be portrayed on film.  ' For those who have
not ^^^^a^M^^^P^SI^^di-ence  before, here are some usefultips on what to
bring:  Rice — At the wedding scene in the beginning of
the movie,  when the weddingguests throw rice, so do you. No cooked rice, 
please. .:,;.,;:.r-v:,.,.,.:,;s,:s?.;;:f  Squirt bottles/guns ^ | # ^ | | |
| ^ p ^ i ^ h e n Brad and Janet first  leave their stranded j c j | ^ | i
^ ^ | ^ ( ^ ^ | t h e screen by squirtingwater into the air I | ^ ^ ^ ^ t w
^ r l i l ^ ^ ^ | ^ b e like Janet—wear  a newspaper. T
h j ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ K ^ a n l ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ , but other papers  are allowed. i l
l i ^ B l i | l l | S I | l I i l p | l i l I l l i ^ ^ !:  Party
Supp^^^plpfe'-T^a^^aiuia^^^^^^ng a party, and  so is the audience, ffi
bring all the necessary supplies,  includingnoisemakers, confetti and party
blowers. Also, during the  dinner scene, Frank puts on a party hat
andproceeds to sing  ||Happy Birthday" to Rocky. It is proper to do the
same, including  file singing..,.,rv::rgt;^»».. 
Toilet J ? | i ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ S c o t t smashes through a wall and Brad  s
c r e a m | | ^ ^H i ^ B f i i l i r t ^ P u r ' rQU m t o m e ^ (Scott
brand pre-  , | ^ ^ ^ ^ p i | ^ ; i d K n r | | | | ^ ^ ^ | p k willraise
his glass and say, "A  ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ B t e | f f i p : ; i | | i | | | i | i |
^ ^ ^ o fling a slice of uributtered toastThese are the major props to
bring to "The Rocky Horror Picture  Show"; however, many more have inched
their way into the cult  tradition. Other props that have been spotted
during showings are  flashlights, bells and playing cards. These provide
some humor but  are not necessary for first-timers; just stick to theabove
essentials  and have a great time.  Look for Real Estate 
^^^^^^^^^^^^§^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^  t

     ----------

     Western Front - 1998 October 30 - Page 8

     ----------

8 • THE WESTERN FRONT SPORTS October 30, 1998  Dynamite
comes in small packages  By MarcFenton  The Western Front  Success comes
much easier for  some people than for others.  Examine thecase of Western 
senior Chris Ortiz. After being  involved in competitive weight  lifting
for only one year,Ortiz has  already joined the elite ranks of  American
weight lifters.  As an incoming freshmen, Ortizsimply wanted to lift
weights to  stay in shape, since he was not  interested in doing any
sports.  However, after noticing big  gains in his ability, Ortiz decided 
to take things a step further.  "I started looking atresults on  the
Internet, and I figured I'd try  the sport out," Ortiz said." Since  then,
Ortiz hasn't lookedback.  He has been involved in eight  competitions and
won them all.  In competitive weight lifting,  Ortizhas captured two
national  championships, Pacific Coast  Championships, the Northern 
CaliforniaChampionship and the  United States Bench Press  Championship. 
To top it all off, Ortiz set threenational tournament records at  the
collegiate nationals for the  snatch, clean-and-jerk and total 
weightlifted for the 62 kilogram  weight class.  "Right now, as far as the
collegiate  level, there's no one reallyclose to me. At the collegiate 
nationals, I out-lifted some guys  in the weight class above me
—  let's put it that way," Ortiz said.  Although Ortiz
has maintained  a level of domination throughout  the collegiatelevel, his
competi-.  tors are hardly pushovers.  "I have competition from  Nebraska,
Florida State,Appalachian State, everybody,"  Ortiz said.  Like all great
athletes, Ortiz  consistently has new hurdles to overcome. His newest
hurdle is  The American Open, which will  take place from Dec. 11 to Dec.
13  inOrlando, Fla.  "That will be my biggest competition  of my career;
I'll be going  against former Olympians from  the '96 Olympics, U.S.
champion,  which is the number-one guy, and  it's going to be great,"
Ortizsaid-  Ortiz will have an even bigger  hurdle to clear in the 1999 
American Open, considering it  will be thepre-Olympic qualifier  for the
2000 Olympics.  "It's a tough decision, but at the  rate I'm going, I'm
anOlympic  hopeful. I made the Olympic  hopeful list. I might as well see 
what I've got," Ortiz said.  Not onlydoes Ortiz have his  sights set on the
2000 Olympics,  but he also plans to lift until the  2004 Olympics.After
that, Ortiz  plans to lift to stay in shape but  not competitively.  One of
the main ingredients of  Ortiz's success, in addition to his  intense
workouts Monday  through Friday, is using multi-vitamins  regularlyand
having the  self-control to maintain a healthy  diet. Ortiz said he feels
that self-control  is the key to his diet.  "The thing about being a really
 good athlete is, you got to discipline  yourself," Ortiz said.  "It'stough
when you're like  studying for finals and you're  like, T just want to
order a pizza  and have a bigmocha,'" Ortiz  added.  Ortiz, however, said
he realizes  he is at a level where he must be  extremelycareful and have a
lot  of self-control so it does not catch  up to him in the long run. 
Ortiz said he knowshis competitive  weight lifting days consisting  of
rigorous workouts and  intense competitions willeventually  come to an end.
That is why  he has disciplined himself to do  well in his school work. 
Infact, Ortiz is currently receiving  an academic scholarship. He  plans to
graduate in the spring  with anengineering degree.  "Once I'm done lifting,
I'm  done lifting. I still have to raise  my family, buy a house,pay my 
bills, and that's where my degree  comes in," Ortiz said.  Ortiz's
combination of confidence,hard work and natural  ability has earned him a
variety of  accomplishments both athletically  andacademically. However, he
 insists that he does not allow his  success to go to his head.  "I try to
beknown as a really  nice guy more than anything,"  Ortiz said. 
Front/Bobby Stone  Chris Ortiz practices his clean-and-jerk at Lou Parberry
Gym.  YOU  WANT  IT TO  SELL,  October is Co-op Month!  MemberAffectation
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     ----------

     Western Front - 1998 October 30 - Page 9

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October 30, 1998 SPORTS THE WESTERN FRONT • 9  Vikings
take the goo out of Geoducks  ByDave Shepherd  The Western Front  "This is
more like a hockey  game," said spectator Paul Austin  latein the second
half of the  men's scrappy season-closing soccer  match yesterday against 
Evergreen.Despite high tempers and a  flurry of yellow warning cards 
launched mostly at the frustrated  Geoducks,the Western men  skunked their
way to a season-high  5-0 shut-out.  The nimble Vikes took an early  lead
as Rob Schaper claimed first  blood off an assist from Matt  Schaffer only
10 minutes into the  game.Two minutes later, team captain  Chris "Bowdie"
Beaudoin followed  it up with a well-placed  penaltyshot.  Western
continued a tough  offense, keeping the ball in  RyanAstle shows his form
at Wednesday'sbadminton tournament  Geoduck territory.  After 20 minutes of
heated  territory-scrabbling,  Brian "Brit"Brittain-  Simmons drilled two
goals  within four minutes off  assists from Wade Ambrose  and ShaneBrady. 
Then things started to get  ugly.  Evergreen Striker Matt  McDowell
blatantly threw  Schaffer a hard elbow to the  side of the head after  ;
Shaffer tangled and tumbled  with McDowell and  Evergreen striker Koffi 
Assounan Jr. Schaffer was  on the ground for a full  minute before shaking
it  j off.  "It was a cheapshot,"  : Shaffer said — a
shot that  only earned McDowell a  yellow warning card,  much to the
crowd'sdismay and  surprise.  "We got a little foolish,"  Assounan said,
regarding the  four warnings thebeleaguered  team garnered in the course of
 the game.  Evergreen showed some  improved defense in the second  half,
allowing only one more  point before the final whistle and  giving goalie
Dave Ayer slightlymore exercise than in the first.  The Geoduck offense,
however,  suffered ball-control problems  the wholematch. All but two  Two
Vikings race upfieid in Thursday's 5  shots soared high and wide into  the
north-end parking lot, threatening  their own vans far more  than the
Viking goal.  "It was a good game for us," captain Beaudoin said. "It was 
important for us to win at the end,  especially at home."  This game marks
Beaudoin's  last game for Western, after a  four-year tour of duty. He said
he  plans to stay in Bellinghamafter  graduating at the end of this
quarter,  continuing his job at a pharmaceutical  firm in town.  Healso
intends to compete in  the Bellingham Semi-Pros in the  Front/Bobby Stone 
•0 shut out winagainst Evergreen.  spring.  Coach Brad
Swanson was  pleased with yesterday's game  but exhibitedfrustration at a
season  fraught with injuries and  plain-old bad luck.  Only four players
survived the  fullseason unscathed, and the  team's two other seniors ended
 their seasons two weeks early, one  withblown knees, the other "with  a
broken jaw.  "You don't have a good season  without a bad season,"Swanson 
said. "This wasn't a good season."  The Vikings closed out the year  with a
6-10-1 record.VIKING VOLLEYBALL  Tonight!  Friday, October 30th  WWU us.
Saint Martin's  Carver Gym, 7:30Tommorrow!  Saturday, October 31st  WWU
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p.m.COME SUPPORT YOUR VIKINGS!  Costume O^mjje^t  $5 cover/ndgt;mjnors 
1107 Railroad Alfe*647-5593

     ----------

     Western Front - 1998 October 30 - Page 10

     ----------

10 • THE WESTERN FRONT OPINIONS October 30, 1998  New
campus crime laws  inform, protectstudents  What you don't know can hurt
you.  Knowledge about campus safety influences students'decisions  about
selecting a college, protecting property and even whether to  walk home
alone late atnight.  Accessing that information about public and private
colleges and  universities, however, has notalways been easy. Higher
education  institutions have a vested financial interest in showing
nervousparents  that few crimes have occurred on campus.  The Student Right
to Know and Campus SecurityAct of 1990 and  the 1992 amendments to the
Higher Education Act took the first steps  to establish asystem of reliably
reporting campus crime. Still, the  loopholes in those laws left students
and parents toooften uninformed  about major, campus crimes.  Finally,
after years of effort by campus safety groupsand the  Society of
Professional Journalists, Congress agreed.  The new Campus Crime Reporting
andDisclosure provisions,  which are part of the Higher Education Act
amendments of 1998,  expand thecategories on which schools are required to
report. The  changes, signed into law Oct. 7, will requireschools,
including  Western, to disclose additional categories of crime and where
those  crimes occurred. The changes will have a major impact on the
information students  have access to. It's about time.Universities are now
required to compile statistics about  manslaughter and arson and disclose
thatinformation to the public.  Campus disciplinary referrals for alcohol,
drug and weapons violations  alsomust be reported.  Hate crimes must now be
reported by "category of prejudice," so  students will know ifa hate crime
occurred because of a person's  race, gender, sexual orientation or any
other reason.Western's university police already compile information about
the  number of hate crimes on campus, butlisting the reasons why crimes 
were committed is essential. This knowledge will help Western's 
campusgroups focus their efforts on eliminating a particular type of  hate
and for all students to participate inpreventing hate crimes on  campus. 
Most importantly, for students making determinations about  whichareas of
the community are safest, statistics will now be disclosed  in four
categories: on campus, non-campus (such as fraternity  and sorority houses
and remote facilities), public property, and residentialfacilities for
students (such as dorms or apartments).  Knowing where these crimes
occurred is necessaryfor students to  make efforts to protect themselves.
Looking at the statistics won't tell  students if dormsare unsafe. The
statistics alone are not enough for  students to decide if an escort is
needed on a darknight. These new  provisions help students make smart
decisions to protect their safety.  All of thisinformation helps provide
much more of a complete picture  about crime that occurs near and
onWestern's campus. Congress  and President Clinton should be applauded for
passing such importantlegislation.  Frontlines are the opinion of The
Western Front, as determined by the members of the  Front's editorial
board: Katy Calbreath, Wendy Giroux, Jesse Kinsman, Jessica Luce,  David
Plakos, KatherineSchiffner and Samantha Tretheway.  The Western Front 
Editor: Katherine Schiffner; Managing Editor:Jessica Luce; News Editors: 
Wendy Giroux and Ken Brierly; Features Editors: Meredith Lofberg andErnesto
Cardenas; Accent Editors: David Plakos and Caroline Deck; Sports  Editors:
John Bankston andErin Becker; Opinions Editor: Samantha  Tretheway; Copy
Editor: Amy Christiansen; Photo Editor: JesseKinsman;  Assistant Photo
Editor: Bobby Stone; Graphics Editor: Ben Stabler; Online  Editors:
KatyCalbreath and Jeremy Reed; Community Relations: Klaus  Gosma
Cartoonist: Sarah Kulfan; Adviser: LyleHarris; Business Manager:  Teari
Brown; Song of the Issue: "You Gotta Fight for Your Right to Party"Staff
Reporters: Bryta Alvensleben, Lisa Beck, Coleen Biery, Millissa Brown, 
April Busch, BeckyChristopherson, Cole Cosgrove, Katie Doyle, Gwen 
Edwards, Melissa Evavold, Marc Fenton, JimFerguson, Kelly Ferguson, Erin 
Fredrichs, Brooke Hagara, Justin Hall, Kasey Halmagyi, Nick Haney,Kristen 
Hawley, Holly Hinterberger, Arvid Hokanson, Rob Holman, Colin Howser, 
Soren Hughes, MattJaffe, JJ Jensen, Nadja Kookesh, Zse Zse Kovacs, Scott 
LaMont, Paul McCoy, Kayley Mendenhall, Cindy Nunley, Jenni Odekirk,  Mia
Penta, Alyssa Pfau, Shane Powell, Laura Query, Christine Root, JanelleRust,
Derrick Scheid, John Shelley, Dave Shepherd, Jenn Sherman, Anthony  Shows,
Robin Skillings,Angela Smith, Jennifer Smith, Aaron Snel, Darcy  Spann,
Sara Stephens, Andrea Stremler, Jay Tarpinian,Miki Tashiro, Heidi  Thomsen,
Steven Uhles, Carrie Van Driel, Beth Walker, Tyler Watson, KevinWestrick,
Matt Williams, Curt Woodward, Tim Wyse and Marissa Ziegler.  The Western
Front is theofficial newspaper of Western Washington  University and is
published by the Student PublicationsCouncil. The Western  Front is mainly
supported by advertising revenue, but the opinions of Front  editorsor
reporters are not reflected in these advertisements.  Content is determined
by student editors. Staffreporters are enrolled in the  course entitled
"newspaper staff." Any Western student may sendsubmissions  to: The Western
Front, College Hall 09, Western Washington University,  Bellingham, WA
98225. Advertising inquiries should be directed to the business  office in
College Hall 07 or made byphone at (360) 650-3161.  Single copies of The
Western Front are distributed free to members of theWestern community. 
ABORTION TARGETS  INNOCENT VICTIMS. \ WAS  R/MSFD ON THE BELIEFTHAT MUOOER
\S  SIM. WE CAM NO  LOMER ALL.OW  THI5 5EM51ESS  1AU60ER TO  CONTINUEIM 
SOCIETY  QUH,  *\Ef SWi^Oii (,6V  SOME RED STUFF  AVU OVEPv ^foua  HANDS 
THE weareRM en  Killing not justified  Heidi Thomsen  COMMENTARY  Last
Friday, an abortion doctor  was shotfrom behind while  talking to his son
and wife in the  kitchen of his home.  I am sickened and saddenedthat, as a
nation, we are not more  appalled by this terrible crime. A  murderer would
rather shootsomeone dead than sit down  and talk with that person to  reach
a peaceful agreement. ~  Differences inopinion can be tolerated, murder
cannot.  Dr. Barnett Slepian, 52, was the obstetrician-gynecologistkilled
by a sniper in Amherst, N.Y. His death  was the first fatality in a series
of five  attacks in the pastfour years.  According to1 the Seattle Post- 
Intelligencer said Slepian did-not  hold anything against anti-abortion 
demonstrators who, he said, "scream  that I am a murderer and a killer 
when I enter the clinicsat which they  'peacefully' exercise their First 
Amendment right of freedom of  speech."  According to theNew York Times, 
Alan Dickison, the father of two children delivered by  Slepian, said,
"(Dr. Slepian) cared for women through  pregnancy, infertility, childbirth
and menopause ... he  brought hundreds of babies into the world and
attended  to women who for medical or personal reasons  could not carry ah
embryo toterm."  A'father of four, Slepian performed his services for  poor
and low-wage clients, all the whileremaining  devoted to public welfare. A
man who obviously cared  very much for his patients did notdeserve to die
for  practices intended to help people.  In a statement released last week,
Rev. DonaldSpitz,  founder of Pro-Life Virginia, called Slepian's killer "a
 hero," one who stopped Slepian's "bloodthirsty practice."  The P-I
reported Spitz as saying, "We as  Christians have a responsibility to
protect theinnocent  from being murdered the same way we would want 
someone to protect us."  While we mustremember that extremists exist on 
both sides of political arguments, only two things can  come from such a
statement. People will either think  all Pro-Life supporters think the same
as Spitz (which  they don't), or Pro-Choice supporters will get so angry 
at Spitz, they will retaliate and the result will be more  peoplederiding
against Pro-Choice.  Rev. Spitz needs to reflect on what he stands for: 
Christianity asserts that it is not up to individuals to  decide the right
and wrong in society. Christianity is  based on the belief thathumans  are
subject to God's punishment;  Christians believe we cannot  judge others
because,ultimately,  only God who will  judge us.  If the murderer is
Christian,  that person will be able to faceGod knowing he or she killed 
someone.  Using the word "hero" to  describe a cold-blooded killer
isabsolutely disgusting and should not be tolerated.  It is bad enough we
teach our children to look up  toover-paid athletes with no manners, but it
is detrimental  to our society if this man's actions are lookedupon as
good.  Whatever stance people have on abortion, the most  important thing
to remember here isthat a man was  killed in his own home while talking to
his family.  Debating abortion will go on for a longtime; the  most
important thing to remember here is that people  were killed in the process
of reaching aconclusion.  Killing does not solve existing problems; it only
creates  new ones.  "Using the word'hero'to describe a  cold-blooded killer
is  absolutely disgusting  and should not be  tolerated."  letters  1-694
does not  outlaw abortion  To the Editor:  Arvid Hokanson wrote in a 
commentary for The Front abouthow Initiative 694 is about abortion,  how it
is unnecessary, it is  written in a vague manner, theprocedure doesn't
exist and it  doesn't protect a woman's right  to choose. Here is what I
have to  sayabout it.  It is NOT about abortion.  Hokanson calls 1-694 the
partial-birth  abortion ban, when it is  aboutinfanticide.  1-694 does not
outlaw any  abortion. It will make it against  the law to kill a
well-developedhealthy human baby once the  process of birth has begun.  The
Seattle Post-Intelligencer  on Sept. 22, the "process of birth"  is when
the pregnancy has ended  and the "cervix dilates and the  fetus enters the
birth canal."  1-694 does not deal with the act  of killing a fetus within
the  womb before the birthing processhas begun (abortion). It deals  with
killing a child who is no  longer unborn, but is in the  process of
beingborn (infanticide).  The procedure does exist.  1-694 doesn't have
anything to  do with abortion or hurtinga  woman's right to choose.  Molly
Freeny  Western student

     ----------

     Western Front - 1998 October 30 - Page 11

     ----------

m  October 30, 1998 THE WESTERN FRONT • 11  letters 
Misinformation  about Iraq trip  To the editor:  While I appreciate all the
good  coverage by The Front of my  involvement with Voices in the 
Wildernessover the past year, the  article in the Oct. 27 edition has 
inaccuracies that distort the  intent of both theVoices in the  Wilderness
and myself.  1. The name of the group that  I traveled to Iraq with was 
"Voicesin the Wilderness/' not  "Voices in the Wind."  2. Voices in the
Wilderness is  not "affiliated" with theCatholic  Church. Travelers with
voices  have included Christians,  Muslims, Jews and Buddhists.  3. In my
interview with Ms.  Beck, I did not mention "people  bathing in rivers" as
a way in  which waterbornediseases are  spread. From my experience and 
knowledge of Iraqi culture, it  would be unlikely to seeanyone  bathing in
a river. It would be  considered undignified.  4. "Voices in the Wind (sic)
has  becomeknown in the media as a  crusader for (Iraq)" gives the 
erroneous impression that we  support (and aresupported by)  the Iraqi
government. We have  had no contact with the Iraqi government.  5.
Sanctionswere instituted  against Iraq on Aug. 6, 1990, not  April 6,1991. 
6. We deliver medical supplies  to Iraqsuch as antibiotics, analgesics, 
suture kits, surgical supplies,  syringes and needles, not  "medicalkits." 
I hope this letter clears any  confusion from the article.  Charlie Brown 
Fairhaven student  Makahswill do  the right thing  To the editor:  I just
finished reading the commentary  on Makah whaling. I  wish I could have
been at the  debate while it happened.  I am Makah, and I attend  Western.
I would like toaddress  this issue from my point of view.  Having the news
media here has  been very trying. This is asmall  town, and we are not used
to all  the attention. There has been bad  and good press directed toward 
us, but we still hold strong our  decision to resume the whale  hunt in a
traditional manner.  People thatoppose the whaling  sometimes have good
points,  but what gets me is that nobody  recognizes that we have it
written  into our treaty that we can  hunt whales.  We do not need a letter
or  proof from theInternational  Whaling Commission.  The Makah voluntarily
quit  hunting whales because they  respectedthe whale and the ecological 
system enough to do their  part in conserving the population  of
whalesleft.  The rifle that is being used on  the whale after it is
harpooned is  out of respect for the whale. Werespect the whale for giving
of  itself freely so that people might  eat.  How can those opposing
usunderstand the tradition behind  the whale hunt when they have  been here
only a short time? You  canonly understand such a rich  tradition by living
it and growing  up with it instilled in your heart  and lives.  Ifyou
really think you have a  valid reason to oppose the hunt,  think first of
the tradition and  culture that weare gaining back  for the children in the
tribe that  was lost when we were forced to  live on a reservationand not 
allowed to speak our language.  Marlena Burlingame  Western student 
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     Western Front - 1998 October 30 - Page 12

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HD  32x CD ROM  56k Modem  4MB 3D video card  16 bit Sound Card  80 watt
Speakers  Windows98  104 key Keyboard  2 ButtonLogitech Mouse  Mouse Pad 
$949  Election  If Day Special  •mmi  lologna Sandwich 
1319 RailroadAve. Downtown Bellingham  Give Your Halloween  Costume That 
Vrop-Vead Look  With Our  To-Die-FotBeads!  CREATIVE  BEADING SUPPLIES 
OPEN 7 DAYS  In Historic Fairhaven  (360) 671-5655 VEducate  your palate i 
•Ten Taps  •2 Beer Engines 
•Huge Belgian Ale  Selection 
•TraditionalPub  Fare  •Smoke-free  2 1
Over  OPEN AT  3:00 P.M. SUN. - FRI.  1:00 P.M. SAT.  DOWNSTAIRSAT  1212
TENTH ST.  FAIRHAVEN  3 6 0 - 6 4 7 - 7 0 02  www.nas.com/ArcherAlc  HIGH
MARKS FROM MORNINGSTAR, SP, MOODY'S,  MONEY MAGAZINE AND BILL.  We take a
lot pf pride in gaininghigh marks  from the major rating services. But the
fact  is, we're equally proud of the ratings we get every,  day from our
participants. Because at TIAA-CREF,  ensuring the financial futures of the
education andresearch community is something that goes beyond  stars and
numbers.  We became the world s largestretirement organization*  by
offering people a wide range of sound  investments, a commitment tosuperior
service, and  operating expenses that are among the lowest in the 
insurance and mutual fundindustries.***  With TIAA-CREF, you'll get the
right choices—  and the dedication—to
help you achieve a lifetime  of financial goals. The leading experts agree.
 So does Bill.  Find out how TIAA-CREF can helpyou build a  comfortable,
financially secure tomorrow.  Visit our Web site at www.tiaa-cref.org or
call  us at 1800 842-2776.  Ensuring the future  for those who shape it.* 
* Source: Momingstar, Inc., July 31,1998.Momingstar is an independent
service that rates mutual funds and variable annuities. The top 10% of
funds in an investment category receive five stars and the next 22.5%
receive  four stars. Momingstar proprietary ratings reflect historical
risk-adjusted performance and are subject to change every month. They
arecalculated from the account's three-, five-, and ten-year average annual
returns m  excess of 90-dayTreasury bill returns with appropriate fee
adjustments, and a risk factor that reflects performance below 90-day
T-bill returns. The overall star ratings referred to above are Momingstar s
published  ratmgs, which areweighted averages ofirs three-, five-, and tm^ 
P i rM  3-Year  5-Year  10-Year  CUP Stock l a m  StarRating/  Number of
Domestic Equity  Accounts Rated  4/2,120  4/1,363  4/674  CUV flkfcd l a ^
l l a AmatStar Rating/  Number of Inmrutional Equity  Accounts Rated  .
V«59  5/23S  N/A  CUT Bfakj l a t eAcoaat  Stir Rating/  Number
of Domestic Equity  Accounts Rated  5/2,120  N/A  N/A  CUT GfMta l o M
tStar Rating/  Number of Domestic Equity  Accounts Rated  S/2,120  N/A  N/A
 CHFlWIUfkftAomt  StarRating/  Number of Fixed-Income  Accounts Rated 
4/719  4/487  N/A  CIBT fecial Oak* Accmt  StarRating/  Number of Domestic
Equity  Accounts Rated  4/2,120  4/1,363  N/A  t\  "These top ratings
arebased on TIAA's exceptional financial strength, dairm-paying ability and
overall operating performance.'Based on assets under management. '"Sundmrd
emptor's Insurmna Rtting Antlytis,  1998: UpperAnalytical Services, Inc.,
Upttr-Dirtatr's Amdjticml OtM, 1998 (Quarterly). CREF certificates and
interestsin the TIAA Real Estate Account are distributed by TIAA-CREF
Individual and  Institutional Services. Formore complete
irnmtkjo,induduigdiari^aiid expenses, can 18M  you invest or send money.
~APPPPP