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1998_1117


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     Western Front - 1998 November 17 - Page 1

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INSIDM  MORE M Q l M ^ F ^ ^ ^ ^ S ^ ^ ^ ^B  GEAR \ J ^ : : ¥ C
i $ i m ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^  WESTERNWASHINGTON UNIVERSITY  TUESDAY, NOVEMBER
17,1998  VOLUME 206 ISSUE 15BELLINGHAM,.WASHINGTON  Vigil focuses on
human-rights abuses  By Curt Woodward  The WesternFront  While most of
their peers enjoy  time off with family and friends,  three Western
students will facethe  possibility of spending  Thanksgiving in federal
custody.  Approximately 60 peace  activists, studentsand community  members
gathered Monday afternoon  in Red Square to show support  for EricRobison,
Melissa  Roberts and Shane Powell, who  will travel with nine other local 
Front/Jesse KinsmanTravis Stone attended the  vigil with his father, David.
 people this week to Fort Benning,  Ga., toparticipate in a national 
protest of the U.S. Army's School of  the Americas Nov. 21 and 22.  The
Schoolof the Americas is a  training facility located at Fort  Benning that
trains Latin American  soldiers inmilitary practices.  Opponents of the SOA
maintain  that graduates of SOA training go  on to commithuman-rights
abuses  in their own countries; activist  group SOA Watch claims to have 
documented more than 600 such  abusers.  Robison addressed Monday's  crowd,
stressing the need to educate  peopleabout the SOA.  "Right now we can make
a difference,"  Robison said. "When we  get more peopletogether, when we 
get the word out, that's when  things change. When people learn  about
this, theyrealize it's wrong.  This is the first step."  Those in
attendance echoed'  Robison's sentiment.  "It's one ofthe grossest things 
that I know our government does,"  Fairhaven senior Regina Goldner  said.
"It can beshut down if  enough people oppose it. This is  important to
people our age  See Vigil, page 6  Front/Jesse Kinsman  Marchers protesting
the alleged human rights abuses committed by graduates of the School of the
Americas make their way from Red Square to the Federal Building downtown. 
Retreat pools studentstrength  By Jenni Odekirk  and Nadja Kookesh  The
Western Front  The stark white barracks of Whidbey Island's Camp Casey came
alive this  weekend as more than 100 Western students,  faculty and
stafftraveled to the site  of this year's Ethnic Student Center  Retreat to
address issues facing minoritystudents at Western.  Discussion of
Initiative 200 and the role  of allies of racial, ethnic and
sexualminorities dominated the retreat.  The theme of the retreat this year
was  "Strength: Self, Solidarity andCommunity," which Ethnic Student 
Center Coordinator Michael Vendiola  said was crucial in the face of 1-200.
 "We're focusing on strength through  self — starting
with yourself and what  you can do and thenturning that into  what you can
do within the group in  order to help the community, whether it's 
theWestern community or the  Bellingham community," said Amanda  Hashimoto,
a member of the planningcommittee for the retreat.  The activities began
that night with a  performance by Will Act for Change, astudent acting
troupe that portrays risky  behavior and conducts discussions about  how to
handlepotentially dangerous sit-  Front/Jenni Odekirk  Participants of last
weekend's Ethnic Student Centerretreat at Camp Casey,  Wash, pose for a
group photograph. About 100 people attended.  uations.Although the audience
responded  with many comments to scenes depicting  unsafe sex,
alcoholpoisoning, sexual  assault and a party, a scene depicting a 
racially insensitive game sparked the  longest discussion of the evening. 
The portrayal of a woman who counted  the number of African Americans on
campus for fun and her friends who were  uncomfortable with the game gave
the  audience a chance todiscuss allies.  Although the audience could not
exactly  define the term "ally," it was generally  agreedthat allies are
advocates of people  who are being discriminated against.  "There's no
hierarchy ofoppression,"  student Anne Melton said. "Anyone can  stand up
for everyone."  The audience alsodiscussed the qualities  needed in an
ally.  "Allies need to be educated," senior  Kim Morrison said.Western
senior Douglas Leek noted  that allies need to be continually committed 
because minoritiescan't take a break  from the struggles they face.  After
discussion about the plays died  down, Englishprofessor Bill Lyne took  the
stage.  Lyne began a fiery speech by calling  the world "racist,
sexist,homophobic and  imperialistic" and saying that Western  reflected
those qualities.  He blasted faculty andadministration  inaction regarding
1-200 issues.  "If you had an initiative about parking  spaces, youprobably
could have gotten  more faculty involved," Lyne said.  He said it was up to
students to createchange on campus and praised efforts to  See Retreat,
page 4  New legislature  allows release  of crimerecords  By Tyler Watson 
The Western Front  Western is considering adopting a recently 
passedlegislative amendment that  would allow universities to disclose more
 information about campus crimesand student  records.  The Foley Amendment,
passed Oct. 7,  revises the Family Educational Rightsand  Privacy Act.
Schools that decide to adopt  the new legislation would no longer be able 
to withholddisciplinary records under the  provision that they are part of
student educational  records.  The newlegislation would allow universities 
to release information to victims  about students involved inmisconduct and
 their punishment.  Parents would also be able to obtain  information about
their childrenat the university,  and the media would have the right  to
obtain information about certain incidents  ofmisconduct.  FERPA, also
known as the Buckley  Amendment, prevented universities from 
releasingstudent information that pertained  to educational records without
the  student's consent, or in certaincases,  parental consent. Western has
been using  that system for the last 28 years, Judicial  AffairsOfficer
Michael Schardein said.  "FERPA had created a shield where there  was
virtually no information(being  See Legislature, page 3

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     Western Front - 1998 November 17 - Page 2

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2 • THE WESTERN FRONT NEWS November 17, 1998  Campus
Police:  Nov. 9,12:30 a.m.: TwoBirnham Wood residents reported receiving a 
harassing phone call and various incidents of "inappropriatematerial" 
posted on their door.  Nov. 9, 7:18 a.m.: A man reported his vehicle was
broken into whileparked in the 16CR lot. A portable CD player and a CD were
stolen.  Bellingham Police:  Nov. 10, 8:30a.m.: Five juveniles were
arrested for assault after being  involved in a fight in the 2700 block of
AlderwoodAvenue.  Nov. 11, 8:30 a.m.: A woman reported several of her
daughter's  friends threw eggs and paintballs at her home in the 88 block
of  Pacific View Road. Police contacted a group of juvenile males whoagreed
to apologize and clean up the mess.  Nov. 12, 5:52 p.m.: Employees at a
restaurant in the 1900block of  King Street contacted police because a
customer was harassing  employees. The man allegedlykept telling employees
that they had  better give him the correct order. Employees also said the
customer was cutting in line and being disruptive. The customer left before
 police arrived.  Nov. 13, 11:30 a.m.: Awoman reported that a video camera
and a $1  were stolen from her car in the 2600 block of King Street.Nov.
13, 5:22 p.m.: A Potter Street resident asked police to increase  patrols
near his residence on Fridayand Saturday evenings. The person  complained
that someone had been stealing fence boards from aneighborhood fence on
these nights.  Nov. 13, 8:37 p.m.: A resident who lives near the
intersection ofBroad  and Linden streets requested that police increase
patrols in his neighborhood  because of a hot-rodding vehicle.  Nov. 13,
10:21 p.m.: Officers responded to a 911 hang-up call in the  300 block
ofWhatcom Street. Officers contacted the renter of the  house, who was
having a small part. He said no onehad called 911.  Police checked with
people at the party and no one admitted to making  the call.  Nov.14,12:40
a.m.: Officers responded to a complaint of a loud party  in the 1600 block
of James Street. Thetwo residents of the house  agreed to have their guests
leave.  Nov. 14, 1:30 a.m.: Bellingham Policeassisted University Police in 
trying to locate a suspect who ran from University Police in the 3100 
blockof Bill MacDonald Parkway. The suspect was not located.  University
Police will continue the investigation.  Nov. 14, 2:02 a.m.: A store in the
1200 block of East Sunset Boulevard  reported someone entered thebusiness
and stole a case of beer.  Nov. 14, 2:45 a.m.: Police contacted two people
in the 2300 block ofWilson Street who were celebrating the end of tests.
Officers asked  the men to turn off their music andstay inside and advised
them of  the possible consequences if police had to return. The men
compliedand went inside.  Compiled by Tyler Watson  ! ^  Smith was
misideniified^  Th^rnan pictured: w^ Marf$0dean of  JttoQclring College of
Education. W^  ike error. .  Publication's Title:  Statement of
Frequency:Authorized Organization's  name and address:  The Western Front 
Published 2 x Weekly  The WesternFront  Western Washington University 
College Hall 110  Bellingham, WA 98225-9100  Experts discusspoisons  Erica
Schrader from  Washington Toxics and Carl  Weimer will discuss poisons in 
"Poisons inthe Web of Life" at 7  p.m. Nov. 19. in Fraser Hall 2. 
Admission is free.  Western playwrights toshowcase their work  The New
Playwrights Theatre  is unleashing three original plays  written by
aspiringplaywrights  from Western.  "A Very Special Dinner/' written  by
Brooks Fair and directed  by TiffanyLouquet, "Maxine is  Not Here," written
by Erin Jane  Miller and directed by Grant  Knutson, and "God In A Cage," 
written by Christopher Mattson  *tand directed by Sarah Petty, will  be
showcased at 7:30 p.m.Nov. 19  through 21 in Performing Arts  Center 199.
Tickets are free but  must be obtained through thePerforming Arts Center
Box  Office. Early arrival is encouraged  since seating is limited. For
moreinformation call 656-6146.  Salon-style discussion  sponsored by
Stuart's  The November episode ofDemocracy Cafe, Stuart's Coffee  House
monthly European salon  style discussion forum, will occur  at 8p.m. Nov.
18 at Stuart's Coffee  House. It will focus on Georgia-  Pacific and the
upcoming renewal  of itswater lease with the city of  Bellingham and its
waste-discharge  permit with the state.  "Violence inSociety and  the
Media" to be presented  The Shalom Center will sponsor  a panel discussion
entitled"Violence in Society and the  Media" from 7 to 9 p.m. Nov. 26 in 
the Wilson Library Presentation  Room.The panel consists of  Brandon
Centerwall, of the  department of epidemiology at  the University
ofWashington and  retired public nurse Inez Allen.  They will discuss the
causes,  remedies and theologicalreflections  of violence today. A
follow-up  discussion will be at the  Shalom Center for reactions andmore
in-depth discussion. For  more information contact the  Shalom Center at
733-7440 or 733-  1325.Native American club  sells food for fundraiser 
Western's Native American  Student Union will sell Indianbread and tacos at
a table on  Vendors' Row Nov. 23. Profits will  go toward general
fundraising forupcoming activities.  Talk show will discuss 
disability-access issues  KUGS-89.3 FM will broadcast"Windows on our
Community," a  radio program sponsored by the  Whatcom Opportunity Council,
 from 7to 8 p.m. Nov. 28 and Nov.  30. The discussion will cover services 
available in our community  forpersons with disabilities; it is  an
opportunity to express ideas  about accessibility issues and 
potentialenhancements to services  now offered.  Volunteer positions open 
The Whatcom Volunteer Center  islooking for volunteers for the  following
positions: coaches,  assistants and sponsors to be a  part of thenewly
forming Special  Olympics basketball teams; animal  caregivers at a
wildlife rehabilitationcenter; support counselors  to provide encouragement
 and support for young women  who are returningfrom Job  Corps; and food
service aides  who can learn about nutrition  while working with a
nutritionspecialist to provide food service  for pre-schoolers. For more
information  on these and many otheropportunities, call Whatcom  Volunteer
Center at 734-3055.  Discussion focuses on Iraq  Sponsored bythe Peace 
Resource Center, Charles Brown,  a Western student, will speak at 7  p.m.
Nov. 19 in theWilson Library  Presentation Room about his  recent trip to
Iraq with the Voices  in the Wildernesshumanitarian  aid action group. For
more information,  contact the Peace  Resource Center at 650-6125.  Pot
opinions offered  The Drug Information Center  will provide "Hashing It
Out,"  educated opinions aboutmarijuana  from 7 to 9 p.m. Nov. 18 in 
Fraser Hall 4. Admission is free.  For more information, contactthe  Drug
Information Center at 650-  6116.  Huxley maps on display  The Huxley Map
Library will  have an open house at 9 a.m. Nov.  19. The library is
considered to  have an extensive U.S. map collection.Compiled by Robin
Skillings  §^^^fBriefs Polifyg  Bn^fs,: send ai news release two
weeks;  before ?tfefevent: to The Western Front/  via fa^|6^Z775, or
e-mail, wftont®  i ^ W ^ i e ^ t til"1?  l^^tior^lwie
cannot:guarantee; the  publicahpri:M• all submissi 
reserve- thel nghrto edit any^neyvs  ^releaie^-v;---".:.;^::^WWU Official
Announcements  Deadline for announcements in this space is noon Friday for
the Tuesdayedition and noon Wednesday  for the Friday edition.
Announcements should be limited to 50 words,typewritten or legibly printed,
and  sent through campus mail to "Official Announcements/' MS -9117, viafax
to X/7287, or brought in  person to Commissary 113A. DO NOT SEND
ANNOUNCEMENTS DIRECTLY TO THE WESTERN FRONT.  Phoned announcements will not
be accepted. All announcements shouldbe signed by originator.  PLEASE POST 
PARKING PERMITS MAY BE RENEWED FOR WINTERQUARTER from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m
through Jan. 15 at the  Parkinq and Transportation office. Valid permits
for R lots are needed starting Jan. 3 and for C lots beginning Jar. 5. 
Those on the waiting list will remainon it through August 1999 and will be
contacted if space becomes available  MATH PLACEMENT TEST.Registration is
not required. Students must bring picture ID and a No. 2 penciL A fee of 
$10 is payable inthe exact amount at time of testing. The test is timed for
60 minutes; however a»7a  9  n°.m.'n  r  ute  7  for
full administration. Testing will be at 9 a.m. in Old Main 120 as follows:
Mondays - Nov. 23, 30, andDec. 7,  Thursdays-^ Nov. 19, Dec. 3 and 10.  ALL
STUDENTS WISHING TO STUDENT TEACH during the 1999-2000 academic year are
asked to attend one of  fhe foHowing meetings in MH 163: noon Monday,Nov!
30; 10 am. Thursday, Dec. 3; or 1 a.m. Friday, Dec. 4.  Information will be
provided about proceduresand timelines, and applications will be available.
 PROIECT EARLY LITERACY SCHOLARSHIP: Eligiblefor this scholarship are
juniors seniors or graduate students  majoring in education or a related
field.Priorit/deadline is Dec. 1. Recipients w,H ^ W j ^ «
»mPle-ment  a preliteracy curriculum at LummiHead Start. For
more information, stop by OM 275B or call X/754A  THE MILLER ANALOGIES
TEST(MAT) will be given at 2 p.m. in FR 4 on Dec. 15. Registration is
required in OM 120  or by calling X/3080.A fee of $35 is payable at the
time of the test. Testing takes approximately 1% hours.  TETEP (TEST FOR
ENTRANCE INTOTEACHER EDUCATION) will be given at 9 a.m. Monday, Jan. 4, in
FR 4.  Registrationis required in OM 120. A $25 fee must be paid in the
exact amount at time of registration. Testing takesapproximately 2Vz hours.
.  THE BELLINGHAM FIRE DEPARTMENT REQUIRES PERMITS signed byone of its
representatives for all indoor use  of resin-bearing cut trees and cut
vegetation in public buildings. Live trees in soil
are«empt/^permit andfloor  plan must be ?ompleted, decorations
must be treated withan approved fteme retardanttagged and 'nspected  by the
fire department. Permits and tags are availablefrom Environmental Health
and Safety, OM 345, X/3064.  THE VIKING UNION IS ACCEPTINGAPPLICATIONS for
quarterly vendors on the VU Plaza. Application^packets.are  available in VU
202 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Appl.cat.ons must be
submitted by 5 p.m. Dec. 4.  THE HAROLDLANT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
COMPETITION is open to students pursuing a career as a lawyer  andwho 3 e
applied to an accredited law school. Applications and more information is
available from Academ.c  Advising, OM 380. Application deadline is Jan. 9. 
SEVERAL IOB SEARCH WORKSHOPS arescheduled each quarter through the Career
Services Center. Education  woriLhops alsoarescheduled forteachers. For
complete details on workshops titles, times and dates, contact the  Career
Services Center,OM 280, X/3240.  On-campus recruiting  Payless Shoe Store,
Thursday, Nov. 19. See signup folder for abrief description of the training
program, compensation and  opportunities. Also see employer file in
theCareer Services library. Submit resume and sign up in OM 280.  Safeco,
preselect interviews Nov. 18 and19.
___^_____________^___—i

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     Western Front - 1998 November 17 - Page 3

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November 17, 1998 NEWS THE WESTERN FRONT • 3  By Jenn
Sherman  The Western FrontMichael Vendiola undergoes a daily  "juggling
act."  Vendiola's brightly decorated office in  the EthnicStudent Center
has pictures of  his inspirations, such as Martin Luther  King Jr. and his
family.  Vendiolais the Ethnic Student Center's  coordinator and activities
adviser, a husband  to his wife Michelle, and afather to  his 3-year-old
daughter Michaela and 1-  year-old son Melchor. He also wants to  pursue
hisdoctorate.  "The support from my wife has been  tremendous; I really owe
her a lot,"  Vendiola said.  Partof Vendiola's job as coordinator is to 
plan events and arrange space for programs  and events at theEthnic Student
 Center.  As activities adviser, he advises student  groups and
organizations within thecenter  and beyond. He advises about 10 to 18
ethnic-  student clubs.  Vendiola said he has received awarm  reception as
he entered his position for the  center this year at Western. "Everyone's 
been reallynurturing," he said.  "It's such a high-output position;
numerous  people will call me or take me out tolunch, or they will go on
walks to check in  with me, and I really appreciate that,"  Vendiola said. 
Thisyear, Vendiola helped arrange  events such as the Welcome Back
Barbecue,  the Building UnityLeadership Workshop  and different round-table
discussion  groups. He also helped arrange lastweekend's  Ethnic Student;
Center retreat at  Camp Casey, Whidbey Island.  "Each year has a
differenttheme; this  year focuses on student leadership,"  Vendiola said. 
"It has a lot to do with students bonding together and getting to know one
another.  This year, we'll discuss the passing of 1-200  and how it
willaffect ethnic students and  P E O P L E M A K I N G AN I M P A C T ON C
A M P US  women," Vendiolasaid.  It also gives students a chance to relax 
and explore their creativity, he said.  The only struggleVendiola says he
faces  is working on many different projects and  not having enough time to
service allprograms  that work on ethnicity and diversity.  "I need to
learn how to juggle better; I am  takinglessons in juggling," Vendiola
said.  Vendiola is also a Western graduate — he  walked
the stage twice.He received a bachelors  degree in American Cultural
Studies  in 1994, the first graduating class of theprogram.  He returned to
school to receive his  masters in adult education and administration  in
1997.  Vendiola's leadership and listening abilities  led to two jobs at
Northwest Indian  College, where he was the assistant Student  Support
Services director and director of  student activities. He was also a
tutorand  mentor coordinator.  "The director of student activities was a 
position that had been created, and Ihelped create it because I had an
interest in  working with students," Vendiola said.  At Skagit
ValleyCollege, Vendiola was a  recruiter for Native American outreach and 
a retention specialist.  "The job wasto recruit and retain Native  American
students for the college,"  Vendiola said.  He said he learned
manyimportant values  while working at both colleges.  "My communication
skills elevated; I  learned to make it more concise and clear. I  also
learned a lot about networks and how  a system works —
which people you need  to go through and keep in contact with to  get
something done," he said.  "I learned a greaterrespect for the college  or
university in how to relate to students,  because, in reality, that is who
wework with," Vendiola said.  Vendiola said he sees himself working  with
and supporting students for mostof  his life.  "I think I have the greatest
job because I  get to see the moments where students real-Front/Bobby Stone
 As Ethnic Student Center coordinator, Michael Vendiola said he wants to
contribute to the  center's continued growth and success.  ize their power,
whether it is their own personal  power orat a campus level," he said.  "I
see them developing and realizing  their leadership skills, and it's a
greatcomplement,"  Vendiola said.  "I am pleased to be part of this mission
to  make Western's campus atrue place for  diversity. I anticipate doing
the work."  Vendiola said he wants Western to be a  universitywhere
students feel safe.  "I want to be a part of this center's continued 
growth and success," he said."I have a lot of passion and drive to be 
here," Vendiola said.  "To me, I am really a student born out of  this
center. The year I started here was  when this center was being created, so
it's  truly a blessing to comeback here because  I get to give back and be
a part of what I  was once a part of," Vendiola said.  In about10 years,
Vendiola sees himself  going through graduation ceremonies for  the third
time to receive hisdoctorate.  Vendiola said he doesn't know if he will 
teach or where he will go to after he  receives hisdoctorate.  "By then, my
daughter will be 13, and I  will probably be struggling with that," 
Vendiola said.Getting his doctorate, he said, and a  high-paying job is a
success not only for  himself, but for thecommunity.  "You become a role
model, and you feel  you want to succeed for not only yourself  but
forother people who want to set a positive  example," he said.  "I look at
myself in reference to thecommunity,  whether it would be the Western 
community or my own personal community,  and Ihope that my success can
inspire  others to continue," Vendiola said.  11  go  a. *"  z tu  ui
«s  =gt;gt;•. so  AAuentUUup Sate*
RepAeieniative  THE WESTERN FRONT  Academic Year 1998 / 1999  a.  yjf 
Requirements:  • Prior sales experience helpful but not 
essential, (training provided)  • Capableof dealing with
the public.  • Full time student enrollment required. 
Submit Resume and Letter of Intentto:  Business Manager, Student
Publications,  CH 110, MS 9100.  WWU PARKING TRANSPORTATION  Has some
information for you on:  WINTER QUARTER PARKING  Applications willbe
accepted beginning  Monday, November 23rd.  R Lot permits required begining
 Monday, January 4th.CCR Lot permits required  Tuesday, January 5th  Office
Hours 7:30am-5pm Mon.-Fri. 650-2945  "Hflalfljf^Agnv RmsfimfinT  Changes
lit legislation, from page 1  released)," Schardein said. "(The
newlegislation)  allows the university to create policies that  reflect
their campus.''  "If there are reasons thatare educationally  sound, where
information can be released, and  we think that it's proper, then we can do
that  instead of having one standard, which was created/  in Washington
(DC.), that all universities  fallunder,'' he said. 
•'Our basic philospphy has been, in the past,  that most
all Students ^—unlessthey're under 18  :TS areadults,
andso we respected the concept of  confidentiality for every / s t udent,? 
Schardein said.2-^:•';v%-  The new legislation is being 
reviewed by Western AssistantAttorney General Sr. Council  Wendy Bohlke to
see if a change  We're going to  make sure that if  thereare changes,  may
be a very logical one that helps the general  population, but then, when it
comes to aspecific  case, I think we're going to try to take a very 
thorough look at it," he said.  "We're going to try,over the next couple of
 months (through talking to our colleagues), to  gain as much information
abouthow other people  see it in different situations that have come  up,"
Schardein said.  "It may be that weend up staying with the  way it has been
done all along, or maybe we  will make some changes for certainreasons. 
We're going to make sure that if  there are changes, we do (the  changes)
in the best interest ofour  students."  One concern with the new
legislation  is that names of students  in the current systemwould be w e d
o ( t h e C h a n g e s ) who are victims of crimes are not  in the best
interest  of ourstudents."  Michael Schardein  Western Judicial Affairs 
Officer  viable.  "(Bohlke) is going to look at  thepolicy and see what
kinds of  changes, if any, that we may  need to make," Schardein said. 
"She wasgoing to look at it as  far as what policies we have  right now and
what the law  allows, and to see if thereare  things we ought to be doing
or can do."  "I think it won't be something that happens  really
quickly,"Schardein said. "We want to  make sure we have the best interests
of the students  in mind, both in ageneral way as well as  a specific way. 
"I think sometimes we make a policy and it  protected under thenew law.
Thus,  victims may be less willing to report  incidents of crime. 
Schardein said Western will  look at a variety of aspects, including  the
problems and benefits of  possibly adopting the new legislation, and try to
decide if the current  system needs changing.  "I think for most
institutions, what they're  goingto try to do is see if changes should be 
made that can actually help them without compromising  howwe see each of
our students and  how we treat students," Schardein said.

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     Western Front - 1998 November 17 - Page 4

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A • THE WESTERN FRONT NEWS November 17, 1998  Group
provides computer assistance forstudents  By J J Jensen  The Western Front 
Tucked away in the back of the second  floor of the VikingUnion is a group
of people  who can help you with almost all of your  computer-related
problems, yet most Western students don't know they exist.  Located in room
218, the Western  Computer Users Group isavailable to educate  students,
staff and faculty about  Western's computing environment. WCUG 
alsoencourages Western students to become  involved in the decision-making
process concerningtechnology issues on campus.  "It's about discussing
issues related to  computing on campus, and weeducate people  about how to
get the most out of their  computer," WCUG vice president Grant  Millersaid
in a written interview. "We also  just like to hang out and have fun, too."
 From WCUG's Web site,www.wcug.wwu.edu/, people can gain  access to and
learn about how to operate  many useful programs.Some of the programs to be
accessed  include instructions about creating your own  Web pages, finding
a Western student's e-mail  address, creating your own e-mail mailing 
lists and filling out a form to obtain  answers to your computer-related
questions.  An Associated Students club since 1994,  WCUG isfunded by
private, student and  clubmember donations and a $50 per quarter  stipend
from the A.S.  Themoney WCUG spends goes toward  club promotion and special
projects, but the  majority is spent onhardware such as a new  tape drive,
creating more disk space and various  upgrades, WCUG treasurerDan Retzlaff 
said.  "We've got to have the hardware to do the  kind of stuff we want to
do," Retzlaff said."Club members are not required to donate  money, but
most do because they want to see  the club dothings," Miller wrote.  Some
past activities WCUG may not be  known for taking on include creating
theWestern Online Textbook Exchange, a meeting  place for students to sell
and buy  new/used books.  "Ithink that (Western Online Textbook  Exchange)
has saved students hundreds or  thousands of dollars,and AskWCUG is also 
an invaluable resource," Retzlaff said. "The  more people use it, the more
everyone gets  out of it."  WCUG also helped create the Student  Technology
Fee and now helps evaluateproposals  and makes recommendations to the  A.S.
president about technology issues.  Currently,WCUG is working to bring a 
representative from the Attorney General's  Consumer Protection Division
tocome to  Western and talk about new laws regarding  unsolicited e-mail,
or "spam." The program  wouldgive advice about how to avoid getting 
spammed and what to do if it happens.  Also in the works iscreating a
program  within the A.S. called the A.S. Technology  Education Center. 
Though few have taken advantage of the  resources WCUG offers, WCUG
officers  remain willing to help, and those who haveused the services have
been pleased.  T bet a lot of people don't know about  WCUG and the
vastness ofresources we  have," Miller wrote. "A good portion of our 
members are pretty knowledgeable aboutcomputers and are more than happy to 
answer questions about computer problems."  "I think it's agreat service to
the students.  They're really willing to help," senior and  Resource and
Outreach ProgramDirector  Bekki Brown-Winkels said.  The club has 20 to 30
active members and  about 100 more thatparticipate through the  club
mailing list. WCUG meets at 5 p.m.,  every Friday in room 285 of
theChemistry  Building. WCUG may be reached by phone  at 650-7282.  Members
consider the meetings 50percent  business, 40 percent social and 10 percent
just  plain off-topic.  "I would like to see more facultyand staff  attend
our meetings. The ideal situation  would be to have an even number of
students,  faculty and staff participating,"  WCUG president Holland
Guldberg wrote.  Retreat enhances dialogue, from page1  create the ethnic
studies and women's studies programs.  "What we've got here is the best
part," hesaid  with a smile as he scanned the audience.  Lyne lamented the
passage of 1-200 but also  praised the student demonstrations directed
against  the initiative.  "The only way things are going to change is bythe
 kind of activities that went on around 1-200 and the  kind of activities
that went on around Red Squarein  your resistance to 1-200," he said. 
Initiative 200 was the subject of a mandatory  workshop Saturdaymorning. 
Western administrators and staff members  addressed the impact the
initiative would have onWestern.  Although the law changed, Western's
commitment  to diversity has not changed, said KunleOjikutu, assistant vice
president for Student Affairs  and special assistant to the president for
diversity.  He told the audience that Western didn't yet know  all the
consequences of 1-200 at Western but would  have a better idea in early
December when Gov.  Gary Locke's 1-200 task force and the attorney
general'soffice begin to issue reports.  Director of Admissions Karen
Copetas explained  that admissions atWestern will not be affected by I- 
200, unlike other state universities. In 1991, Western  ended race as
afactor in admissions, Copetas said. A  student's multicultural experience,
which may be  detailed in anoptional essay, is now considered but  is not a
determining factor.  Equal Opportunity Center DirectorRobbi Ferron  said
the only Western employees who may be affected  by 1-200 are
state-classifiedemployees who benefit  from the "plus three" system. Under
the practice,  the next three candidateswho could help employers  meet
affirmative action goals are considered for a job  opening, along with
thetop seven qualified candidates.  The first workshop ended with an
activity  designed to take action in thepreservation of diversity  at
Western. Students split into small groups to  brainstorm three
considerations Western should  take into account as it continues its
efforts to diversify  the campus community.Some of the suggestions, which
will be given to  the administration after the retreat, were to
incorporatea diversity-sensitivity session in faculty training  and to give
a more personal touch to student-retain-mentactivities.  After the
mandatory workshop, students were  free to choose from many options for two
moreworkshop sessions.  Two of the workshops focused on the consequences 
of 1-200: "AdmissionsProcess at Western"  and "Affirmative Action/Equal
Opportunity."  "Admissions Process at Western" wasfacilitated  by Copetas
and Joy Mbajah. Nine students attended  and learned how the admissions
processworks at  Western and how it compares to other universities in  the
state.  Some students wondered ifthey were accepted to  Western because of
the race box they checked on  their applications."Multiculturalism is more
than skin color,"  Copetas said. "We want you to share with us who  you
are."Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity" was  facilitated by Ferron. This
workshop defined affirmativeaction and equal opportunity and how they 
differ. Ferron also discussed hiring processes and I-  200.  Inthe hiring
process, affirmative action was used  to help meet gender, race, ethnic,
age, veteran anddisabled-employee goals, and during the search  process, if
appropriate, and the selection process.  Nowaffirmative action will only be
applied to age,  disabled individuals and veterans.  Ferron defined
equalopportunity as similar  opportunities for everyone, regardless of
whether  they are eligible for affirmativeaction or not.  Affirmative
action was defined as taking positive  steps to correct effects of groups
that have been traditionally  discriminated against, Ferron said.  Another
of the workshops, "An Ambassador forMy Race ... I Don't Think So," explored
the role of  allies at Western.  Director of Prevention and
WellnessServices Pat  Fabiano, who facilitated the workshop, suggested 
allies expand their role from personal topolitical.  She said allies should
not only stand up for their.  friends, but also for others anytime
theywitness a  racist, sexist or homophobic comment or act.  Gajee Parsons
said allies need to step out oftheir  comfort zones and become more active
and outspoken.  She talked about the degrees of supportshe  observed as one
of the Red Square campers.  Melton, a member of Student Allies for
Equality,  saidthe workshop was very informative.  "to me, being an ally
was being a friend, but it's  more," she said. "Irealize I have more to
learn."  Some of the other workshops offered focused on  academic skills
andservices, leadership, art and cultural  identity and wellness.  This
year's Ethnic Student Center Retreatwas the  eighth —
they have occurred each year since the  Ethnic Student Center was formed in
1991."The original concept... was a retreat for students  of color
— it was just an opportunity for them to  reflect about
how they're doing.at Western, how  they are affecting; the campus, look at
some ways to  improvetheir surroundings, share common ideas  and
experiences and take those ideas and move  them intosome sort of action,"
Vendiola said,  adding that in recent years the focus has been less on 
just studentsof color and more on students of color  and people who support
them.  "This year especially there's been a real strong  emphasis on ally
building, ally networking and  what an ally is," Vendiola said.  "I think
we'vemade a strong step ... to build  those relationships and break down
some barriers  and build a sense oftrust," he said.  A handful of students
from Whatcom Community  College, Northwest Indian College andSeattle 
University also attended the retreat.  "This retreat's breaking a barrier,"
Northwest  Indian CollegeStudent Levi Aleck said. "You learn  about every
culture and different ways on how to  work on situationswith different
minorities.  "I came out with more knowledge than I had going  in
— that just makes me feelstronger," Suzanne Vera  Cruz
said.  ||ll|||I|||||^:;|fter;;vigii=:  P^:€JK::;C*V^
Kinsman.  WesternstudentJesse Saigrnonarid graduateRowen Peterson 
attheUnitedFirst MethodistCfa vigil.  Relieve the blurredvision, 
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VISION CENTER  411 E. Magnolia  Bellingham, WA 98225  [360} 647-2020  $5
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Offer is limited to one coupon percustomer. Coupon must be  presented at
time of purchase and is not valid with other offers or discounts.Offer
valid at time of purchase only  and may not be discounted or credited
toward past or futurepurchases. Offer valid at participating Kinko's
locations  only. Offer expires 12/31/98. ©1998 Kinko's, Inc. All
rights reserved. Kinko's is a registered trademark of Kinko's  Ventures,
Inc. and is used by permission. Kinko's requires written permission from
the copyright holder in order to  reproduce any copyrightedmaterials. 
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     ----------

     Western Front - 1998 November 17 - Page 5

     ----------

November 17, 1998 NEWS THE WESTERN FRONT • 5  Kids
benefit from  Woodring book drive  ByHeidi Thomsen  The Western Front  In
keeping with the tradition of  giving people a hand up instead of ahand
out, Partners in Reading, an  Americorps Program sponsored by  Woodring
College of Education and  Circle K, a collegiate sector of the  Kiwanis
Club, is having a book  drive on campus to help encouragetoday's youth to 
further their reading  ability.  Partners in  Reading is a program 
Woodring  sponsorsby  employing work-study  students to  tutor children in 
k i n d e r g a r t en  through sixth  grade in twoBellingham elementary 
schools  and one Ferndale  e l e m e n t a r y  school, Alisa  Winkler,
co-coordinator of Partners  in Reading, said.  "The children tutored by our
 work-study students are a coupleof  grades behind their peers, so it is 
important they receive all the help  with reading that is available. Thaf s
 where we come in and try to help,"  Kathleen Holt, president of Circle K, 
said.  The book drive isimportant  because it gives children the chance  to
broaden their horizons through  reading, which betterprepares them  for
high school and college,  Kathleen Holt, president of Circle K,  said.
Circle K is acampus service  organization whose purpose is to do  community
and volunteer work, as  outlined in theAssociated Students'  Clubs and
Organizations directory.  "The children  tutored by our  work-studystudents
are a  couple of grades  behind their  peers."  Kathleen Holt  president of
Western Circle K  "Wehave already collected four  boxes of books for
helping kids to  read," Holt said, "but we hope to get  many more."  "(We)
want to remind students  going home for Thanksgiving break  to take a look
around theirhouses to  see if any children's books are lying  around they
don't need anymore,"  Winkler said.  Yoshiko Matsui, a coordinator  with
Winkler, said  fliers will be handed  out this week in  Red Square and
abanner will go up  Tuesday in Red  Square to raise students'  awareness 
of the book drive.  "Morepeople  means more  books," she said.  " ( T h r o
u g h  Partners in  Reading) we are  trying toemphasize  the need for  kids
to read outside  of school. Our goal is to make  parents realize theirrole
in child  reading development is essential,"  Holt said.  The Partners in
Reading book  drive will befrom 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.  Nov. 30 and Dec. 1 in
Viking Union  300. A drop-off box will be located at  Buchanan Towers for
people on the  south side of campus.  Winkler encouraged people to  drop
off new or slightlyused books  for children in kindergarten through  sixth
grades.  Holt pointed out the purpose of  the drive is for people to
understand  the importance of child development  through reading.  "If
people drop offbooks they  enjoyed as children, then the drive  will be
successful," she said.  ^P r CHESTNUT FAMILYPRACTICE  904 E. CHESTNUT ST.
BELLINGHAM WA. 98225  FAMILY HEALTH. WOMEN'S HEALTH.SPORTS MEDICINE 
CONVENIENT TO WWU CAMPUS (AT BOTTOM OF HILL)  WE ACCEPT MOSTMEDICAL HEALTH
PLANS.  TP  PHILIP M..ANDRESS JR.. DO  BOARD CERTIFIED FAMILYPHYSICIAN 
BARBARA BALFOUR. ARNP  FAMILY NURSE  PRACTIONER  (360)671-4400 
JANAWILLIAMS, ARNP  WOMEN'S HEALTH  CARE  BREWERY  BISTRO  Are you tired of
waiting 30minutes to be seated,  30 minutes to place your order and still
another  30 minutes to get your food whileyour stomach is  churning and
revolting against you for the "Liquid  Meal" that you consumed the
nightbefore?  YOU DESERVE BETTER  Boundary Bay Breakfast: No Wait. Hot,
Fresh,  Homemade Food.Espresso. Great, Fast Service.  Saturday  Sunday 9 am
- 1:30 pm  1107 Railroad Ave  Bellingham, WA647-5593  STRATA welcomes
director  By Cindy Nunley  The Western Front  If you are feeling lost or
outof  place on campus, STRATA may be  your answer.  Students That Return
After Time  Away has hired an enthusiastic new  director who is trying to
restore the  group, whose membership has  dwindled during the last year. 
Despite the fact that more than  2,000 STRATA students are on campus,  the
group has had a hard time  getting people involved, something  Director
Robin Jones wants to  change.  Jones, 26, wasrecently hired to fill  the
STRATA director position,  which has been vacant all quarter.  "Since I was
hiredin the middle  of the quarter, it's been kind of a late  start; I feel
like we're just beginning  to tap into theSTRATA popula-_  tion," Jones
said.  "Robin has come in the middle of  the quarter and has done
aphenomenal  job/' Resource and  Outreach Program Director Bekki 
Brown-WLnkels said.  Jones, whois pursuing her master's  degree in
teaching, said she  believes the population and the  need forSTRATA exist;
many students  have come into her office asking  where the older students
are oncampus, she said.  "Finding a way to become part of  the community
makes life a lot easier,"  Jonessaid.  Jones has planned many events  for
the coming months and has kept  STRATA'S Coffee Housegoing with  a few
needed changes.  "The Coffee House is a low-key  way for people to come and
meeteach other," Jones said.  The Coffee House, which meets  from noon
until 2 p.m. on  Wednesdays, hasbeen a time used  for guest speakers to
address the  group. This year, fewer guest speakers  will makeway for more
one-on-one  communication.  Jones' goal is to allow people to  find a small
group within thecampus  community to relate to.  "What I want to see
happening is  people forming friendships withinthe group," she said.  Jones
said she hopes to provide  an assortment of activities to allow  all
olderstudents to become  involved with something they  enjoy.  "We are open
to any ideas; we  just want tohook people up so that  they have a way to go
out and enjoy  themselves," Jones said.  Jones said shewants to do whatever
 she can to help students get  involved on campus.  "I've got a desk, I've
got acomputer,  I know how to make flyers  and I know how to call people,
so  tell me what you want to do,and  we'll put it together for you," she 
said.  Jones said it is easier for younger  students to becomeinvolved with
 their peers because many live in  dorms; she wants older students to  feel
they also havesomewhere to fit  in.  "There are plenty of things to do 
when you're a freshman, but when  you come backto school and you're  26,
who wants to live in the  dorms?" she asked.  "It was intense coming back
tocampus, and I spent the first two  months on hyper-adrenaline mode  just
trying to figure out how the  next day was going to come together,"  she
said. "We all know being a  student is overwhelming, and if  you have a
family, too, and are  working ... it's not very efficient to  be going out
alone to make  friends," Jones said.  STRATA has many events coming  up,
including an open-microphone  night, CPR certificationand  swing dancing;
Jones said she  hopes everyone will become  involved.STRATA's Assistant 
DirectorDavid Larew said he also  hopes more people will take advantage  of
STRATA'S offerings.  "If you're notpart of a social or  academic group,
then this exists for  you to get acquainted," Larew said.  "There areloads
of people out  there who want to do fun things  like go out and explore and
have a  good time otherthan school; this is  a good way to filter through 
because how else do you get to  know people oncampus?" Jones  said. 
Front/Cindy Nunley  Robin Jones was recently hired as the director of
StudentsThat Return After Time Away.  Jones said, as director, she will
seek to get older students involved oncampus.  Center offers online writing
help  By Dave Shepherd  The Western Front  Students submittingpapers for 
review to Western's Writing  Center may now do so electronically.  Writing
Center ProgramSupervisor Roberta Buck proudly  announced this week that
then-office  is now capable of receivingstudent papers online.  Using a
form provided on the  Writing Center's Web site, students  may submitpapers
of up to  10 pages in length via the Internet  for review by the center's
student  writing assistants.The form includes an option for  the student to
identify specific  questions or concerns they might  haveabout their
submissions,  which will help reviewers better  address the students'
needs. Buck  pointed outthat assistants will  not proofread or revise
papers  directly, although they will identify  recurring

     ----------

     Western Front - 1998 November 17 - Page 6

     ----------

6 • THE WESTERN FRONT NEWS November 17, 1998  Price tag
rising for higher education .  By Arvid Hokanson  The Western Front  Two
recent studies by the national  non-profit College Boardconcluded  that
tuition and fees at four-year  public universities rose an average  of 4
percent from lastyear, and a  record $60 billion in financial aid  was
available to students.  In comparison, Western's tuition and fees rose
slightly less than the  national average last year, 3.67 percent,  to $874
from $842 perquarter.  The two reports studied tuition  and fees, financial
aid and housing  costs at two- and four-yearpublic  and private
institutions nationwide.  The average tuition per year for  four-year
public universities is$3,243 and $14,508 for private institutions.  Other
findings in "Trends in  Student Aid" and "Trends inCollege Pricing" found
that:  • More students are relying on  some form of
financial aid.  • Themajority of financial aid is  in
loans.  • Student loans have increased,  while federal
grant aid hasdeclined.  • Many families do not begin 
planning for college early  enough.  • The majority
ofAmericans  overestimate the price of  college and may be discouraged  by
the costs.  •Tuition rateshave increased  faster
percentage-wise than  median family income.  Washington's Tuition
RatesWashington state's tuition is set  by the legislature, based in part
on  recommendations from the HigherEducation Coordinating Board.  Western
Vice President for External  Affairs Albert Frodeberg said theHECB bases
tuition-rate boosts on  increases in the median family  income.  The median
is found bytaking  the middle number in a list of  Undergraduate Residents,
Full-time 1998-1999  $12,000  $10,000$8,000  $6,000  $4,000  $2,000 
HWestern  • Nationa  Tuition  Fees  Front graphic/Ben
StablerBooks   Supplies  Housing Transportation Other Total  Source:
College Board  ranked numbers.  TheHECB has proposed a 4-per- -  cent
tuition increase, or a $35  increase, for the 1999-2000 school  yearand a
3.6-percent increase, to  $940, for the following year.  According to the
state, tuition rose  anaverage of about 8 percent for  regional
universities, including  Western, from 1976 to 19% and 9  percentfor
community colleges and  research schools. Since then, tuition  has risen
about 4 percent per year atall institutions.  Frodeberg said during budget 
crunches, 'Tuition is under scrutiny  in every budgetsession, and in hard 
times they (the legislature) have a  tendency to raise tuition."  According
to the State Office of  Financial Management, median  family income has
increased  between 4.7 and 5.2 percentevery  year between 1996 and 1998. 
The College Board found that  more families need to make collegefinancial
plans earlier than a student's  junior or senior year in high  school. 
"The reality for families isthat if  they don't plan and save early, they 
may face the prospect of borrowing  more than necessary,"John Joyce, 
manager of communications and.  training for the College Scholarship 
Service, said.  Joycesaid an increasing number  of states, including
Washington,  offer pre-payment programs.  Washington'sGuaranteed  Education
Tuition (GET) program  allows families to pay current  tuition rates for
futureenrollment at  a state college or university.  'Trends in College
Pricing" found  that many familiesoverestimate the  price of college. These
misconceptions  can lead to students being discouragedfrom applying to
certain  schools and families from saving  and investing money early.  "The
truth is that amajority of  Americans often overestimate the  price of
attending college and may  be discouraged bythose miscalculations," 
College Board President  Donald Stewart said in a prepared  statement. 
Henoted that the majority of students  and four-year colleges and 
universities pay less than $4,000 peryear for tuition and fees.  Student
Financial Aid  A record amount of student-aid  was available last
year— more than  $60 billion nationally in scholarships,
 grants, loans and employment  awarded tostudents.  'Trends in Student Aid"
found  "the vast majority of growth has  come in the form of
studentborrow-ing.  Western's 1997-98 financial-aid  disbursements topped
$52 million  last year, an increase of6.4 percent.  About one-third of
financial aid at  Western comes from loans.  The largest amount of student
aid  comes from the federal government  in the form of Pell Grants and
subsidized  and unsubsidizeddirect  loans.  Joyce said Pell Grants, the
largest  form of government aid, were  approved to give $4,500per year to 
students, but only $3,000 was appropriated  to each student, despite an 
increased need for assistance.  College Board Executive Director  for
Policy Analysis Lawrence  Gladieux said in a preparedstatement  that in the
1970s, Pell Grants  covered about three-fourths of the  cost of attending a
publicfour-year  college, while today they cover  about one-third of the
cost.  "It is almost a complete reversalfrom 15 years ago," Joyce said. 
"Financial aid is now based on 60  percent in loans and 40 percent
ingrants."  "Students are realizing if they  want to go to college, they
have to  get a loan," Western's SeniorAssistant Director for Student 
Financial Resources Georgette Chun  said.  Last year 8,206 studentsreceived
 some form of financial aid at  Western, which included students  with and
without financial need. More than 64 percent of the aid was  distributed in
loans, 18.5 percent in  grants and the rest inscholarships  and employment.
Some students  receive aid from scholarships, even  though they may nothave
a financial  need for them.  Of the almost $2.7 million distributed  in
scholarships, about halfcomes from Western and the other  from private
donors. Rachel  Oscarson, scholarship coordinator  forStudent Financial
Resources,  said all of Western's scholarships are  distributed each year. 
Studentshave to start paying off  loans six months after being at least  a
half-time student. Joyce said  default rates are at an all-time low,  and
Western has the lowest rate in  the state—3.3 percent in
1996.  "Debt levelsare manageable for  most students, especially those who 
complete their degrees," Gladieux  said. 'Torsome students, however,  there
is an imbalance of grants and  loans in the system," Gladieux said. 
"Thegrowing reliance on loans  puts a disproportionate burden on  the
neediest students, who were  neverexpected to have to borrow  when these
programs were created.  The borrowing trend especially  hurtsthose who
don't complete  their degrees and are left with a debt  they can't repay." 
Undergraduate Non-Resident, Full-time 1998-1999  518,000  516,000  514,000 
512,000  510,000  $8,000  $6,000  $4,000$2,000  BWestern 
• Nationa  Tuition  Fees Books   Supplies  Housing
Transportation Other TotalSource: College Board  WWU Financial Aid
Disbursements by  Type  Program, 1997-1998  Scholarships  Employment  12% 
Front graphics/Ben Stabler Source: Student Financial
Resourcesliiiii^HB^^BpliBill^BII  j|§||]^p|||J||i|^|||J|g|^^ 
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•

     ----------

     Western Front - 1998 November 17 - Page 7

     ----------

November 17, 1998 FEATURES THE WESTERN FRONT • 7  All you
really need is love  Love Pantryoffers a wide variety of sexual products,
from inflatable dolls to vibrators  By Sara Stephens  The WesternFront 
Whether you are naughty or  nice this holiday season, Santa  may bring you
some special toys,which are guaranteed to expand  your existing toy
repertoire. The  naughty people may get ForPlay'sSucculent Lotion, which
responds  to touch and breath by heating the  skin, "creating a warm
sensualglow." For nice people, Santa  could put Hide-A-Vibe traveling 
vibrators under their trees, which  come intheir own discreet carrying 
cases that, at first glance,  appear to be lipstick/cosmetic 
compacts.Whether most like it or not, sex  shops dot this country,
providing  the latest in orgasmic technology  andfun bedroom toys. Love 
Pantry in Norm Bellingham off  Meridian Street has been providing 
thecommunity with its  wildest fantasies for about nine  years.  Love
Pantry employees use  pseudonyms forprotective purposes  at the store, and
requested  to be quoted by those names.  Sam, an employee,has been  there
for more than a year. "I  stumbled upon this job by finding  an ad in the
paper; hell, I wasdesperate."  "I have been here,much longer  than I
thought I would be," Sam  said. "My day-to-dayexperience  is very bland.
It's retail, just like  any other retail. Well, kind of."  The average
customer of Love  Pantry is like the average person  walking down the
street. No specific  traits bring someone into asex store where their
inhibitions  are tested and curiosity is set free.  "There are no 'typical'
customers," Jo, a Love Pantry  employee for more than nine  months, said.
"Couples, singles,  18 to 100-year-olds — we have a 
true mixture."  "The typical customer is the  female or male right next to
you,"  Sam said. "Myold high school  principal came in the other night. 
Who knew?"  When customers who look too  youngenter the store, they must 
show I.D. to prove they are older  than 18.  The store seems
systematicallyset-up by a kinkiness rating. Gag  gifts are to the left side
of the  entrance, while massage oils and  ediblelotions grace the center of
 the floor. The farther back the  customer goes, the more uncommon  sextoys
they may find. From  penis enlargers to the vibrating  Back Door Buzzers,
which, for  some, heightensexual pleasure  when inserted in the anus, Love 
Pantry has a remarkable array of  items for any type ofsexual  encounter. 
As customers round the room,  passing various penis pumps that  claim to
arouse thepenis for a  harder erection and more intense  ejaculation, they
pass the his-and-hers  g-string underwearin assorted  colors and patterns,
guaranteeing  personal and partner viewing  satisfaction.  Roundingthe back
and continuing  down the left wall, leather  items are next on the journey
Lin-  Front/TylerWatson  A countertop covered with naughty delights like
edible lotions.  Front/Tyler Watson  Love Pantry,located in Meridian Plaza,
has products ranging from dildos to pornographic films.  gerie equipped
withmetal studs  and a collar hang on' the wall  beside the lacy, more
typically  feminine lingerie. With a fineassortment of whips, collars, 
leashes and penis leashes just a  hop, skip and a jump away, customers can
outfit themselves and  their partners with a full sadomasochistic  sexual
costume.  The books arenext in line. Jo  recommends the book, "The  Guide
to Getting It On."  "It is a funny but learning  book,"she said, referring
to its  teaching qualities for sexual  encounters. "That book is very 
informative and fun,too," Sam  said. "The books are, by far, my  most
favorite items in the store."  Kama Sutra items are alsonear  the front of
the store. These products  have natural ingredients,  which have been
formulated todelight the senses and heighten  pleasure.  "All are
delightfully edible and  uniquely soothing to all parts of the body,"
according to an  explanatory card written by the  management and
strategically  placed in front of the items. "They  are perfect for the
most intimate  encounters."  Love Pantry also rents a lot of  movies to its
customers.  Almost every type of movie is  offered by Love Pantry,
including  a wide range of gayand lesbian  films. Love Pantry also offers
less  mainstream, pornographic films  with, for instance, women portraying 
high school cheerleaders  and naughty farmer's daughters,  oral sex movies
and moviesabout  the art of love-making and massage.  "Love Pantry has a
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think the staff makesan  effort to make you feel comfort-  See Love Pantry,
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Comparative, Gender, and Multicultural Studies: Anthropology  353 (4); East
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     ----------

     Western Front - 1998 November 17 - Page 8

     ----------

8 • THE WESTERN FRONT FEATURES November 17, 1998  Learn
your renter's rights  By AngelaSmith  The Western Front  When the toilet
refuses to flush, or if it's  so cold inside during the earlymorning  hours
that tendrils of steam rise to meet the  air from a mere breath, it's time
to call the  landlordfor repairs.  As many renters know, a phone call to 
the landlord may elicit replies of "next  week" or "assoon as we can get to
it."  Must a tenant wait patiently, huddled  under layers of blankets and
using thebathroom next door?  A tenant has rights under the national 
Landlord /Tenant Act and in the revisedcodes of Washington state that
define both  landlord and tenant responsibilities.  "Most of the
tenantsdon't really know  what their rights are," Bellingham attorney 
Terrence Lewis said.  According to theLandlord/Tenant Act,  tenants are
only required to wait 24 hours  before the landlord has to begin
makingrepairs.  The same waiting period applies in  instances where there
is a lack of electricity,  water, or during a life-threatening emergency 
such as a gas leak.  Repairs for refrigerators, stove ranges,  ovens
ormajor plumbing fixtures, such as  toilets or kitchen sinks, require a
72-hour  wait, according tolandlord/tenant law. All  other repairs require
a 10-day wait.  If the tenant caused damage, the landlordis not required to
fix the damaged  item.  If repairs have not been made in the  allotted
time, a tenant hasfive options. He  or she may hire the lowest bidder of an
outside  repair agent and deduct the cost fromthe rent, hire an attorney,
repair it him- or  herself if possible, move out or put rent into  an
escrow account— a separate account  similar to a trust
fund — upon the advice of  an attorney.  Before acting
on any ofthe aforementioned  solutions, a tenant must realize that  the
Landlord/Tenant Act also hasrestrictions.  If rent or utilities have not
been paid in  full, the landlord is not required to act on  repairrequests.
 Tenants who are live-in employees of the  landlord, renters in a mobile
home park or  residentsin a medical, religious, correctional,  recreational
or educational institution,  including dorms, are notcovered by the 
Landlord/Tenant Act.  "A lot of tenants think that if a toilet is  not
working, they just stoppaying rent/'  Lewis said. "They have to give
written  notice." 
iHi^ttBiiifciiiBiliiliiPfcSftKB^B|||i|i||^p|||j||i|iB|^B^^^ 
IBlliiBliiliHi^HiBHMii^^^^^  The tenant is  required to give written 
notice includingthe address of the residence,  the name of the  landlord
and the specific  repair request.  The waitingperiods  begin after the
landlord  has received this  notice.  The tenant cannot  deduct more than
onemonth's rent for each  repair done by an outside  agent or half of 
one-month's rent for  repairs done bythe  tenant.  In any 12-month  period,
no more than  two-month's rent can  be deducted for  repairs doneby an
outside  agent and only  one month's rent for  repairs done by the  tenant,
according tolandlord/tenant law.  Repair requests  must be reasonable,  and
tenants may not  hinder the landlord'sattempt to make the  repairs.  The
tenant must  allow the landlord  access to the residence  in order tomake
these  repairs.  The landlord, however, does not have  free access to a
tenant's house.  The landlordmust give two-day's notice  of when he or she
will enter the residence,  unless the landlord is showing theresidence  to
a prospective buyer, in which case  he only needs to give one-day's notice.
In  the event ofan emergency or if the residence  is abandoned, the
landlord may  enter freely.  While many landlordsabide by landlord/  tenant
law, tenants' rights are sometimes  violated.  Violations most often
occurbecause a  tenants do not know their rights or did not  use the
correct procedure in informing the  landlord, said Katy Kellogg,
coordinator at  the Legal Information Center.  The Legal Information Center
is locatedin Viking Union 210 and may be reached at  650-6111. It provides
legal information and  attorney referralsto students, Kellogg said.  Out of
approximately 350 student-clien-varie  tele who came to the center
lastyear, about  70 percent, or 245 students, came with  problems
concerning landlord/tenant law,  Kelloggsaid.  The most common problems
involved  deposits, breaking leases, invasion by the  landlord andrepairs,
Kellogg said.  Mary-Anne Grafton at the Whatcom  County Opportunities
Council said mostlandlord/tenant complaints concern  deposits, the breaking
of verbal contracts  by the landlord and highrent rates.  The Opportunities
Council, at 734-5121,  extension 370, is only one of many  resources
renters can use to learn about  landlord /tenant law and voice concerns. 
Other resources, such as renter's guides  and handbooks outlining
Washington state  and national landlord/tenant laws are  available at
locallibraries.  Internet searches for landlord/tenant  law will procure
everything from the  Revised Codes ofWashington, title 59, to  the Tenant's
Union web site, which  includes procedures for requests and  phonenumbers
tenants may call to issue  complaints.  These resources allow renters to
inform  themselves oftheir rights and steps they  can take to ensure their
rights are not violated.  "Students aren't proactiveenough," Kellogg  said,
noting that students do not act  on their rights because they may feel 
they'retoo busy or can't afford legal services.  While seemingly an arduous
and expensive  process,landlord/tenant disputes concerning  rent deductions
and deposit withholding  can be settled in small-claims court  for about
$21.  For more serious problems, the Legal  Information Center offers
referrals tolocal  attorneys who will sometimes give free  half-hour
consultations.  A tenant may also report violationswith  an agency, such as
the Tenant's Union, that  may force landlords to make repairs that  violate
city orcounty building, housing or  health codes. 
IIBi^lHiBBiiBBiii^l^lBllBB
IBHBl^BI^BiiiiilliiHisSii^BBll^iBi^^HiBiili^HiiM^iiB 
ISi^R^wli^^lliMHIMWlBillllll

     ----------

     Western Front - 1998 November 17 - Page 9

     ----------

November 17, 1998 FEATURES THE WESTERN FRONT • 9  By Erin
Fredrichs  The Western FrontOne forward flip with four full twists  drives
one gymnast into the foam like a  corkscrew into cheap wine.Two back flips,
 with her body extended completely, look  so effortless, it's as though she
flew to thatheight instead of bounced.  Below, jaws ache from hanging open,
 necks hurt from the rhythmic motioncaused by following her body up and 
down and up and down. Quickly, her body  launches from the whitenylon,
twisting,  rolling and flipping in a way only tram-polinists,  or bouncers,
can do. The spectatorsgawk at the positions these athletes  hurl themselves
into from the springs of a  trampoline.  Thirty-fiveminutes to the north,
through  the pesky border patrol and into Langley,  British Columbia,Flip
City,awaits, a haven for those  who never learned to stop  bouncing off the
walls. In  an old building, host to amini ice arena, a roller rink  and
this gymnastics center,  people of all ages are learning  to flip.  On Feb.
1, 1998, Rusty  Pierce, former Canadian  trampolining champion,  bought
Langley Aero-  GymnasticSports Center  and changed the name to  Flip City.
In October 1997,  the Sports Center had 150members; a year later, with 
Pierce's ownership, membership  increased threefold.  "Our philosophy is
for  anyone who comes here to  have fun, learn the fundamentals  (of
gymnastics)  and gain a level offitness,"  Pierce said.  His attitude
created an  affectionate following of  athletes; some athletes  workedwith
him previous  to Flip City and help bring  in business.  "I wanted to come
and  jump with him when hestarted his own  club; he's got a great coaching
style," said  Kaija Farstad, a former national-levelgymnast  who converted
to bouncing and trains  at Flip City.  Flip City is a center for
gymnastics, butthe trampolines dominate the facility.  The 2000 Olympics in
Sydney are the  first to include the newestgymnastic sport,  trampolining,
as an event. A certain number  of countries with athletes able tocompete 
on the trampoline are required for the  event to be added to the games. The
 announcement ofthe addition of the sport  to the games created a bouncing
boom —  25 countries joined the competitionsince  the
announcement.  "Trampolining is like feeling like you are  flying; you
can't get that from othersports," said one of Flip City's rising  bouncers,
Rachel Moore.  Flip City is the home to two 7 by 14 footAustralian
string-bed trampolines. These  official competitive-sized trampolines steal
 the spotlight.Harnesses linger at the side,  ready to support the amateur.
The ceiling is  raised an additional 10 feetabove one  string bed for those
who bounce higher  than 25 feet.  "I like the height and thrill and
thefeeling  of control I get on these trampolines,"  may dismount onto two
large mats or finish  theirroutines on the trampoline.  "Bouncers don't go
as high (on the double-  mini), and everything happensfaster,"  Pierce
said. The pit is a safety precaution, a  soft landing for those moving up
the skill  ladder. It is not used during competition.  Forty feet of black
nylon creates the  trampoline known as the fast track, anarrow,  low-lying
trampoline. This tramp is  for tumblers rather than for bouncers.  "It
makes tumblingsofter on the body,"  Pierce said. The fast track hosts a
contest to  anyone who walks into the gym; theone  who can cross it in the
fewest jumps wins.  The record is three.  Trampolines dominate the
scenery,but  this is not the reason most people join Flip  City. Pierce
recognizes gymnastics is not for  everyone,so he developed alternatives to 
traditional gymnastics to attract a wide  Front/Erin Fredrichs  Above
right:Rachel Moore flies through the air. Above left: Kaija Farstad does a
tuck. Bottom: Owner and  formerCanadian trampolining champion Rusty Pierce
watches Brandi Riley's textbook execution of a layout.Farstad said.  A
bouncer can also propel from a double-mini  tramp into the 5 foot deep,
foam-block  filledpit. The double-mini is a narrow,  angled trampoline made
of bands of nylon  woven together, instead of the traditional  mesh
composition of backyard trampo--  lines. The event involves two tricks;
both  can beperformed on the tramp, or one can  be during the 20-meter
approach to the  tramp. For die double-minievent, bouncers  breadth of
customers. By creating classes  that allow anyone to come in and have 
theirturn on the equipment, Pierce is promoting  an atmosphere for fun. 
"All the years that I trained were ablast;  I want people who come here to
have that  kind of experience," Pierce said. "We try to  create anavenue
for everyone to join."  For those who just want to jump around,  Flip City
has an adult drop-in classthree  nights per week. No restrictions apply,
and  only $8 Canadian pays for use of the facility  for anhour and a half. 
Jumping has benefits for athletes from a  wide range of sports. Skiers,
snow- andwakeboarders, martial artists, divers,  cheerleaders and even
wrestlers can  improve their skills with somefundamentals  of gymnastics. 
"Gymnastics is the ultimate sport,"  Pierce said. "It's not aerobic, but
itcovers  all the other basics."  With education systems cutting back on 
physical education in schools, anextracurricular  activity is necessary for
kids to stay  fit, Pierce said. He wants people to take  what they learn
from Flip City and be able  to apply it to other activities in their lives.
 Broken bones, strains andsprains are  common concerns for anyone
considering  doing gymnastics. Twenty-five years of  coachingtaught Pierce
that adults are the  biggest and scariest athletes to deal with.  People
are not allowed toattempt skills they are not  physically ready to do. 
Intelligent progressions  in activities allow people  tolearn respect for
the  equipment and what they  can and can't do, he said.  "Risk is involved
in  everythingwe do," Pierce  said. This risk is eliminated  by the use of
safety  belts, the foam pit and 23  giant crash mats.  The belts linger
above  the giant string-bed trampolines.  The foam pit rests  below the
edge ofbalance  beams and the tumbling  floor. With all the existing 
precautions, Pierce insists  there is alwaysroom for at  least one more
mat.  Hand spotting is the  most effective means of  protection against
injury.Being too close to see the  whole picture, the hand  spotter has to
be able to  feel the action and knowwhat the bouncer is doing  right or
wrong.  "We have to gain the athletes  trust by spotting  them,"Pierce
said. The spotters focus on  the safety factor to help the spotted land on 
their feet.  Landing isexactly what Pierce did. After  years of bouncing
from club to club, he settled  down at Flip City.  FlipCity is Pierce's
life pursuit. By having  enough energy and risking a little  money, he set
a dream inmotion. He now  has the opportunity to provide the best  quality
programs. His Flip City has peopleflipping out.  I "~*i*ik

     ----------

     Western Front - 1998 November 17 - Page 10

     ----------

10 • THE WESTERN FRONT SPORTS November 17, 1998  The
Western Front  The Western women'srugby  team pulled off an upset against 
Reed College last Saturday,  :,scoring;a;:lQr^  Many Westernplayers were 
HI, so five B ^  at new::ppsitipns.:. i" '-:W-^K^M^::\  ^Bpttt S(Crum-halY 
and thre6 orfourofit^igry^^cd  pack
.•':• were::?;'--new;''-; fpn^ard 
SlP::the:secdnd'hesf^^  'Tl|hjn]^^e;-!knew..;we had tip  step i ^ P ^  and
as a r|lt;jiilt, I think we felt;;  really strphg gpirig into the  garnev"
she said.  The teammissedboth: of its  point-after kicks, which  could've
helped winthe garne;  But Reed also missed both ofits  point-after'kicks,
enabling the  Flames to tie. '  The; Flames ha ve their bigge$t:  test this
weekendagainst big-timerival  and defendmg-charn-pipn  Central.  -Because
Central is so intimidating,  v/e^^recome out  wiJtrt me s a m e^  against
Reed/ Sanguinetti said,;  Jll^Itvahvrays ,• helps to Have
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Fab-haven  (360) 671-5655  Western flies by Blue Angels  By Tim Wyse  The
WesternFront  Western's men's basketball  team rounded out its exhibition 
season with a dramatic 85-82 win  over The Son's Blue Angels  Monday night.
 The Vikings were led by 18  points and 10  r e b o u n d s  fromsenior 
forward Mike  Simms.  Simms has  led the team in  scoring and  rebounding
in  each of its two  e x h i b i t i o n  games.  "I bring experience, 
dedication and hard work  to this team/' Simms said. "It took  me four
years to realize that hard  work is the most important thing,  but now that
I am here, I am morerelaxed."  "He played well in both exhibition  games,"
Head Coach Brad  Jackson said. "He scored,rebounded and just flat out 
played hard."  Western came out strong, scoring  18 points in the first
fiveminutes.  All 18 were posted by  Sehome connection Jared and  Jacob
Stevenson — brothers whoboth graduated from Sehome  High
School.  Jared Stevenson finished with  18 points and six assists;Jacob
fin-  Simms  Front/Bobby Stone  Freshman guard Shelton Diggs hustles
between two defenders.ished with eight points, all in the  first half.
Freshman guard Shelton  Diggs contributed 15 points in  only16 minutes of
play.  "Shelton played very well  tonight," Jackson said. "He is a  very
smart player and heknows  the game very well."  The Vikings turned the ball
 over 26 times; the Blue Angels  had 17 turnovers.  "We weren't pressed
very hard  tonight, and we still made a lot of  unforced errors," Jackson
said.  "Weare a lot better ball-handling  team than we showed tonight." 
"That's definitely something  we need to work on — not
fouling  as much," Jackson said.  The Vikings have their first regular- 
season action Fridayand  Saturday at the Colorado School  of Mines
Shootout. Their first  home action will be Nov. 27 and  28,when they host
the Western  Thanksgiving Classic.  Viking volleyball  ousted in opening 
round of playoffs By Darcy Spann  The Western Front  Western's women's
volleyball  team finished its season with a  lossto Brigham Young 
University-Hawaii last Thursday,  falling 0-3 in its opening-round  match
of the PacificWest  Conference Championships in  Laie, Hawaii.  The No.
8-seeded Vikings, who  defeated BYU-Hawaiiin their  last meeting at the
quarterfinals  of the 1990 NAIA National  Tournament, ended their season 
witha disappointing overall  record of 15-14.  Middle blocker Tanya Price
led  the Vikings with seven kills.Senior outside hitter Staci  Asher
contributed five kills and  seven digs.  The No. 1-seeded Seasiders,whose
60-mateh winning streak  was snapped Tuesday with a loss  to No. 7-ranked
University of  Hawaii,improved to 25-1.  Price, a senior, finished her 
four-year career as Western's all-time  leader in blocks(504) and  ; attack
percentage (.355).  During the last two seasons,  Price- was selected: to
sevenstraight regular season all-tournament  teams..  Price's 394 kills,
116 blocks and  .356 attackpercentage were all  team highs for the Vikings.
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     Western Front - 1998 November 17 - Page 11

     ----------

November 17, 1998 SPORTS THE WESTERN FRONT • 11  Voice of
the Vikings  With 16 seasonsannouncing Western football and  men's
basketball, Viking mic-man Bill Palmer has  become a familiarfixture in
Western athletics  Front/Bobby Stone  'As a little boy, I  would sit at the
 desk in my  bedroomand  do pretend  announcing/'  Bill Palmer  Viking
announcer  By Alyssa Pfau  The Western Front  As thefans file into the
grandstands of  Civic Field, anxiously awaiting the start  of another
Viking football game, a voice  is heard overhead.  "And now, fans, your
Western  Washington University Vikings ... "  The voice is strong and
confident, one  of authority; yet its reverberating presence  is
intertwined so naturally withthe game that the two flow together as  one
entity.  This is the ideal announcing Bill  Palmer strives for.  "Ishould
be able to do my job so well  that the crowd doesn't even realize who  was
announcing the game,"Palmer said,  adding that it is his job to portray the
 game as accurately as possible. "People  come towatch the team play and
players  perform."  After 16 years of announcing Viking  football and
men'sbasketball, the 48-  year-old Palmer is valuable to athletics at 
Western, said Paul Madison, SportsInformation director at Western.  "It is
a huge value when you have  someone who knows the process andis  clued in
and ready to go," Madison said.  "I would take Bill over anyone I have 
heard at any otherschool."  Eager to be involved  in athletics, Palmer 
began his announcing  career for the Vikings  in 1971-72, his senior  year
at Western.  "I figured if I couldn't  play, the next best  seat was the
announcer'sseat," Palmer said.  Palmer announced  Viking football and 
men's basketball for a  single season, whichwas enough to make  an
impression on  Madison, his friend  and classmate at the  time. Palmer went
onto earn his master's  from Western in elementary  education and  began
teaching in the  south KingCounty  area.  In 1983, he moved back to
Bellingham,  and as soon as Madison heard Palmer  was intown/he was eager
to get Palmer  back in the announcer's seat.  "I knew I had a person I
could count  onand someone who would do a good  job," Madison said. "If he
was interested,  he was the man."Palmer accepted the position 
— for him, it was a  childhood fantasy come to  life. 
"As a little boy Iwould sit  at the desk in my bedroom  and do pretend
announcing,"  Palmer said. He said  he listened to the radio and  TV sports
announcers and  announced the games as he  heard them.  Today, Palmer
sitsin the  public address box overlooking  Civic Field whenever  the
Vikings host a game.  He has a viewdown the  40-yard line and announces 
the game to thousands of  people.  Those who know his work  sayWestern's
athletic  department is fortunate to  have him.  "(Palmer) has a strong 
voice and puts in asense of  humor with his announcements,"  head football
coach  Rob Smith said. "When one  of ourplayers has a good  run or play,
(Palmer) goes a  long way toward getting the  fans excited." 
Front/BobbyStone  Conveying a sense of excitement to the  crowd is an
important part of an  announcer's job, Palmersaid.  He added players like
Sam Hanson  and Ben Clampitt make an announcer's  job a lot easier. 
"Aquarterback like Sam Hanson is an  announcer's dream come true," Palmer 
said. "He makes really greatplays and  gets the crowd into the game with
those  plays."  Palmer admits his bias shows when  theVikings make a really
great play.  "I look upon myself as sort of an assistant  cheerleader at
times, but I also try to  be very respectful to the visiting team,"  Palmer
said.  "He supports the home team, which Ilike," Smith said. "Every home
announcer  should show a little favoritism."  One of Palmer's bestfeatures
as an  announcer is he can announce simple situations  and more
complicated. ones,  Madison said.  "No matter what the score is or result, 
you always know that (Palmer) is going  to do the samesuper job," Madison
said.  Palmer said he couldn't do his job  without the help of Brian Rick,
hisassistant  and second set of eyes.  Rick, however, is reluctant to take
any  credit.  "(Palmer) could dothe job on his own;  I am. just there to
verify what he saw,"  Rick said.  Madison has just as much troubleimagining
the end of Palmer's announcing  career at Western as Palmer has.  "I would
have a hard timeeven thinking  about having a basketball or football  game
without (Palmer) announcing,"  Madison said. £  2 
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     ----------

     Western Front - 1998 November 17 - Page 12

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12 • THE WESTERN FRONT SPORTS November 17, 1998 
Football: Vikings lose,  settle for secondplace  By Timothy Wyse  The
Western Front  Western came up one touchdown  short of a
co-ColumbiaFootball  Association title last Saturday at  Southern Oregon,
losing 28-21.  NAIA All-American runningback  Griff Yates scored two
second-half touchdowns,  including a go-ahead six-yarder  with 3:19 left
inthe game, leading the  Southern Oregon Raiders to victory.  The loss has
the Vikings ending with a  5-5record for the second straight season.  They
would have had a share of the CFA  championship if they had won either of 
their last two games.  Instead, they finished with a 3-2 record  in their
division, whileSouthern Oregon  snapped a four-game losing streak to end 
the season 2-3 in league play and 4-6overall.  Last season, the Vikings
upended the  Raiders in a 27-26 upset, winning the  game in the last
90seconds to take away  the Raiders' championship hopes.  Yates, who was
nursing a back injury,  had only two carries in the first half but 
finished the game with 92 yards on 15  carries. His 57-yard touchdownscurry
in  the third quarter gave his team a 14-13  lead.  The Raiders extended
that lead on an  80-yardpass from quarterback Dan  Walters to Mike Long,
who also caught a  53-yarder in the second quarter.Long  finished the game
with 133 yards on only  three receptions.  The Vikings rallied to tie the
game  with 8:24 to play. Quarterback Sam  Hanson connected with his
favorite  receiver, Ben Clampitt, for a 55-yardtouchdown pass. He then
successfully  completed the two-point conversion to  Sean Marshall. 
Hansonfinished his record-breaking  season, completing 20 of 38 passes for 
260 yards and three touchdowns. He was  sacked six times.  The Vikings held
a 13-7 halftime lead  behind two Hanson touchdowns.  Hansonhit Jeremy Klug
with a 12-yard  touchdown pass that was set up by a  Marty Juergens
interception. It was Juergens' team-leading fourth of the season.  Hanson
also threw a 13-yard touchdown  to tight endBen Fairbanks in the  second
quarter. But for the second week  in a row, the Vikings couldn't sustain 
their lead in the second half.  Southern Oregon had a 519-291 total-yard 
advantage over the Vikings, led bythe career-high 291 yards on 19-of-26 
passing by Walters, who also had two  touchdowns.  Hanson setWestern
single-season  records for touchdown passes (28), completions  (232) and
pass attempts(394).  His 270.6 yards per game is the top mark,  while his
2,766 yards is the second best in  schoolhistory.  Clampitt had four
receptions for 74  yards, giving him 71 catches for 1,288  yards and
10touchdowns ending the  season. These are all second-best marks  in school
history.  The Raider victorywas its first against  the Vikings since 1984;
Southern Oregon  had lost five straight to Western.  FourViking football
players  named first-team all-stars  pifjipiii  Clampitt  By Timothy Wyse 
The Western Front Wide receiver Ben Clampitt was a unanimous  pick among
four Western football players  named to thefirst-team Columbia Football 
Association all-star squad, which was  announced yesterday.  Tight end Ben
Fairbanks,  quarterback Sam Hanson  and kick returner Scott  Noteboom round
out the  quartet.  Clampitt finished with 71  catches for 1,288 yards and 
10 touchdowns, all of which  are CFA-best totals andsecond  in Western
history.  Clampitt set single-game  school records with 295 receiving yards
againstHumboldt State Oct. 3 and 12 catches against  Western Oregon Oct.
31.  Hanson led the CFA in everypassing statistic  and in total offense. 
He completed 232 of 394 attempts for 2,766  yards, connecting for28
touchdowns with only  eight interceptions.  His touchdown, completion and
attempt  numbers were allbests in  Western history.  Hanson also set school
single-  game records, passing  for 480 yardsagainst  Humboldt State and
throwing  five touchdowns on two  different occasions.  Fairbanks had
49catches,  sixth best in school history,  for 531 yards and six
touchdowns;  Noteboom aver-  FairbanksHanson  aged 31 yards-per-kickoff
return.  Noteboom was selected to the CFA's second  team as arunning back
along with defensive  tackle John Bergford, linebacker Andy Harris,  strong
safety MartyJuergens and offensive tackle  Nick McClain.  Noteboom led
Western in rushing (466 yards,  4.1average). He was second  in all-purpose
yards (106.7  average) and fourth in pass-receiving  (29receptions, 229 
yards, 4 touchdowns).  Harris led the Vikings with  76 tackles, and
Juergens led  theteam with four interceptions.  Bergford had 39 tackles, 
10.5 for a loss of yards.  Six players receivedhonorable  mention: Josh
Bailey for his roles as place  kicker and punter, offensive guard Greg
Bell,defensive tackle Mark Bone, defensive end Josh  Graham, defensive end
Nate Spitzer and free  safetyMike Williams.  Bone led the team with 15
tackles-for-a-loss,  including and eight sacks. Graham had 14tackles- 
for-a-loss and caused two fumbles. Williams  was second in tackles with 67
and interceptedtwo passes. Spitzer had 12.5  tackles-for-a-loss.  Western
earned a tie for  second place with a 3-2record in its first season as a 
NC AA-II member.  The Vikings led the league  in passing offense,averaging 
303.3 yards per game,  and tied for the league lead  in scoring offense at
24.9  Noteboompoints per game.  Attention:  Washington State  active
government employee!  We are a  $0/$10Healthplan!  This means that as a
Washington State active  government employee, your monthly premiumis  $0
for you and your child(ren) and $10 for  your spouse.  Northwest Washington
Medical Bureau of fers:  • the largest provider network
in Whatcom,  Skagit, Island, A San Juan Counties  •
local,community leadership  • 66 years in the community 
Sign up by November 30 for coverage throughNorthwest Washington Medical
Bureau.  Your employer should have enrollment information,  or, you can
call NWMB at 734-8000 in  Bellingham, or, 336-9660 in Mount Vernon. 
££} NORTHWESTWASHINGTON  MEDICAL BUREAU  An
Independent Licensee of the Blue Shield Association  A locally-controlled,
community health plan.  Big Brown  Santa  NeedYOU!  UPS is now hiring for
Seasonal HelpHelpers-$7.00 -$3.50 per hour  % Must have access to a
telephone  *• Must meet UPS appearancestandards  *
Willing to work in adverse weather conditions  * Positions available
throughout WesternWash.  *A11 positions require the ability to lift up to
70 lbs  and be at least 18 years old  UPS will be oncampus to interview on
Nov. 23rd  2 4 th  in Old Main rm 230. Sign up for interviews in the 
StudentEmployment Center. For more info,  call Alicia Gibson  ( 2 0 6 ) 7 6
4 - 3 4 9 7 ext 7795.  -SS- UnitedParcel Service Values Diversity  in our
Workplace  Equal Opportunity Employer

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     Western Front - 1998 November 17 - Page 13

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November 17, 1998 OPINIONS THE WESTERN FRONT • 13  Theory
not science  Creationism,evolution valid philosophies  Derrick Scheid 
COMMENTARY  Recent scientific  discoveries have  shownthat the debate 
between Charles  Darwin's theory of  evolution and the creation  story does
not  belongin the science  classroom.  Darwin said, "If it  could be shown
that  any biological organ or system existed which  could not possibly be
made by numerous,  slight modifications, my theory would 
absolutelybreakdown."  Since Darwin shook the world with his  theory,
science has made  numerous biologicaldiscoveries  show living systems are
too  complex to have evolved from  a chemical reaction.  MichaelBehe, a
Biochemist  from Lehigh University from  Bethlehem, Penn. said, "No  one
can give a detailedaccount  of how cilium, or vision, or  blood clotting,
or any complex biochemical  process might havedeveloped in a  Darwinian
fashion." Scientists can examine  the smallest components of life, and
theyhave found that living systems are like  machines, full of irreducibly
complex systems.  According toDarwin's statement, this  means evolution as
a theory for the origins of  life breaks down.  This by nomeans proves
anything about  how life began, but the complexity of living  systems down
to the micro level does cast  enough doubt on Darwin's theory to take it 
out of our biology textbooks.  No belief that cannotbe proven
scientifically  should be taught in science, including  the creation story.
Let the philosophers,historians  and theologians debate the creation  story
and evolution using proven scientific  discoveries,but keep the debate out
of the  laboratory.  We are doing our education system a great  disfavor by
leading students to believe the  origins of life are close to being figured
out,  when most scientists know they arenot.  Those who believe God created
the world  in six days are thought of as being ignorant,  but nowherein the
 Bible does it say these  days were the 24-hour  periods we classify as 
days.  When evolution  was first taught in  schools, the media blew  it up
and set two great  powers against each  other. Science wastaking on
religion. But a  closer look shows nothing proven scientifically  is
opposed to the creationstory. These  disciplines are different tools humans
have  created to explain our world.  One uses thescientific method and is
done  in a laboratory; the other requires meditation  and relies on faith. 
One dayscientists might have insight on  how life originated on earth, but
until then  schools should only teachwhat is scientific in  science class. 
...living systems  are too complex  to have evolved  from a
chemicalreaction."  Teach true science  Evolution scientific theory based
on facts  At one point, the  vast expanseof the  universe was completely 
empty; now it  is filled with an  unfathomable variety  of life. Today, two
explanations — creationism  and evolution 
— claim to  answer that phenomenon.  Jenni Odekirk 
COMMENTARY  Of the two, only evolution is appropriate  for teaching in a
biology classroom becauseevolution, based on objective facts such as 
natural selection and gene mutation, is scientific,  butcreationism is
based on ideological  texts, such as the Bible, «|-|.
• • • .1  which makes
itpwio- Biology class is the  sophical and out of place n I £1 r
* 0 f r\ T  in a science class. |JIQV/0 \\J\creationism is the scientific
theories ...'!  belief that an "intelligent  designer" created the universe
 andthe natural things in it at one time  and is not altering them,
according to the  Creation Science homepage.  Biology department chair Rich
Fonda said  evolution is "the process by which species  adjust toand
maintain their population in  relation to the environment."  Although
technically a theory, evolution isbacked up by facts and proven principles,
 such as natural selection — survival of the  fittest in
nature —and mutations — gene 
differentiations that can create change in a  species.  Fonda explains to
hisbiology classes that  the high rate of sickle-cell anemia in African- 
Americans is a result of evolution.  Itcan be attributed to the fact that
malaria  invaded the west coast of Africa 400 years  ago. BecauseAfricans
with sickle-shaped  red blood cells had higher resistance to  malaria and
had more offspring,sickle-cell  anemia is prevalent in African-Americans 
today.  "It's the one prevailing theme (in biology)  that laces everything
together," Fonda said  about evolution.  A subject that crucial to a
discipline must  takecenter stage in its classes; it must not be  obscured
by ideas like creationism that have  no basis in fact.Another problem with
creationism is that  it is based on faith,  which carries with it the 
problem of deciding  which creation story to  teach.  Christianity, 
Buddhism, Native  American faiths and other religions allhave  different
explanations of how the world  began.  Most of the current literature on
creationism  isbased on the Bible, which is irrelevant  to non-Christians
and excludes them. On the  other hand, if allcreation stories were taught 
in class, little time would be left to cover evolution.  "People have
differentviews, but that  doesn't excuse them from knowing the principles 
and facts of evolution," Fonda said.Biology class is the place for
scientific theories,  not philosophic ones.  BASKETBALL SEASON ISHERE! 
Come watch the Viking  Women as they play host to  Simon Fraser, Colorado 
Christian Masters College  in the WESTERN CLASSIC  1998/99 WOMEN'S
BASKETBALL HOME SCHEDULENovember 20th  21st  Sam Carver Gymnasium  (Games
at 5:00 p.m.  7:00 p.m. each night)WESTERN WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY  NCAA
PEPSI  Date Opponent  11/20-21 Western Classic11/23 Riverside  11/27 San
Francisco State  12/4 Humboldt State  12/5 Western Oregon  1/2 SimonFraser 
1/15 Univ. of Alaska Fairbanks  1/16 Univ. of Anchorage Alaska  2/10 SPU 
2/13 St. Martin's  2/18Central  2/20 LCSC  Time  5:00/7:00 p.m.  7:00 p.m. 
7:00 p.m.  7:00 p.m.  7:00 p.m.  7:00 p.m.  7:00p.m.  7:00 p.m.  7:00 p.m. 
7:00 p.m.  7:00 p.m.  7:00 p.m.  COME SUPPORT WOMEN'SBASKETBALL!!!

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     Western Front - 1998 November 17 - Page 14

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14 • THE WESTERN FRONT OPINIONS November 17, 1998  Allies
must act,  not simply talkEveryone has the right to a safe and healthy
environment.  That's very nice to hear, and it may be true, butit
definitely  isn't reality — well, not everyone's
reality.  The environment isn't just green grass, tall treesand clean 
water. Environment is political. Environment is economic. And  environment
is social.  In theUnited States and subsequently Washington state, we  have
political freedom constitutionally guaranteedby way of the  ballot. Some
choose to exercise this freedom by voting, and some  do not.  Although
theconstitution does guarantee citizens "inalienable"  rights, economic and
social realities of class andrace either  limit or expand our access to
political freedoms that shape our  environments.  Freedom andjustice for
all.  Freedom for whom?  Justice for whom?  Washington state voters
recently fought a battleagainst affirmative  action. The battle drew
students from all sides of the political  spectrum, arguingfor and against
Initiative 200.  The drama of the argument attracted students to the
forefront  of action whonow call themselves allies.  Last weekend, the
Ethnic Student Center hosted a retreat at  Camp Casey onWhidbey Island. It
hosted various Workshops  attended by more than 100 students and staff. One
of theworkshops  was titled "An Ambassador for My Race ... I Don't Think 
So."  The workshop focused onhow to be an ally.  An ally can be black,
white, red or yellow. An ally can be heterosexual  orhomosexual. An ally
can be Christian, Buddhist,  Muslim or Jewish.  An ally reaches across
differencesand finds common space.  Allies offer acceptance.  It is
glamorous to stand for freedom and justice as anally, and  it is hard to
hear about inaccessibility to freedom and justice for  many people in the
UnitedStates.  During the 1-200 debate, it was glamorous to be an ally.
Will  self-named allies still be aroundwhen the glamour disappears?  Will
they too, disappear?  Only time will tell if these folks are what theysay
they are, for  actions speak louder than words, and our environment needs 
both.  Frontlines are theopinion of The Western Front, as determined by the
members of the  Front's editorial board: KatyCalbreath, Wendy Giroux, Jesse
Kinsman, Jessica Luce,  David Plakos, Katherine Schiffner andSatnantha
Tretheivay.  The Western Front  Editor: Katherine Schiffner; Managing
Editor: Jessica Luce;News Editors:  Wendy Giroux and Ken Brierly; Features
Editors: Meredith Lofberg and  Ernesto Cardenas; Accent Editors: David
Plakos and Caroline Deck; Sports  Editors: John Bankston and Erin
Becker;Opinions Editor: Samantha  Tretheway; Copy Editor: Amy Christiansen;
Photo Editor: Jesse Kinsman;Assistant Photo Editor: Bobby Stone; Graphics
Editor: Ben Stabler; Online  Editors: Katy Calbreath andJeremy Reed;
Community Relations: Klaus  Gosma Cartoonist: Sarah Kulfan; Adviser: Lyle
Harris;Business Manager:  Teari Brown.  Staff Reporters: Bryta Alvensleben,
Lisa Beck, Coleen Biery, MillissaBrown,  April Busch, Becky Christopherson,
Cole Cosgrove, Katie Doyle, Gwen  Edwards, MelissaEvavold, Marc Fenton, Jim
Ferguson, Kelly Ferguson, Erin  Fredrichs, Brooke Hagara, Justin Hall,
KaseyHalmagyi, Nick Haney, Kristen  Hawley, Holly Hinterberger, Arvid
Hokanson, Rob Holman, Colin Howser,Soren Hughes, Matt Jaffe, JJ Jensen,
Nadja Kookesh, Zse Zse Kovacs, Scott  LaMont, Paul McCoy,Kayley Mendenhall,
Cindy Nunley, Jenni Odekirk,  Mia Penta, Alyssa Pfau, Shane Powell, Laura
Query,Christine Root, Janelle  Rust, Derrick Scheid, John Shelley, Dave
Shepherd, Jenn Sherman, AnthonyShows, Robin Skillings, Angela Smith,
Jennifer Smith, Aaron Snel, Darcy  Spann, Sara Stephens, AndreaStremler,
Jay Tarpinian, Miki Tashiro, Heidi  Thomsen, Steven Uhles, Carrie Van
Driel, Beth Walker, TylerWatson, Kevin  Westrick, Matt Williams, Curt
Woodward, Tim Wyse and Marissa Ziegler.  The WesternFront is the official
newspaper of Western Washington  University and is published by the
StudentPublications Council. The Western  Front is mainly supported by
advertising revenue, but the opinions ofFront  editors or reporters are not
reflected in these advertisements.  Content is determined by
studenteditors. Staff reporters are enrolled in the  course entitled
"newspaper staff." Any Western student maysend submissions  to: The Western
Front, College Hall 09, Western Washington University,Bellingham, WA 98225.
Advertising inquiries should be directed to the business  office in College
Hall 07 or made by phone at (360) 650-3161.  Single copies of The Western
Front are distributed free to members of the  Western community.  Iraq
doesn't want war  Hussein seeking to lift deadly U.N. sanctions 
RobinSkillings  COMMENTARY  A stereotype has been  implanted in the minds
of  humanity that SaddamHussein is a cruel, power-driven,  manipulative man
with a  demented mind, aiming  weapons ofdestruction at the  rest of the
world.  Hussein must have strong  motives behind his abrupt  change of
heart to allow  United Nations inspectors back into Iraq.  I don't believe
he changed his mind solely  because he was scared of the United States'
threat  of his attack; or that he grew a conscious and realized  theonly
"respectable"  thing was to allow the inspectors  back into Iraq.  I would
suspect he saw this  crisis as a good time to implement  his own "plan of
attack."  Iraq would allow weapon  inspectors back onone condition:  the
U.N. must lift sanctions  placed on the Iraqi people. But  the United
States found nosympathy  for him or the Iraqi people  and demanded a
different  approach or an attack would occur.Hussein understands that if
the United States  took military action, it would significantly degrade 
hiscapabilities to develop weapons of mass  destruction, but it would also
mark the end of the  U.N. •Special Commission (UNSCOM),
the  weapon-inspection team.  According to The Seattle Times, BritishPrime 
Minister Tony Blair said, "We know from our experience  with Hussein that
he is not a man to be trusted ... The Iraq position has to be unconditional
 ...."  National Security Council spokesman DavidLeavy said the
national-security team was  unequivocal in its conclusion that Iraq's offer
was  "clearlyanother step in their effort to lie, deceive  and cheat." 
Hussein is a political pleaser. In a sense, he tellsthose opposed to his
ethics, such as Clinton, exactly  what they want to hear.  If world leaders
want an"unconditional" statement,  they'll hear it.  "... Saddam Hussein
remains an impediment to  the well-being of his people and a threat to the 
peace of this region and the security of the world,"  , , _ , . , , . .
.Clinton said in a Reuter's arti-  Clinton s decision not cie Sunday.  to
strike Iraq and to Clinton's decisionnot to  accept its offer leaves  him
open to criticism  that he has again  been out-maneuvered  byHussein." 
strike Iraq and to accept its  offer leaves him open to criticism  that he
has again beenoutmaneuvered by Hussein.  Sunday, even before Clinton's 
announcement to the world to  accept Iraq'sproposal, Iraqi  newspapers
proclaimed "victory."  But is Hussein the "mad  man" the rest of the
worldportrays him as, or is he trying to work for the  Iraqi people, as its
leader, to lift the harsh sanctionslimiting any kind of aid from the West. 
His true character is hanging in the balance of  this crisis. If he isthe
worst that many view and  accept him to be, then what steps must be taken
to  exterminate thismaniac from the international  spotlight?  We hesitated
the first time we had a clear shot;  let's not let ithappen again! 
letters.  Control Western's  litter everyday  To the editor:  During my
recent visit toWestern for Parent's Weekend,  while touring and admiring
the  artwork, architecture and overall  autumnscenery, I was disheartened 
to observe litter strewn  about, not only around campus,  but
inneighborhoods inhabited  by students with shattered beer  bottles and
discarded pizza  boxes.  As Istrolled around the fountain,  inscribed with
chalk symbols  and writing celebrating  diversity, I notedthe littered 
landscape and concluded that  evidently none of the participants 
considered litter control as  part of the celebration.  While gaining an
education is  the main purpose of attending  Western, it'sdiscouraging to
see  that lessons about individual  stewardship of buildings and  grounds
are neglected.True,  there are paid staff who are  responsible to clean up
after  those who cannot take a few  moments to pick up an empty  pop can or
candy wrapper.  Although it wasn't the goal of  my morning stroll, I
pickedup  trash and left the grounds a little  better looking.  I add my
voice to the general  lament over the visibledeterioration  of what was
once a lovely  continued...

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     Western Front - 1998 November 17 - Page 15

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November 17, 1998 OPTNIftNS THE WESTERN FRONT • 15 
letters  campus. Perhaps The WesternFront or the university's
administration  might consider mounting  an anti-litter campaign;
encouragedorm residents to "adopt" an  area of the campus and keep it 
clean.  If students are so zealous in  theirefforts to defend diversity, 
they might just as easily, and  more profitably, channel that  energy
intoimproving their surroundings.  Who knows? Perhaps commitment  to litter
cleanup could  become the"cause celebre" of the  millennium
— with far more  reaching effects.  Nancy Covert 
Steilacoom, Wash.necessary for any society  Monetary support needed for
future artists  Steven Utiles  COMMENTARYRecently, in a White  House Rose
Garden  ceremony, the president  and first lady  gave the NationalMedal of
Arts to 12  people who have made  lasting contributions  to the American
cultural  landscape.Actors and artists,  writers and musicians 
— all were personally honored on behalf of  a grateful
nation of excellence in their  respective creative endeavors. Each left 
Washington with a faux-gold medalswinging  from their necks.  These days, a
shiny ornament is about all  an artist can expect fromWashington.  In 1998,
a mere 10 years ago, the budget  for the National Endowment for the Arts 
was$168 million, less money than was  being spent on a single, relatively
inexpensive  military aircraft.  In1998, the NEA's budget is $98 million. 
So much for an enlightened society.  Looming high on the list ofreasons for
 the NEA's lack of funding is a series of controversial  grants made in the
mid-and late-1980s.  Among them, the funding of work by  conceptual artist
Andres Serrano, remembered  mostly forhis photograph of a crucifix 
submerged in a jar of his own urine, and  the sponsorship of a
retrospectiveof photographs  by the late Robert Mapplethorpe  in
Cincinnati. Much of Mapplethorpe's  work washomoerotic in nature.  Outrage
over these grants, as well as general  disregard for the First Amendment, 
allowed powerful conservative forces in  Washington to all but eliminate
funding for  the NEA.  In fact,some more vocal Republicans,  such as North
Carolina Sen. Jesse Helm,  called for the dissolution of theendowment. 
Since humans first began streaking cave  walls with berry juice, the arts
have been  thewatermark by which a society is judged.  They are the record,
the historical stamp  "Since humans firstbegan streaking cave  walls with
berry juice, the  arts have been the  watermark by which a  society
isjudged."  mankind leaves, illuminating a given people  or period's pages
of history.  When theRenaissance is mentioned, our  heads are filled with
visions of  Michelangelo painting ceilings in Romeand Shakespeare composing
sonnets in  Stratford-on-Avon — not advances made in 
cartwheeltechnologies.  So how will we be judged? By the aesthetic  beauty
of our politically correct operatingsystems, or the lasting artistic
statement  our landfills make?  John Frohnmayer, former chairman of the 
NEA, has said that for the endowment to  function properly, a budget of at
least $350  million is required. According to Frohnmayer, this amount 
would allow the endowment to support  arts organizations, suchas local
symphonies  and art museums, promote arts  education in our schools and
enhance cultural exchange internationally, the purposes  for which the
endowment was originally  chartered.  So now wehave an office of the United
 States government, running at one-third its  needed budget
— an agencyworse off than  even the nation's woefully
underfunded  education, health care and parks and  wildlifeprograms.  Even
here on Western's campus, new  pieces for our famed sculpture collection 
are beingmade possible only through the  generosity, of private
foundations.  Pieces slated for installation oncampus  are often being
donated to the school  instead of purchased by the school.  So here we sit,
idlytwiddling our collective  thumbs and depending on the continued 
trendiness of private sponsorship ofthe arts, sponsorship that is
single-handedly  making creativity fiscally viable.  Soon, the
nation'sinactivity may cost it  its cultural heritage —
and no medal will be  given in the Rose Garden for that.STUDENT
PUBLICATIONS EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY  EDITOR  Klipsun  Winter Quarter,
1999EDITOR  The Western Front  Winter Quarter, 1999  EDITOR  Jeopardy 
Winter - Summer 1999  To apply:Submit resume and letter of intent by
November 25,1998,5:00 p.m. to Chair, Student Publications Council, CH 237,
MS 9101.  Applicants will be interviewed on December 1,1998 at 12:00 noon
in Viking Addition#460.  For further information contact the Chair, Student
Publications Council, CH 237, MS 9101  P i i i i i i i i i ^ i i
« l i P i ^ l i i i i i » i l 
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SOS help! 752-5918  • Other(specify) Classified
Advertising Form for the Western Front  • 101. For Sale
• 301. Wanted • 501.Services
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• 1001. Garage Sales  1. Insert one letter per box. 3.
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classifieds must be run in consecutive issues for reduced rate. No
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     Western Front - 1998 November 17 - Page 16

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16 • T H E WESTERN FRONT November 17, 1998 
• 1  The Cat Clinic  is pleased to announcebasic vaccines
included at your cars yearly exam  To new client on any medical exam 
kitty-carepackage* to new clients A .THE CAT CLINIC  1214 DUPONT ST. 
BELLINGHAM, WA.  671-7707'Including: Identification tag  Food Samples  Cat
Nip  ...and more!  After Thanksgiving Sale  Nov. 27, 2?, 29  Everything's
On Sale ]  In Mercantile!  10% - 4-0% Off  Kitchenware, Clothing, Paper
Goods, and GiftItems  One Prize Drawing Each Day of Sale  m  1220 N. Forest
 Open Everyday  ? AM to 9 PM FOODCO-OP  (students that return after time
away)  •WEEKLY COFFEE HOUSE VU 40B  WEDNESDAYS12:00 -
2:Q0  •L3AT INFO. NIGHT - NOV. 19 
•CPR/FIRST AID C6RT. - NOV. 22  OLDERSTUDENTS' SOURCE FOR
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8tfst4@cc.wwu.eduhttp://www.ac.wwu.edu/~strara  RIGOS BAR,  CPA  CMA-CFM 
Review  f WINTER-SPRING'  ^ 1999Exam Cycle j  CPA-CMA  Seattle Mon 11/30
6:00pm  Tacoma Sat 12/5 8:30am  Beilevue Sun 12/138:30am  BAR  Seattle Wed
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« CALL FOR FREE BROCHURE  U i n A C 230 Skinner Building  l l l
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Rpokina (509)325-1994  Authentic Mexican GrUI fflJTake Out  360-714-9428 
300 N.Samish Way  Bellingham, WA  Mon. - Sat. 11 am -10 pm  Sun. 11:30 am -
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