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     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 1

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TUESDAY, September 28,1999  The Western Front  Western Washington
University Volume 107 Issue 1Bellingham, Washington  1-695 to decrease WTA
funding  By Jenni Odekirk  THE WESTERN FRONTInitiative 695 would cut 
Whatcom Transportation  Authority's budget by 43 percent 
— $5.7 million — inaddition to 
reducing vehicle license tab fees  to $30, said Steve Clancy, WTA  director
of Finance andSupport  Services.  1-695 (see story, page 5), which  will
appear on the November  ballot, would repeal theMotor  Vehicle Excise Tax
beginning  January 2000. The MVET helps  fund Washington state's
roadconstruction, ferry system and  public transportation, among  other
state and county programs."Virtually every area of our  service (would) be
impacted,"  Clancy said.  To compensate for the loss,  WTA would have to
lay off many  of its employees, cut about half  of its bus routes, cut
about 40  percent of itsspecialized services  for the elderly and disabled 
and drastically cut or end van-pool  and rideshareservices,  Clancy said. 
WTA operates about 40 bus  routes. They are concentrated in  Bellingham,
butbranch out to  Ferndale, Lynden and Blaine.  WTA specialized services
travel  as far as Lummi Island,Point  Roberts and eastern Whatcom  County.
WTA has approximately  30 passengers per bus per hour—
about-30 percent of them students,  Clancy said.  WTA has not chosen
specific  areas to cut if 1-695 passes, but  will most likely try to keep
at  least one route in each service  area and decrease thefrequency  of
buses so "everyone can get  where they need to at some  point," Clancy
said.  "Everyonewill feel significant  service reduction," Clancy  added. 
One bus route that will not be  cut is the campusshuttle from  Civic Field
to Western.  See WTA, page 6  Kevin M.  Raymond  r"*  New member 
joinsboard of  trustees  By Laura Mecca  THE WESTERN FRONT  Western's
newest member of  the Board ofTrustees is a  Seattle lawyer (and Western 
graduate) who is focused on  giving back to the Westerncommunity.  Kevin M:
Raymond said it  was an honor to be offered the  position to serve on
Western'sboard.  "Being at  Western was an  utterly transforming 
experience  both- personally  andacademically,"  he  said.  He said
long-term  goals are to  maintain the  environment at  Western and
topromote successive  generations of students  to grow and benefit from 
Western's educationalsystem.  He has no specific plans for  the current
year.  "Having a sense of importance  to lifelonglearning is  essential,"
he said.  Raymond was appointed by  Gov. Gary Locke on Aug. 25 to 
replaceWayne Ehlers, who  retired from the board.  "I was a mediocre high 
school student; the professors  atWestern turned me on to  learning,"
Raymond said.  Raymond graduated from  Western's Huxley Schoolof 
Environmental Studies in  1980. He received his law  degree from the
University of  Washington in 1984.  He credits former Western 
professor-turned-congressman  Al Swift with challenging him  to get
moreinvolved in his  education. Raymond joined  the cross-country and track
 teams at Western. He also  wrote for The Western Front.  After graduation,
Raymond  worked as the senior deputy  prosecuting attorney inthe  King
County Prosecutor's  Office. He later served as chief  of staff to former
county executive  andcurrent governor,  See TRUSTEE, page 11  Salmon return
to creek after blast  By Kristen Hawley  THEWESTERN FRONT  Whatcom Creek
still bears the  scars of the June 10 pipeline  blast that killed
threepeople  and charred a stretch of land a  mile-and-a-half long, but the
 restoration process is beginning  tohelp the area recover, said  Steve
Hood, an environmental  engineer at the Department of  Ecology. 
Thegreatest progress along  the creek is the return offish to  the area,
Hood said. The excavation  ofcontaminated soil from  the stream wreaked
havoc on  the fish -habitat, he explained, .  but fish wererecently sighted
as  far up stream as .Woburn Street.  "These reports (of returning  fish)
are fairlysignificant  because Woburn Street has been  a barrier, but
because of recent  work that has been done,there  have been definite
habitat  improvements," he said.  Contaminated soil from the  creek was
eitherremoved to be  incinerated, or agitated by  methods such as pumping
or  excavating. When the soil wasagitated, it caused the contaminating 
gasoline to float to the  surface of the water and evaporate,Hood said, but
the process  Chris Fuller/ The Western Front  Free-swimming salmon can be
seen from the western side of the Woburn Street Bridge,  which crosses
Whatcom Creek.  consequently left the creekin  disorder.  "To avoid having
a river that  was either full of bowling balls  or mud, the solution
proposedwas to rearrange the creek in  natural formation," he said.  To do
this, workers  rearranged rocksrearranged,  added woody debris and created 
Climb every mountain  pools at various locations in thestream, which is
similar to the  setup at a fish hatchery.  See SALMON, page 4  IN THIS
ISSUE  Kidsgotta regatta  Youth from throughout the  region set their sails
in  Bellingham Bay for the  Bellingham One-Design  Regatta.  See story,
page 24.  The best of Crowe  Front  cartoonist,  Chad  Crowe, displays  his
 best — and  most controversial  —
work in this  full-page spread.  See cartoons, page 31.  FRONTONLINE  http:
/ / vvesternfront.vvwu.edu  i

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     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 2

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2 • The Western Front News September 28,1999  COPS BOX AP
WIRE NEWS BRIEFS  CampusPolice  ;;^o;y.;;.n^shrppm  Officers assisted
Bellin^i  ham paramedics. He =wa$|  transported toStf^;JpsepHl 
'Ho^itjal.;'':':::^:;^^^^  •:arrestee1:;:::';esc|^e^  v |
M i J d^  ::;Police|^^  ;-;Suspe;£fa^^fcw||M|HiBiKiiifcilBI 
liiiiBttiiiiiiiiiipiiiiB  Biiplliitt^HiBiliB! 
••BUB^iiiSllHI  Bellingham
PolicellBwj|HlillJSIIBIIII  •^ii|j^||§M||HIIII
 Ji||^^JiJ|^g||§||g  STATE NEWS  Washington state tosses the 
greento college freshmen  The first of 5,700 state-financed  college
scholarships  will be awarded today to tophigh school students and newly 
enrolled college freshmen. The  $1,100 yearly scholarships are  meant
tohelp low- and middle-income-  families afford college.  1-695 meets green
opposition  Ten of Washington'slargest  environmental groups will fight 
Initiative 695, the measure to  eliminate the state's vehicle  excisetax.
The organizations  say they oppose the initiative,  which would replace the
tax  with a $30 yearly fee,because i|§  would hurt transit and
environmental  programs.  Nuclear waste expands in  Hanfordstorage tank  A
nuclear blob has risen like  bread dough in a million gallon  radioactive
waste storage tank at the Hanford nuclear reservation.  Hanford managers
say possible  environmental contaminationor an explosion are both 
unlikely, but they're still dealing  with the problem in an urgent 
manner.Connection between divorce,  negative talk  A University of
Washington  study suggests it's possible totell which newlywed couples 
will divorce. It's based on the  way the partners interact in discussing 
adisagreement in their  marriage. The more negative  the talk, the greater
the chance  of divorce.NATIONAL NEWS  Nuclear violation gets  costly
penalty  Northeast Utilities says it  will pay a record $10-million 
federal fine, after pleading  guilty to violating nuclear safety  and clean
water laws.  Prosecutorssay half of the fine  is for nuclear safety
violations,  the largest penalty ever levied  against the nuclearpower 
industry.  Take heed, small germs  A new medicine called Zyvox  is
described as the first entirelys new kind of antibiotic in more  than 35
years. Researchers say  the just-developed drug is  expected togive doctors
a fresh  weapon against resistant  germs.  Quayle's fundraising efforts 
flop, quits race  DanQuayle has quit the  Republican presidential campaign.
 The former vice president  blames poor fundraising and  low poll numbers.
Quayle also  cited the juggernaut of GOP  front-runner George W. Bush,who
leads the polls and has  raised more than $50 million in  campaign funds. 
There he goes, head ofMiss America ...  The search is on for a new  person
to head the Miss  America Pageant. Robert Beck,who had the job for a year,
has  been fired. No one will say.  whether it's because of a decision,  now
onhold, to drop a  longtime ban on contestants  who'd been married or had
abortions.  Juveniles charged in rape  In St. Paul, Minn., prosecutors 
have charged three boys in  the alleged gang rape of an 8-  year-old girl. 
The suspects are 10, 11 and  13 years old.  The Ramsey County  Attorney's
office says the 13-year-old boy is charged with two  counts of
second-degree criminal  sexual conduct and kidnapping.Each of the other two
boys is  charged with second-and  fourth-degree criminal sexual  conduct
andkidnapping.  The boys made their first  appearances in juvenile court 
today.  Four younger suspectsincluding  the alleged victim's brother  are
under the age of 10, and  cannot be charged.INTERNATIONAL NEWS  Rescue
operation launched  after mistake in Morse code  What's Morse codefor
"oops"?  A preliminary report says a  German cargo ship reported to  be
missing in the Black Sea lastweek sent out the alarm by mistake.  The crew
of the German  "Birkenwald" sailing in the  Baltic Sealaunched the SOS 
signals Wednesday "by mistake,"  according to a Romanian  news agency. 
Thefalse signals were  "wrongly interpreted" by port  authorities in
Canada, who  passed them on to officials in  Russia, who in turn relayed 
them to Romania.  The Romanians launched a  search and rescue operation 
that failed to turn up any ship  in distress.  Blast kills 56, injures 
more than 300  Hundreds of people incentral  Mexico are continuing a search
 at the site of a deadly explosion  late Sunday.  At least 56 people were
killed  and close to 350 injured when a  series of explosions ripped 
through a crowded area of street  stalls and shops.  Officials think the
blast started  in the back of a candy store  where fireworks aresold. 
Security officials say it's possible  more survivors may be  found.  As
soldiers and others search,they're being extremely careful;  fearing they
might set off unex-ploded  powder.  Bomb explodes inRussian mall  There's
been another explosion  in Russia, this one coming  Sunday outside a
shoppingmall in St. Petersburg.  News reports say a small  bomb exploded
outside the mall.  No one was hurt.The ITAR-Tass news agency  says the bomb
left a small  crater and shattered windows. A  suspectreportedly has been 
detained. Russia, has  been hit with a wave of bombings  in recent weeks.
Officials  are blaming Chechen rebels f o r^  the blasts.  Compiled by
Daniel Pearson  room!http://westernfront.wwu.edu  The "western Front is
published twice weekly in fall, winter and spring; oncea week in summer
session. Address: The Western Front, Western Washington  University, CH
110,Bellingham, WA 98225-9100. The Western Front is  the official newspaper
of Western WashingtonUniversity, published by the  Student Publications
Council, and is mainly supported by advertising.Opinions and stories in the
newspaper have no connection with advertising.  News content is
determinedby student editors. Staff reporters are enrolled in  a course in
the Department of Journalism, but anystudent enrolled at Western  may offer
stories to the editors.  Advertising inquiries should be directed tothe
business office in  College Hall 07, or by phone to (360) 650-3161. 
Members of the Westerncommunity are entided to a single free  copy of each
issue of The Western Front.  WWU OfficialAnnouncements  Deadline for
announcements in this space is noon Friday for the Tuesday edition andnoon
Wednesday  for the Friday edition. Announcements should be limited to 50
words, typewritten orlegibly printed, and  sent through campus mail to
"Official Announcements," MS -9117, via fax to X/7287,or brought in  person
to Commissary 113A. DO NOT SEND ANNOUNCEMENTS DIRECTLY TO THEWESTERN FRONT.
 Phoned announcements will not be accepted. All announcements should be
signedby originator.  PLEASE POST  THE MATH PLACEMENT TEST is offered at 9
a.m. Mondays on Oct.4,11,18,25, Nov. 1,8,. 15,22,29 and Dec. 6 and  at 3
p.m. Thursdays on Sept. 30, Oct. 7,14,21,28, Nov.4^11,18 and Dec. 2 and 9.
Sample problems may be found  at
http://www.washington.edu/oea/aptp.htm.Test registration is not required
but students must bring photo ID and  a No. 2 pencil. A $10 fee is
payablein exact amount at time of testing. Allow 90 minutes.  THE TEST FOR
ENTRANCE INTO TEACHERPREPARATION (TETEP) may be taken at 2 p.m. Oct. 13 in
OM 587, Nov.  16 in FR 4 or Dec. 1 in OM587. Registration is required in OM
120. A $25 fee is payable in exact amount at time of  registration.TETEP is
not administered on an individual basis; testing takes about 2V2 hours.
Admission deadline isOct. 31 for winter quarter and Jan. 31 for spring
quarter.  MILLER ANALOGIES TEST: Registration isrequired in OM 120 or by
calling X/3080. A $35 fee is payable at time of  testing. Testing
takesapproximately 1 Vz hours. Testing will be at 2 p.m. on the following
dates: Oct. 19, FR 4; Nov. 19,OM482;Dec.13,OM482.  INFORMATION REGARDING
NATIONAL TESTING is available at the TestingCenter, OM 120.  INTERNSHIP
FAIR. The Human Services Department, in collaboration with the
CareerServices Center and the  Center for Service Learning, will hold an
internship fair from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.Sept. 30 in the VU Main Lounge. The 
fair will offer opportunities to learn more about opportunities withlocal
agencies.  ATUS FACULTY/STAFF AND COMPUTER HELP DESKS have moved to HH 145.
Thismove includes Teri Blow and  Laurie Yeager. Telephone numbers remain
the same for all. Other ATUSservices continue in their usual locations. If 
unsure where to go for assistance, call X/3333.  THE ASIAUNIVERSITY AMERICA
PROGRAM SEEKS students to be "campus friends" to Japanese students.Campus 
friends volunteer one hour a week during fall quarter to share
conversation. To sign up, call Shaun Stone, X/3297, or  stop by OM 530 by
Oct. 6.  THE VETERANS EDUCATIONAL OUTREACHPROGRAMS office has moved to 3800
Byron St., Suite 124, in the Lincoln  Business Center, next to theSamish
Drive-ln. Resources are available to help veterans with all of their
special needs.  Interested in awork-study job? Call Jeff Kissick, 676-4856.
 OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS DEADLINES are noon Fridayfor Tuesday editions and
noon Wednesday for the Friday  editions. Submit announcements via
e-mail,clearly marked for "Official Announcements," to pubs@cc.wwu.edu, to 
MS-9117, or from on-campus,send a fax to X/5428. Outlook users may choose
"publications" from the global address  list. Do not sendannouncements to
the Western Front.  PLANNING TO RETIRE AND WANT TO RECEIVE FAST?
AllUniversity retirees are eligible to receive FAST at their  home address.
If you are planning to retire and wish to receive FAST, call X/7434, or
send your name, home (or  retirement) address and retirement date toFAST,
MS-9117.  r-n  i

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     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 3

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September 28,1999 News The WesterriFront • 3  P E O P L E
M A K I N G A N I M P A C T O N C A M P U S  By Shannon Ager  THE WESTERN
FRONT  All of the signs indicated that  University Police ChiefJames  Shaw
made the right choice  when, at the last minute, he  decided to join
Western's staff.  "Itreally happened very quickly,"  Shaw said. "I saw the
advertisement.  Frankly, I was getting  nearretirement age in  7 really
enjoy working  with students. It keeps me  as young as I can possibly  be
— itkeeps me on my  toes.'  James Shaw  University
Police Chief  California. It came open at just  the righttime."  Shaw said
he applied for the  position and received a call in  May 1998 asking him to
come up  toBellingham June 2 to interview.  He came up for the interview 
and was invited back for a  subsequentinterview the following  week. After
32 years of law  enforcement work in California,  Shaw and his wifemade the
 move to Bellingham.  "I moved up here and took the  job by Aug. 15," Shaw
said. "It  just wasrolling. It was amazing  how quickly it had gone. It 
seemed to work out just perfectly.  I haven't beendisappointed  either,
this is a great campus."  Shaw's interest in Western  was sparked years ago
whenhe  visited the area several times on  military leave.  "I just like
Washington," Shaw  said. "I like the green,I like the  lower temperatures,
just everything  about it."  Shaw graduated with a degree  in
managementfrom Saint  Mary's College in Moraga, Calif,  and has worked for
city police  departments as well as forCalifornia State University at 
Stanislaus.  "College campuses are really  quite different," Shaw said.
"Inmunicipal policing, everybody  goes home and the police go  home. Here,
when everybody  goes home,the police take care of  the campus. It's much
more  responsive to take care of a  group of people."  Shawdescribed
university  policing as "high service" because  a great deal of attention
is given  to individualneeds.  Shaw's duties as University  Police chief
are varied. Shaw is  involved with the Department ofPublic Safety, which
includes the  lock shop, police department and  parking. He also assists
indisaster  planning and crime prevention.  "I deal with decisions as far
as  policy and procedure, longrange  planning, budgetary issues,"  Shaw
said.  Shaw said he also works on  agreements with Whatcom Transportation
Authority  regarding campus bus routes,  which also involves an abundance 
ofadministrative work.  Referring to the two sexual  assaults that occurred
last year,  Shaw said thoseincidents tend  Craig Yantis/ The Western Front 
Police Chief James Shaw enjoys Western's greencampus and climate. He began
his love  affair with Washington years ago while on leave from the
military. to be the most challenging part  of his job.  "Those are very
difficult to  deal with in many ways," he  said."There's a perception out 
there that things are unsafe  when we have incidents like  that."  He said
one ofhis main goals  in assault situations is to promote  awareness and
build programs  to prevent assaults from  happening again.  Although his
job can be difficult,  Shaw said working in the  community andwith people
is  rewarding.  Josef Bailey, a dispatcher for  University Police, said
everyone  in thedepartment has regular  interaction, with Shaw.  "He's very
approachable,"  Bailey said. "He'll try and help you with any problems." 
Bailey said he enjoys working  with Shaw because he tends not  to
placehimself above others.  "He seems very willing to work  with his
employees and his  staff," he said.  Baileyalso said Shaw, is more  than
willing to leave the office  and his administrative work  behind and go
into the field to  respond to problems.  "He responds to calls when  needed
as a regular patrol officer  would,"Bailey said.  Shaw said he enjoys
helping  students with problems .  "Ill be quite candid with you," 
Shawsaid. "I really enjoy working  with students. I t keeps me as  young as
I can possibly be — it  keeps me on my toes."  WWU GURs
Available from  Independent Learning  Communications Block B: English
201(4)  Humanities: Classical Studies 260 (3); English 216 (4), 281 (4), 
282 (4) and 283 (4); History 103 (4),104 (4) and 112 (4);  Liberal Studies
232 (4)  Social Sciences: Anthropology 201 (5); Canadian-AmericanStudies
200 (5); Economics 206 (4), 207 (4); Linguistics 204 (4);  Psychology 201
(5);  Comparative,Gender and Multicultural Studies: Anthropology  353 (4);
East Asian 201 (5) and 202 (5); English 338 (4);History 280 (5); Women
Studies 211 (4)  Mathematics: Math 102 (5), 107 (3), 124 (5), 125 (5), 156
(4),157 (4), and 240 (3)  Natural Sciences B: Environmental Studies 101 (3)
 See WWU Bulletin forexplanation of GURs.  To preview a course outline,
call or stop by  800 E. Chestnut • 650-3650lAMlKMO^ 
•^x nCV^/Ki  http ://westernf
ront.wv#»»edu  Want A  Challenge?  BWESTERNWASHINGTON
UNIVERSITY  T R A I N I N G S C H O OL  Start your career off on the right
foot byenrolling in the Air Force  Officer Training School. There you will
become a commissioned  officer in just 12 weeks. From the start you'll
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To discover how high  a career in theAir Force can take  you, call
1-800-423-USAF, or visit  our website at www.airforce.com 
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     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 4

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4 • The Western Front News September 28,1999  On-campus 
safety, online  Associated Studentscreates Safety Watch  List for students 
By Alex P. Hennesy  THE WESTERN FRONT  Students helpingstudents.  That's
the idea behind  Associated Students vice president  of Legislative and
AcademicAffairs, David Toyer's Safety  Watch List.  Toyer wants to open an
on-line  forum where students can share  ideas about campus safety with 
other students and administrators.  The Safety Watch List web-pagecould let
students post mes-sages  and view a  list of other students'  messages 
about safety  issueson  Western's  campus.  "Hopefully it  will become a 
suggestion box," David Toyer  Toyer said.  Toyer isworking on the idea as 
part of his focus on safety for the  year.  "Campus safety is one of my 
big issues," Toyer said.  Toyer said he also hopes the  administration will
look to the  webpage for ideas about waysto  improve the campus, according
to  a memo he addressed to the AS  Board of Directors.  "I'd like to see
students and the  university take it seriously,"  Toyer said. "We've got to
pin  down what we want toimprove."  Toyer will propose the idea to  other
members of the board at  their meeting Oct. 29.'Participation will improve 
the quality of life on campus.'  David Toyer  AS vice president for 
Legislative AcademicAffairs  He wants to get a consensus  from other board
members before  undertaking theproject.  Toyer hopes that the watch  list,
which will likely be part of  the AS Web page, will be active  next
quarter.  Some students said although  they feel comfortable on campus 
now, feel the forum would bepositive.  "That would be a good idea as  long
as the administration got to  hear about it," freshman Kjell Mauseth said. 
Freshman Matt Peterson, who  said it is sometimes necessary to  walk other
on-campusstudents  home after dark, also felt that a  watch list would
help.  Samantha Vaughn, a freshman,avoids certain areas' on  campus, but
said she feels comfortable  with the amount of safetyinformation provided
by the  university.  "They get the information to  us," Vaughn said.  When
the forum is active,  Toyer said he hopes that as many  students as
possible will take  advantage of it.  "Participationwill improve the 
quality of life on the campus,"  SALMON, from page 1  Whatcom Creek's
banksrearranged to allow for nature to return  "Instead of the stream being
a Edwards said. ZZZZZZZZIZZZZZZZ-:steep slope, there are steps, and  pools
at each step," he explained.  "The existing pools in the river  were
augmented and wood was  added. Wherever wood was  added, more fish have
been  , reported."  Much of the soil in the area  of the blast was too
contaminated  to be cleaned by the agitation  process, so itwas  removed by
dump trucks and  transported to TPS  Woodworth, an independent  contractor
inTacoma, and incinerated,  said Olympic Pipeline  spokesperson Pearse
Edwards.  To date, TPSWoodworth has  incinerated 7,958 cubic yards  of soil
and 130 cubic yards are  still waiting to be shipped, This is a massive
amount of  dirt, considering eight to 10  cubic yards of soil will fill one
 dump truck,Hood explained.  Now that the removal of soil  in the area is
nearly complete,  the natural recovery process will  be the main source of
restoration  for Whatcom Creek, Hood  said. The area is  reacting to
theexplosion in the  same way it would if a forest  fire occurred, he
explained.  "Standing dead trees becomestags, and a lot of hard wood  trees
have already resprouted,"  he said. "We won't know about  the conifers
until the spring, but  a lot of people are astounded at  how many trees
survived."  In addition to the newvegeta-  'Deer actually like the  burnt
area, and every day  deer are spotted there.'  Steve HoodEnvironmental
engineer for the  Department of Ecology ^  tion, Hood said deer have 
returned to theWhatcom Creek  area.  He explained deer actually  like the
burnt area, and nearly  every day deer arespotted  there.  There is no
contamination  left in the trees because the gas  evaporated long ago, he
said.  ti«l  .'!'£% Kaddy Shack  Restaurants Spirits 
Wed-Seit  LIVE MUSIC  BIG SCREEN T.V. • POOL TABLES 
Monday  Tuesday  $4.75 Beer Pitchers  $3.99 Hamburger  Fries  MON.TUES.  $
7 . 99ALL YOU'CAN EAT  BEEF RIBS!  WED.THURS.  $ 6 95  TOP SIRLOIN STEAKS 
1114 Harris Ave *Fairhavei  DINE IN OR GARRY OUT •
671-6745  n

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     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 5

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September 28,1999 News The Westerly Front » 5  Pros and cons
riding behind Initiative 695  By JenniOdekirk  THE WESTERN FRONT 
Supporters of Initiative 695  say the measure will give citizens 
relieffrom a burdensome  tax, but its detractors say it  could drastically
cut government  services andstrangle  representative government.  Appearing
on the November  ballot, 1-695, if passed, will  repeal theMotor Vehicle 
Excise Tax, the Travel Trailer  And Camper Excise Tax and  the Clean Air
Excise Tax,reducing the license tab fee for  all vehicles to $30.  "It's
about time we pay less  for car tabs," said Dorene  Bahzad, former Whatcom 
County Republican Party secretary  and supporter of 1-695.  "It's a cry to
let people know  we're paying higher taxes."  Tim Farris, chair of the 
Whatcom County No on 1-695Committee, said he disagrees.  "(1-695) would
have drastic  consequences for government  and the people it serves," 
Farris said, adding that it  could impact public transportation,  the state
ferries and  cities'health and criminal justice  programs. "I think these 
are areas people who don't  want to cut taxes takefor  granted."  Of the
$1.5 billion the MVET  is expected to gather during  the 1999-2001
biennium,  about47 percent, $705 million,  is mandated for state
transportation  programs, about 29  percent, $435million, is mandated  for
local transportation  and about 24 percent, $360  million, is designated
for local government's for transportation,  criminal justice and other 
purposes, according to the  Washingtonstate Office of  Financial
Management's website.  'It's about time we pay less  for car tabs. * 
DoreneBahzad  1-695 supporter  During the 1999-2001 biennium,  the CAET is
expected to  gather $22.6million for pollution  control and the TTACET  is
expected to gather $15.9 for  cities, counties, schoolsand  transportation,
according to  OFM's website.  If 1-695 passes, the  Washington State
Department  ofTransportation would lose  $1.2 billion from the 1999-  2001
biennium budget — $686  million inReferendum 49 bond 
proceeds and $558 in direct  revenue, according to  WSDOT's website.  The
budgetWSDOT  approved for that biennium is  $3.3 billion, so it would have
to  either cut projects or ask thestate for money from other  sources. 
Chris Goodenow/ The Western Front  1-695 would cut nearly half ofWTA's
funding but would reduce the price of tabs to $30.  Highway improvements
and  maintenance,Washington  State Ferries operations, public 
transportation and aid to  local governments are allWSDOT programs and
projects  that could be cut or eliminated  if 1-695 passes, according 
toWSDOT's website.  "It's something we would  have to deal with," Bahzad 
said about possible WSDOTcuts. "You'd have to juggle a lot  It's time to
gear  of learning and lounging  the piopJI^BBâ„¢^"  '
Coffl|§|and check out  gifts, pyschedelic  and really cool stuff
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www.textbookplace.com  of budgets to get it to work,  but itwould be worth
having  our opinion heard."  Farris said if 1-695 passes,  those with low
incomes would  behit by cuts in public transportation  and benefit little 
from the tax break.  1-695 would also require  thatvoters approve any
state,  county or city tax increases,  such as sales tax, property tax  and
license fees.Higher education  and civil and criminal  fines are exempt
from the initiative.  Bahzad said that section  was one of the main reasons
 she supports the bill.  "We would get our say for  each increase,"
Bahzadsaid.  Farris, however, said he is  most concerned by this aspect  of
the initiative.  "It's an attempt tocripple  government," he said,
explaining  that even a library would  have to get voter approval to  raise
its fee for overdue books,  according to 1-695.  David Toyer, Associated 
Students vice president forLegislative and Community  Affairs, said the
Associated  Students board has not yet  taken a stand on 1-695, but 
advised students to read the  text of the initiative before  voting.  "The
biggest worry I have is  that ... student voters might  not be aware of all
the effects  of 1-695," Toyer said. "If this  passes students aredefinitely
 'It's an attempt to cripple  the government!1  Tim Farris  Chair of the
Whatcom County  No on 1-695 Committee  going to have to take the step  of
becoming registered voters  and find out what's goingon."  Attention
Western Students!  Campus Buddies  . . .starts October 30th  Make a lasting
friendshipwith a Little Buddy.  As a "Big Buddy" you will be matched with a
 "Little Buddy" between 6 and 14 yearsof age.  The goal is to build a
friendship and have fun.  Get started, call today!  x? Call Today! 
671-6400Big Brothers Big Sisters of  Whatcom County

     ----------

     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 6

     ----------

6 • The Western Front News September 28,1999  Kappa
Karnival wins national accolade  By AprilUskoski  THE WESTERN FRONT 
Western's annual Kappa  Karnival received national  recognition fromthe
National  Residence Hall Honorary in  August.  Only one institution is
recognized  in each of theeight  regions throughout the nation,  competing
against 50 to 60  other schools.  After winning at theregional  level,
Kappa Karnival competed  against the other seven  regions and won.  "This
is atremendous honor  for Western Washington  University," said Nova 
Gattman, vice president of the  NRHH. "Kappa Karnival is an  amazing
program that will  now be known at schools  throughout the nation
andCanada."  Kappa Karnival happens on  the Old Main lawn during  Western
Showtime Family  Weekend."Kappa Karnival is a great  time for the outside
community  to become more involved with  the campus lifealong with 
introducing prospective students  to Western's campus,"  said Kim Fricke,
Western  senior. "It gives family members,  students and the community  an
opportunity to visit the  campus andparticipate in  many events from chalk
art  contests, entertainment and  food, skills and craft booths,"Gattman
said.  Western will receive recognition  for this program in  November at
the NRHH  regionalconference in  Fairbanks, Alaska and in May  2000 at the
national conference  in Boulder, Colo.  ChrisGoodenow/The Western Front 
Western students, a large portion of WTA patrons, may  experience adecrease
in bus service if 1-695 passes.  WTA, from page 1  WTA to hold public
forums if 1-695  approvedby voters, contingency plan waits  "All direct
operating costs (of  the route) are paid by  Western," saidStephen 
Klaniecki, WTA manager of  marketing/communications.  WTA is creating a
contingency  plan in case voters  approve 1-695 .  The plan will mandate
the  total hours and miles per day  that WTAshould run, the types  of
customers it should serve  and how it should use its $2.6-  million
reserve, Clancy said.  If 1-695 passes, WTA would  hold public forums as
soon as  early November to find out  whichroutes and services the  public
thinks are most important  to preserve, Clancy said,  adding that the cuts
would be  made as early as March 2000.  The $2.6-million reserve  would
most likely fund WTA  betweenJanuary and March,  Clancy said.  "We're not
putting a lot of  hope in any alternative source  of funding,"Clancy said. 
A replacement for lost MVET  funds does, however, exist.  In Washington
state, countyresidents can be taxed by their  local government up to 0.6
percent  for public transportation.  Currently,Whatcom County  has a sales
tax of 0.3 percent  for public transportation,  which constitutes 49
percentof  WTA's budget.  If county residents voted to  increase their
sales tax by 0.3  percent, the money lostfrom  the repeal of the MVET could
 be replaced.  The contingency plan will be  completed and presentedto the 
WTA board at an open meeting  from 7:30 a.m. to noon Sept. 30  at the
Bellingham Public  Library.  Chris Goodenow/The Western Front  Fields of
Mars performed at the Spring 1999 Kappa Karnival alongwith bands Bugs of 
Amber, Rocky Votolato and Bellingham's Basement Swing.  One trip here and 
yourhealth plan  could pay for itself.  If you or a member of your family
has a  medical emergency this quarter,how can  you be sure your finances
will survive?  The Student Emergency Health Plan  QUARTERLYPREMIUM 
Individual $64  Family $118  continues through the month in which a 
quarter ends.  Enrollment Applications for enrollment  are available at the
WWU Cashier's  This plan provides for treatment ofOffice, Student Health
Center, or at NWMB.  covered emergency illness or accidental injury You
mayenroll in the plan for the 1999 fall quarter  conditions. Coverage is
provided through Northwest throughOctober 8, 1999-  Washington Medical
Bureau and is available for you Premium The quarterly premium is$64 for an 
and your dependents. (Please see the benefit individual and $118 for a
family,  brochure forcomplete coverage information.) Questions Contact the
Student Health Center at  Eligibility Students,visiting professors and
650-7352 or Northwest Washington Medical Bureau  dependents are eligible.
Youmay enroll at the time at 734-8000. NWMB office hours are Monday through
 you register for classes,provided you are currently Friday from 8am to
5pm, except holidays. Northwest  carrying six or morecredits. Your coverage
is effec- Washington Medical Bureau is located at 3000  tive for the month
in whicha quarter begins and Northwest Avenue in Bellingham.  lt;fgt;
NORTHWEST WASHINGTON  MEDICALBUREAU  B An Independent Licensee of the Hue
Shield Association

     ----------

     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 7

     ----------

September 28,1999 News The Western Front • 7  Biology
department recieves grant for research  ByJ.R. Cook  THE WESTERN FRONT  As
part of a $200,000 grant  awarded to Western's BiologyDepartment by the
National  Science Foundation, visiting  assistant professor David  Hooper
will conduct a study of  grassland ecosystems in San  Jose.  Two Stanford
graduate students  and Western research assistant Colleen Mohl will  work
with Hooper on the ecosystem  project.  'We want to find out whatmakes
different ecosystems susceptible  to invasion (from non-native  species)
and we have our  system set up really well to test  that," Hooper said. 
The plots of native grasses  and foliage are located in south San Jose.
These plots will have  different invader species (non-native  plants)
introduced to  them. Theteam will then sample  plots for results in the
spring  and early fall by looking to see if  any species have taken over, 
Hooper said.  "We are also looking into this  for a conservation reason,"
he  said. "In anumber of cases,  invading species can drive out  natural
species and there is a lot  of interest in theprotection of  biodiversity."
 "A study like this really hasn't  been done before," Mohl said.  The
informationgathered in  this study will help further the.  understanding of
biodiversity by  studying the effect thatforeign  species have on native
species  when introduced into a new  ecosystem, Mohl added.  The grantwill
cover the  majority of the expenses for the  study. The equipment purchased
 for the study will bereturned to  Western's biology department  once the
study is completed.  Photo courtesy of  David Hooper  David Hooper 
extracts plants and  soil cores for experimental  lab manipulation.  The
plants are then  tested for their ability  to survive under different 
situations.  iii^liiiii!  §fS|ple^^ 
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     ----------

     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 8

     ----------

.8 • The Western Front News September 28,1999  Western
tricky for disability access  By JenniferSutton  THE WESTERN FRONT  Think
of the thousands of  steps throughout Western's campus.  Nowthink of how
many  stairs are within each building  — from College
Hall to  Environmental Studies.Entering and exiting buildings  entails a
lot of effort many people  take for granted — opening 
doors,climbing stairs and shuffling  between people.  Now imagine trying to
get  around campus in awheelchair  by only using automatic doors,  paved
pathways and elevators.  Access to buildings suddenly becomes very limited.
 'All of the ramps in Miller  Hall are brutal.'  Roger Flotre  Human
ResourceDepartment  "The entire campus is a potential  access barrier,"
said David  Brunnemer, assistantdirector/disability specialist of  Student
Support  Services/Disability Resources for  Students.  DisabilityResources
for  Students is designed to help disabled  students ease the transition 
from high schooland orient  them into college life.  "As soon as students
finish  high school, they are responsible  for all the arrangements that 
must be made concerning management,"  Brunnemer said.  In response to
thistransition,  the Disability Management  Council was established to help
 ease students into a healthylifestyle and put all issues a college 
student faces into perspective,  Brunnemer said.  When adisabled student is
 interested in attending Western,  they are told they must have a  sturdy
wheel chair,back up  wheels and deeper tread. They  must also come to DRS
for an  orientation, Brunnemer said."We're brutally honest with  students,"
he said.  Some of the least accessible  buildings on Western'scampus 
include College Hall, Miller Hall  and Bond Hall. The different levels  and
multiple stairs in these  buildings make some access  impossible.  "The
biggest problem with  College Hall is the rises andsteps," said Ann Dwyer
of the  Communications Department.  "All of the ramps in Miller  Hall are
brutal,"said Roger  Flotre of the Human Resources  Department.  Buildings
constructed after  1990 have morecareful consideration  for disabled access
because  of the Americans with  Disabilities Act.  Brunnemersaid the older
sections  of campus, such as Old  Main, are less ADA equipped  than the
newersections.  Buildings such as the Biology  Building and the Science
Lecture  Hall contain amenities suchas  elevators and wheel chair lifts. 
The ADA was signed into law  July 26,1999. It is a
federalantidiscrimination  law designed to  remove the barriers that
prevent  individuals with disabilities  fromenjoying the same employment 
opportunities available to  persons without disabilities,  according to the
ADA Handbook.  Flotre said he has positive  experiences on Western's campus
 regarding courtesy bystudents  and faculty members.  "I've been treated
fairly, at  least it has been good to me at  Western,"Flotre said.  The DRS
serves people with a  variety of needs, such as people  who need sign
languageinterpreters,  time caption and books  in Braille.  Chris Goodenow/
The Western Front  Roger Flotre ofthe Human Resources Department in Old
Main said he finds occasional  difficulty getting around campusin his
wheelchair.  liiilillJiiii^^^Hifc^Bill  lBilliilllii|te|ii|Hi|^jH 
•l|||gj|^|||i|^||  HilliiiBli^i^^^ii^BJ! 
li^illBiiliHll^^BiBIHHIHiBllllilflllliSIl  B»I^Bl^BiliilIHiliHiB
 IlliSta  Politician visits campus to encourage voter registrationChris
Fuller/The Western Front  Western held its annual Infofair to welcome
students for  fall quarter Sept.20-21.  By Kristin Bigsby  THE WESTERN
FRONT  Bellingham mayoral candidate  Russ Weston visitedcampus last  week
in an effort to encourage  voter registration.  Weston supporters manned a 
boothoutside the Viking Union  beginning Monday morning, urging  students
to pick up absentee  ballots andregister to vote in  Whatcom County. Weston
and his  crew registered about 50 students  per day.  "The purpose of the
booth is to  help people get registered to vote  — to
educate them about the votingprocess and the democratic  process here in
the United  States," Weston said while distributing  hisplatform pamphlet. 
An independent, Weston is recognized  by some students as the  "moose
man,"because of bis campaign  trademark.  "Weston for Mayor," pamphlets 
and T-shirts were randomlycirculated  throughout campus last  week.  "It
caught my eye," said Celina  Rourk, Western junior. "Iwondered  why it was
a moose and not  a donkey or an elephant."  Rourk said he thought having
abooth on campus would make  student voters more likely recall  Weston
during the general election,associating him with the  moose.  Weston said
he believes  Microsoft has proven that icons  make adifference.  "You're
not clicking on words on  your screen anymore; you're  clicking on icons,"
he said. "Ithink that with the moose it's a  symbol that will help me,
being  the underdog in the situation.  I've got atough hill to climb." 
Yet, some students said trademarks  make no difference when  it comes
topersuasion.  "I can't say I did notice the  booth or the moose," said
David  Mann, Western senior. "Igenerally  try not to notice the booths as I
 walk by just because Fm back  and forth on campus all thetime  and I tend
to tune things out."  Bellingham boasts 37,222 registered  voters. Weston
saidtypically  20,000 of those registered  vote in the general election. 
"There are 11,000 students oncampus," he said. "If I can capture  that vote
alone, it would put  me over the top."  Weston is runningagainst  incumbent
Mark Asmundson.  "Western is an institution of  higher learning," Asmundson
 said. "It is my belief that students  will make their votes on quality 
experience and positions on  important issues, not cartoon  characters." 
Asmundson has not visited  campus for campaigning purposes,  but he
saidsupport for his  campaign remains unaffected.  "I have always received
a good  portion of student votesbecause  philosophically I am more in-tune 
than my opponents," he said.  "One of the principles that I'veperceived in
office is to do my best  to make sure that Bellingham  feels like home to
students."  Despitethe lack of campaigning  on campus, Asmundson said  he
has worked cooperatively with  the universitynumerous times,  including
setting up a student-violence  task force.  Asmundson, who has been in 
officesince 1996, won this year's  primary election without campaigning. 
The general election will be  Nov. 2.

     ----------

     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 9

     ----------

September 28,1999 The Western Front • 9  Try drinking
water for a change.  flTs the dear stuff withoutthe head.)  Sure, water is
good for you.  Everybody knows that. But who  knows where if s been?
Checkout the  Brita® Water Filtration Pitcher. It  removes
chlorine, sediment and 99%  of lead from your tapwater.  The water is so
good, you may not  want to drink anything else. (Yeah, right.)  Look for a
Britasampling  event coming soon to your campus.  IBRTTA  Tap water,
transformed.1  Substances removedmay not be in all water. ©1999
The Brita Products Co.  WESTERN  ASSOCIATED STUDENTSBOOKstore  The official
bookstore of WWU and proud sponsor of WWU Athletics! ^  Homecoming Sale30%
OFF  All Sportswear  Saturday, Oct 2nd!  501 High Street  (across the
street from the Wilson Library)  Bellingham, WA 98225-9104  Monday-Friday
7:30am - 5:00pm  Saturday 11:00am - 3:00pm  phone:(360) 650-3655  fax:
(360) 650-2888  email: stucoop@cc.wwu.edu  website:
www.bookstore.wwu.eduWhere eve^|®pi|MH3fiigSISto  support
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     ----------

     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 10

     ----------

10 • The Western Front News September 28,1999  Huxley
students control weed using wily weevil  ByBill Bennion  THE WESTERN FRONT 
Weevils may be the answer to  a problem facing Western'sHannegan
Environmental  Center.  Western students Sara  Waddell, JoAna Philips and 
Patrick Boicediscovered that  the Canada thistle was dominating  the
center's field while  enrolled in an ecosystemrestoration class taught by 
Bert Webber. The class was  held off-campus at the center,  located on
thecorner of  Bakerview and Hannegan  roads. The Canada thistle is a 
state-designated noxious weedbecause it is non-native and  tends to take
over areas into  which it is introduced.  The three studentsresearched ways
to control or  eliminate the thistle without  using herbicides. They came
up  with twooptions for control of  the weed: frequent mowing of  the field
or use of a biological  control agent.  'Theweevils are deposited  at a
living plant and immediately  find their way to  the seed head.' 
AprilMarkiewicz  Research technologist suprivisor  According to April 
Markiewicz, research technologistsupervisor for Western's  Institute of
Environmental  Toxicology and Chemistry, the  school was paying$1,500 each 
time the field was mowed and  was only able to mow it approximately  twice
during thesummer.  In order to control the  weed, the field would need to
be  mowed about every two weeks.  Also, mowing the field did not  allow for
a natural environment,  so the students looked  into biological
controlagents.  The students considered several  options, but decided on t
he  Canada thistle seed headweevil,  because it does well in  Western
Washington's climate.  The weevil attacks the Canada  thistleby drilling
holes in  •  1  campus  unopened buds and depositing 
eggs. The larvae then feed on  thetissue of the thistle, including  the
seed tissue. The adult  weevils do their part by feeding  on the
plant'sfoliage.  "We were able to place about  420 weevils in the field," 
Markiewicz said. "The weevils  aredeposited at a living plant  and
immediately find their way  to the seed head."  Markiewicz said that
thethistle is able to reproduce not  only through seeds, but also  through
its root system. The  plan is tocontrol the weed, not  eradicate it. If the
weevils  destroy the seeds, the plant will  not be able to spreadand will 
eventually be out-competed for  sunlight and soil nutrients.  "I was very
excited that we  were able to complete a project  that was student
designed,"  Waddell said. "I found out that  there are a lot ofpolitics to 
completing projects, even within  the university..."  Western's Planning
Facilities  andOperation Department  donated $500 for the purchase  of the
weevils. The total cost  with shipping cameto $569;  the remainder was made
up by  the Institute of Environmental  Toxicology and Chemistry.Waddell
said she hopes to see  the results within the next couple  of years. 
ABOVE: The weevils crawl on a decaying maple tree  leaf. Soon after, they
will  deposit eggs into the seed  head of the Canadathistle,  killing the
plant without  pesticides.  RIGHT: Sara Waddell  releases weevils into a
field  atWestern's Hannegan  Environmental Center.  Photos courtesy of the 
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     ----------

     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 11

     ----------

September 28, .1999 News The Western Front • 11  Gallery
exhibits artifacts, photos, history from eras gone by  By April Busch  THE
WESTERN FRONT  Western in the 60s: students  with afros, long hair,beads
and  bell-bottoms held hands in Red  Square. Psychology professor  Peter
Elich wore a wool blazer  while he leaned against his  desk and smoked a
pipe. The  president of Harvard advised  Western facultyto remember  that
campus troublemakers  needed to be loved as our children.  These images
andartifacts  from Western's 100 years as an  institution are part of the 
Centennial Celebration display  at theWestern Gallery.  "I've never been in
here  before but am impressed with  the exhibit," Western studentCaroline
Bobka said as she  wandered randomly through  the room.  Arranged by
decade, the  exhibitbegins with the 1990s.  "By starting with the present, 
the exhibit opens with  Western's look to thefuture,"  said Western Gallery
director  Sarah Clark-Langager.  Visitors can choose to begin  with
photosarranged from  1899, or start at the end of the  exhibit
chronologically backwards.  A photo-selectioncommittee  originally chose
exhibit photos  four years ago for the small  Founder's Day history show. 
Thecommittee had to choose  from hundreds of prospective  photos from
Western's  archives, Westernannuals and  the Bellingham Herald's  archives.
 "There were so many wonderful  photographs thatweren't in the Founder's
Day  show," Clark-Langager said.  The centennial exhibit,  Western
Tableaux: 100 Years, is  an expanded exhibit that  includes pieces taken
directly  from the photos or time periodsdepicted.  "Tableaux" is a
theatrical  term that describes actors  posed to represent a particular 
scene orpicture, Clark-  Langager said. The artifacts in  the exhibit are
either the same  as in the photographs orare  arranged to represent
particular  photos or time periods.  By creating a mixed art  exhibit,
thegallery was able to  display Western's extensive  chair collection and
archived  costumes.  The exhibitfeatures the history  of the outdoor
sculpture  collection, academic life, entertainment,  clothing,furniture 
and attitudes during Western's  100 years.  A video narrated by students, 
alumni and facultyshowcases photos not in the  exhibit. People who
experienced  the different phases of  Westerndescribe its sense of  place,
student and academic  life and life after Western.  "We've had a pretty
goodamount of people coming  through and the response has  been really
positive," gallery  receptionistMeridith Baldwin  said.  Western Tableaux:
100 years  is on display Monday through  Friday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 
until Oct. 8.  Another historical perspective  exhibit titled Decades of 
Giving: Virginia Wrightand  Sculpture at Western will begin  Sept. 27. The
exhibit will feature  Virginia Wright's generousdonations to Western's
outdoor  sculpture collection.  Old Main  fire small,  no injuries  Flames
sparkedby a lighting  fixture in Old Main 530 shut  down the International
Programs  Office last Friday at 9:53 a.m. There were no injuries and the 
only damage was to the fixture,  plus a few dime-sized holes  burned inthe
carpet below it.  The office was re-opened on  Monday.  "Everyone responded
well to  the emergency,and all systems  worked as they should," said  Gayle
Shipley, director of environment  and healthsafety.  The Western Front
staff  From TRUSTEE, page 1  Seattle lawyer appointed to board,
lookingforward to service  Gary Locke, during his election.  Raymond is a
partner at  the Seattle law firm,Principal,  Caircross and Hempelmann, 
where he provides legal services  to the state, local and  special purpose
governments.  Raymond said Oct. 8 is his  first meeting on the board and 
he is excited abouthis new  position.  .still. .  looking  for thai parking
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     ----------

     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 12

     ----------

The Western Front  FEATURES  Campus  Community September 28,1998  B'HAM'S
BEERBACCHANAL  By JJ Jensen  THE WESTERN FRONT  Thursday nights in
Bellingham  ... what to do?Well, for those over  21, or with a good fake
ID, it's a no  brainer — you're going out with 
intentions ofgetting wasted, getting  action, or preferably both.  Thursday
nights are something  of an anomaly inBellingham. It's  the one night of
the week where  the consensus is to put away the  bong and head to theplace
in town  to see and be seen at — The World  Famous Up 
Up Tavern, which  you might also know as The Down  and Out or The Throw Up
and Up.  THE RECENT HISTORY  "The Up  Up has been theplace to come for
years now," said  Evan Benthien, bartender, janitor,  door boy and cook at
The Up."People come for the cheap beer  and cheap burgers. It's definitely 
fun and crowded."  Even in the days of yore (early  90s), The Up was the
place to go,  but other hot spots such as The  Royal Room andDowntown 
Johnny's weren't even considered  and the Thursday night scene was 
possibly even morerowdy.  Heather Brady, a 25-year-old  former Western
student who used  to enjoy the bar scene said TheBlack Angus was the dope
place to  go because it had the only dance  floor. Gus and Nap's on
RailroadAvenue and the now-defunct  Station were also favorites among 
college students.  "The Up  Up wasalways the  big thing," she remembered
fondly.  Brady, however, still sees some  similarities between now and the 
early 90s.  "Everyone still goes out to get  drunk and get laid," she said.
 "Maybe not get laid,but everyone  goes out to get hammered."  Erin
Crabtree, a 27-year-old former  Western student saidshe  notices some
differences, though.  "Now people are more casually  dressed; back then it
was a more  'pimps and ho' sort of thing."  WHERE IT'S AT  Fpllinghflm
offers a widp variety  of downtown bars wherestudents  and bar flies can
catch a buzz on  Thursday; each fighting for a slice  of that
college-studentmoney.  Most every clique has its own bar. 
• The Royal and mVTs offer  dance floors and hard
liquorand  are good forums to showcase and  view some tight, white tanks
tops,  short skirts and crazy games. • The 3B (three
beers and  everyone's looking good) has a  decent dance floor and
reasonably  pricedcans of Schmidt's and Pabst  Blue Ribbon (hey, it won a
blue ribbon  somewhere). Here's the rub:hippies dancing to 80s music and a 
smell that's a cross between  patchouli and your housemate's  roomthat
reeks of man-sweat.  • The Ranch Room, The  Beaver,
Father John's and Gus  and Nap's are goodplaces for the  low-key college
crowd or a place for  the older crowd to flaunt their  biker
girlfriends.THINGS ARE ROCKING  It's 7:15 p.m. on the first  Thursday back
to school at The Up   Up. You thought you were going  to get a table or
even a pitcher? —  yeah right.  There's already a line
outside  and theline to the bathroom is so  long the sink is looking like a
good  option. lines for the $1 pitchers  and 50-cent pounders are moving 
about as fast as a seven-year itch,  and the quarters are so cramped  you
haveto worry about not getting  someone pregnant.  Ozzy Osborne's "Crazy
Train," a  fixture at The Up, canbarely be  made out as friends greet each 
other for the first time in four  months, but everyone seems tobe  a little
bitter because of the wait  and long lines.  "They might as well sell seven
 pitchers of O'Douls for a $1,  because it looks to me like no one  wants
to get drunk or laid," Shawn  Scott-Deeds said as hewaited in a  beer line.
 Scott-Deeds wasn't in the minority  of those angered at the
inaccessibility  ofalcohol.  "The only way you can have a  good time at The
Up  Up is taking  10 shots of hard liquorbefore  you come or if you get
here at 6  o'clock," spouted Kevin Hambly, a  malcontented
22-year-oldsenior.  Unfortunately, Hambly only had  six shots of Bacardi
before he came  Thursday night.  Meanwhile, the people stuck in  the
hour-long lines outside were  also getting restless.  "Dude, waiting in
line blows," angry student Scott Willabee said.  "We've been here for an
hour and  we're not even near the door."We've been here a few days," 
shouted someone else.  At 8:45 p.m., the alcohol is taking  effect andthe
liquid courage is  starting to kick in. People have  downed their cheap
pre-funct and  are ready to headoff to the other  meat markets.  "You gonna
get wasted tonight?"  "I drink in moderation, you  know,"replied Vic
Schiavone, a  mafia-looking Western student  with slicked-back, black hair,
 known to be aregular at  Bellingham bars and said to have  a stinging left
and one of the  toughest rights in the business,  should anyone want to
throw  down.  "Most Western students only  have three to four beers when
theyparty," Schiavone said sarcastically  as he clutched a pitcher of Busch
 Light in his right hand and twopounders in his left.  Later at The Royal:
A young  man asks a young lady what she  came to the Royal todo and she 
replied unconvincingly: "To see  you." "A little bit of Jessica, here I 
am," said Jessica Lewis,22, professional  banker by day, party girl by 
night. "Things are fuckin' rocking.  We're going to have agood time."  The
attractive crowd of people  made for nice scenery.  Chris Fuller/The
Western Front  ScottMcKinnon spins retro tunes for revelers at the 3B
Tavern's Thursday 80s night.  "There's some really nice-looking  girls with
some nice boo-tays,"  said general studies major Tony  Irwin, who'd been
(irinkingSchmidt's all night.  Elsewhere, those who chose to  have house
parties tonight may  have had the rightidea.  "My big plan was to avoid the
 bars because the lines are so utterly  obnoxious," senior KatieHeggerty
said while at a party on  Undine Street. "At least at a party  like this
you can get laid ... Ahhh!,  Iwas just joking, I was totally jok-  'They
might as well sell  seven pitchers of O'Douls  for a $1, because itlooks 
to me like no one wants to  get drunk or laid.'  Shawn Scott-Deeds  Waiting
in line for beer  ing,"she stressed.  Senior James Policar was also in 
agreement.  "This is better than the bars,  plus I can'tstand the cigarette
 smoke," he said. "It just seems like  a bunch of Willie Nelson fans 
smokingcigarettes."  With the first Thursday night  now in the books,
first-timers got  their first taste of Bellinghamaction while seasoned
veterans got  back in the saddle again.  Unfortunately, reviews of the 
first Thursdaywere mixed.  Fortunately, nine months of puke-filled, 
opposite-sex chasing  Thursdays await.  Grammyand American Music Award
Winner  12 !Vlii!ion Albums Sold Worldwide  featuring The Hits  "I Swear" 
"So Much in love"  "I Can Lowe You Like That"  The HBW Hit  -*l Will 8e 
Bight Here"

     ----------

     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 13

     ----------

September 28,1999 Features The Western Front • 13 
PRE-FUNCTION PREPAREDNESS  By LiamHouse-Doyle  . THE WESTERN FRONT  It's 6
p.m. on the first  Thursday night of the quarter  and indowntown Bellingham
 the bars are quiet and bare  except for a few bartenders tapping  the kegs
andbouncers  preparing for the night ahead.  Not far away from West Holly 
and North State streets, a group  7 hop around the house on  one foot while
making  instinctual and guttural  noises; it gets me warmed  upfor all the
funky dancing  I do.'  Melba McKay  Western Student  of three Western
students are  stuffingtheir faces with fat- filled  food and downing a few
beers.  The first stains of spaghetti  sauce are spatteredagainst the 
newly painted ivory-white walls  of an apartment. Ample servings  of army
green spinachnoodles  and sweet Italian sausage are  piled high on jumbo
paper plates.  Three Western guys tear garlic bread and sip cheap canned
beer  as they laugh about the  Thursday nights of past.  Western studentand
business  major Tim Osborn, 23, routinely  visits the The World Famous Up  
Up — as do many ofhis kind  — on
Thursday night.  "I eat a big solid meal to soak  up the beer so I don't
get buzzed  tooquick, ya know, since pitchers  are only a dollar,'' Osborn
said.  Like any function looked forward  to,Thursday nights have  specific
steps and rituals known  as the "pre-funct" that prepare  the
individual."The pre-funct depends on who  you're going out with," Osborn 
said. "There's a lot of calling  around tosee what's up, and figuring  out
who's going to drive  and who's going to get fit."  Western students
havebeen  preparing for the weekly  escapade since 1984 when Ian  Relay,
the owner of The Up  Up,  boughtthe bar and began hosting  $1 pitchers of
beer.  "When dollar pitchers started,  students would do thepre-funct 
here, and then go to The Black  Angus or Speedy O' Tubbs,"  Relay said.  On
the wilder side ofpre-func-tions,  some behave primitively.  English major
Melba McKay, 21,  confidently explained her ritual disembarking.  "I hop
around the house on one  foot while making instinctual  Leni Neumaier, a
Westernfreshman, prepares for an evening out.  and guttural noises; it gets
the  limbs warmed up for all the  funkydancing I do." she said.  "The bars
take a lot of energy, so  I like to get the blood pressure  up."  Ofcourse,
there are some people  who allow the Thursday night  tradition to happen
safely.  In distinctcontrast to the  "party animal," Western student  and
human services major  Gretchen Feider, 21, staysmellow  and watches
"Friends" or  "ER" before driving her friends to  and from the bars.  "My
friends relyon me instead  of a cab," she said. "They give me  money and
that's fun because the  numbers becomeblurred."  When the bars have closed
and  the congregations disperse, people  disappear. Butsomewhere  else
activities just as creative,  but far more crude are taking  place.  Angela
Smith/TheWestern Front  "Well, this one time after the  bars we ripped up
plants in front  of a fraternity; we juststarted  rippin' pansies out of
the  ground," McKay said.  The after hours for Gretchen  Feider is a car
full of loud and  merry friends, one of which occasionally  request an
emergency  stop.  "I keep plastic bags in the car,  and I pull over to let
them puke,"  Feider said.  SATURDAY!  WWU Vikings  vs.  Western NewMexico 
Saturday, October 2 .  Civic Stadium, 1:00 p.m.  Mhmmf PEPSI  7(sm  Free
shuttles to the game depart from the Viking Union at 12:15 p.m.  wwu v i k
i n gs  JVW/LJLLJL-J crew  By checking in with theBlue Crew at every  game
you attend, you receive free stuff  are  entered into grand prize drawings.
Themore  games you attend, the better the prizes.  Mim-grand pitas / after
each saasu  $ 100 in munchmoney (4)  CD Player/Stereo (4)  For entry to win
the 1st mini-grand prize you must attend  3 homefootball games.  For entry
to win grand prize, attend a total of at least 12  football, basketball, or
volleyballgames.

     ----------

     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 14

     ----------

14 • The Western Front Features September 28,1999  Taming
 crowd  By Soren Velice  THEWESTERN FRONT  As many Western students know, 
Thursdays are a boon to local drinkingestablishments; crowds are huge, and 
access is often denied because of the  masses already inside.Many would be
surprised, however, to  find out that local authorities don't add  more
patrols and that mostbars prepare  for Thursday crowds mainly with a
combination  of music, cheap beer and extra  bouncers.  Anyone who enters
The Royal or The  Up  Up on a Thursday night will meet  with a crowd so
thickmovement is difficult  at best. Upon leaving, one is likely to  see
police cars parked near the door,seemingly waiting for trouble to erupt. 
Local officials, however, tell a different  story. Although bar hoppersmay
see  more cops by the door when they leave,  police apparently alter their
routes  rather than theirschedules to accommodate  the action at local
bars.  "We have a schedule and we stick to it,  unlessthere's something
exceptional,"  said University Police Chief J im Shaw. "I  don't think
there's anysignificant  changes due to the day of the week."  Although
Bellingham police broke up a  fight Thursday,Lt. Dae Jamison was hesitant 
to blame it on the night of the week.  "We had a fight at Rumours," hesaid.
 "Some college students are going there,  but I'm not sure we could lay
that on college  drinking on Thursday nights."  Indeed, in large crowds
such as those  at Bellingham dance clubs on Thursday  nights, Jamison said
conflicts are likely  to break out regardless of the night of the  week. 
Although movementthrough the pulsing,  balmy crowds at Bellingham seemingly
 be measured in geologic time, localowners and staff don't do things jmuch 
differently on Thursday nights.  "I have cheap beer," Up  UpTavern 
proprietor Ian Relay said in the nearly  empty beer garden on a relatively
slow  Saturday night, "but I always have cheap  beer."  He said he didn't
add bouncers because  the wall-to-wall crowd on Thursdays usually  prevents
fights from getting too serious.  "It's hard to fight when you can't even 
play pool,"Relay said. "The. crowd usually  breaks em up before we can even
get to  'em anyway."  Althoughpractically anyone standing  outside of
Downtown Johnny's on a  Thursday night will talk about insanecrowds of
drunken college students dancing  their lives away, the club's management 
doesn't treat ittoo differently from  any other night.  "Thursday night is
traditionally the big  night around here," doormanKevin  Rogina. said on a
markedly mellow  Saturday night. "We've got two bouncers  tonight, but we'd
have four on a night like  that."  Chris Fuller/The Western Front  A
Bellingham Police Department cruiserpatrols outside of The Royal on  a
Thursday night.  As two of the four dancers present left  the. floor
forrefreshments, Rogina said  the additional bouncers pretty much  summed
up the club's preparations forThursday nights.  Rogina added that so far,
the Thursday  crowds are large, but pretty tame^  "It's beenreal quiet
— a real good  crowd," Rogina said.  Jamison agreed. 
"Fortunately, the students aren'tberserk drinkers," he said.  Shaw agreed
as well, commenting that  people seem to be handlingthemselves  well. 
Although any student who's taken a  test hung over or still fighting a
residual  haze fromthe previous night's endeavors  may disagree, the
general practice among  Western's professors is not toadjust exam 
schedules for Friday hangovers.  Engineering Technology professor  Dave
Werstlersummarized the attitude  well.  "I could care less about Friday
exams,"  he said. "I do them when we setthe  schedule. Students don't tell
me if they  come in drunk or hung over."  Despite the sheer size of
thecrowds  and their inherent propensity for trouble,  the consensus among
local authority figures  seemsto be that as adults, Thursday  revelers are
responsible enough to handle  the consequences of theirdeeds.  Quizno'O
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     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 15

     ----------

September 28, 1999 The Western Front • 15  *
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     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 16

     ----------

16 • The Western Front Features September 28,1999  COMMON
 SENSE  1. Leave a trip scheduleand any alternate  plans with a responsible
 person.  2. Hike or climb in a  group (3 + recommendedso that one can stay
 with the injured person  and one can go for  help).  3. Know your
equipment  andhow to use it.  4. Research your trip;  know the area and 
local conditions.  5. Check the weather  beforeand during the  trip; watch
for weather  changes.  6. Sign in at the  Ranger Station (if  applicable). 
7. Keep the party  together at all times.  8. Obey the leader or  majority
rule.  9. Take only pictures;  leave onlyfootprints.  10. Don't eat the
yellow  snow.  rescue  facts  10 ESSENTIALS  1. Map of the area in a
:waterproof case. :  2. Compass and know »  how to use it.
••:  3. Flashlight with ;  extra
bdtteriesand :  bulb. : . J  4. Extra food. :  5. Extra clothing ( h a t^ 
gloves or mittens, rain :  gear^sweater). : :  6.Simglassesjand sun ? 
screen lotion. r --V-  7. Pocket knife. •
•  8. Matches in water- ?  proofcontainer.
.•':  9; Candle or fire »  starter.;;  10.
First aid kit.  I North Cascades National Park Servicehelicopter assisting
Bellingham Mountain Rescue with a  Bellingham's all-volunteer, all-By Jenni
OdekirkTHE WESTERN FRONT  REQUESTING HELP : gt; \  If you are worried about
a friend: •  1. Contactthe sheriff's office (911) or the
ranger. :  2. Be able to furnish the following information: *  a) Time they
wereexpected to return. •  b) Location and license
numbers of their vehicles. ^ J  c) Trip plan andalternatives. -=?  d)
Names, ages, equipment, experience and condition :'i  of group members. J 
e) Anypertinent medical conditions of party •  members. ,
i  If you are requesting help for an injured person: :1. Contact the
sheriff's office (911) or the ranger. • \  2. Be able to
furnish the following information: \  a)Exact location and time of
accident. :... • j  b) Summary of injuries of each
injured person. :  c)Numbers of people and kinds of equipment at :  the
scene that can be used to sustain the injured. :  d)Specialized conditions
or equipment needed.  e) Any evacuation or other plans of those on  scene. 
f) Note elevation, landmarks and any helicopter  landing zones.  3.
Establish a rendezvous point and stay putuntil the  rescue team arrives. 
Heavy rain and winds steadily assaulted Harte  Bressler, a
BellinghamMountain Rescue Council  field operations officer, and his search
team as they  scoured Stuart Mountainone evening in search of a  missing
boy, Bressler recalled. The incident occurred  about five years ago,
hesaid.  "A family had gone out bear hunting... and a young  man... 9 or 10
was with them and got separated from  the family and got lost," Bressler
said.  After a 4x4 search team couldn't locate them, the  BMRCwas called
the next day to join the search  effort, Bressler said.  ..The. Whatcom
County Sheriff's Office isin charge  of search and rescue, but, because of
training and  equipment shortfalls, it calls on localvolunteer  groups such
as the Dive Rescue Team, Radio  Amateur Civil Emergency Service, 4x4s,
RidgeMeadows Bloodhounds, and BMRC, among others, to  execute the missions,
said Whatcom Coiinty;Sheriff•.  Chief Ron Peterson,
search and rescue supervisor; :  The local search and rescue teams often
work with  each other and sometimes with regional search and  rescue teams,
Peterson said.o . , , .,„..-.;  Composed of about 50
volunteers — 12 of them  women — the
BMRC conducts searches andrescues  on difficult terrain, such as glaciers,
mountains and  cliffs, Peterson said.  Once Bressler's teamgot to Stuart
Mountain during  that search mission several years ago, it spaced  out and
descended thecliffy area, shouting and blowing  its whistles above the
bluster of the storm,  Bressler said.  The teamwas apprehensive.  "We
didn't have a good feeling about the search,"  Bressler said. "The boy had
virtually no protection  (against the elements). It had almost been two
days  (since he got lost)."  After half anhour, however, the team found the
boy  in a hollowed-out log, Bressler said.  "I got to him, took my packoff
and asked him if he  was hungry and took out what I had
— two sand-  ^wiches. gt; (They) were gone in under 60
seconds,"  i Bijessier said, chuckling. 
•gt;^gt;'--^n^'mission) was quick and had a happy ending.
 *  m*  A victim with a leg fracture caused by a fall into a crevasse on
Mount Baker is pulled tosafety.

     ----------

     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 17

     ----------

ptember 28,1999 Features The Western Front • 17  Photos
courtesy of Sam Gardner  »ry on MountShuksan's north face.  ain
rescuers  like those," said Bressler, 49, who has been  )lved in missions
formore than 20 years,  hat mission was one of an average of 25 calls per. 
— most of them during summer— that
the  RC receives, said field operations leader Lynn  iayton, 50, who has
been involved in BMRC for  •e than 30 years, had been
interested in the organ-ion  since he was a Md. One of his childhood 
ndswas the son of Dave Jenkins who founded  RC in 1955. Jenkins still
volunteers at its base  n though he's in his mid-80s.  MRC missions range
from searches for missing  dren to injured climbers on Mount Baker,Dayton 
, adding that the BMRC also monitors flooding of  Nooksack River.  [e said
the mission that hashaunted him the most  the recovery of a dead climber at
Twin Sisters  August.  He) was impaled on his ice ax and basically bled 
eath," Dayton said. It's so sad that he didn't have  knowledge ... to use
hisequipment."  Tie calls are split almost evenly between searches  missing
people and rescues to assistpeople who  injured or dead, Dayton said,
adding that the suc-rate  of BMRC during the years is about 99per-tie 
missions can be as short as a few minutes or  as long as seven or eight
days, Bressler said.lommon places BMRC is called out to are Mount  cer,
Snoqualmie National Forest and North  icadesNational Park, Dayton said. 
tegardless of location or circumstances, every mis-begins  the same
way.omeone calls 911 and their call is forwarded to the  atcom County
Sheriff's Office. A sheriffs deputy  callsa coordinator
— a field operations leader in  case of BMRC. The field
operations leader gets  gt;rmationfrom the 911 caller, discusses initial 
itegies with the sheriffs deputy, calls all volun-chooses  a teamleader
— someone who has  ibing, navigation and medical skills
— and  embles a team.  fhe missionprocess takes place in
about five minor  less," Peterson said.  Volunteer responses vary, Bressler
said. Sometimes we come up virtually empty handed,  ; sometimes we're
overwhelmed," Bressler said.  tfotnvolunteers are not able to respond to a
call,  RC asks assistance from various out-of-county  untain rescue groups,
Bressler said, adding that  ely happens.  •s,  -i The
volunteers irieet at the BMRC bmldl^ and  ;drive out to a trail head.
Usually ateam of two to four  is sent out initially, but more teams are
dispatched if needed. For a rescue, six to 10 people are sent out for 
every mile that a stretcher would need to becarried  back to the trail
head, Dayton said.  "Being an operations leader, Fm in charge of
everybody,the safety of the teams and making sure the  strategy that we
have is going to work," Dayton said.  Hesaid some of his major concerns are
gathering  the right equipment — which may include items
such  asropes, pulleys, radios, and medical supplies — 
facilitating communication between team members,matching volunteers' skills
with mission tasks and  making sure team members stay safe.  Five levels
ofvolunteers exist. Level-one trainees  are brand new and are trained in
first aid and mountaineeringtechniques — they can't go
on missions.  Level-two trainees have some mountaineering skills,  first
aidcertification and limited mission experience.  Support members have
spent at least one year as a  traineeand have proficient search and rescue
skills.  Rescue members can be team leaders and fieldoperations  officers,
charged with organizing missions,  Dayton said. He estimated that an
activemember  spends 20 to 30 hours per year doing BMRC activi-.  ties. 
"What makes (missions) intenselyinteresting is  the multitude of mental and
physical tasks occurring  simultaneously," team leader JimMcClintock said. 
"In general, I enjoy a mission where you feel you  made a difference and
contributed and had the opportunity  to use some skills you've been
practicing and  end up with alive and well people.".McClintock, a BMRC
veteran of more than 10  years, said when he's out in the field he focuses
on themechanics ^ d strategies and often shut out the emotion^  the
missions,  f "GettingEmotionally involved... does not help the  mission,"
McClintock said. "There's no time to focus  on the tragic aspects
ofrescues."  McClintock said his emotions crept into his work,  however,
when he participated in the teamthat  searched Whatcom Creek for about five
hours for survivors  the evening after the pipeline blast.  "Itwas one of
the most surreal and bizarre circumstances  we were called into,"
McClintock said.  Thepocket fires on the hillside and in trees and the 
smell of petroleum created an eerie environment for  thesearch that
uncovered 18-year-old Liam Wood's  body in Whatcom Creek, he said.  After
the WhatcomCreek mission, the BMRC  team members were debriefed by a
counselor, Dayton  said.  "We try to watch our own members ... especially
if  there's been a fatality," Dayton said. "Any time someone  dies itssad,
and sometimes you think it could  have been avoided, but you try not to
say, When we  were there,we should have done this or we should  have done
that.' We never criticize someone."  Despite thetragedies he's witnessed,
Dayton said a  desire to help others and love of the outdoors keeps, 
himinvolved in BMRC.  "Sometimes it's grisly work, but you try to make  the
best of the situation and enjoythe surroundings  up there and the weather
and the love of the mountains,"  Dayton said.  Above: KellyBush  and Hugh
Dougher  assist in a fatal accident  recovery on  Mount Shuksan.  Left:
Members ofBellingham Mountain  Rescue sort equipment  after a training 
exercise.  Below: BMRC lower  a spinalinjury victim  800 feet to a
helicopter  landing zone.  Bellingham Mount Rescue begin first aid on
arecently discovered avalanche victim. The team will locate  the victim's
face, ensure that his vital signs arestable and splint him before removing
him from the snow.

     ----------

     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 18

     ----------

18 • The Western Front Features September 28,1999  BODIES
 MOTION  By Monica Bell  THEWESTERN FRONT  Twenty to 40 dancers, moving 
their bodies in perfect syn-chronicity,  executingenthusiastic  leaps,
turns, kicks and  jumps come together as  Western's Competitive Dance 
Team.Started in the spring of  1998, the dance club incorporates  elements
of jazz and hip  hop into its high-energy performances.  "We support the
team a lot,"  said Sabrina Johnson, dance  team co-captain.  "Ithink it
keeps the excitement  going while the team is  away," Johnson said. "It
keeps  the crowdpumped up and gets  them excited about the game."  Members
of the dance club  commit their time andhard  work to perform at four to
six  basketball games and two football  games for the university. 
Lastyear, they also performed  as an exhibition team  for the Interlake
High School  competition.  This yearthe team's ultimate  goal is to be the
first  Western dance team to participate  in a national collegecompetition 
in either California or  Seattle- said Sherri Alberts,  dance team
co-captain.  If the teamtravels to  California to compete, the  price per
participant will  range from $500 to $1,000 for  travel,uniforms and
choreography,  which the team plans  on earning via fund-raisers.  "The
experience overallof  competing at a nationals competition  is just very
uplifting,"  Alberts said of a national high  schooldance competition she 
participated in.  The team now has five captains:  Sherri Alberts,
JodiAlexander, Sabrina Johnson,  Vanessa Keverkamp and  Heather Werckle,
who also  advises the team.Twenty-one  members from last year will  perform
during two football  games. After this year's try-outs  theteam will have 
approximately 45 members on  the performance squad for basketball  season. 
Thedance team has try outs,  but instead of cutting people it  ranks each
individual through  Steven Uhles/TheWestern Front  Western's competitive
dance team performs at the information fair on Sept. 21.  */ loveperforming
... it's  fun and it's a big reward  after having all the hard  practice.' 
Sherri Alberts  Dance teamco-captain  a point system. Those on the 
performance squad must have  a set number of points.Members of the dance
team  do not need dance experience  but it helps, Alberts said. 
Prospectivemembers sign a  contract promising to commit  their time and
energy to the  team, as well asacknowledging  the demerit point system  for
missing practices, arriving  late, or missing fund-raisers.Camaraderie is
just one of  the benefits of the team.  "I love the bond that has  formed
for the team, we'veall  gotten really close," said Lisa  McWayne, a senior
and returning  member.  The performance itself is  reason enough for some
of the  members.  "It's kind of addicting; if you  start doing it you can't
stop,"Johnson said.  "I love performing first of all  —
performance is like the  biggest thing," Alberts said.  "It'sfun and it's a
big reward  after having all the hard practice."  Editors note: Every week
The  WesternFront will feature a  profile of a different on-cam-pus  club
being sponsored by  Western's AssociatedStudents.  If you have a suggestion
for a  club you would like to see profiled  e-mail to the Featureseditors 
care of The Western Front  — wfront@cc.wwu.edu. 
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     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 19

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September 28,1999 Features The Western Front • 19 
iWesteri;  1 0 0 YEARS Western's NewWhatcom Roots  By Jenni Odekirk  THE
WESTERN FRONT  When Western opened in 1899, it consisted of  a main
building that sat in the middle of a  swamp, 88 students and eight faculty
members  under thedirection of Principal Edward T.  Mathes.  In fact, the
institution wasn't even called  Western WashingtonUniversity
— it was  called New Whatcom Normal School, and it 
wasn't a state college — it offered one- and two-year 
teaching certificates for its students.  New Whatcom Normal School had been
 plannedsince 1893, when Gov. John H.  McGraw signed legislation that
mandated a  teaching school in the townof New Whatcom,.  one of the tiny
hamlets that eventually combined  to become Bellingham.  "Thepopulation (of
New Whatcom) was  growing rapidly, and there was a great need for  public
schoolteachers," history professor Chris  Friday said.  It wasn't until the
1898 Yukon Gold Rush,  however, thatWashington state had enough  money to
begin building the school.  Construction was not quite finished by the time
 students arrived the following fall.  The class of 1899 consisted only of
women,  although mencame to the school in subsequent  years. Many of the
women were recruited by  Mathes and came frompioneering families that  had
settled New Whatcom and the Seattle-  Tacoma area. After graduation, many
taught in  the fishing, logging and farming communities  that dotted
Western Washington, Friday said.  "Ialways looked upon (the class of 1899)
as  being quite courageous," said Steve Inge, who  is helpingWestern
assemble its centennial history  book. "They were willing to take a little 
more of a risk."  At the time, what is now the University of  Washington,
Washington State University,  Central WashingtonUniversity, Eastern 
Washington University and Seattle Pacific  Archive/The Western Front  Old
Main, built in 1899, originally housed the New Whatcom Normal School, 
which eventually became WesternWashington University.  the relationship
between faculty and students  was close.  "We were just like abig family,
faculty and  students alike. You didn't just know who the  teachers were;
you really knewthem," Millikan  told a reporter in the March 1997 issue of 
Resume, Western's alumni publication.  Whenout of the classroom, students
stayed  in residential hotels, apartments — which were 
rare — or nearby boarding houses because no  residence
hall had yet been built.  "The tradition of students walking fromHigh  and
Garden Streets up the hill to Western is  100 years old," Friday said.  7
always looked upon (the class of  1899) as being quite courageous.'  Steve
Inge  Historian  University also offered teachingcertificates as  part of
their curriculum.  The age of students the first few years  ranged from
approximately15 to 25, and the  education level of the students also varied
 widely — some were finishing high schoolcourses and
some had taken several years of  college.  • Ida Pillman
Millikan, a student in 1899, saidEditor's note: Every week The Western
Front  will present a chapter from Western's 100-year  history.instant
recall.  In(|ylie  LITERALLY DIAL *G? AND AUT(j,\  IT'S ON YOUR PHONE NOW
AND JUST 7lt;v' PER  LAST PERSON v\HO CALLED  LINE"' • (
^  Eastern Washington University  offers more than 40 master's  degrees in
a diversity of fields in  programs that are convenient  and flexible for
workingprofessionals. Courses are held  at downtown Spokane locations 
during the evening.  ...in a K  Graduate f;  Degree  from  Eastern 
Washington  University  "I think the MFA is so  excellent because it is 
such aprivate degree.  It would be silly to get  it for the sake of 
monetary ambition or  worldly recognition  Onegets it privately.  And its
joys ate private  ones. I feel like I have  done something right, 
something big formyself because of that  degiee. It is a luxury.  It was
just for me. I  Love It. Capitals, each  of those words" -Jennifer Oakes 
MFA, Creative Writing,  '96  Professional Editor,  1999 Boyden  Wilderness
WritingResidency  Boston, Massachusetts  EASTERN  WASHINGTON'  U N I V E R
S I T Y  For moreinformation about specific EWU  graduate programs, please
contact the Graduate  Studies Office at1509)359-6297 or e-mail at 
iradprograms amail.ewu.edu

     ----------

     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 20

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20 • The Western Front Features September 28,1999 
I—I  SCIENCE  O F  UTUAL  ATTRACTION  ByMelissa Miller 
THE WESTERN FRONT  Inside the World Famous Up   Up Tavern on a Thursday 
nightthe smells of sweat,  cologne, perfume and stale  Busch Light blend
together to  produce an aroma thatcan  have the effects of a love  potion. 
Western students may pack  the bar to drink $1 pitchers,  but aftera few
pitchers, a  game of pool and idle conversation,  the next logical step is 
to check out the opposite sex.  It may be the shy girl sitting  at the bar
or the talkative guy  playing pool, but anybody can  spot theperfect
someone from  across the crowded bar. And  that's when the mating rituals 
begin.  "As much aswe deny it, the  biggest thing people look at is 
appearance when meeting  someone," said Barbara Col-lamer,  Ph.D.
psychology professor  and vice president of  the Northwest Singles Club. 
"You're notwatching them  work or listening to them talk  much."  Collamer
said gender behavior  intensifies whenmales and  females interact with the 
opposite sex. She said women  are primarily concerned with  theirlooks, and
men try to  look successful and competent  by buying women drinks.  Kevin
Gaidos, 23, ageology  major, said he thinks a guy's  ultimate goal is to
take a girl  home, and most girls areinterested  in getting to know the 
guy.  Senior Sarah Barnes, said  she's seen women skillfully  worktheir way
closer and  accidentally nudge a guy just  to get his attention.  Barnes
said she met herboyfriend through her work,  but said she thinks it is
possible  to meet a guy at a bar.  "If I meet a guy Idon't want  alcohol
involved," Barnes said.  Collamer said many people  are self-conscious
anduncomfortable  being on display, but  alcohol reduces their inhibitions 
and anxiety.  "They feel likethey're funnier  and more social," she  said. 
Gaidos said he thinks alcohol  does take awayinhibitions  and makes it
easier to  approach the opposite sex.  "I'm not much for coming up  to
people Idon't know," he  said. "I'm used to coming up to  friends or
acquaintances."  "It's a meat market," saidKirstin Badger, a special
education  major. "Everybody is all  done up and scanning the  room for
theopposite sex."  Badger said she goes to the  bar to hang out with her 
friends, but if a dreamy guy  caughther eye she would buy  him a pitcher of
beer.  Scott Luedke, 21, an engineering  major,, said when he's at a bar
he's not desperately  looking for a girl, but he keeps  his eye out.  "I'd
go say hi and start aconversation," Luedke said.  "That's the key to
getting the  first step in."  For April Mills, 21, anadolescent  psychology
major, a  guy approaching her in a bar  paid off. She said she met her 
boyfriend of a year and a half  at a club in Canada. She said  he started
hitting on her 15  minutes after his bestfriend  had hit on her, and at
first she  thought it was rude. Mills said  she doesn't encourage
meetingguys at bars, but it just  worked out for her.  "You meet someone
when  you meet them," Mills said."Have fun afr the bar but leave  it at the
bar."  Collamer said as vice president  of the Northwest SinglesClub, which
has been in  Bellingham for 28 years, she  gets calls from people all the 
time who want tomeet others  without the bar scene because  it's too
superficial.  "People in their 30s and 40s  are tellingme that finding a 
date in a bar doesn't lead to a  significant relationship," she  said.  1 
Chris Fuller/TheWestern Front  Thursday night remains popular for students
looking for a little male/female interaction.Live off-campus?  Like to
prai?  Do you believe students can party and  wake up with no regrets? 
Wewant your input.  Join the Campus-Community Coalition and gain 
marketable experience as a communityleader.  The Campus-Community Coalition
is a  partnership dedicated to the social and academic  well-being of
students. Our goal is to cultivate  peaceful relationships between our
students and  theneighboring communities.  Interested?  Send a letter of
intent to the  Campus-Community CoalitionCoordinator by October 8th  For
more information contact the coordinator at  650-7918

     ----------

     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 21

     ----------

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     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 22

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February 16,1999  Q  L*/ JL \ ^ JL\. JL d  NCAA //  Intramural The Western
Front • 22  Westernsmothers St. Mary's  By JR Cook  THE
WESTERN FRONT  In a game that was more a  defensiveshowdown than an 
offensive showcase, the Vikings'  offense struck hard and early  against
St. Mary'sCollege Gaels,  leaving Western with a 20-7 victory.  There were
a few offensive  gems, but this gamebelonged to  the defensive linemen. 
Western's first drive ended in a  punt. Good coverage on the punt  bythe
Vikings' special teams led  to a fumble by St. Mary's, which  returned the
ball to the offense.  Thissecond chance wasn't  squandered as quarterback
Scott  Mitchell marched the Vikings  downfield. Thedrive was capped  by a
3-yard run by Mitchell for a  touchdown. Josh Bailey converted  the point
afterand the Vikings  claimed a 7-0 lead.  The defense came up big on St. 
Mary's first possession. TheVikings rushed Gaels' quarterback  Gus
Papanikolas and  deflected his pass. Defensive  Tackle MattAlderman made
the  interception.  "We needed our defense to  come up big and they did,"
said  headcoach Rob Smith.  The offense was back on the  field with good
position and just a  few minutes of rest.The Vikings  marched downfield,
and a 9-yard  touchdown pass from Mitchell to  Ben Clampitt capped
thedrive.  The first quarter ended with the  Chris Goodenow/The Western
Front  Western quarterback ScottMitchell evades the St. Mary's rush during
Saturday's game at Civic Field.  Vikings holding a 14-0 lead.St. Mary's
answered back in  the second quarter with a 22-yard  touchdown pass from 
Papanikolas toMike Kelleher.  The offenses quieted down and  the defenses
stepped it up as the  game wore on. Bothquarterbacks  were run around the
backfield so  much it looked as if they were  running a marathon.Western
did  manage to get within field goal  range near the end of the quarter, 
and Bailey didn't flinch,hitting a  35-yard field goal. At halftime the 
Vikings held a 17-7 lead.  The third quarter began with  St.Mary's
receiving the ball. The  team drove downfield and was  knocking on the door
for a touchdown,  but the Viking defense  denied them. Settling for a field
 goal, St. Mary's set up for one, but  the defense hadsomething else in 
mind — Mike Perez came around  the line to block the
field goal.  The third quarterended with  Western leading 17-7.  The fourth
quarter was pretty  much the same fare with bothquarterbacks being rushed
and  hassled. Neither team moved the  ball very well on offense.
Thecoverage  and pass rush was good.  The Vikings did manage to score  a
44-yard Bailey field goal.  St.Mary's had one last drive  that was cut
short by an Aaron  Totten interception. The Vikings  then fedrunning back
Georgio  Usai to run down the clock.  The Vikings improved to 2-1 on  the
season, defeatingan NCAA  Division I-AA team for the first  time. The
Vikings held St. Mary's  to 34 yards rushing.  "We had a solid game on all 
faces, but we were led on by our  defense and special teams,"  Smith said.
"Playershad fun,  played with great emotion and  were very disciplined." 
The Vikings play their homecominggame next week, hosting  Western New
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     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 23

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September 28,1999 Sports The Western Front • 23  Soccer
teams win close contests  By MariLynnTerrill  THE WESTERN FRONT  Western's
women's soccer  defender Trisha Keating headed  in a cornerkick by
midfielder  Suzanne Soine late in the first  half Saturday.  The score was
the only goal  needed tobeat Central  Washington University.  "We've been
working on scoring  on corner kicks all year so itwas wonderful to have
that be  the game winner," Derrek Falor,  coach said.  The second half was
adefensive  battle.  Goalie Shaye Anderson, who  made four saves, earned
her  third shutout of theseason.  Falor opted for defensive  strength up
front — switching  to a 4-4-2 formation, which uses 
twoforwards, instead of the  three-forward 4-3-3 formation  used earlier in
the season.  "The 4-3-3 formation isour  line up, our formation, and we  do
play better in it, at least  offensively," Falor said.  "It was a
prettyintense  game, pretty rough,"Forward  Julia Goodlett said.  "We
played hard and with  heart," Soine said.Craig Yantis/The Western Front 
The Viking women battle Central Washington University  for control of the
ball in Saturday's home game.  Viking men  triumph in  waning  moments, 
send geoducks  packing  ByMarc Fenton  THE WESTERN FRONT  Viking midfielder
Mike  Belisle converted a penalty kick  in the69th minute of action to 
lift Western to a 2-1 victory  against The Evergreen State  College
Geoducks onSaturday.  The Geoducks came out of the  starting blocks
quickly, scoring  in the third minute of the game  on an unassisted goal by
Shaun  Gravatt.  Western, however, evened  things at one apiece in the 
14thminute on an unassisted  goal by midfielder Andy  Quinn.  Western
controlled the  action for much of thegame,  owning a 16-3 edge in shots 
and a 6-0 advantage in corner  kicks.  The victory improvedWestern's
overall record to 5-3-1.  Western will travel to NCAA  Division I Oregon
State at 1 p.m.  Oct. 2.men, women  place fifth By Millissa L. Macomber 
THE WESTERN FRONT  Western's men's andwomen's  cross country teams both
placed  fifth in the Sundodger Classic  open races Saturday at
theUniversity of Washington.  "We were —  encouraged by
l l | | l | l l l l i | | l l l l|  this meet,"  coach Keiven'We were
encouraged  "Pee Wee" by this meet.'  Halsell said.  Junior Megan  Clancy
led the  women'steam,  finishing 21st  with a time of  19:39.  The men's
invitational team  was led by returning senior  Scott Gilmore with a time
of  29:01. Also running for the invitational  team was Devin  Kemper, Zach
Boteilho,Karl  Meller, Martin Ranney, Kurt  Hartmeier and Matt Vincent.  T
y l e r  Campbell finished  as the toprunner for  Western and  24th overall
in  the men's open  race with a  time of 27:51.  Running withCampbell was 
Shawn Miller,  Pee Wee  Halsell  Coach  Finishing in Western's top  seven
were JenniGordon,  Kathryn Hickman, Adrienne  Sherred, Jill Hall, Nina 
Laurinoli and Marta Bednarcyk.  TheWestern men's team split  to enter both
the invitational  race against Division I teams  and the open raceagainst 
Division II schools.  Emil Newhouse, Ryan Seamster,  Johnny Johnson, Travis
Radich  and TomPileggi.  Both teams will be looking for  big improvements
in the next  two weeks as the Novemberregional competition gets closer, 
Halsell said.  "We're going to continue to get  better," Halsell
said.^^^^^^^^B^WS  Announcing  minimum 10% discount  on 0p1i 11 general ''
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     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 24

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24 • The Western Front Sports September 28,1999  #  By
Steven Uhles  THE WESTERN FRONT  Kristy Taylor's attention  is focused. She
 peers beyond the bow  of her small sailboat  toward an orangemarker on the
horizon,  floating like a discarded  tangerine in the  middle of Bellingham
 Bay.  On allsides, other like-minded  sailors carefully tend their  craft,
ever wary of crossing the  start line before theappointed  time. The only
sound is the soft  lapping of the tide against the  wooden hulls and the
flappingof  the wind in loose sails.  Suddenly, the quiet is pierced  as an
air horn is sounded and a  red flag raisedon the committee  boat, signaling
the start of the  next race. Taylor wraps the  bright nylon rope aroundone 
hand and pulls hard against a  ratcheting pulley. Her sails snap  as they
pick up the westerly  windblowing in from the San  Juans and the boat, as
if guided  forward by Taylor's own force of  will, begins tomove.  Watching
Taylor expertly pilot  her craft across the bay, her eyes  scanning the
water for wind-produced  ripples and her position  in relation to her
competitors,  it's easy to forget that it  will be sixyears before she can 
get a driver's license.  Taylor is not alone. All around  her, young
sailors are pullingsails and pushing rudders, racing  for more than just
the honor  of being first.  "I like being out there, and it's  fun to be in
charge of something  that actually does what you tell  it," Madeline
Jackson, 10, said."You have to actually do something  too, you aren't just
sitting  there."  Ranging from 8-to 19-years-Steven Uhles/The Western Front
 Sailors pull their laser-class sailboats out of Bellingham  Bay after a
day of racing.  old, representing a generation of  sea-farers inclined to
favor the  Spice Girls versus Old Spice,the  young sailors were
participating  in the Bellingham Yacht Club's  annual One-Design Regatta, 
whichscattered the bay with  boats on Sept. 18 and 19. The  regatta was the
second-to-last  event in a JuniorSailing season  that had begun in March. 
"It's a real individual kind of  activity for them," Lynn  Hamiltonsaid.
Hamilton serves  as Junior Sailor Fleet Captain  at the Bellingham Yacht
Club  and has children whohave participated  in the program.  "They all
have their own  boats, they all are competing asindividuals," she said.
"But at  the same time, they are all coming  together as a group."  Across
thebreadth of  Bellingham Bay sails were lifted,  filling the water with a
veritable  forest of triangles,making  the otherwise quiet seascape  look
something like a particularly  chaotic geometry class.Junior Sailors
utilize a variety  of craft. The younger sailors,  like Taylor and Jackson,
often  sail Optimistclass boats. These  boats, called "optis" in the
vernacular,  seem to be a hybrid of a  Chinese junk anda bathtub.  Slower
and harder to capsize  than some other boats, they are  the perfect craft
for beginningsailors.  After mastering the forgiving  optis, most Junior
Sailors graduate  to the quicker and morechallenging Bytes and Lasers. 
These low-slung racers are built  to skim the water, and offer far 
lessprotection from the elements  than the stubby optis. For  many of these
young sailors,  these fasterboats represent  another step in their sailing
evo-  Steven Uhles/The Western Front  Junior sailors racetheir
optimist-class sailboats at the  Bellingham Yacht Club's One Design
Regatta.  lution.  "I think itwould be really fun  to crew on a bigger
boat," Laser  racer Eliza Davison, 15, said.  "Maybe when I'm outof high 
school."  Hamilton said the popular  conception that sailing is expensive 
and elitist ismisguided.  "It's an image that we're trying  to dispel," she
said. "A lot of  people think 'Oh, yacht club—  all the
kids have tons of money.'  That usually is not the case."  Hamilton said
because the  clubsupplies the boats, far and  away the most costly aspect
of  sailing, the investment is limited  toclothing, gear and coaching 
fees.  These young skippers come to  sailing for a variety of
reasons.Davison said she enjoys the outdoors  and finds the solitude of 
the sport appealing. Others areattracted by the cerebral nature  of the
sport.  "I guess I like the tactics of  sailing," Emily Bruns, 15, said,
"and I know it's something that  I'll be able to do for the rest of  my
life."  If the Shoe fits — Pitch it  BySharon Armbruster
 THE WESTERN FRONT  Horseshoe pits - how has  Western survived without
themfor so many years?  This is the question junior  Erin Smith asked last 
December.  Thanks to Smith'sefforts,  Western finished building its  first
horseshoe pit last spring.  It wasn't an easy task toaccomplish. Smith
began making  phone calls last December to  get the project started, but it
 was fourmonths before he found  someone willing to help him.  Smith said
the process was frustrating  at first.  "I was passed around quite a  bit,"
he said.  Michael Bartosch, facility  manager for University 
Residences,helped guide Smith.  "Mike . was the person who  said it was a
possible thing,"  Smith said.  Smith saidhe has always  enjoyed pitching
horseshoes and  decided it was time that  Western offered pits forstudents 
to enjoy. He said Cornwall Park,  among others, has nice horseshoe  pits
— however, thepits  are a 10-minute drive from campus. 
Smith said he volunteered to  build the pits himself.  Thiswould keep the
cost down  and make the project more feasible.  After proposing his idea, 
Smith wastold that a permanent  structure added to  Western's campus must
be built  'It's been a long timecoming ... it's good to  see someone
stepped  up.'  Andy Hay  Western horseshoe pitcher  by aprofessional, which
would  have raised the cost more than  $700.  To help with his efforts he 
formed theWestern Horseshoe  Pitchers Ciub last May.  One month later the
money  had been raised throughsupport  of the Residence Hall  Association,
Associated Student  Activities Council and several  PhotoIllustration by
Nick Haney/The Western Front  hall councils. Once started, construction  of
the pits tookonly  three weeks to complete.  "It's been a long time
coming,"  sophomore Andy Hay said. "It's  good tosee someone stepped up  to
get the money to get the job  done," he said.  After pitching at the new
pits,Hay said they looked great.  Smith said now he wants to  make students
aware of the new  horseshoepits.  The pits are located northeast  of
Buchanan Towers in the grass  lawn and are open to all Westernstudents. 
The horseshoes are available  at the South Campus Fitness  Center in
Buchanan Towers andcan be checked out with a valid  Western card.  He said
it's a good way to get  outside in the sun.

     ----------

     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 25

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September 28,1999 The Western Front • 25

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     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 26

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September 28,1999 Sports The Western Front • 26  Tardy
Galloway  still crucial to  'Hawks' successKevin  Maloney  COMMENTARY 
Despite the Seattle Seahawks'  overwhelming 29-10 victory  over the
2-1Pittsburgh Steelers  this past weekend, something  was missing.  Like
ham with no burger, a  fencewithout a link, something  is missing from this
year's  Seahawks. Joey Galloway is  that missing link. Heis the  offensive
ham in the Seahawks'  burger.  In the final year of a five-year  contract,
Galloway is in themidst of a season-long holdout  with the hope of
receiving a  higher-paying contract.  Galloway and hisagent, Eric  Metz,
are seeking a contract  that would make him one of the  highest-paid wide
receivers inthe league at $25 million over  five years, with a $10 million 
signing bonus. The Seahawks'  latest offerwould pay him $35  million over
the next seven  years with a $7 million signing  bonus, an offer
thatGalloway  has rejected.  "Why would he do such a  thing?," you ask.
Well, because  as one of the topreceivers in the  game, he can.  During his
already productive  four-year career, he has led  theSeahawks' receiving
corps  with 4,122 yards and 36 touchdowns.  Those are the kind of  numbers
the'99 Seahawks are  missing. In last weekend's  game, the Seahawks'
offense did  not score a singletouchdown. All  of the points were scored by
the  excellent performance of the  special teams and apunishing  defense. 
Galloway is an essential  ingredient to coach Mike  Holmgren's high-scoring
WestCoast offense. His speed enables  him to run short, quick routes  that
can help the Seahawksquarterback Jon Kitna, who has  been hurried all
season long.  Galloway also brings a deep  scoring thathas been nearly 
non-existent.  The Seahawks' receiving corps  is adequate, featuring the
offseasonacquisition of seasoned  veteran Sean Dawkins, former  Green Bay
Packer Derrick  Mayes and lastweek's return of  Mike Pritchard from the
injured  reserve list. But they can not  carry the load for aGalloway-less 
receiving corps that is thin  at best. This is not enough for  the high
aspirations ofHolmgren and his many newly-baptized  followers.  At the
heart of almost every  NFL dynasty is anexcellent  receiving corps. In San 
Francisco it was Jerry Rice, in  Dallas it was Michael Irvin and 
inPittsburgh it was Lynn  Swann.  These receivers played an  integral role
in their Super Bowlchampionships — that is the  same
role Galloway can play in  the Seahawks' dynasty.  All of the piecesare in
place  for the Seahawks to put themselves  in serious playoff and 
championship contention forseveral years to come.  Holmgren has assembled
an  excellent team that is full of talent,  but not quiteenough for the 
Seahawks to rise from the ashes  created during the Dennis  Erickson
regime.  Gallowayis not the savior of  this team. But on a team that is  so
deep in all other postions, he  could be just whatthe  Seahawks are looking
for to end  a drought that has only brought  them one measly AFC
Westchampionship, way back in  1989.  Memo to Seahawk  Management: It is
time to  relieve your fans fromthe doldrums  of mediocrity. It is time to 
lift us to the promised land. It is  now time.  Check out theWestern Front
Online...  naked if you want  http://westernfront.wwu.edu  TEACH EN6LISH IN
JAPAN!AEON, One of the largest English conversation schools in Japan, A  is
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TheWestern t  Kick, jump, hit and swing  Western has a sport for you  Hxr
AIPV P H o n n p s v By Alex P.Hennesy have to be athletes."  b  THE
WESTERN FRONT  Competitive sports at Western  aren't reservedmerely for the
 scholarship-laden and the athletically  gifted.  This fall, intramural
sports  will once againgive rise to the  weekend warriors in a large 
number Western students of  various talents and experiencelevels.  Last
year, more than 7,000 students  participated in intramural  sports, said
P.J. McGuire,Western's intramural coordinator.  "Intramurals are for
everybody,"  McGuire said. "They don'tIntramurals are organized  sports on
campus that pit students  against each other. This  fall'sintramurals
include co-ed  soccer, co-ed volleyball, men's  and co-ed flag football and
co-ed  basketball,among others.  If students don't wish to play  on a team
all quarter long, they  can participate intournaments  for tennis,
innertube water polo  and bowling, all scheduled during  fall.  Intramurals
areabout more  than just playing games,  McGuire said.  "It gives you
another way to  socialize with otherstudents  and gives you a chance to
balance  your mental and physical  lives," she said.  Western junior Walter
Reyes,  who played flag football and soccer  last year, said he agrees with
 McGuire.  "It gaveme a chance to do  something so I wouldn't sit  around
the dorm room all day,"  Reyes said.  "It gives youa chance to meet 
people."  The cost to students is $20 per  team to join. Sign-ups are 10 
a.m. to 5 p.m.Oct. 28 and 29,  and are first come, first served. 
Interested students can pick up  a calendar in CarverGym 101.  Club
baseball looks to fill roster  By Andrea Abney  THE WESTERN FRONT 
Western's boysof summer are  looking for a few new faces. The  club
baseball team will hold try-outs  beginning 10 a.m.,Oct. 2 at  Joe Martin
Stadium.  Players must first attend a  mandatory meeting 7 p.m.  tonight in
CarverGym 109.  Team manager Matt Questad  said 10 players will be selected
 to join the team. He expects 15  or 16 men to return.  "Last year's team
was a pretty  even squad," Questad said.  "We playedeveryone a lot. Most 
people get a lot of playing time,  depending on the weather."  The 1998
squadfinished third  -in its region, led by standout  seasons from Joe
Baginsky,  Adam McNeley, Matt Nelsonand Questad.  Both Baginsky and Questad
 hit the ball well, while McNeley  led the team with 10 stolenbases, and
Nelson only allowed  an average of three earned runs  per game.  The team's
experienceshould  place it top in the region.  Questad said he picks
Western  to finish either first or second.  Theteam needs to raise funds 
to cover the costs of travel, new  equipment and simply playing  the
games.Last year, team members  raised $5,000 and they hope to  match that
this year. In order to  meet theirgoal, they will have a  camp for area
Little Leaguers,  among other odd jobs.  The team's season begins in March.
Home games are played  at Joe Martin Stadium.  Tryouts are expected to last
 two weeks. Anyplayer wishing  to try out needs to bring $10 for  various
new equipment. For  more information, contact the  club sports office at
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     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 27

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September 28,1999  PINIONS  Letters  Editorials The Western Front
• 27  Media, money shape races  Corey  Lewis  COMMENTARY 
This summer has marked the  start of another season of the  quadrennial
madness known as  the race for president of the  United States. Next year's
race,  however, is shaping up to become  a different creature than it has 
in the past. In case some people  haven't noticed, money andmedia are
shaping this "race" to  the primaries.  Hasn't money and media  always
shaped political races? Yes, but not to the extent it has  this year. For
starters, look at  the front-runners, Al Gore for theDemocrats and George
Bush Jr.  for the Republicans. Neither candidate  has given a single solid 
ideato the American people.  In fact, the only thing American  voters know
about Bush is that  he used hisdaddy's positions of  power to evade the
Vietnam  draft — something Bush Sr. venomously 
attackedBill Clinton  about — and that for a major 
portion of his 20s, he was  extremely edgy and had a chronic  case of the
sniffles.  Why are these candidates being  declared winners in a race that 
hasn't officiallybegun yet? The  answer is money and media.  At the end of
June, the Bush  campaign released itsfinancial  disclosure records that
showed  the campaign has raised a mind-boggling  $37 million, a figurethat
shattered previous records  for political fund raising.  In the current
system of political  fundraising,how are any  other Republican candidates 
supposed to compete with a  money machine like that? Unless  their name is
Steve Forbes, they  can't.  Another factor is also rapidly  turning the
2000 primaries intothe race that almost was — the  'Why
are these candidates  being declared winners in  a race that hasn 't
officially  begun yet?'  media.  If people watch network news  on any given
day, they can tune  in to seewhat the day had in  store for Bush or Gore,
but the  other candidates are curiously  absent from DanRather's take  on
the day's events.  It seems the media has simply  forgotten that the race
it is covering involves about 10 different  candidates, not just Bush and 
Gore.  The media has done a shameful  job ofcovering the candidates  who
don't have the money to hire  10,000 public relations people to  spoon
feedthe news to reporters.  Take Democratic hopeful Bill  Bradley. 
Bradley, a former U. S. Senator  from NewJersey, has been one of  the only
people in the primary  race who has actually put forth a  thoughtful
andconcise agenda.  The Rhodes scholar has offered  up his take on
education, youth  violence and has evenoffered to  abstain from using soft
money if  he is nominated and if his  Republican counterpart does so,too.
Most impressively, he has  offered a comprehensive agenda  for a national
dialogue about  race issues — something this  country
badly needs.  Yet, he is getting almost no  press coverage.  American
politics is rapidly  deteriorating into a game played  only by the rich and
powerful (or  sons thereof), and alienating  common people as it slides
down  that slippery slope.  Before you, as a voter and  shareholder in
thecompany that  is America, choose to endorse the  candidate that you see
everyday  on television, take the time to do  a little research.  All it
takes is a visit to the candidates  websites.  Then you can say youmade an 
informed decision — that's more  than a lot of people
can say.  1-695 makes sense  BrandonKorab  COMMENTARY  Nov. 2, Washington
state voters  will have the opportunity to  cast their vote onan important 
tax cut that could improve the  lives of all Washingtonians.  Initiative
695 would set anannual fee of $30 for license tabs  and would require
public votes  on all new state and local tax  and feeincreases.  This means
no matter the cost  of a vehicle, license tabs would  cost $30. This would
allowpeople  in low-income brackets to  save money on a new car and  enable
some to afford insurance.  The second part of 1-695 protects  taxpayers by
requiring  voter approval for any new tax  or fee increase
— whether it  would raise the cost of a bus ride  or
increase the fee people pay to  renew their driver'slicenses.  This would
put an end to excessive  taxation.  Washington state is the sixth 
highest-taxedstate in the  nation. Washington also has a  projected $1
billion left unspent  by June 2000. If our state has a  $l-billion surplus,
then we as  taxpayers are paying too much.  A common scare tactic
1-695opponents employ is the idea of  a huge loss in revenue from the 
Motor Vehicle Excise Tax. They  saycreating a flat $30 tax will  result in
many social programs  being cut, along with funding  cuts for transit,road
services  and even medical aid.  We have a $l-billion surplus; if  we can't
afford the tax cut now,  when can we?  Another weak excuse opponents  give
is 1-695 would hurt  the environment and increasetraffic problems because
more  people would be able to afford  cars and fuel.  Why is it such a bad
thingfor  cars to become affordable for  less fortunate citizens? It 
sounds as if opponents want the  poor to ridemass transit and  bicycles
while the rich enjoy the  comfort and convenience of  automobiles. 
Opponentsalso believe voters  are not capable of making  important tax
decisions; they  say the public will beconfused  at the polls because of a
lack of  information on the issues.  Most voters out there have a  goodidea
how they want their  money spent.  Colorado voters passed a measure  in
1992 that requires voterapproval for tax and fee increases,  and the state
has since cut  taxes while approving spending  onmany programs essential to
 its citizens' well being.  Do the smart thing, and vote  yes on 1-695.  N
I G HT C L U B  tBfmmgg^mmmmi  @ THE FUNKY PLAN  * * # *  * 5 0% US EXC  i
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     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 28

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28 • The Western Front Opinions September 28,1999 
Keeping it clean:  Northern neighbors  no jokingmatter  Chris  Blake  GUEST
 COMMENTARY  Since the earliest of times,  Americans have long
takenpleasure in poking fun at  Canadians.  Whether it is making fun of 
the way they talk, the way they  drive or the sports they play,  most
Americans know one of  the easiest ways to get a laugh  at a party is to
bring up  Canadians.  After all, Canadians make it  so easy.  They play
sports such as curling,  measurethings with that  God-awful metric system
and  love to say things such as 'eh'.  . Hell, even their
national'WhatAmerican hasn't  thought about sacrificing a  couple of hours
some  weekend to quickly take  overCanada?'  anthem gets a good chuckle. 
My roommate's uncle used to  be the star of the stands atThunderbird hockey
games  when he would burp the lyrics  to "O Canada."  I have even been
witness to afew diatribes in which  Americans advocate the systematic 
invasion of our  Northern neighbors.  WhatAmerican hasn't  thought about
sacrificing a couple  of hours some weekend to  quickly take overCanada? 
Long thought of as a cheap  imitation of the United States,  Americans have
come to  believethe only good things to  come out of Canada are Wayne 
Gretzky and Jim Carrey.  But the time has come for a  change.  Americans
must realize the  great contributions Canadians  have made to the world. 
Nolonger do Canadians need  to wallow in the shadow of  Southern ignorance.
 They can now stand up andsay with pride, "Look at all the  great things
Canadians have  done."  Canada brought light to the  world.Toronto's own
Henry  Woodward invented the first  electric light bulb in 1874.  He sold
share of his patentto  American Thomas Edison, who  used Woodward's method
to  design a more practical bulb in  1879.Canada gave us bloodsports.  The
first public exhibition of  modern hockey took place in  1875 at
VictoriaRink in  Montreal.  Canada enabled us to communicate.  Alexander
Graham Bell made  the first long-distance telephone  call between the
Ontario  communities of Mount  Pleasant and Brantford in  1876.The first
transatlantic radio  telegraphic message was  received by Guglielmo Marconi
 in 1901 on SignalHill in St.  John's, Newfoundland.  Canada invented time.
 Universal Standard Time,  which divides theworld into 24  time zones, was
created in  1879 by Canadian engineer  Sandford Fleming.  Canada gave us
Michael  Jordan.  Basketball was invented by  James Naismith of Almonte, 
Ontario.  Sure the first gamewas  played in Massachusetts in  1892, but it
was a Canadian  who invented it.  Without Canada, Jordanmay  only have
become the world's  greatest burger flipper.  Canada gave us films to 
watch in school.The world's first documentary  film was "Nanook of the 
North," which was shot by  Canadian RobertFlaherty in  1922.  Canada
allowed us to become  couch potatoes.  The first frozen food sold to  the
public was Ice Fillets  frozen fish, which went on sale  in 1929 in
Halifax, Nova  Scotia.  Canada gave us superheroes.  Toronto artist Joe
Shuster is  half of the tandem that brought  the world Superman.  He
andJerome Siegal created  the man of steel in 1938.  Canada made our
weekend  chores easier.  NormanBreakey of Toronto  invented the paint
roller in  1940.  Try painting a house without  one.  Canada madetaking out
the  trash even easier.  The green plastic garbage bag  'Most importantly,
Canada  gave us been The oldest  continuously operating  brewery in North
America  is Molson, in Montreal  since 1786.'  wasinvented in the 1950s at 
the Union Carbide plant  Lindsay, Ontario.  And most importantly,  Canada
gaveus beer.  The oldest continuously operating  brewery in North  America
is Molson, in Montreal  since1786.  The next time you and your  buddies are
sitting around with  a sling-shot plotting to take  overCanada or get the
sudden  urge to burp "O Canada," stop  and think of all the things we 
wouldn't havewithout  Canadians.  Instead of firing that rock,  find a
Canadian and thank  them. The beer alone is reason  enough.  GUN
• Can Canadian laws  QONTROL" save American  John 
Bankston  COMMENTARY  Inthe wake of the Columbine  school shootings, and
the rash of  similar incidents in public  schoolsthroughout the United 
States, liberals from all 50  states have united under a  mighty anti-gun
banner witha  consolidated cry for trigger  locks, waiting periods and
registration  restrictions.  The problem, theybemoan, lies  with America's
gun culture: the  National Rifle Association, the  Second Amendment
andaging  actors with an affinity for  Winchesters. Gun control, they 
wail, will "save our children."  So thepuzzle of teenage psychopaths  can
be tidily solved  with anti-gun legislation.  Just look at Canada, they
say.  True, fewer people are shot in  Canada each year than in the  United
States. Royal CanadianMounted Police Commissioner  J.RR. Murray, in a
letter to the  Deputy Minister of the  Department ofJustice, dated  July
21, 1997, stated, "RCMP  investigated 88,162 actual violent  crimes during
1993,where  only 73 of these offenses, or .08  percent, involved the use of
 firearms."  But one needs only tolook at  Canadian public schools to
conclude  America's teen shootings  won't end with trigger locks and 
assault-rifle bans — or even  radical legislation
comparable  to Canada's.  RCMP seized 24 guns from a 15-year-old boy's home
in rural  British Columbia last May —  along with a list
of classmates hepresumably planned to murder.  A 14-year-old boy killed one
 and injured another in a Taber,  Albertaschool shooting that  same month. 
In Manitoba, six students were  charged with making threats or  plansto
kill students and teachers  or blow up schools.  Parents called for a  'Gun
control is simply  action forthe sake of  action —
shallow and  ultimately self-serving.'  NewFoundland principal's
resignation  inJune when school  officials covered up the discovery  of a
home-made bomb on  school grounds.  SoCanada and the United  States have
more in common  than anyone seems willing to  admit; still liberalssay
strict  gun-control legislation, such as  that in Canada, will "save our 
children."  In Bellevue, nearlyfour years  ago, two teenagers brutally 
clubbed and stabbed an old couple  to death in a botchedrobbery  attempt. 
In Drummondville, Quebec,  last May, a 15-year-old girl was  hospitalized
withmultiple stab  wounds following a classroom  butcher-knife attack,
which led  to a 14-year-old girl beingcharged with attempted murder.  So,
liberals, why did no one  blame the cudgel in Bellevue?  How manychildren
have to die  before we adopt some strong  anti-knife legislation?  Perhaps
blaming firearms is adesperate attempt to wrestle  reason from the
unreasonable or  to seek sanity in the insane.  One thing iscertain: The 
strictest gun-control legislation  couldn't have saved any of the  lives
listed above.  Guncontrol is simply action  for the sake of action
— shallow  and ultimately self serving.  Those who
screamfor gun control  don't care to solve society's  problems; they strive
solely to  make themselves feelbetter.  Let's face it: Who can blame  them?
 Gun control won't keep guns  out of the hands of criminals.The question
is, will restricting  law-abiding Americans stop  teenagers from killing
each  other?  TheSecond Amendment, in  fact, the entire Constitution, 
hinges on one simple premise:  With liberty comesresponsibility  If the
United States employed  gun-control legislation similar  to Canada's, could
it havesaved  the lives of the Columbine victims?  The answer lies,
motionless, in  Taber, Alberta.  SELL YOUR STUFF  For Only  ONE BUCK!  In a
Western Front Classified ad *  For a limited time Western Studentscan sell
their used cars,  trucks, textbooks, super nintendo, Mac SE, tickets, or
what ever  in the Western Front for only a dollar. Bring your ad in person 
with a one dollar bill (4 quarters may be substituted for aone  dollar
bill) to the Western Front office 7A in College Hall.  Hurry! deadlines are
on Thursdays andWednesday at 3 pm.  * Offer is extended to Western Students
with valid ID and must purchased at theWestern  Front office 7Ain College
Hall. Ad is limited to three lines. Additional lines are 85 cents  each.

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     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 29

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September 28,1999 The Western Front • 29  Wafina Win a
HllWimer? See OUr WebSlte for details.Deadline for online entry is
10/15/99. Mail-in entries must be postmarked by 10/15/99. No
purchasenecessary. Must be at least 18 years old and a licensed driver in
state of residence. Void whereprohibited. For Official Rules, mail a
self-addressed stamped envelope to:  The eCampus.com Wanna Wina Hummer?
Rules, c/o Marden-Kane Dept RF, 36 Maple Place, Manhasset, NY 11030.
Requests received after 10/31/99 will not be fulfilled.

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     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 30

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30 .-•. The-Western Front Opinions September 2Sr 1999 
Welcome to Western;  remember the aspirinWelcome to Western. Did you find a
place to park? Did you  find a seat to sit in? Did you understand thenew
RSVP system  and register for the classes you needed? Did you remember 
your new studentnumber? Did you receive financial aid on  time?  Chances
are, the answer to most of these questions isno.  As we start the final
quarter of ^he millennium, Western's  efficiency seems as if it is
regressingtoward the 19th century.  For all the hoopla about Y2K
compliance, it seems as if no  effort was made tomake the new RSVP system
user compliant.  Let's start with the basics: Reading the new
timetables.Any graduate students or seniors with more than 135 credits 
experienced the preliminary difficulties ofusing RSVP in  the spring. 
Problems with any new system should be expected; however,  making
thetimetables legible should have been a forethought  rather than an
afterthought.  At least by the time thenew timetables were mailed in 
September the print was legible, but deciphering the scrolling  numbersand
military time was near impossible.  Why military time? This is Western, not
West Point.  Thisexpensive system (registrar Joseph St. Hillaire said he 
didn't know exactly how much it cost) wasdesigned to reduce  strain on
departmental staff, but professors were still passing  out blue slips
onWednesday.  It was reported by the registrar's office that Western set a 
record this fall with 3,000students registering Sept. 9.  Approximately
2,500 students registered via phone and about  300 via theweb.  This may
have been a registration record, but how many of  those students actually
got the classesthey needed?  How many of that record 3,000 are trying to
blue-slip into  classes they actually need?After the initial growing pains,
the new RSVP system will  become easier to use, but more thought shouldhave
been  directed toward informing students of the new system and the 
potential problems surroundingit.  Frontlines are the opinion of The
Western Front editorial board:  John Bankston, Erin Becker, LisaCurdy,
Corey Lewis and Greg  Tyson.  The Western Front  Editor: Erin Becker;
Managing Editor: CoreyLewis; Copy  Editors: Bryta Alvensleben, Julie
Graham, Remy Kissel;  Photo Editors: Chris Goodenow;Chris Fuller; News
Editors:  Lisa Curdy, Tiffany White; Accent Editors: Angela Smith,  Greg
Tyson;Features Editors: Alyssa Pfau, Steven Uhles;  Sports Editors: Jenni
Long, Curt Woodward; OpinionsEditor: John Bankston; Cartoonist/Graphics:
Kevin Fir;  Adviser: Lyle Harris; Business Manager: CarolBrach; 
Advertising Manager: Joel Hall.  Staff Reporters: Andrea Abney, Shannon
Ager, SharonArmbruster, Monica Bell, William Bennion, Kristin Bigsby, 
Chalain Brazzell, Cory Chagami, Homer Cook,Cole Cosgrove,  Marc Fenton,
Devin Finco, Alex P. Hennesy, Jeffrey Hoffman,  Jacob Horn, Liam
House-Doyle, Matt Jaffe, J.J. Jensen, Jessica  Keller, Brandon Korab, Steve
Leslie, Kimberly Lincoln, KevinMaloriey, Jamie Martin, Jill McEvoy, Laura
Mecca, Melissa  Miller, Jessamyn Morisette, Katherine Mullen, James Neal, 
Jenni Odekirk, Tami Olsen, Meghan Pattee, Daniel Pearson,  Joshua Porter,
Natalie Quick,Tiffany Reighley, Edward Routh,  Terrill Simecki, Marilynn
Terrill, Jeremy Thurston, April  Uskoski, Michael Van Elsberg, Craig
Yantis.  And we quote:  "I'm sick of it and I'm sick of him. My  message
is: 'Go, Pat,go — and don't let the  door hit you in the
butt on the way out.'"  Rich Bond, former Republican PartyChair, on Pat 
Buchanan's possible defection to the Reform Party.  Source: USA Today,
September 27,1999; page A2.  WESTERN'S NEW PARKING SOLUTION  IllllllM 
length, libel and content Direct lettersto The Western Front c/o the
Opinions Editor, College Hall  09, WWU or e-mail them towfront@cc.wwu.edu.
Include phone number for verification.  Announcing  minimum  d. 10% 
discount  ja IIgeneral d" books.  WESTERN  ASSOCIATED STUDENTS  BOOKstore 
Shop your store!  Proceeds go to support student programs.  Phone Number: 
650-3655  Store Hours:  Monday-Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00p.m.  Most Saturdays
11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.  •minimum 10% offofsuggested retail
price.www.bookstore.wwu.edu

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     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 31

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September 28, 1999 Opinions The Western Front • 31  The
Best ofA  | had irowe  A sample of a formerWestern Front cartoonist's  most
memorable work.  ^ 66*'OF WESTERN  FEWER DRINKS WHEN  -fP/£y
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frompark. Avail, immediately. Call  Maureen at 715-9660.  LOOKING FOR a
job? University  Dining Servicesand Viking Union  Eateries has several
openings.  Benefits of working for Dining  Services include:Convenient
locations  and hours *closed during the  majority of school breaks
*quarter-ly  appraisals and raises based on  performance *free meals when
you  work *fun, safe work atmosphere  *save your parking spot, walk to 
your job *work with your peers  *over 400 students work for  University
Dining Services *a lot  of potential subs who understand  about finals
*opportunity for  advancement. See your VU  Eateries orDining Services 
Manager for an application. Viking  Union Eateries: 650-7661 Viking 
Commons: 650-3947 Ridgeway  Commons: 650-3945 Fairhaven  Commons: 650-6851.
 COMMUNITY VOLUNTEERS  AgainstDomestic Violence needs  volunteers to work
as Court  Advocates, Support Specialists, and  CommunityLiaisons within the
 Criminal Justice System. Help  make the system work more effectively  for
victimsof Domestic  Violence. Training begins October  13. For application 
training information  contact 714-9601.

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     Western Front - 1999 September 28 - Page 32

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32 • The Western Front September 28,1999  I  ZEPHYR 
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