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     Western Front - 1999 October 5 - Page 1

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TUESDAY, October 5,1999  Western Washington University Volume 107 Issue 3
Bellingham, Washington  Morse joins  NCAA  Presidents  Council  By Meghan
Pattee  THE WESTERN FRONT  WesternPresident Karen  Morse was elected to
serve a  four-year term on the NCAA  Division II PresidentsCouncil.  The
council is responsible  for controlling the budget and  establishing the
general policies  for D i v i s i o n - I I  athletics.  "I think it's  a
real feather  in the cap for  Western, so  I'm pleased to  beasked to  p a
r t i c i p a t e Karen Morse  with my colleagues,"  Morse said.  Morse
said her experience  working in athletic programs  helped her get elected
to the  council by Division II schools,  including anumber from  Western's
conference.  She served as president of  the PacWest Conference for  the
pastthree years and has  experience working in a  Division I-A school.  She
is also active in the  AmericanAssociation of State  Colleges and
Universities,  which includes many Division  II schools.  "It reflects
therespect of the  school in the fact that I'm  known nationally by my
peers  in Division II," she said.  Westernhas been a full-fledged  Division
II school for  only one year, so it is an  unusual opportunity for  Western
to have her on the  committee, Morse said.  "I knew what I wanted for 
athletics at Western," she  said. "Itwas important for me  to have the
conference set  itself up where there were  good bylaws and constitution 
and where there was strong  leadership by the presidents."  Morse said she
would like to  see somechanges in the conference,  particularly the 
involvement of university  presidents.  Strong presidentialinvolvement  is
key because leadership  for intercollegiate activities  comes from them,
Morse  said.  She said she would also like  to have specific guidelines for
 membership in the council  and for studentparticipation  in the future. 
Morse said she hopes her  membership in the Presidents  Council allows
herto ensure  the regulations that are good  for Western are continued 
throughout the division.  See MORSE, page 5  VU to receive big makeover in
2000  By Shannon Ager  . THE WESTERN FRONT  Creating asense of community, 
unity and identity for Western's  campus — these are the
goals of  the $22 millionViking Union renovation  project scheduled to
begin  February 2000.  "It's called a union, but obviously  it's not a
union because  there's the Viking Union  Addition," said Jack Smith,
director  of studentactivities.  The current VU building has  10 different
levels, and it is  impossible to get from one level toanother without going
outside,  which does not create a sense of  unity, Smith said.  "Our intent
is to try to tie them  together with elevators, lobbies  and small lounge
spaces," he said.  "Right now, when you say'Go  to the Viking Union,' you
kind of  go, Which floor?'" Smith said.  "We're trying to tie that all 
together." This should make students feel  like Western is more of a
community,  Smith said.  For example, anopen stairwell  will connect the
first and second  floors of Associated Students  offices, making all
officesvisible  from the stairwell.  "It will be much more active in 
here," Smith said.  With the new VU design, allof  the food services will
be consolidated  into one large area.  The food court will take the  space
of what is now the art  gallery and music listening room.  A main goal of
placing the food  court there is sostudents can  take advantage of one of
the best  views in town, Smith said.  "It will also be a real gathering 
space for people," Smith said.  "The food court area where it's  located
(now) is more of a destinationlocation."  Smith said many students  won't
make the effort to trek all  See VU, page 4  Chris Fuller/TheWestern Front 
Traffic backs up on the Samish Way Overpass due to construction. When
finished, theoverpass will have five lanes, making traffic congestion
easier, including a bike lane.  New records systemto ease  access for
students, faculty  By April Uskoski  THE WESTERN FRONT  New software has
beeninstalled into Western's entire  student computer system,  affecting
the way faculty will  handle businessand the way  students will
communicate.  The student record system,  including those maintained by 
theOffice of Admissions,  Registrar's Office and Student  Financial
Services, are just  some of a few areaswhere students  can see the effects
of the  new software.  For students, more information  is availablethrough 
Western's homepage.  By going to the homepage at  www.wwu.edu and clicking
on  "Admissions  Registration,"  then on "Web for Students,"  students can
register on the  Web, rather than using thephone.  "This system will help
to  bring Western into a new era of  communication," Registrar  Joseph
St.Hilaire said.  "Students will have access to  information they need,
whether  it be financial aid deadlines or degree requirements."  He said
about 30 percent of  all Western students did some  form of
registrationtransaction  through the new Web site  designed for students.
This  came as a surprise for many inadministration because the  new Web
access wasn't highly  publicized.  By going to the homepage,  thento the
"Admissions   Registration" link, students  can get an unofficial copy of 
their transcripts and acopy of  their personal accounts.  "The new software
gives students  quicker access and moreinformation administration has 
about them," St. Hilaire said.  He said there have been complaints  about
the new software.  The biggest complaint from  faculty is the disappearance
of  add codes.  Instead,faculty members  must give students an override 
through the "Web for Faculty"  site or they can givestudents a  blue slip
override, which students  must take to the department  office or
Registrar's Office  to have it keyed in.  "I can see the long-term benefits
 of the new software —  right now it is all a
littlecrazy  See SYSTEM, page 4  New bridge  complete,  only last  touches
left  By Alex P. Hennesy  THEWESTERN FRONT  Work is nearly complete on  the
Samish Way Overpass that  crosses over InterstateHighway  5 near Bill
McDonald Parkway.  "The bridge itself is done,"  said Joe Rutan, project
engineer;• for -Bellingham. -  Construction continues,
however,  on the roads connecting to  the bridge, andnew signals are  being
added at the closest intersections.  Landscaping will begin once  the
roadwork is done Rutan  said.  "We're hoping to have the  roadwork done, by
the end of  October," he said.  Crewsrecently removed the  old bridge,
which did not meet  seismic and height requirements.  The demolitionof the 
aging bridge took several days  and required road closures and 
interruptions to 1-5 traffic.  SeeOVERPASS, page 3  Happy homecoming 
Western football throttles  the University of  Western NewMexico in 
Western's homecoming  game.  See story, page 12.  Samish salmon season 
It's time to  getout the  fishing rod  and head to  the Samish  River banks
 to catch a  fine finned friend, the  salmon.  Seestory, page 9.

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     Western Front - 1999 October 5 - Page 2

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2 • The Western Front • News October
5,1999  COPS BOX  ll^iyefsit^  •!;ai"l9-|ea|^^ 
N:|nfp6siepi^faletm'qi;^^  |||illlJllH|||iil(|||il  HMlliliSiiiiBliHiBl 
SIBIIlIlliJIlKiilBpl  Ji|l||^lB|i||i|||| 
liliipBQfiHIlllili^BiliiliiliiiWHI^IBliilBBiBi  Compiled by Alex R Hermesy 
AP WIRE NEWS BRIEFS  STATE NEWS  Melee inCostco parking  lot, armored car h
e ld up  Bellingham Police are looking  for an armed man who heldup an
armored car security  guard Monday. It happened  about 1 p.m. in front of
the  Costco store. •The robber fled on foot with  an
undisclosed amount of  money. Police Lt. Dae Jamison  said it wasfortunate
a shooting  didn't occur since both men  were armed and many people 
nearby.  Secretarysuspected of  pocketing cash  Renton Police suspect one
of  its secretaries of taking more  than $10,000from its officers.  She has
been placed on paid  leave while the case is investigated  by Kent
police.Renton police are not investigating  because its officers are  the
victims in this case. The 35-  year-oldwoman worked for the  police
department for more  than two years.  Vaccinate early for a fair  fight
againstthe flu  With the approach of flu season,  the state health
department  is recommending shots  for theelderly and people with  chronic
diseases.  The flu season generally runs  from December to early March,so
shots are recommended in  October or November.  This year's vaccine
protects  against three virusstrains  expected to be circulating this 
winter.  As many as 20,000 a year die  in the United States of flu-related 
illnesses.  Park volunteer assaulted  near Mount Rainier  The FBI is
distributing a  sketch of a man who sexually  assaulted a volunteer at
Mount  Rainier National Park.  The man approached the  womanSaturday (on
the  Natchez Loop hiking trail near  Tipsoo Lake). He told her  another
hiker was injured andneeded help. He then led her to  an area where she was
assaulted.  She was treated for her  injury at ahospital. The suspect  is a
white man in his late  30s or early 40s, about six-foot-two  with a heavy
buildand  medium-length dirty blond  hair. He was wearing a green  polar
fleece vest and a large  gold class ring with black inlay.  NATIONAL NEWS 
Clinton calls for global ban  on nuclear testing  President Clintonconceded
 he still doesn't have the Senate  votes to gain ratification of a  global
ban on nuclear testing.Lawmakers take up the treaty  later this week, with
critics  calling the agreement dangerous  andunverifiable.  Policyholders
cheated out  of money, awarded  millions by court  An Illinois jury
awarded$456 million to State Farm policyholders.  The jury found the
insurer  liable in a lawsuit accusing it ofcheating customers. An insurance
 trade group warns the  verdict could lead to higher  premiums.Students
attend school  outside, people still  live in gym  Nearly three weeks after
 Hurricane Floyd,students in  one hard-hit North Carolina  county have
returned to  schools. At one high school,  classeshad to be moved outdoors,
 because some evacuees  from the storm are still living  in the school's
gym. Philly principal shot in l eg  Doctors in Philadelphia said  an
assistant high school principal  has nosignificant damage  after being shot
in the leg.  Police say William Burke was  shot Monday morning ashe 
confronted a student suspected  of carrying a gun to school.  INTERNATIONAL
NEWS  French trainsto halt  when Y2K bug bites  The Y2K computer bug will 
stop trains in their tracks  across France.  Butthat's according to plan. 
The french national train  company said it will halt all  trains briefly on
New Year's  Eve to reassure travelers. It  said it has taken all
precautions  to make sure the system  works, but itjust wants to be  on the
safe side.  The company said all trains,  including those on subway  lines,
willstop for 20 minutes,  starting at five minutes before  midnight. 
French radio said the pause  will giveeverybody on board a  chance for a
quick glass of  champagne to ring in the new  year.  Hero dogs askedto be 
released after Turkey  quarantine  British rescue workers are  trying to
get two hero dogs out  of lock up.  The trained border collies  Gemma and
Kelly went to  Turkey after the disastrous  earthquake andsaved three 
lives. But, they were quarantined  when they returned  home.  British law
requires allanimals  entering the country to  spend six months in
quarantine  kennels. The quake dogs have  beenlocked up since August. 
Their trainers have given the  prime minister petitions signed  by 50,000,
plus7,000 letters  asking for the dogs' release.  Death toll rings higher 
than originally believed  Reports coming in from isolated  communities are
bringing  word of a higher death toll in  last week's quake in
southernMexico.  There are now 27 people  known dead from the 7.5 magnitude
 quake. It shook a large  part ofMexico, including  Mexico City.  A
spokesman for the southern  state of Oaxaca said more  than 120others were
injured  and about 3,800 buildings were  wrecked or badly damaged. 
Compiled by DanPearson 
••••I
 -*- Online  : /Avestemfrorrtvwwj.edu  The Western Front is published
twiceweekly in fall, winter and spring; once  a week in summer session.
Address: The Western Front, WesternWashington  University, CH 110,
Bellingham, WA 98225-9100. The Western Front is  the officialnewspaper of
Western Washington University, published by the  Student Publications
Council, and ismainly supported by advertising.  Opinions and stories in
the newspaper have no connection withadvertising.  News content is
determined by student editors. Staff reporters are enrolled in  a course in
theDepartment of Journalism, but any student enrolled at Western  may offer
stories to the editors.Advertising inquiries should be directed to the
business office in  College Hall 07, or by phone to (360) 650-3161. 
Members of the Western community are entided to a single free  copy of each
issue of TheWestern Front.  WWU Official Announcements  Deadline for
announcements in this space is noon Fridayfor the Tuesday edition and noon
Wednesday  for the Friday edition. Announcements should be limited to50
words, typewritten or legibly printed, and  sent through campus mail to
"Official Announcements," MS -9117, via fax to X/7287, or brought in 
person to Commissary 113A. DO NOT SEND ANNOUNCEMENTSDIRECTLY TO THE WESTERN
FRONT.  Phoned announcements will not be accepted. Allannouncements should
be signed by originator.  PLEASE POST  THE MATH PLACEMENT TEST isoffered at
9 a.m. Mondays on Oct. 11,18, 25, Nov. 1, 8,15, 22, 29 and  Dec. 6 and at 3
p.m. Thursdays onOct. 7,14,21,28, Nov. 4 J 1 , 1 8 and Dec. 2 and 9. Sample
problems may  be found athttp://www.washington.edu/oea/aptp.htm. Test
registration is not required but students must  bring photoID and a No. 2
pencil. A $10 fee is payable in exact amount at time of testing. Allow 90
minutes.  THETEST FOR ENTRANCE INTO TEACHER PREPARATION (TETEP) may be
taken at 2 p.m. Oct. 13 in OM 587, Nov. 16 in FR 4 or Dec. 1 in OM 587.
Registration is required in OM 120. A $25 fee is payable inexact  amount at
time of registration. TETEP is not administered on an individual basis;
testing takesabout 2gt;h  hours. Admission deadline is Oct. 31 for winter
quarter and Jan. 31 for spring quarter.MILLER ANALOGIES TEST: Registration
is required in OM 120 or by calling X/3080. A $35 fee is payableat  time of
testing. Testing takes approximately 1 Vz hours. Testing will be at 2 p.m.
on Oct. 19, FR 4;Nov. 19, OM  482; Dec. 13, OM 482.  ATUS FACULTY/STAFF AND
COMPUTER HELP DESKS havemoved to HH 145. This move includes Teri  Blow and
Laurie Yeager. Telephone numbers remain the samefor all. Other ATUS
services continue in their  usual locations. If unsure where to go for
assistance, callX/3333.  THE ASIA UNIVERSITY AMERICA PROGRAM SEEKS students
to be "campus friends" toJapanese students.  Campus friends volunteer one
hour a week during fall quarter to share conversation. To sign up, call 
Shaun Stone, X/3297, or stop by OM 530 by Oct. 6.  THE VETERANS
EDUCATIONALOUTREACH PROGRAMS office has moved to 3800 Byron St., Suite 124,
in  the Lincoln Business Center, next to the Samish Drive-ln. Resources are
available to help veterans with all of  their special needs.Interested in a
work-study job? Call Jeff Kissick, 676-4856.  On-campus recruiting 
Clothier and Head,Tuesday, Oct. 19. Submit resume and cover letter by Oct.
5 to Career Services, OM 280.  Knight, Vale Gregory. No campus interviews.
Accepting resumes for preselect interviews for accountant positions 
inTacoma. Submit resume to Career Services, OM 280, by Oct. 7.  KPMG Peat
Marwick, Thursday, Oct.21. Submit by Oct. 7 resume and unofficial
transcript.  Microsoft Corp. Presentation, 6 to 8 p.m. Oct. 13,Library
Presentation Room. Submit resume for preselect  interviews on Oct. 25-26 to
Career Services, OM280, by Oct. 13.  Sears Roebuck  Co., Wednesday, Oct
.20. Submit resume and sign up for interview inOM 280.

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     Western Front - 1999 October 5 - Page 3

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October 5,1999 News The Western Front • 3  Western
students left homeless by construction delaysBy Kristen Hawley  THE WESTERN
FRONT  While their fellow Western students  decoratedapartments and 
prepared for a new quarter of  classes, 47 tenants of the New  York
Apartments spent the week  prior to the first day of school in  hotels, on
friends' couches or  commuting to Bellingham fromrelatives' houses. 
Thirty-six of these students  finally moved into the apartment  complex,
located in the900 block  of 22nd Street, on Sept. 24, said  Kena Stebner of
Stebner Real  Estate.  Students who signedrental  agreements for one of the
14  three-bedroom apartments were  able to move in last weekend,though some
still remain without  a permanent home. An adjacent  building of 26
one-bedroomapartments, also a part of the  New York Apartments, is still 
unfinished, but the 11 students  who rentedthe apartments will  be able to
move in by Oct. 15,  Stebner said.  "It's like a domino effect
— if  onesubcontractor falls behind,  everything falls
behind schedule,"  she explained.  Problems with the initialplans  for the
complex slowed the  process for a building permit,  said Preston Burris,
building official  for the City of Bellingham's  Building Services.  "The
time factor was delayed  because of initial engineeringchanges that needed
to be fixed,  and they made modifications  after the building started that 
wasdifferent than they had specified  initially, so we had to reevaluate," 
Burris said. "They didn't  realize the need for a sprinkler  system in a
building that  size, so that had to go back and  be done."  Oncecontractors
finished the  building, Building Services  inspected the complex to check 
the fire alarmsystem and ensure  building safety, Burris said.  While the
completion of the  building was three weeksbehind  schedule, Burris said
that kind of  delay is to be expected.  "In general, the project moved 
alongthe way you would expect,"  he said. "During the course of  review, we
just saw that the  plans werelacking a lot of things  that needed to be
done."  While the apartments are now  open to move into, several residents 
say many amenities are  missing from their living quarters.  "There's no
mailboxes, nophones, no cable," said senior  Ben Hummer, who moved into 
the New York Apartments Sept.  25. "Themail is just being sent  back where
it came from. We  have a cell phone, so that's the  only reason we can even
call people."  Hummer said when he and his  roommates moved in, workers 
were still completingthe project,  and he is dissatisfied with the  jobs
that are finished because  workers may have rushedthrough projects.  "When
we were moving in they  were throwing paint on the wall,"  he said.
"Thedoorknob to my  roommate's room comes off; the  washing machine takes
an hour  to fill because there isno hot  water pressure; there's a hole 
next to the light socket on the  wall. They just threw spackle
oneverything."  Hummer's roommate, junior  Russ Wildenberg, said living at
a  friend's house instead of hisown  apartment disrupted his first  week of
school.  "School started and I didn't get  anything donebecause I was 
thinking about moving in," he  said. "We had to go through a  week of
school without anyof our  stuff moved in. That kind of  sucked."  "You're
stuck living out of a  suitcase and trying to go toschool," Hummer added. 
In addition to the chaos created  by starting school without a 
permanenthome, Hummer and  Wildenberg said the continuing  construction on
the one-bedroom  complex is amajor distraction.  "You wake up to
construction  every morning," Hummer said.  "It's filthy. We can't evengo
outside  on our deck or everything  will get dirty."  "Now the construction
guys  work until 8 or 9 atnight because  they have to get it done," 
Wildenberg said.  Despite the fact they marked  every categorylisted on
their  Chris Fuller/ The Western Front  Construction should be finihed by
Oct. 15.  move-ininspection form as "Not  OK," neither Hummer nor 
Wildenberg plan to find a different  apartment.  "All of this is probably
grounds  to break a lease, but I don't want  to have to find another place
and  move again," Hummer said.  "They offered no compensation,  but they
should've."  From the summer, Stebner  calledstudents who signed rental 
agreements last spring to alert  them of the delay.  She offered a
15-dayextension  on each lease; if the building was  not ready for students
15 days  after their scheduled move-in  date, they had the option to  break
the lease without penalty.  "Several students were scheduled  tomove in on
Sept. 1, and  even though the building wasn't  ready by the 15th, "all of
them  decided to stay," she said.  Stebner prorated the students' 
September rent so they would  only pay for days they occupied  the
apartments, and she assisted  in the moving process.  The New York
Apartments project  beganlast spring after  Stebner Real Estate purchased 
property on 22nd Street, but the  developers realized inearly July  the
apartments would not be finished  in time for the Sept. 1  move-in date,
Stebner said.  Old bridge comes down, new bridge erected  OVERPASS, from
page 1 bridge to get around BellinghamOnce the project is complete,  it is
expected to ease congestion  at the busy intersection.  The project ison
schedule and  within the original cost estimate,  although costs exceeded 
the final construction bid,Rutan  said.  Signs detailing the state and 
federal funding for the nearly $6  million project are posted near  the
bridge.  Some students who use the  say they view the construction  as a
necessary inconvenience. "That area is so congested,"  said junior English
major  Hillary Garrett.  "I'd rather have it done than  not,"agreed senior
English  major Matthew Snyder.  More minor closures are  expected in coming
weeks.Samish Way will be close::  from 5 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday  from Bill
McDonald Parkway to  Lincoln Street.  http://westernfront.wwu.edu  BREAK 
TIME!  Drop your books!  Clear your brain!  Treat yourself to  greatfood,
espresso   "musical sociology"  4 nights a week!  It all happens at the 
Cookie Cafe-  Your study-break  headquaters!  1319 Cornwall (just north of
Holly)  Open 6 AM daily 671-8550  1 5
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r"*• *. J- J" '  Music Every  Friday C Saturday 
•Accoustic Jam •  Say You're # 1  For a
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     Western Front - 1999 October 5 - Page 4

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4 • The Western Front News October 5,1999  Renovations to
the VU building will include an open upperlevel  VU, from page 1  the way
down to the food court  seating area just to hang out  unless food is
thedriving force.  "If you've got the nice view,  you're on the main level,
you're  right by the plaza area, it's likely  students will use it for
gathering  and studying," Smith said.  Another feature of the new food 
court areawill be more registers  and more seating. With a more  efficient
checkout system, students  will nolonger have to wait  in huge lines' just
to finally sit  down to a cold meal. Seating will  be ample so thatpeople
shouldn't  have difficulty finding a seat.  "The intent of this food court
is  to create the seating for agather-ing-  around space," Smith said,"... 
(to) have as much seating as we  can to handle that rush."The seating area
for the current  food court will be converted  into a conference room to be
used  formeetings or dinner parties,  Smith said.  "It would not impact
day-today  use," Smith said. "Studentscan still use it for lounging 
space."  Smith said the plaza area will  remain an outdoor facility, but it
 willalso have indoor components.  Where Plaza Pizza is now will be  a
"greenhouse" area, with large,  glasswindows so students can sit  inside
and look out to where covered  seating will be.  The new buildingplan
expands  the union toward High Street,  and the VU main lobby will be
reoriented  so it opens ontothe  plaza, which is now the lounge  entrance. 
"It'll be a very visible location,"  Smith said.  Vendor's' rowwill be in
the  same area, but shifted out toward  High Street.  "The multi-purpose
room is  going to bequite a positive addition,"  Smith said. "The current 
lounge is too small for a lot of  events and is not well designed 
acoustically."  Smith said the area where the  information desk is now will
be  part of the multi-purpose room.  "We want students to feel  there's a
reason to come here —  there are other services
inaddition  to meetings," Smith said.  Much of the renovation is  already
under way. Smith said a  greatdeal of it is behind the  scenes, such as
earthquake  upgrades.  "It's been put off because we  knew therenovation
would be  happening," Smith said.  During the renovation, VU services  will
be moved totemporary  locations, mostly in High Street  Hall. Smith said in
the past High  Street Hall has been usedfor  "surge space" to house campus 
offices any time construction is  going on.  One of the first services to
be  moved will be KUGS-89.3 FM.  Ted Askew, general manager for  KUGS, said
it will be the only  officethat will be displaced for  the entire
year-and-a-half renovation.  The room the radio station  will use inHigh
Street Hall  is occupied right now, but Askew  said he is hopeful those
people  will be out in time forthe move.  Get transcripts online with
Banner system  SYSTEM, from page 1  because the biggeststruggle is 
teaching people how to read  the new software," said Joe  Melland, manager
of Student  Fiscal Services.  The biggest complaint is  from returning
students about  the way the old registration  systemused to be in
comparison  to the new system, St.  Hilaire said.  Also, the new "W"
student  numbersand new timetables  have caused a few complaints,  he
added.  %, lt;"  FOODCO-OP  WHOLENATURAL ORGANIC Fools I  HONEST
INFORMATION  With a PERSONAL TOUCH  1220 M. FofGsfOpen Everyday
£ AM to 9 PH  S #  r TEACH ENGLISH IN IAPAN!  AEON, One of the
largest Englishconversation schools in Japan,  is recruiting enthusiastic
individuals for our 260 branch schools locatedthroughout Japan. Recruitment
will be conducted in Seattle in late  October. BA/BS degree
required,Japanese language ability not required.  Send or fax resume and
essay stating why you want to live andwork  in Japan by 10/14/99 to:  AEON 
1960 East Grand Ave. #550  El Segundo, CA 90245www.aeonet.com 
aeonla@aeonet.com  Fax: 310-414-1616  He said technically High  Street Hall
will bean appropriate  place because it is a straight  line to the tower on
Sehome Hill.  "The radio station isobviously  sort of a sensitive area
because  our antennas are on the roof,  because of the noise andbecause  of
everything involved with the  demolition," Askew said.  He said this is the
reasoning  behindmoving KUGS out at the  beginning of the process.  Once
the renovation is complete,  KUGS will havemore studio  space, Askew said. 
"(The main studio) is going to  look out onto the campus," he  said."Itll
be a lot more visible to  students as opposed to being  tucked away in the
back corner.  The idea is togive more visibility  to the radio station." 
Smith said he believes the project  will benefit Western'scommunity. 
"It'll have a comfortable feel all  times of the year —
that feeling  of a place you'd want togo to just  hang out," Smith said.  .
Chris Fuller/ The Western Front  Renovations have already begun
—many are behind the  scenes, such as earthquake
upgrades.  One trip here and  your health plan  couldpay for itself.  If
you or a member of your family has a  medical emergency this quarter, how
can  you besure your finances will survive?  The Student Emergency Health
Plan  QUARTERLY  PREMIUM  Individual$64  Family $118  continues through the
month in which a  quarter ends.  Enrollment Applications forenrollment  are
available at the WWU Cashier's  This plan provides for treatment of Office,
StudentHealth Center, or at NWMB.  covered emergency illness or accidental
injury You may enroll in the plan forthe 1999 fall quarter  conditions.
Coverage is provided through Northwest through October 8, 1999.Washington
Medical Bureau and is available for you Premium The quarterly premium is
$64 for an  andyour dependents. (Please see the benefit individual and $118
for a family,  brochure for complete coverageinformation.) Questions
Contact the Student Health Center at  Eligibility Students, visiting
professors and650-7352 or Northwest Washington Medical Bureau  dependents
are eligible. You may enroll at the time at 734-8000. NWMB office hours are
Monday through  you register for classes, provided you are currentlyFriday
from Sam to 5pm, except holidays. Northwest  carrying six or more credits.
Your coverage is effec-Washington Medical Bureau is located at 3000  tive
for the month in which a quarter begins and Northwest Avenue in Bellingham.
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     ----------

     Western Front - 1999 October 5 - Page 5

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October 5,1999 News The Western Front • 5  Western
president begins 4-year term on NCAAPresidents Council, athletics part of
her life  MORSE, from page 1  She said she wants to be sure  gradepoint
averages are met  and that recruitment in athletics  is fair. She would
also  like to see more faculty athletic  representatives be more  active
within their schools and  in the Division II conference."Athletics is a
window for  the university, and scholarships  in athletics put students  in
the classroom,"Morse said.  She said she feels her nomination  will give
Western some  national recognition, stressthe importance of presidential 
involvement in athletics and  get students in the classrooms.  Morse
saidher involvement  on the committee has brought  a healthy enthusiasm to
the  athletics department atWestern. She has seen emerging  community
support resulting  in scholarships and more  interest inWestern's athletic 
programs. It has also helped  with recruiting athletes who  are good
students."Students have to get into  Western and be able to compete 
scholastically as well as  be good on thefield," Morse  said.  Morse said
she has been  involved in athletics all her  life and stressed
theimportance  of athletics to her. She  participated in club sports and 
in church leagues as well assupporting her children in athletics. 
"Athletics have always been  a part of her," said Paul  Madison,sports
information  director. "It's good to have  somebody from our institution 
and league on the council."Morse said she will have a  lot of homework to
do because  Division II is evaluating its  regulationhandbook.  The council
will make some  changes depending on what is  not working within the
division."I was willing to do this  because I truly believe that 
presidents should have a  commitment and a trollinginterest in
intercollegiate athletics,"  Morse said.  Grand Opening  Special!  CARVER
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     Western Front - 1999 October 5 - Page 6

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6 • The Western Front News October 5,1999  New train
route connects Bellingham to Seattle  By BillBennion  THE WESTERN FRONT  A
new train route between  Bellingham and Seattle may be  the firststep
towards high-speed  rail in the Northwest.  On Sept. 2, the Washington 
State Department ofTransportation and Amtrak  began operation of a new
Amtrak  Cascades train route that travels  betweenBellingham and Seattle. 
"The goal of the Pacific  Northwest rail corridor is to help  diminish
congestion on1-5," said  Laura Merritt, rail communications  and public
involvement  manager for WSDOT. "These cool  new trains are the first step 
toward high-speed rail in the  Pacific Northwest."  These are the
firstEuropean-style  trains to operate regularly  in North America, Merritt
said.  According to Amtrak's Website, www.amtrakcascades.com,  the trains
are designed to travel  at speeds exceeding 125 mph,although track
limitations do not  yet allow this.  "Right now Amtrak Cascades  travel at
79 mph and aftertrack  and safety improvements are  implemented, the trains
will  travel 110 mph and also offer  morefrequent service," Merritt  said. 
Each train seats up to 244 passengers,  and includes coach cars,business
class cars, a bistro car, a  dining/lounge car and a luggage  car. The
luggage car even has abike rack.  The bistro car offers at-counter  and
to-go service for snacks and  beverages.  The bathroomsare easily 
accessible and the comfortable  seats recline and offer a footrest  as well
as a seat-back tray.The  windows are large and frame  scenic views along
the trip. Each  seat has its own AC power outlet  for lap-top computers,
and $2  gets passengers a set of headphones  to listen to music or the 
on-boardmovie.  Cars are equipped with 17-  inch monitors for the movie, 
which also show trip data such as  thetrain's location, remaining  trip
time and scenery information.  Each train has an on-board 
informationsystem that uses  satellite links to track the train's 
location. .  "Local customers helped us  come up with hundreds of 
improvements for these new  trains," said Stan Suchan of the  WSDOT rail
office. "From the tail fins to lighter window tints to  improved footrests,
customer  ideas were the key to.making  thesetrains work for the 
Northwest."  Along with avoiding the hustle  of Interstate Highway 5,
riders  are alsohelping the environment.  If customers used other 
transportation means in 1998,  they would have driven more  than 30 million
miles, according  to Amtrak's Web site. This driving  would have been
primarilyon 1-5, and would have released  more than 690 tons of carbon 
monoxide and volatile organiccompounds.  Tickets may be purchased at  the
train station, on the Web site,  or by calling 1-800-USA-RAIL.  Prices
change daily. For a single  coach seat, round-trip from  Bellingham to
Seattle, tickets  range from $30 to $46. Business  class is an additional
$15.  Attention  Independent Learning  Students!  Foryour convenience, a
new drop  box for lessons and videos is located  to the right of the
elevator on the  first floor of Old Main.  Lessons may also be dropped off
in  person at our office in the Chestnut  ProfessionalBuilding. From 
campus  take N. Garden  or Indian St.  north  to Chestnut,  turn right and 
proceed  to 800E. Chestnut.  Independent Learning  650-3650
• ileara@cc.wwu.edu  BWESTERN  WASHINGTONUNIVERSITY 
Courtesy of Amtrak  The goal of the new Amtrak Cascades route between
Bellingham andSeattle is to ease  traffic congestion along the 1-5
corridor. The European-style trains are designed totravel  at speeds
exceeding 125 mph.  Oh, you look great. Mate ^  Come in to THAT TEXTBOOK
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     ----------

     Western Front - 1999 October 5 - Page 7

     ----------

7 • The Western Front  JLJXJL.JL I^JL\.JLikJ  Campus 
Community October 5, 1998  ^Western  - 1 0 0 YE A R s Western by any other
name  MariLynn Terrill  THE WESTERN FRONT  In 1977, students werewelcomed 
back from summer break to  Western Washington University. A  random student
adjusts hisbackpack  as he strolls across the bricks  in Red Square
searching for his  first class.  In 1961, thatstudent would  have been
welcomed to Western  Washington State College and  would be walking through
a grassy  field where the school band could  be heard tuning up.  In 1937,
that student would  have beenwelcomed to the  Western Washington College of
 Education and would have been  walking through anathletic field 
— Red Square did not exist.  In 1899, that student would
 have been part of the first class to  attend The New Whatcom Normal 
School and would have searched  through only one building for thatterm's
classes.  "Each change is prompted by  changes and growth within the 
school," said Jo Collinge,Western's  centennial coordinator.  "The term
'normal' is for an  institution that teaches teachers toteach," Collinge
said.  All teaching prep schools were  called 'normal' schools, she said. 
The NormalSchool was housed  in a single building, which was  referred to
as The Main'.  Years later, in 1937, thename  changed to Western Washington
 7 days'a week^ „ A  Cappucino  Espresso  Latte  c Wak^
upand smell  N  9e/L  Une UjageirtJ7  theyBagels!  here bagels are  baked
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Bellingham  mm Mon-Fri 6:30 to 5:00  Saturday 7:30 to 4:00  Sunday 8:00 to
3:00  College of Education because  requirements for earning a teaching 
certificate changed."The teaching requirements  increased and increased and
 increased," Collinge said.  A bachelor's degreein the liberal  arts, along
with the teaching  courses, became necessary to earn  a teaching
certificate.This new  requirement replaced the previous  requirement at The
Normal School  of a high school diplomaand one  year in college.  In 1961,
the school's name  changed to Western Washington  State College.This name
change signified a  shift in the college's academic concentration, 
Collinge said. Instead  ofoffering only teaching certificates,  degrees in
other academic  fields were offered.  "(WesternWashington State  College)
was not only a teacher's  prep college, but also a liberal arts  college
andoffered bachelor  degrees in a wide range of areas,"  Collinge said.  In
1977, the college petitioned  thestate legislature for another  name change
because it had  reached the university level. The  legislatureconferred the
name  Western Washington University.  "The college had to be organized 
academically toreach university  status," Collinge said referring to  the
establishment of several separate  colleges within the institution. 
Fairhaven College opened in  1968, followed by Huxley College  in 1970, the
College ofArts and  Sciences in 1973, the College of  Fine and Performing
Arts in 1975  and the College of Business and  Economics in 1976. 
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     Western Front - 1999 October 5 - Page 8

     ----------

1  8 • The Western Front Features October 5,1999 
STUDENTS GET HIGH  By Soren Velice  THEWESTERN FRONT  At 7:30 a.m.
Saturday, most Western  students were still gathering eye boogersafter a
night of maybe not-so-wholesome  fun. CJ Costanti, co-founder of Western 
Aviators, a certifiedflight instructor, as  well as the club's current
president Ellie  Youngquist, however, were preparingthemselves and a couple
planes for a short  but scenic flight over the San Juan Islands.  Although
themorning was brisk to say  the least, it was also free of fog and haze, 
making it perfect for such a flight."This is gonna be great," Costanti said
as  he taxied the Cessna 172 down Bellingham  InternationalAirport's
empty-runway.  That feeling — knowing that you're  about
to have a good time playing in the  sky — is the main
focus of Western  Aviators, the Western's flying club.  Costanti and
Youngquist both saidthat  being in control and taking in the  panoramic
views are the main reasons  they enjoy flying.  "You'rejust really free and
kind of powerful  — I'm not a power tripper or
anything,"  Youngquist said. "I likethe view,  too."  One club member,
Charles Thompson,  contrasts flying with the seething frustrationoften
associated with bumper-to-bumper  traffic.  "Instead of saying four letter
words  every 10 seconds, it's just ooohs and  aaaahs," he said.  Indeed,
the San Juans are a sight to  behold from above. But thebreathtaking 
vistas and soaring feelings of freedom do  come at a cost. Even a private
pilot's  license, thebare minimum needed to fly  solo in a small plane, is
staggeringly  expensive.  Costanti said he tellsstudents it will  cost
$5,000 to $6,000 to get a private  license.  "Some instructors will tell
you about$3,500, but that's with the bare minimum  of 40 hours. The last
article I read said the  national average isaround 77," he said.  Reducing
some of that cost is one of the  club's many goals, club co-founder
MikeHusmann said.  "That's the idea here, being in the club,"  he said at
the last meeting. "Yeah, flying'sexpensive, but you put four people in an 
airplane, it's not so expensive anymore,  and everyone's havingfun." 
T£M  Soren Velice/The Western Front  Western student Ellie
Youngquist flies Alpha Aviation'sCessna 172 over the San Juan Islands. 
"What we've been trying to do is set up  a network of people thatlike to
fly airplanes  ... offer the opportunity to get your  license if you want
to get your license, atsomewhat of a discount rate," he said.  Husmann
explained that club members  can get a price break atBellingham's only 
flight school, Alpha Aviation, where  Costanti instructs. Although the club
is  free,members who choose to pay a $20-  per-month membership can save
between  $5 and $13 an hour onplane rentals,  depending on the plane they
choose, he  said.  Thompson had his own suggestion forpaying for air time. 
"I financed my flying entirely when I just  quit (Irinking beer," he joked.
"I spent $200  or $300 a month on beer. Now, I just fly."  Although
Thompson was, for the most  part, kidding, Husmannsaid it was only 
partially a joke.  "You can spend easily 20, 30 bucks on  booze and liquor
at the Up Up, and  spend $75 — another $50
— to do an  amazing weekend," he said.  "The most
expensive tripwas $75 apiece,  and that's where we went to Harvey 
Airfield, flew a whole bunch while we were  there, did these flour drops,
then flew to  Sultan, camped out, and then tried to  make our way back up
the nextday."  He said that particular fly-in was a lot of  fun, especially
the flour fdr^p^^-JcoTiteM  where pilots try to drop a numbered bag of 
flour into a 12-foot circle on the ground.  "The judges all stood in the
target," hesaid. "They knew there was no chance of  getting hit there." 
The club, which meets on alternateWednesdays, does more than just flying or
 sitting and talking about it.  Husmann, Costanti andYoungquist all  talked
about things they'd like to do with  the club, such as touring air traffic
control  towers and naval facilities, starting aviation-  related classes
at Western and bringing  in guest speakers."One that I had in mind was the
captain  from the Sioux City United DC-10 crash  way back in the early'80s,
where they lost  all hydraulics," Husmann said.  "Most of his speeches are
to businesses  forcommunications skills because his  speech is based on
communications and  how it works," he said.Although expensive and
time-consuming,  .flying; is a rewarding passion well  - ^ o r l ^ l ^ ^ ^
s t s ^ W e ^ f e h Aviators-" Club"  members said.  "Going out to -an
island and camping, or  just a road trip on aFriday night,"  Thompson said,
"is just a really super-cool  alternative to going out and getting  trashed
atthe Up  Up."  Husmann agreed, adding that it's not  always expensive to
experience the freedoms  offlight.  "One we did that was really, really
cheap  was we just went to Orcas island — a six-tenths 
of anhour flight — and we did a little  dinkin" around
on the way back, some  formation flying, and I think itcost everyone  25
bucks apiece, and we got to go  campin" out on the island Saturday
night."Roommate wars: The ins an  Photo illustration by Chris Fuller/ The
Western Front  Many college studentsfind tension indicative to living with
a roommate.  By Jennae Phillippe  THE WESTERN FRONT  It startsout with
little things, doing more than the  fair share of the chores, or having to
deal with  unwanted visitorsonce in a while. Then belongings  are borrowed
a few too many times, and clutter starts  accumulating onthe floor. Soon
the tension between  roommates escalates, words are exchanged and two 
people whowere once the best of friends can't even  talk to each other
anymore.  At least that is what happened when Western sophomore  Tiana
Langan and a good friend from high  school decided to share a roomtogether
at Western  last year.  "She wanted to share everything, well, everything
of  mine," she said. "Iwanted my own space."  "Roommate problems are a big
thing," said J im Orr,  one of the counselors atWestern's Counseling Center
 in Old Main 540. "It means your sanctuary, your private  space where you
go to create, relax and collect  yourself is interrupted
— eliminated by conflict — and  that
makes it avery big deal."  Part of the problem for some roommates is the
way  Western matches people to livetogether on campus.

     ----------

     Western Front - 1999 October 5 - Page 9

     ----------

)ctober 5,1999 Features The Western Front • 9  aimish 
almon  l w / X  fgt;(gt;  - - § j ^ n | ^  j.-^ -v» /
3 , / -i  By Liam House-Doyle  THE WESTERN FRONT  From a passing
crop-duster,  resembles amuddy ditch,  from a rusty old farm truck,  p's j
u s t a bump in the road. To  le avid angler, it's a piece ofie action. 
Leaving Bellingham and  leading south on Chuckanut  )rive leads to the
Samish  flats. The fertile lowland is  leckered with acres of corn  |nd
fallow fields. Passing  irough the two-block town of  Jfaison
— population 138 —  lager sportsmen
dodge trac-  M U  tors on the road and slow for  the herds of gruff,black 
leather-wearing bikers. Close  by, the dike-rimmed Samish  River winds
through the  croppedlandscape.  Everett resident Ryan  Queen, 34, sloshes
back to  shore to re-bait after loosing arambunctious salmon. Retracing 
his mud-sunken tracks  back to the same location,  Queen gracefullyplops a 
gigantic wad of salmon roe at  the top of the hole.  "Yeah! I got another
one,"  Queen says in acool but urgent  tone. "Watch out, he's comin"  Liam
House-Doyle/ The Western Front  Anglers form agauntlet of hooks and lines
along the banks of the Samish River.  Liam House-Doyle/ The Western
Frontvan Queen pulls an unsuspecting salmon from its watery home.  your
way.  After 10 minutes of battle,  the silver-scaled, 15-pound  Chinook
reluctantly moved  into the hands of its captor.  The Samish River
offersexcellent fishing to responsible  sport fishers. Prime sections of 
the river — easily accessed  from thebank
— are open to  fishing. Fresh bait, perfect timing  and
a little patience will  yield hours ofentertainment  and perhaps a fillet
for the barbecue.  The popular Chinook  run starts around Labor Dayand ends
in the middle of  October.  Sport fishers have not  always been welcome at
the  Samish River.Don Collen, 70,  president of The Wildcat  Steelhead
Club, described  some past sport fishers as"flagrant  poachers."  In a
meeting, Collen — with  help from several of the club's 
500 members —persuaded the  Department of Fisheries,
land  owners and tribes that sport  fishers should be allowed tofish the
river.  In the meeting, Collen and  JWith the populated fishing  that we
have on the  Samish, thefishermen have  a kind of self-rule; if one  guy
gets out of line, well,  the other guy won't allow  it.'  DonCollen 
President of  The Wildcat Steelhead Club  other club members made an 
agreement with theenforcement  branch of the DOF. The  steelhead club
agreed to pick  up garbage, implement a  stream-watch and help set up 
rules and regulations. In  return, the sport fishers were  allowed a salmon
seasonon the  lower three miles of the  Samish River.  "With the populated
fishing  that we have on the Samish,the fishermen have a kind of 
self-rule," Collen said. "If one  guy gets out of line, well, the  other
guy won'tallow it."  Mount Vernon resident John  McNutt, 62, has regularly 
fished the river since 1960 and  doesn'tmind the crowds of people  fishing.
McNutt originally  fished for cutthroat trout and  recently startedfishing
for  salmon.  "It's combat fishing but people  are real considerate," he 
said. "I just get some fresh  eggs and float 'em' down there  on the
bottom. It has more to  do with patience than luck."  Aiding andabetting
the  anglers' luck, the Samish River  Hatchery is ensconced on  Friday
Creek, at theheadwaters  of the river and five short  miles from
open-fishing areas.  For the last 15 years, the  Samish River Hatchery has 
annually released 5.2 million  fingerlings back into the river. 
Approximately 8,000 to15,000  of the released Chinook return  to the river.
 On Sept. 25, the three hatchery  specialists startedtaking  eggs from
mature female  salmon and began the life cycle  for a future run.  outs of
living withpeople  he roommate questionnaire has seven items that  eal with
age, daytime versus nighttime studyhabits,  moking and drinking
preferences, cleanliness issues,  ow often guests visit and the type
ofrelationship a  tudents want with their future roommates.  Orr said other
concerns that effect the living envi-hment  are not included on the
questionnaire,  iutside interests, personality, the kind of music peo-le 
like,religious differences and dealing with a  Dommate's boyfriend or
girlfriend can also lead to  anflicts.  Susan Martin, a residential advisor
for Edens  outh, said living so closely with another person  'ways
causestension in the relationship.  "But big roommate conflicts don't
happen all that  ften," she said. "The biggestproblem is that the  oommates
don't talk to each other about their frus-ations."  Langan said that
talking to her roommate wasn't  lways easy.  ^CJ talked to her and she
didn't like what I had to  ay, it was hell forme for the next two weeks,"
she  aid.  Martin said that if people feel they can't talk to  leir
roommatewithout it "turning ugly," then they  ould try bringing in a third
person with an objective  'When we stoppedcommunicating, and she  did her
thing and I did mine, it worked better  for us. Every time we
didcommunicate it turned  into a big accusation match.'  Tiana Langan 
Western sophomore  view to helpmediate conversations.  Langan said,
however, bringing in a mediator wasn't  a realistic option for her.  "I had
people I vented to, but there was nobody I  could go to to solve the
problem," she said. "There's nosolution, like go to the RA and she'll solve
j t for you."  Both Orr and Martin insist that communication isthe key to
solving roommate conflicts.  "I think people are surprised how powerful
talking  about a conflictis," Orr said.  He suggested that roommates try to
anticipate  what might happen in the living situation tocause  problems and
talk about them beforehand. When an  issue does come up, Orr
suggestedroommates try  talking after things happen —
not during — which he  said often leads to
yellingmatches.  "If both people see a problem and want to resolve it, 
both will come to the center and work hard to solve  the problem," Orr
said. "But it is very easy for the  antagonist to says, I f you don't like
it, moveout.'"  Moving out isn't always easy, Orr said. It could  mean
students would have to change dormbuildings  and move away from their
established social group.  Talking about a problem and working it outmay be
a  better solution, he said.  For Langan and her roommate, she said not
talking  seemed to workbetter.  "I think communication would have made
things  worse," she said. "When we stoppedcommunicating,  and she did her
thing and I did mine, it worked better  for us. Every time we
didcommunicate, it turned into  a big accusation match. Because we were
friends,  everything that was saidwas taken very personally."  In the end,
Langan and her roommate chose not to  room together a secondyear. The two
have hardly  spoken this year.  "We tried to communicate in the beginning
but it  just didn'twork," Langan said. "It was just too many  little things
that kept coming up."

     ----------

     Western Front - 1999 October 5 - Page 10

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October 5,1999  PORTS  NCAA II  Intramural The Western Front
• 10  Men, women place last inEllensburg  Rocky course
gives Viking cross country runners fits as Seattle Pacific, Central
Washingtontake top spots  By Kristen Hawley  THE WESTERN FRONT  Western's
men's and women's  crosscountry teams both placed  third Saturday at the
Central  Washington University Invitational  meet inEllensburg.  Both teams
competed against  Central and Seattle Pacific  University; however, the
men'srace was a much closer contest,  with Western only three points 
behind first-place Central.  "We didn'texpect to be the  strongest team we
had," said  head coach Pee Wee Halsell.  "Three of our top five guysdidn't 
run."  Senior Devin Kemper led the  Viking pack with 21:57 to place  fourth
overall in the four-milerace, but the men were missing  senior Scott
Gilmore and sophomore  Zach Boteilho, who haveconsistently run well for 
Western, Halsell said.  Seniors Megan Clancy and  Jenni Gordon placed
13thand  15th in the five-kilometer race  with 20:25 and 20:29,
respectively,  to finish first and second  for the women's team.  Halsell
said the women have  the ability to run better, and the  third-place finish
is notgood  enough to keep the team competitive  with other top teams in 
its region.  "With the women'steam, I  just felt we could be running 
faster, and they're going to have  to if they want to be running at 
aregional level," he said. "We're  going to have to place higher  than
third out of three."  The course was flatand gravelly,  which is different
from  what Western runners are used  to, Halsell said, and runners hadto
concentrate on their footing  more than on other courses.  "This was a
flatter course and  the footingwasn't as sure, which  presented a different
kind of  challenge," he said.  Gordon agreed, saying shespent a lot of time
watching  where she was running during  her race, rather than concentrating
 on herspeed.  "The course was different  than we're used to, with rocks 
and gravel, and it was a skinny  trail,"she said. "That made it  crowded,
and you didn't really  know where you were going  until you got there."Both
teams need to move up  in the ranis to remain competitive  with other teams
in the  region, Halsellsaid. The men  did not face any of their biggest 
competition, and the third-place  finish should motivate the team  to go
out faster in upcoming  races, he said.  "I was a little disappointed  that
we weren't able to win the  meet," he said. "It's too bad, but  hopefully
we'll use it to our  advantage and say that we can't  justgo in all
lackadaisical like  that."  The women need to focus more  on placing high
in the pack thanimproving individual times,  Halsell said.  While time
improvement is  important, the place of eachindividual runner is what
matters  most at the end of a race, he  explained.  "The times aren't a
concernto  me, it's where they're placing,"  he said. "They're going to
have  to be real conscious of that. We  stillhave a little bit of time for 
fine-tuning."  The teams' next race will be  hosted by Pacific Lutheran 
University Oct. 9 at Steilacoom.  On Oct. 16 the Vikings will host  a home
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     Western Front - 1999 October 5 - Page 11

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October 5,1999 Sports The Western Front • 11  Craig
Yantis/The Western Front  (L-R) Mindy Falor-Dalziel, Mary Wellnitz and
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on James Street  Western bids 'aloha7 toHPU  By Jeff Hoffman  THE WESTERN
FRONT  Senior forward Julia Goodlett  scored two goals in twominutes  as
Western defeated Hawaii  Pacific University 2-0 in  women's soccer action
Monday.  With thewin, the Vikings  improved to 8-4 for the year, and  3-1
in the PacWest Conference.  Hawaii Pacificdropped to 2-5-  1 for the year
and 2-2 in the  league.  Goodlett's two goals, her  team-leading eighth
andninth  of the year and 35th and 36th of  her career, came in the first
half  in the 15th and 17th minutes ofthe game.  The first goal came off a
feed  from junior midfielder Suzanne  Soine that Goodlett put home togive
the Vikings an early 1-0  lead.  Two minutes later, Goodlett  attempted a
cross that was  knockeddown by the keeper, but  squirted away from her. 
Goodlett found the rebound and  scored her second andfinal goal  of the
game.  "We worked well together as a  team," Goodlett said. "We were 
passing the ballaround really  well and we had good move-  'I think our
keepers  did a nice job coming  off their lines andbeing assertive.'  Derek
Falor  Women's soccer coach  ment. It felt pretty good out  there." 
Western'sgoalkeepers, freshmen  Shaye Anderson and Kara  Davis, each
stopped three shots  to preserve theshutout for the  Vikings.  "I think our
keepers did a nice  job today, coming off their lines  and beingassertive,"
coach  Derek Falor said.  "We did a nice job of possessing  and changing
the point of  attack and ultimately I think  that is why we ended Up with 
the goals," he said.  Western's midfielders, led bySoine, junior Stacy
Schilter and  sophomore Mary Wellnitz,  played well, helping the Vikings 
on theattack.  "Ultimately, I would say hats  off to the midfield," Falor
said. "I  thought the midfield did the  bestjob today of redistributing 
the point of attack and finding  the open runners and possessing  the
ball."The Vikings have now won  two games in a row and five of  their last
seven games.  "(Our season) hasbeen really  up and down, but hopefully
after  today we've broke that streak,"  Goodlett said.  The womenare in
action  Saturday at noon when they  host Seattle University on the  soccer
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     Western Front - 1999 October 5 - Page 12

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I  12 • The Western Front Sports October 5,1999  Vikes
tame Mustangs  By Andrea Abney  THEWESTERN FRONT  Western's football team 
played as a whole for Saturday's  homecoming game as the offense and
defense came  together to crush Western New  Mexico University 49-21. The 
Vikings arenow 3-1, with conference  play beginning next  week.  The
offense scored three  touchdowns, and thedefense  added one more in the
first  quarter to give Western a 28-0  lead.  Quarterback Scott Mitchellwas
21-of-25 for 236 yards and  four touchdowns to lead  Western's offense.
Also big for  the Vikings wererunning back  Giorgio Usai, who r an for 133 
yards and one touchdown, and  receiver Ben Clampitt, whocaught 10 passes
for 105 yards  and one touchdown. Usai's performance  was the best by a 
Westernrunning back since  1997.  "Our continuity is starting to  come,"
Mitchell said. "We still  have some thingsto work on. I  know I do." 
Western came out strong on  the first drive. On the second  play of the
game,Usai ran up  the middle for 52 yards before  being tackled by the
Mustangs'  Josh Allen.  "The run feltgreat," Usai  said. "I wish I had a
little more  breakaway speed at the end, but  it felt great to have a lot
ofroom  to run. The offensive line did a  great job today. Everything kind 
of fell into place."  Mitchell cappedthe drive with  an eight-yard
touchdown pass to  Ben Fairbanks. Kicker Josh  Bailey's extra point
gaveWestern a 7-0 lead.  Western then scored touchdowns  on the next two
drives.  Mitchell threw a 30-yard touchdown  pass to Clampitt and later 
hooked up again with Fairbanks  for 29 yards and another score.  "I think
anybody who's  watched Fairbanks over the  years knows what he's capable 
of," head coachRob Smith said.  "There was some frustration on  his part,
not being more  involved in the first threeweeks. The first play was to go 
to Fairbanks, get him the ball  right from the very first snap,  and it got
him off to the right  start."  Not to be outdone, Western's  defense also
scored in the first  quarter. Mike Perezintercepted  a Courtney Boyce pass
and ran  it 23 yards for a touchdown.  Western added anothertouchdown  in
the second quarter on a  19-yard Usai run. Bailey's kick  gave the Vikings
a 35-0 lead.The lone offensive touchdown  for the Mustangs came in the 
second quarter on a 12-yard  pass fromBoyce to Emzy  Nickerson.  Then the
defense took charge.  Western sacked Mustang quarterbacksnine times,
linebacker  Lance Gustafson and defensive  tackle Mark Bone each had two 
sacks. Thedefense also forced  five turnovers.  Western's offense added a
fifth  touchdown in the third quarter  on a30-yard pass from Mitchell  to
Roy Shick. Bailey's kick gave  Western a 42-7 lead.  Western's
defensedominated  the rest of the game. Defensive  end Jamil Jones,
following a  quarterback sack, recovered anArchie Lappin fumble in the end 
zone. Even an excessive celebration  penalty couldn't stop Bailey  from
making the extra point  from the 18-yard line.  WNMU added two touchdowns 
in the fourth quarter onViking offensive mistakes.  "Big leads are great,
but  there's always a tendency with a  big lead to relaxand sometimes  the
game turns out a bit sloppy,"  Smith said. "We made some mistakes  and
gavethem a couple of  touchdowns, but overall it was a  good performance." 
Western's defense allowed  only34 points in the last 14  quarters. WNMU
managed only  59 rushing yards on 43 carries  and 124 passingyards on 27 
attempts.  "Speaking from a defensive  standpoint, we're trying to build 
up an attitude of 'wedon't want  anyone to run on us or pass on  us,'"
Perez said.  "We just come out here each  week and t ry to dominate the 
offense that we're playing  against," Perez said. "Until that  goose egg's
up there, we'renot  going to be happy."  "The defense is gaining confidence
 with each outing," Smith  said. "There's no star player in  that group. We
put 11 of them  out there and it's a pretty good  unit. If we're going to
besuccessful,  it's going* to be behind  our defense."  Western travels to
Simon  Fraser next week. Thegame will  be at 7 p.m., Saturday at  Swangard
Stadium in Burnaby,  British Columbia. It will beWestern's first conference
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     Western Front - 1999 October 5 - Page 13

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i  October 1,1999 The Western Front • 13

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     Western Front - 1999 October 5 - Page 14

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October 5,1999  OPINIONS  Letters  Editorials The Western Front
• 14  Buchanan no longerRepublican headache  If Pat
Buchanan defects to the Reform party and doesn't get the 
presidentialnomination, will he and his group of supporters, small  but
tenacious, endorse the party's nominee?  It's aquestion the popular press
isn't asking — and seemingly it  isn't interested. 
Third-party candidates havehistorically had the effect of taking  votes
from Republicans, strengthening the left and putting  Democratsin office.
Since Pat has about a snowball's chance in hell  of ever landing in the
Oval Office, regardless ofhis party affiliation,  his possible defection,
at first glance, would seem to follow suit.  But this is PatBuchanan.  The
press is acting as if Buchanan already has the nomination.  The
poll-mongers arecalculating a three-way race between  Republican hopeful
George W. Bush, Democratic 'incumbent'AlGore  and Buchanan. The results,
generally, have closed the gap between  Gore and Bush.  So, if it
weakensRepublicans, who are generally more sympathetic  toward Pat's
less-rabid views, why would he defect?Has he  finally found a home? A party
that preaches political reform to be  led by a proud member of thereligious
right? Does it fit?  Jesse Ventura, the only Reform party member ever to be
elected  to politicaloffice, and arguably the party's most influential
member,  has been critical of Buchanan and his platform.In fact, in an
interview with Playboy, the Body called organized  religion a "sham; a
crutch for the weak-minded."  So why would Buchanan latch on to a party
whose only elected  official publicly andunabashedly insults the very
ideals and values  Buchanan purportedly seeks to push?  Maybe Buchanan's
convictions aren't as strong as he would have  the American people think. 
Buchanan has been strugglingfor serious recognition in the  Republican
party at least the past five election seasons.  Republicanscontinually
elbow him to the back of the crowd, shaking  their heads in embarrassment
— the unclewho, at every family  reunion, gets drunk and
throws up on the dinner rolls.  Buchanan needs theRepublican party a hell
of a lot more than  than it needs him. But he's a man who craves the
spotlight, and he's  found it, at least temporarily, with the Reform Party.
 Buchanan has yet to announce wether or nothe will quit the  Republicans
and join Ross, the Body and the rest of the self-proclaimed  reformers
—but the hype is incredible. All his political
posturing,  however, has amounted to dipping his big toe in the bath tub. 
The water is piping hot — just the way he likes it. 
It's not clear whether the Reform party willaccept him, and if it  does,
whether he will get the nomination.  One thing's for sure: Once
Buchananleaves the Republican party,  he's never coming back.  Frontlines
are the opinion of The Western Fronteditorial board:  John Bankston, Erin
Becker, Lisa Curdy, Corey Lewis and Greg Tyson.  The WesternFront  Editor:
Erin Becker; Managing Editor: Corey Lewis; Copy  Editors: Bryta
Alvensleben, JulieGraham, Remy Kissel; Photo  Editors: Chris Goodenow;
Chris Fuller; News Editors: Lisa Curdy,  TiffanyWhite; Accent Editors:
Angela Smith, Greg Tyson;  Features Editors: Alyssa Pfau, Steven Uhles;
SportsEditors:  Jenni Long, Curt Woodward; Opinions Editor: John Bankston; 
Cartoonist/Graphics: Kevin Furr;Adviser: Lyle Harris; Business  Manager:
Carol Brach; Advertising Manager: Joel Hall.  Staff Reporters:Andrea Abney,
Shannon Ager, Sharon Armbruster,  Monica Bell, William Bennion, Kristin
Bigsby, ChalainBrazzell, Cory  Chagami, Homer Cook, Cole Cosgrove, Rachel
Dooley, Marc Fenton,  Devin Finco, Alex P. Hennesy, Jeffrey Hoffman, Jacob
Horn, Liam  House-Doyle, Matt Jaffe, J.J. Jensen, Jessica Keller,Brandon
Korab,  Steve Leslie, Kimberly Lincoln, Millissa Macomber, Kevin Maloney, 
Jaime Martin, JillMcEvoy, Laura Mecca, Melissa Miller, Jessamyh  Morisette,
Katherine Mullen, James Neal, JenniOdekirk, Tami  Olsen, Meghan Pattee,
Daniel Pearson, Joshua Porter, Natalie  Quick, Tiffany Reighley,Edward
Routh, Emily Santolla, Terrill  Simecki, MariLynn Terrill, Jeremy Thurston,
April Uskoski, MichaelVan Elsberg, Soren Velice, Craig Yantis.  And we
quote:  "I don't feel as though I have to defend it. Thepeople who are
attacking this painting are  attacking their own interpretation, not mine."
 Chris Ofili, on hiscontroversial 'Holy Virgin Mary,' a  painting of a
black Madonna smeared with elephant  dung. SeattleTimes, Oct. 3, 1999. 
Liberals aren't open minded  just because they're Liberals  Christian 
KnightCOMMENTARY  If recent times have taught us  anything, it is to be
open-minded:  to observe withoutjudgement, to  accept without questioning. 
Ultimately, to live and let live.  Here I am at a university, thenursery
for that very state of  mind, and I find it hard to be  open-minded, in the
popular  sense of the term.I cannot  observe without judgement, or  accept
without questioning. I cannot  breathe without facilitating  one of the
instincts nature has  been too generous in giving me:  judgement.  I don't
condemn orchastise, or  wag my judgmental finger, but  try as I might to
accept any and  every concept, I simply cannot.  I saw an economy car in a 
Seattle parking lot Uttered with  bumper stickers. Though the 
stickersvaried in size, shape,  color and placement, they all  exclaimed
essentially the same  message:"Conservative, right-wing  Republicans die!" 
Personally, I thought the message  was a little extreme,especially  the
death part. By analyzing the  tiny corporation logos on the bottom, 
however, it wasevident  those bumper stickers found  more than a few cars. 
The owner was returning to  her car before Ileft, so I capitalized  on my
opportunity by asking  her a short sequence of questions,  the last of
whichwas, "Would you  consider yourself to be an open-minded  person?"  "Of
course!" she replied, and wewent our separate ways. But I  couldn't stop
thinking about the  paradox she created with the  bumperstickers littered
so  obnoxiously on her car and the  words she spoke.  How could a person
condemn agroup of people for believing what  they believe and call herself
open-minded?  Then it came to me. Itwasn't  what she said, or the fact that
she  was condemning a broad group of  people, but who she wascondemning. 
As an open-minded liberal her  target was as she perceived them 
— the narrow-mindedconservatives.  Somehow she justified
using  the same weapon her "enemies"  stereotypically use, butwithout 
enduring the same condemnation.  Can you imagine if the words  "Jews" or
"blacks" or "gays"were  substituted for "conservative,  right-wing
Republicans" on those  bumper stickers? Suddenly thesticker has lost all
the humor for  which it struggled so clumsily.  What that woman failed to 
understand is that 'open-minded-ness'  is not an attribute absolutely 
granted to those who call themselves  liberal.Open-mindedness  is an
acceptance of others, not  necessarily their beliefs.  People cannot become
open  minded simply by allying themselves  with stereotypical open-minded 
concepts, because open-mindedness  is not a concept, it is  a state of
mind.  Just because I believe in gay  rights, Civil Rights,animal rights 
or trees' rights does not make me  open-minded. Conversely, if I disagree 
with abortion,the death  penalty or the Needle Exchange  Program that does
not make me  narrow-minded.  Being open-minded does not  require the total
ideological  acceptance of every foreign belief  or lifestyle out there.
That would  be sacrificing judgement. As the  saying goes, "It is good to
be open-minded,  but not so open that your  brain falls out."  Skinner to
help  Lake Whatcom  To the editor:  Please help save the lake!  Itshealth
will affect all that  live here, even part time.  For 30 years scientists
have  warned about the health of Lake  Whatcom, our only source for 
drinking water in Bellingham.  The Department of Ecology has  justhas just
released a report  showing the damage is worse  than imagined.  Mercury
levels are five timeshigher than allowable.  Other chemicals found were 
never tested in the lake before,  which means thewater you're  drinking
today was not tested  for these chemicals at the water-treatment 
plant.Environmentalist Sherilyn  Wells calls the water a "poisonous  soup"
that can have cumulativeeffects, including birth  defects, low sperm counts
and  cancer.  This year's elections could help  put usback on course.  At
present we have a minority  of environmentally minded  members on the
countycouncil  who care about our health, but  several positions will be up
for  grabs.  Clarence Bob, DanMcShane  See LETTERS, page 15

     ----------

     Western Front - 1999 October 5 - Page 15

     ----------

October 5,1999 Opinions The Western Front • 15  LETTERS,
from page 14  and Barbara Brenner havestood out strongly on environmental 
issues.  At the helm is Pete Kremen,  County Executive, who isrunning 
again. He said he stands on  his environmental record, which  includes two
species of fishfacing  extinction and the DOE's  report.  This election
Kremen will face  underdog Harry Skinner, whohas called for a stop to
development  in the watershed, a move  supported by Wells, the Clean 
WaterAlliance and even The  Bellingham Herald.  Skinner shows vision.
Please  learn about the issues. Vote orvolunteer to help candidates you 
believe in. We can save the lake!  Dave Chesson  Western studentAttention
Western Students!  Campus Buddies  . . .starts October 30th  Restaurants
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Business Manager, Student Publications,CH 110, MS  9100.  Western parking:
Get used  to expensive inconvenience  Kristen  MooredCOMMENTARY  One thing
all students can  agree on is that school is not  cheap. We shovel out a
lot ofmoney to attend school here,  and some of our additional  expenses
are absurd.  At the top of the list formoney  that is poorly spent are
parking  fees. There is no room to.park on  the streets
— so that leavesmost people with the option of  campus
parking.  If the plan is to park on campus  for the wholeacademic year, 
hope the parents are willing to  cough up an extra $165, in addition  to
the quarterlytuition.  This outrageous sum purchases  a spot in a Western
parking  lot. All this money must meancovered parking in a nice paved  lot
somewhere right by campus.  Think again.  A Western parking permitensures a
spot in a gravel lot  half-a-mile from campus, if the  driver is lucky. 
"I'm scared to walk all theway  to the C lot at night," Western  junior
Jenny Grose said. "I find  myself hoping that my car is all  right, too." 
Grose, who has a night class,  said she would feel much safer if  she
didn't have to walk so far  after her class. As unreasonable  as this may
sound, she has a  right to be nervous. Just this  past Monday, ahit-and-run
was  reported in the C lot:  Western student Kellie  Bjerkaker left her
1999 black  Cavalier inthe C lot between  7:50 a.m. and 11:05 a.m. When 
she returned she found her new  car had been hit.There was no  note, and
the police could not  help her.  "Now on top of my parking fee  I have a
$300deductible I have  to pay," Bjerkaker said.  Yes, there are meters, but
 spots are never guaranteed, andthere is a two-hour time limit
—  not to mention the ridiculous  cost hike: 25 cents
for 12 minutes  —up from $1 per hour.  "They need to
create more  spots," said Western student  Garrett Yager, who livesoff
campus.  "I'll take my chances finding  a place on the street a lot 
closer."  Though many studentschoose  to do this — the
best advice is to  get to campus early!  Even though Western's
parkingsituation is horrible, we all  know the rules.  To park in any of
the lots  requires a permit. Permits are  $165 for an academic year and 
can be purchased at the parking  office. Quarterly permits and 
motorcyclepermits are also  available.  For those who choose not to  buy a
permit, be careful. Every  ticket is $20 and if the ticket is  not paid
within 14 days $10 will  be added to the original charge.  Good luck
finding a spotto  park tomorrow. If you're late to  class because you can't
afford a  permit and couldn't find a spot,  youknow who to blame.  BREWERY
\|f!gt; BISTRO  The wait is over...  Oatmeal  Now on Tap  Happy HourM-Th
4-6pm $2 Pints  Kegs 6t Gallons to Go  Open @ 1 1 : 0 0 am 7 days a week 
1107 Railroad Ave B e l l i n g h a m 647-5593 
s;liliilic;;iiii«il  Pllllflillill  BEAUTIFUL OAK desk/shelves 
call Erin @676-2744$95 obo  ^REFRIDGERATOR DORM size  (3') $25 clean, runs
well 647-1165  FOR RENT  2BR/1BA quietlocation across  from park. Avail,
immediately. Call  Maureen at. 715-9660.  LOOKING FOR a job?University 
Dining Services and Viking Union  Eateries has several openings.  Benefits
of working for Dining  Services include: Convenient locations  and hours
*closed during the  majority of school breaks*quarter-ly  appraisals and
raises based on  performance *free meals when you  work *fun, safe
workatmosphere  *save your parking spot, walk to  your job *work with your
peers  *over 400 students work forUniversity Dining Services *a lot  of
potential subs who understand  about finals Opportunity foradvancement. See
your VU  Eateries or Dining Services  Manager for an application. Viking 
UnionEateries: 650-7661 Viking  Commons: 650-3947 Ridgeway  Commons:
650-3945 Fairhaven  Commons:650-6851.  INTERESTED IN the Criminal  Justice
System? Want to gain educational  and workexperience? Join  Community
Volunteers Against  Domestic Violence as Court  Advocates,
SupportSpecialists and  Community Liaisons. Volunteer  and Internship
opportunities available.  Training beginsOctober 13.  For information
contact the  CDADV office at 714-9601.  $1,000'S WEEKLY!!! Stuffenvelopes
at home for $2.00 each +  bonuses. F/T, P/T. Make $800+ a  week,
guaranteed! Free supplies. For details send one stamp to: N-  248, PMB 552,
12021 Wilshire Bl,  Los Angeles, CA 90025  NEWSCHOOL year, new Prices!  Get
the math help you need! Special  limited group offer! Math by
Blainhttp://blainn.cc/math  LOST  FOUND  LOST NECKLACE silver w/ blue 
birds @sehome village, sent,value  Return to Sigma 503!!!

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     Western Front - 1999 October 5 - Page 16

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October 5,1999 The Western Front • 16  Shout it out with
Community Voice  Community Voice is anopportunity for members of the 
Bellingham and Western communities to write a full-length  commentary to be
published in The Western Front. It is a  feature of the Opinions section,
giving community members  an opportunity to voice their opinions without
the length  restrictions of letters to the editor.  Anyoneinterested should
contact The Western Front Opinions  editor, John Bankston, at 650-3162, or
e-mail atwfront@cc.wwu.edu.PPPPP