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1913

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     Klipsun, 1913

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Klipsun '13

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Cover

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AWL

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Cover Verso

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[no text this page]

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 1

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  HOLD ON    Did you ever stop to think that an  account with this bank
will help you to  get a start in the world ?  START YOUR ACCOUNT TODAY  The
habits of thrift, economy and  a desire to save money will mean everything 
to you.  FIRST NATIONAL BANK  Capital and Surplus $300,000.00    Teachers
and Students Stop and Think,  what pleasure a KODAK  will add to your
school days  and outings. Buy to- day!  We are headquarters for  Kodaks and
Supplies  WE DEVELOP and PRINT  Engberg's Pharmacy Alaska Bldg. Bellingham,
Wash.  224  Phones M 2440  Page One

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 2

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45-Inch Embroidery Flouncings for Commencement  Dresses,  Beautiful
Patterns and Materials-  79c- 98c-$1.89 a yard  10 per cent. discount to
1913 Graduates  Montague McHugh  THE DAYLIGHT STORE  Cor. Railroad Ave. and
Holly St. Bellingham, Wash.  Clothcraft  "All Wool" Clothes, $12.00 to
$20.00 PARTICULARLY YOUNG MEN'S STYLES  Hart, Schaffner   Marx Clothes-the
Standard in  Men's Ready-to-Wear Clothes - - -  PRICE $20.00 TO $35.00 
GAGE= DODSON CO.  Home of Satisfied Customers  Page Two

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SADIE WARREN MAIN 558  BELLINGHAM ART STORE  EMBROIDERING, STAMPING, FANCY
ARTICLES  1310 Bay Street Bellingham, Washington  PHONE 1185  Palmetto
Sweets  ICE CREAM AND ICE CREAM SODA  LUNCHES AND HOT DRINKS  Fresh Candy
Every Day-Everybody Comes 108 West Holly Bellingham, Wash.   THE LEADER  
Styles shown at The Leader are safe styles - as well    as new styles - Our
Eastern buying agency keeps us  supplied with the new things as soon as
they meet  with Fashion's stamp of approval in New York.  The moment you
see and examine The Leader's Suits, Coats and Millinery you recognize their
superior  style.  Special Discounts to Normal Students on our complete 
line of Graduating Materials in both Silk and  Cotton  Agents for Queen
Quality Shoes, Nemo and Gossard  Corsets  Page Three

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WATCHES  LADIES OR GENTS, ELGIN OR WALTHAM WATCHES IN  TWENTY-YEAR
GUARANTEED  CASES, $9.75  FULL LINE HOWARD, HAMILTON, WALTHAM WATCHES 
ALWAYS IN STOCK EXPERT WATCH AND JEWELRY REPAIRING  Eyes Tested and tiasses
Fitted by the Latest Scientific Method-  Graduate Optician  LUDWIG  
COLLINS  Jewelers and Opticians  214 East Holly St., Alaska Building
Bellingham, Wash.  Pianos and  Player Pianos  Sold on easy terms at bottom
prices  Full line of  popular and classical music  Harter   Wells Piano Co.
 Bellingham's Local Piano House  211 East Holly St.  All Portraits In This
Annual Are Furnished  By Grosart Studio of Bellingham, Wash.  We do
Developing and Printing  BRING YOUR FILMS TO US  The GROSART PHOTO SUPPLY
Co.  Bellingham,  Washington  Page Four

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I could learn to love you if you take me to the  CAVE  The CAVE has best
Candy, Ice Cream, Sodas  Elk Street, next to Sun Drug Store  Launch Sehome 
FOR CHARTER  Private Picnic Parties  Business Trips No No  ED. HOFERCAMP :
1118 Forest Street : PHONE 3037  Page Five

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Students! Students  If you like us tell your friends, if you  don't tell
US.  Normal Grocery  We Deliver Goods If Desired  For Graduation Gifts  SEE
 K. S. MUELLER  Jeweler  117 W. HOLLY ST.  Have you seen them! Have you
seen them!  WHAT?  MRS, GEORGE'S HATS  209 W. HOLLY ST.  9 WHOLESOME 
Wilson-Nobles-Barr Co.  Page Six

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COLLEGE GIRLS COLLEGE GIRLS  WE CARRY THOSE HATS  Which has that
distinction and individuality  which is so characteristic among COLLEGE 
GIRLS  CURTISS MILIINERY  319 West Holly SPRING FASHIONS  The new footgear
for Spring, the fetching, natty  styles approved by Dame Fashion, are here
in a  profusion of lasts and leathers. You'll find your  fit and ideal at
the price you want to pay. The  best known brands of reliable footwear. 
GEO. F. RAYMOND  110 EAST HOLLY STREET  WOLL FITS GLASSES  ACCURATELY 
Glasses Repaired Immediately  Factory on Premises . . . .  209 WEST HOLLY
STREET  OWL Pharmacy  Graham Drug Co.  Cor. Dock   Holly ST. Phone Main
722-723-556 Bellingham, Wash.   Page Seven

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WAHL'S WAHL'S  The Low Price Store  WAHL'S WAHL'S WAHL'S  The Low Price
Store  One Thing You  Have  Learned This Year  Anyhow  THAT WAHL'S IS A NEW
KIND OF  STORE FOUNDED AND CONDUCTED UPON  THE NEW RULE OF BUSINESS, WHICH,
 AFTER ALL IS NOTHING BUT THE GOLDEN  RULE.  IF YOU ARE GRADUATED THIS YEAR
AND  GO OUT TO MAKE YOUR OWN LIFE, WE  HOPE YOU WILL KEEP THIS STORE IN
MIND  AS ONE THAT IS WORTHY OF YOUR PATRONAGE  THROUGH ALL THE YEARS TO
COME.  IF YOU ARE TO BE WITH US FOR A YEAR OR TWO OR THREE YET,-WE FEEL
SURE  YOU WILL COME TO SEE US, FOR ALL THE STUDENTS DO.  J. B. WAHL  HOLLY
ST. BELLINGHAM  Page Eight

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 9

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Let's wear  bright styles  while Youth  is with us-it  cannot  remain 
forever  THE L SYSTEM  Clothes for Young Men  are designed to meet certain
requirements,  demanded by Young Men. From fabric to  the last stitch they
are supreme. If you  haven't given a little time to the investigation  of
THE L SYSTEM Clothes, you are not on  the right clothes track. Ask your
friends.  PELEGRN   MARTIN  The Up-Stairs Clothiers 3rd Floor Exchange
Building Bellingham  Page Nine

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PRINTING  ESTABLISHED 1890  FOR OVER 22 YEARS IN BELLINGHAM  WE HAVE SERVED
THE BUSINESSMEN WITH  "Everything in Printing that is Good"  This Book was
Printed by  S. B. IRISH   CO.  Printing, Engraving , Legal Blanks  ENGRAVED
CARDS AND WEDDING STATIONERY  1311 RAILROAD AVENUE PHONE 282  PRINTING 
Page Ten

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Our Acid Blast  half tones and   Etching are 50 to  100% deeper, cleaner 
and better than   those made by any  Other Process  WARING   BLAKE  Armour
bldg. 3rd   Jackson  Seattle Wash  All Cuts in this Publication were made
by Us  Page Eleven

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Our Base Ball Goods Will Help you Win   NORTHWEST HARDWARE CO.  213-215
HOLLY STREET BATTERSBY BROS  ALWAYS RELIABLE  TO THE GRADUATE  We Wish to
Thank You for Your Patronage  May Prosperity Strew Your Pathway of Life
With its Brightest  Flowers  Page Twelve

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Mail 1634  204-5 Alaska Building, Cor. Elk and Holly  DR. CARL M. ERB 
Specialist: Eye, Ear, Nose and  Throat. Glasses Fitted  Office Hours: 9 to
12 m., 1:30to 4:30 p. m. Evenings and Sundays by Appointment  Bellingham,
Wash.  Office Phone M. 400 Res. Phone M. 577  DR. N. WHITNEY WEAR SUNSET
BUILDING  Office Hours 10 to 12; 2 to 4; 7 to 8; Sundays, 10 to 12 
Bellingham, Washington Hours 11 to 12 a. m., 2 to 4 p. m., 7 to 8 p.m.
Telephone M 699  DR. J. REID MORRISON  RED FRONT BLOCK  Bellingham,
Washington  Main 2725, Res. Main 3642 Res. 511 High Street  DR. J. CLINTON
McFADDEN  OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN  Formerly Secretary State Medical Examining
Board and President Wash. Osteopathic Ass'n  301-2 Sunset Block Bellingham,
Wash.  Phone Main 400 Office Hours: 8 to 12, 1 to 6  DRS. ROSS   SPRATLEY 
Dentists  Third Floor, Exchange Blk. Bellingham, Wash.  GIFTS FOR THE SWEET
GIRL GRADUATES  LAVALLIERES GOLD WATCHES UMBRELLAS MESH BAGS BROOCHES
COLOGNE  4 VANITY CASES FLOWER PINS BOTTLES  SILVER PICTURE  PENDANTS PEARL
BEADS i FRAMES BRACELETS  Ladies' Crown Watches - $10.50 to $13.50 Watches
suitable for young gentlemen, $10 Up  L. L. BERENS CO.  MANUFACTURING
JEWELERS- OPTICIANS  104 East Holly Street  Page Thirteen

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PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY  DR. S. N. KELLY  Alaska Building Tel. Main 301 
Office Phone Main 975  Res. Phone Main 907  DR. T. M. BARLOW  DENTIST 
Rooms 335-36-37 1st Nat'l Bank Block Bellingham, Washington  DR. O. C.
GILBERT, GEN. MAN. DR. W. G. LONGWOOD, LOCAL MGR. NEW YORK DENTAL PARLORS 
SUNSET BLOCK  Bellingham, Washington  Seattle, 614 First Ave. Everett,
Commerce Bldg.  Vancouver, B. C., 201 Dominion Bldg.  DR. J. W. POWELL  310
Exchange Building Bellingham, Washington  Office and Residence Phone, Main
404  DR. MAX MEHLIG PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON  Pike Block Bellingham,
Washington  Office Phone 3074 Res. Phone 2643  DR. C. A. DARLING  DENTIST 
Rooms 304-5-6 Bellingham National Bank Building  Bellingham, Washington 
PHONE MAIN 130  DR. EDWARD W. TURNER  DENTIST  Rooms 1-2 Fischer Blk.
Bellingham, Wash.  Page Fourteen

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Pleasant Rooms and Fine Board  Tarte Hall  Single Rooms $4.25; Double Rooms
$4.00 per week, including  laundry. Three minutes' walk from the Normal,
magnificent  view. Correspondence solicited. MRS. TARTE  626 High Street
Bellingham, Wash.  The Best Line of Box Candies in Town   Phones, Main  180
CHAS.  CHAS. W. PEASLEE  EXCHANGE BLD'G COR. ELK and HOLLY- BELLINGHAM
WASHINGTON   WASHINGTON'S FINIEST DRUG STORE  If You Doubt It, Try Them 
BELL THEATER SHOWS ONLY THE BEST PIGTURES  HOLLY STREET  JESSIE LEE PHONE
M. 592  MANX BEAUTY PARLORS  COMPLETE LINE OF HAIR GOODS  Rooms 1, 31, 32,
Clover Block  Shampooing, Massaging and Scalp Treatment, Ladies'  and
Gentlemen's Manicuring-Bleaching and Dyeing  a Specialty   BELLINGHAM
WASHINGTON  Page Fifteen

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OUR PARTING OF  SCHOOL DIAYS has come  to a close and Smaby  wishes to
THANK EACH  and EVERYONE for your  most valuable patronage  during the
school year.  SMABY WILL MOVE  TO HIS NEW LOCATION AT 109 E. HOLLY  STREET,
BELLINGHAM NATIONAL BANK BUILDING    ABOUT JULY 1, 1913  IT WILL BE MY AIM
TO GIVE THE STUDENTS  OF EVERY SCHOOL AND PEOPLE  AT LARGE--THE BEST
EFFICIENCY IN  SERVING THEIR WANTS IN SWEETMEATS  AND ICE CREAM. My
Watchword will be always "Quality and Purity"  Smaby's Confections 
Bellingham, Wash  TWO PROSPECT  Candies With a Flavor  Page Sixteen

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CONTENTS  PART I. -- ORGANIZATIONS  PART II.- LITERARY  PART III. -
ATHLETIC  PART IV. - MUSIC  PART V. -JOKES  Page Seventeen

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OUR NORMAL  Oh, our Normal, the gem by the ocean,  'Mid forests of fir tree
and pine,  Our hearts bring  to thee their devotion,  Thy impress with
strengthen with time.  For the service of years we revere thee, For the
hearts that were noble and true:  The future will serve to endear thee, 
Three cheers for the White and the Blue!  The future will serve to endear
thee,  Three cheers for the White and the Blue!  When our games seem to be
disheartened,  And defeat seems to stare in our face,  The power then to
bring us to struggle  Is desire to give our School her place.  Then bring
your pennants with you,  Wave them for victory and be true;  The Normal,
the Normal, forever!  Three cheers for the White and the Blue!  The Normal,
the Normal, forever!  Then hurrah for the White and the Blue!  Page
Eighteen

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 19

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Dedication  To the Alumni, those who have gone  before us, who ever extend
to us hearty  sympathy and interest, we dedicate this,  the first number of
the "KLIPSUN."  Page Nineteen

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Foreword    To all into whose hands this Book may find its way,-Greetings: 
With this number we present for your inspection the first number  of The
Klipsun. The Staff have spared neither time nor labor in trying to get out
the best Annual that our School has ever produced, and we  wish to thank
those who have jointed their efforts with ours in working  toward our
ideal.  If the Klipsun in any way resembles the papers which have been 
published before, remember that we have tried to combine the best  points
of each in this. If it meets your approval we trust that it will  prove the
worthy forerunner of future Klipsuns of a larger Normal    Page Twenty

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AN APPRECIATION  As a student body we are indeed fortunate but as Seniors
we are  doubly fortunate in having for our wise counselors and advisors 
Miss Frances Hays and Mr. Deerwester. As teachers they  have  truly taught,
and in their daily associations with the students they have  been an
inspiration to us all,-our ideals are higher, our efforts are  greater. 
One never passes Miss Hays without feeling better for the contact;  no
matter how busy or hurried, she always has time for a cheery  word or a
bright smile,- those little touches of human kindness that  make one see
the roses in the path.  "Let us-let all the world agree,  To profit by
resembling thee."  Mr. Deerwester, with his indefatigable energy, has
guided us over many rugged peaks, and when we have crossed them we are met
with  a smile and encouraging words, tinged with a bit of his inimitable 
humor.  "Dear to the learned, to the simple, dear,  For daily blessing
mark'd thy virtuous year.  For God had form'd thy feelings on the noblest
plan,  To grace at once the teacher and the man."  Page Twenty-One

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MEMBERS OF FACULTY, 1912-13  EDWARD T. MATHES, Ph.D., Principal, History
and Method. FRANCIS W. EPLEY, A.B. Pd.M., Physical Sciences.  NELLIE A.
GRAY, Dean of Women, Associate in  Geography.  ELIAS A. BOND, A.B.,
Mathematics.  HARRY C. PHILIPPI, B.S., Assistant in Mathematics and
Science.  IDA A. BAKER, A.M., Associate in Mathematics.  WILLIAM L. MOODIE,
A.B., Biological Sciences.  FRANK DEERWESTER, A.B., Pd.M., Psychology and
Education.  ROSE BAXTER, A.B., Assistant in Psychology.  M. BELLE SPERRY,
A.B., A.M., English Language and Literature.  GERTRUDE WORDEN, A.B., A.M.,
Assistant in English.  MARY L. JENSEN, A.B., M.Di., Latin and German.  MARY
C. BOWEN, A.B., A.M., Assistant in German and English.  JAMES BEVER, A.B.,
A.M., History and Sociology.  FRANCES S. HAYS, B. Ped., Oral Expression and
Literature. DORIS B. SMITH, Assistant in Oral Expression.  ADA HOGLE, B.
Ped., Drawing and Manual Training. LULU B. DAWSON, Assistant in Drawing and
Manual Training.  ANDREW GEBAROFF, Head of Manual Training Department. 
Page Twenty-Two

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MINERVA LAWRENCE, B. S., Home Economics.  LA VERNE KNOWLES, Assistant in
Home Economics.  FLORENCE FOX THATCHER, Vocal Music.  MABEL SHEAFER,
Physical Training. MABEL PERSONET, School Nurse.  LUCY S. NORTON, A.B.,
Superintendent of Training School. WILLIAM H. PATCHIN, A.B., Supervisor
High School Department.  MINNIE I. TERMAAT, Supervisor Grammar Department. 
MAUDE DRAKE, Supervisor First Intermediate Department.  IDA A. FELT, Ph.B.,
 Supervisor Second Intermediate Department.  CATHERINE MONTGOMERY,
Supervisor Primary Department.  M. ETHEL BROWN, Assistant in Primary and
Lower Intermediate Depts.  MME. DAVENPORT ENGBERG, Violin Instructor.  EDNA
BAYLOR SHAW, Piano Instructor.  MABEL ZOE WILSON, A.B., B.L.S., Librarian. 
EFFIE SANDS, Assistant Librarian.  J. WAYLAND CLARK, Registrar.  BOARD OF
TRUSTEES  JOHN EDENS, Chairman JOHN J. DONOVAN, EMERSON HAMMER    Page
Twenty-Three

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 24

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Departments  PHYSICS-  This Department offers two years' work in Physics,
including both  lecture and laboratory work. The equipment is valued at
$1200. There  are about forty-eight students.  ASTRONOMY-  Short courses in
both descriptive and laboratory astronomy are  offered. The course in
laboratory astronomy is given this year for  the first time. Several new
pieces have been added to the equipment, among them a globe and two hundred
lantern slides.  CHEMISTRY AND PHOTOGRAPHY-  The plan of work in this
department is made up of minimum of  lecture work combined with a great
deal of laboratory work. The laboratory  is large and well equipped. The
course in photography is practical  work in camera experiments and a series
of pictures to illustrate  them is required of each student.  AGRICULTURE- 
A study is made of soil, plants and fruit growing; also domestic  animals,
dairying and poultry raising. In the past some practice has  been given in
plant propagation by budding and grafting. In connection  with poultry
raising, lectures are given on hatching, brooding,  feeding and housing of
poultry.  BIOLOGY-  A full year of High School botany is offered; also
courses in economic  and systematic botany and plant anatomy. Field
excursions and  lectures illustrated by lantern slides are interesting and
instructive features of the work.  A year's work in zoology, also is given.
This course is a series of  lectures upon the important theories of
biology, combined with field  work. The second semester is given to the
study of comparative anatomy.  MATHEMATICS-  Instruction in this department
is in the hands of three teachers. The work includes High School and two
years of College mathematics.  About three hundred students have been
enrolled during the year.  HISTORY-  English history, Modern History,
Nineteenth Century History,  American History, Civics, Political Economy
and State Manual are the  subjects offered, also a half year's course in
methods of teaching History.  Notebooks are required in nearly every case,
together with five or  six hundred pages of outside reading matter. For
Political Economy  an essay of three thousand words upon some topics of
economic interest  is required.  LA TIN AND GERMAN-  The course in Latin
includes four and a half years of Latin and  one-half year of methods of
teaching the subject. Three years of German,  which is the only modern
language taught, are offered. Credit is  given for ability to read and
write Swedish or Norwegian.  HOME ECONOMICS-  This department, which
includes instructions in cooki;ng and  sewing, was opened in September,
1908, with an enrollment of ninety-  Page  Twenty-Four

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four. The work is now carried on by two teachers and the enrollment  has
increased to one hundred and eighty-nine, besides the girls of the  Eighth
Grade.  The work in cooking includes the buying, cooking and  serving of 
foods, also the preparation of lunches for rural schools.  The sewing
classes are taught how to  cut out, fit and make garments  properly. 
DRAWING AND MANUAL TRAINING--  This work is under the direction of two
teachers and has a very  large enrollment. The drawing work given includes
simple object drawing  and work in water colors, also perspective and
advanced color work  and methods of teaching drawing. In the hand work,
clay modeling,  basketry, metal work and wood carving are taught.  ENGLISH-
 Many different lines of work are offered in the English Department. 
Thorough courses in grammar and composition are given as  well as English
methods for both grade and High School work. Instruction  is given in the
History of English Literature and a number of  the classics are studied. In
the Senior year, a semester is devoted to  the study of Browning.  ORAL
EXPRESSION-  This course is in the hands of two very competent teachers.
Besides  the regular Class work this department has charge of the training 
in debating, declamation and giving plays. Selections from the  best
literature, especially for grade work, are  typewritten and sent out  to
schools to arouse interest in this work. It is probable that a course  in
practical public speaking will be offered next year.  PSYCHOLOGY AND
EDUCATION-  A year's work in psychology, semester courses in the History
and  Philosophy of Education as well as method work are offered in this 
department. There are classes in Observation, Methods of Teaching  in the
Rural Schools, Child Study, and School Supervision. Beginning  with summer
school, there will be a special instructor for  rural school  work. 
PHYSICAL TRAINING-  This work is in charge of two instructors, one for
girls and one  for men. Gymnasium work is required of all students except
the  Seniors, who are required to take a course in Physical Culture Methods
 and Plays and Games. All athletics are in charge of this department.  
MUSIC-  Instruction is given in methods of teaching music and also in
ad-vanced  sight reading. A course in the History of Music is given, which 
includes the study of ancient music and primitive instruments, and  traces
the development of music up to the present time. A study of  the lives of
great composers is also made. A special course of one year  is given for
students wishing to become music supervisors.  WOODWORK AND PRINTING-- 
This department is new this year, but is proving very popular with 
students. The course in woodwork includes a general study of woods  found
in this region and practical work in the care and use of tools;  also
design, construction and wood finishing. The work in  printing  Page
Twenty-Five

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includes instruction in setting type, making forms, and operating  a small
job press.  TRAINING DEPARTMENT--  This department includes the first eight
grades and two years of  High School work. The  whole department is in
charge of a competent  superintendent and eight supervisors. One hundred
eighty-five student  teachers are working in the training department. Hand
work, sewing,  drawing and cooking are supervised by the Normal instructor
having  charge of that work. At present the enrollment numbers over five 
hundred children.  TEACHING STAFF--  The Faculty now numbers thirty-five,
graduates  of some of the  best educational institutions in the United
States and well equipped to  direct the work of the School.  ATHLETICS-- 
Keener interest is being shown in athletics than has ever been seen  at the
Normal before. Football, basketball, baseball, and track are the  chief
sports. No student is allowed to play unless his School work  is good. 
ORGANIZATIONS-  The Students' Association assumes the general management of
 The Messenger, school athletics, and provides school supplies and text 
books practically at cost to the students. Officers are elected yearly, 
and the dues are fifty cents a semester. Besides the literary and musical
societies each Class is a separate  organization, elects officers each
semester and carries on the business  of the Class. The Y. W. C. A. adds
much both to the social and spirit-ual  life of the girls.  + +  HISTORY OF
THE BELLINGHAM STATE NORMAL SCHOOL  The Legislature of 1893 passed an act
to establish a Normal School  here and appropriated $40,000 for that
purpose but stipulated that the  site should be given. Two land companies
gave five acres each, making  a  total of approximately ten acres and the
school was built on the  dividing line between what were then the  two
cities of Fairhaven and  WVhatcom.  Although the appropriation of $40,000
was granted by the Legislature  of 1893, in 1895 Governor Rogers vetoed a
bill for it maintenance,  and it was not until September 6, 1899, that the
school was organized.  The Faculty at that time consisted of six members,
but the number was  increased to nine before the close of the year. The
building at that  time was what is now the main part of the school.  The
attendance in 1899-1900 was 264 in the Normal Department,  and 80 in the
Training School. May 1, 1913, the Faculty was composed  of 35 members;
there were 479 students enrolled in the Normal Department  and over 500 in
the Training School.  The Training School Annex was added to the building
in 1901 and  the Science Annex in 1907. Edens Hall, the girls' dormitory,
was enlarged  to its present capacity in 1907. The tangible property of the
 School at the present time is valued at $305,551.  Page Twenty-six

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Page Twenty-Seven

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EVENING ON THE BAY.  Another bright and lovely day is almost past;  The
brightness of the noontide 'gins to fade away,  The cool of evening bloweth
gently past  Laden with the blossom scent of May.  The great sun hangs
suspended 'tween the ocean and the sky,  While the genii of the evening
their gorgeous colors ply.  Golden, red and purple in many a varied hue, 
Their colors lend to the great sea's bend,  They touch the hills and tint
the clouds and.fade in heaven's blue  Till the sky above and the sea
beneath are lost in one great blend.  And then to the north we look away 
On the cold white tops where the colors play.  When the great, bright sun
is sinking in the West,  His nether rim is bathed in ocean foam,  Then each
small thing doth seek his cozy nest,  And the thoughts of man are turned
toward home.  Then the colors on the evening sky  Like Autmn leaves, they
fade and die.  As a great white swan the day floats down the stream of
time,  And, like the swan, her life is sweetest at the last.  Her sad
farewell is vesper's lonely chime  Tells us night is near, the bright and
lovely day is past.  The time has come which Man and Nature loveth best. 
In the shifting of the shadow, in the falling of the light,  Is the promise
of the Maker and the handiwork of God;  And His great and wondrous mercy in
the coming of the night  In which we rest a moment from our weary journey's
plod.  They came, the words so sweet and clear,  "'Tis good for us to have
been here."  LEILA PARSONS.  Page Twntv-PTight

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Part One  Page Twenty-Nine

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 30

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[no text this page]


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SENIOR  Page Thirty-One

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[Image] Senior Class    Page Thirty-Two

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COLORS -Olive Green and Gold  CLASS FLOWER-Yellow Rose.  CLASS
TEACHERS-Miss Hays and Mr. Deerwesler.  MOTTO  "It is good to know;  It is
better to do;  It is best to be!"  CLASS OFFICERS President
.................MARJORIE ARTHUR  Secretary ....................MINNIE
CARVER  Treasurer ...................LOLAH SMITH  CLASS HISTORY.  September
fifth dawned bright and glorious. Early in the morning  the newcomers began
wending their way to the Normal, desirous  of finding what pleasures (?)
were in store for them.  The Juniors were sent to Mr. Epley, where they
faced the problem  of earning the greatest number of credits with the least
amount of  effort. After much weary time spent in juggling hours under the
direction  of a few Seniors, we were at last assigned to classes. In due
time  the report was made that the Junior Class of 1912 had the honor of
being  the largest class ever enrolled in the Normal. The Junior Class was
organized with Mr. Rogers, President; Miss  Nelson, Secretary; and Mr.
Epley and Miss Hogle Class Teachers. After  the many tears of homesickness
were dried everyone entered whole- heartedly  into the enjoyment of his
surroundings. Many were the good  times we had on our picnics and at
parties. We even indulged in Class  scraps occasionally, but only
good-humoredly.  At the beginning of  the second semester new officers were
selected  as follows: Herman Merritt, President; Verna Boyd,
Vice-President,  and Gertrude Davidson, Secretary and Treasurer.  The
Juniors were prominent in all school activities. Their reception  to the
School was a decided success. The Junior girls did not for-  Page 
Thirty-Three

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get basketball, and after many hard games, succeeded in capturing the 
Kline Cup.  May twelfth was the important day on which the Juniors
presented  the Class play, "Mr. Bob." There was an excellent caste of 
characters  to entertain the enthusiastic audience.  The close of the year
was now approaching. The Juniors entertained  the members of the Senior
Class of 1912 by a picnic to Vendova  Island. On Class day the Juniors took
part in the exercises of the  Seniors and in the evening all met in the
drawing room, where many  met for the last time.  On returning to school in
September, 1913, the Seniors found many new faces. Those who were in the
Class during 1912 missed many of  their old friends, but many other jolly
Seniors came to take their places.  Being familiar with school routine it
was not long before we were toiling over the deep subjects of Philosophy
and Sociology. The Senior  Class met and elected the following officers for
the first semester: Lucetta  McKechnie, President; Marjorie Arthur,
Vice-President; Mabel  Brown, Secretary; and Mr. Helm, Treasurer. We were
also fortunate  enough to have Mr. Deerwester and Miss Hays appointed as
Class  teachers.  The first social affair given by the Seniors was the
reception given  to the school. It was held in Society Hall, which was
elaborately decorated  in the Class Colors, Olive Green and Gold. A program
of music  and readings was given after which everyone enjoyed a good time
and  refreshments were served.  Later, the Senior Class was divided into
three groups, each one to  have charge of one social event for the
entertainment of the Seniors.  Group One gave the Senior Circus, which
proved very amusing and entertaining.  Group Two gave a reception at the P.
L. F. club-house, in  honor of the Mid-Year Graduating Class. The reception
was well  planned and very  successful. Group Three had charge of the
picnic to  Ravenswood, whither they were invited through the courtesy of
the  Misses Carver and De Haven; but the weather man got his orders mixed 
and the picnic had to be given up, much to our regret.  At the beginning of
the second semester, new officers were elected,  as follows: Mr. Hevly,
President; Miss Arthur, Vice-President; Miss  Carver, Secretary; and Miss 
Smith, Treasurer. Mr. Hevly was compelled  to leave school because of
illness and Miss Arthur has been  acting  as Class President.  One of the
most successful entertainments given at the Normal  during 1913, was the
Senior Vaudeville, on May 3. Every number was  well given and the audience
was in a gale of merriment all evening.  The play presented by the Senior
Class of '13, undei the direction  of Miss Hays, was well rendered. It
required much hard work on the  part of the caste and they deserve much
credit for the way in which  they handled their respective parts.  The last
social function of the Senior Class occurred on June 3,  1913, which was
Class day. In the morning of that day the Seniors  partook of  a breakfast
in Miss Lawrence's department. The campus  was decorated and in the
afternoon the regular ceremonies of laying  the stone and planting ivy
occurred. This was followed by charades  and games on the campus. In the
evening of that memorable day all  of our carefully treasured plans and
notebooks were  consigned to the  flames of the annual bonfire. Our final
appearance was made on the  morning of June 5,  when we received the
long-coveted diplomas, so  dear to each of us.  ALICE DUNLOP. CRETE TOPPING
 Page Thirty-Four

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CLASS SONG  "1913" TUNE: Vine Gatherers.  We're proud that we're the Class
of 1913.  We're proud of that!  We're proud of that!  Our hearts at
"Normal" always will teem,  We're glad of that!  We're glad of that! 
Sehome's old crest in ancient splendor rises;  We can't forget!  We can't
forget!  Her verdant firs and  cedars that she prizes  Are with us yet! 
Are with us yet!  CHORUS  Sing then, sing then  Spread old Normal's fame. 
Sing then, sing then,  Tra la la la, tra la la la, tra la la la, 1913, 
Laud her very name,  Tra la la la la, 1913.  The mem'ries clust'ring 'round
the Class of 1913  We'll keep with us!  We'll keep with us!   The
friendships we have formed, in future will mean  Much joy to us!  Much joy
to us!  The ivied walls of Normal will be rising  Before our eyes!  Before
our eyes!  1913's old mem'ry then be prizing,  Sound out their cries! 
Sound out their cries!  Cho.    SENIOR YELLS.  Clickety, clackety,  Sis,
Boom, Ah!  Seniors!  Seniors!  Rah! Rah! Rah!  Rah! Rah! Rah!  Ah! Seen! 
Bellingham Normal  Seniors, '13!  Page Thirty-Five

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Class Will  Know all Men by these Presents, That we, the members of the
Senior  Class of the State Normal School, of the City of Bellingham, County
 of Whatcom, State of Washington, students, being about to depart  from
this school, and being of sound mind and memory, do make and  declare and
publish this, Our Last Will and Testament.  First: We give and bequeath to
our honorable successors, our   seats in Assembly. May they fill them as
well as they have heretofore  been occupied.  Second: We give and bequeath
to the Class of 1914, the right to  lay a new block of sidewalk. If they
fail in this duty they are to be  haunted by the spirit of the Class of
'13.  Third: We give and bequeath as Class Teachers to the next  Senior
Class, Miss Hays and Mr. Deerwester, hoping" they will appreciate  them as
we have done.  Fourth: We give and bequeath the dignity of the Class and
its  members to the Freshmen, knowing  that they need it more than their 
elders.  Fifth: We give and bequeath the good teachers out of the Class  
to Miss Norton, knowing she will need them next year.  Sixth: We give and
bequeath to Dr. Mathes the good grades we  received in History Methods,
that he may distribute them as he thinks  best.  Seventh: We give and
bequeath our boys to the Sophomores and  we hope that they will see that
they are propertly  cared for and not left  around for the Juniors to get. 
Eighth: To the Class of 1915 we give and bequeath the Kline Cup  presented
to us by the Class of 1914 on condition that they in turn present  it to
the aforesaid Class of 1914.  Ninth: We give and bequeath Dan's voice to
Mrs. Thatcher as  a basis for a Glee  Club.  Tenth: Our ability to work
hard when necessary and to loaf industriously  and bluff at all times we
leave to the High School that they  may become educated in the ways of the
Seniors.  Eleventh: We give and bequeath to the next Editorial Staff of 
Klipsun, Anna's ability to write; also the drawing powers of Lucetta  and
Helen.  Twelfth: We give and bequeath our love of Browning to our departed 
member, Mr. Hevly, where'er he be.  Thirteenth: We give and bequeath our
Class Spirit to all succeeding  Senior Classes to be used on all occasions.
 Fourteenth: Our exclusive right to meet the discipline Committee we give
and bequeath to any mortal who is original enough to come to  their notice.
 Fifteenth: Our right to  the Association Office we leave to President 
Dahlquist on condition that he is a good housekeeper. Sixteenth: We give
and bequeath the Senior corpse to Mr. Moodie,  on condition that he keep it
from meddlesome children.  Seventeenth: The stretcher we give and bequeath
to Miss Personet  to carry the victims out on.  Eighteenth: We give and
bequeath to the Museum Polly with the  beveled ear. Nineteenth: Our ponies,
notebooks and old essays are to be sold  at public auction and the proceeds
to be used to buy a new Cupid for  the Fountain.  Page Thirty-Six

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Twentieth: Our rights in Faculty meeting we bequeath to the  Summer School
Seniors, hoping they will appreciate the honor.  Twenty-First-Our right to
sleep in Phil. of Ed. we bequeath to  Tubby Wilson. Twenty-Socond: Our
right to change Class plays and postpone  entertainments we leave to the
first Senior Class that has our versatility.  Twenty-Third: We leave our
appreciation and thanks for past kindness to the Faculty one and all. 
Twenty-Fourth: We do nominate and appoint our succeeding  Class to be
executors of this, our last Will and Testament.  In Testimony Whereof, we
have to this subscribed our names this  third day of June in the year of
Our Lord, One Thousand Nine Hundred  and Thirteen. SENIOR CLASS OF 1913.  +
+  SENIOR VAUDEVILLE.  On the evening of May 3, the Seniors covered
themselves with  glory. From the time the curtain went up for the first act
until the  close, the auditorium resounded with the applause and laughter
of the  audience. The "Weaver's Dance" was a very artistic example of the 
folk dance. One of the most popular features was the work of "Sam"  Carver
and Ed. Nattrass on the parallel bars. Every move was enjoyed  immensely.
Misses Davis, Wall and Crawshaw made quite a hit with  their original act,
"Do It!"  What could have been prettier or daintier than the "Dance of the 
Nippon," by girls in Japanese costume? The forming of the figure  thirteen
was certainly well done. One of the strongest hits of the evening  was the
"Rose Dance," by Elizabeth Gaasland, soloist, and six chorus girls. It was
certainly the "pink" of perfection. The encore  in which Dan Hall appeared
was -very much appreciated by the audience.  The "Movies" surely deserve
mention. They were designed by Misses Lucetta MacKechnie and Minnie Carver,
and showed considerable  originality in the line of "take- offs" on the
Faculty and students.  "The Heavenly Twins" gave an entertaining recital of
their woes, set  to  music. They were appropriately dressed as became
children of their  age. Everyone enjoyed Mrs. Deerwester as Madame
Tritosyng. "The  Butterfly Dance," by Isabella Williams was so artistic and
pleasing  with the colored lights that it was enthusiastically encored.
Last but  not least came the "Minstrels." The end men and end girls were
cleverly  gotten up and the jokes afforded abundarit amusement. Mr. Dan 
Hall in a couple of song hits was well liked. Wilbur Anderson made  a hit
with "Pick, Pick, On Your Mandolin." "The Tom Cat Song," by  Elizabeth
Gaasland was quite taking. The music furnished by the  principals was above
criticism and the variety of catchy, popular songs  was much enjoyed by
all. Much credit is due to Wallace Sutherland  for his untiring coaching of
this act. Page Thirty-Seven

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FUTUREOSCOPE.  (Being a few pages from the correspondence of Grace Hardin
and.Min-nie  Carver in the year 1923.)  BELLINGHAM, Washington, August 23,
1923.  DEAR MINNIE: That most excruciatingly amusing letter of yours  was
awaiting me when I arrived at my office this morning. Now don't  let those
superfluous adjectives offend your delicate pedagogical sensibility.  They
are necessary to express the exact state of my emotions  when I read the
account of those heart-rending (?) experiences you  have been having with
your mathematics students. Seriously, however,  I am quite sure that your
new method of teaching algebra by applying  it to the dining room menu will
prove extremely popular, especially to that section of your followers whose
proverbial hearts are most easily  reached through their esophagi. You will
observe from the heading of this epistle that I am writing  on the 23d day
of the month, 1923. Now, if I were in the least superstitious,  I should
hesitate to even begin a letter that would have to bear  a date like that,
but hoodoo numbers have had no terrors for me since  the year 1913, when we
graduated from dear old B. S. N. S. with that  Class that came out so
famously, in spite of the dire forebodings of evil that it inherited from
tradition.  That reminds me of the dream I had last night. I must tell you 
about it. I dreamed that I was back in Philosophy Class and that Prof. 
Deerwester, in his usual gentle and patient manner, was doing his utmost 
to make it clear to us that "ontogeny recapitulates the phylogeny  of the
'race,' " while we sat there demurely and innocently eating peanuts.  Now
what in the world do you suppose made me dream a thing  like that. I can
only account for it in one way: the past week has been Marathon week! Does
that give you a clue? It has been the grandest  event of modern times,
because it marked the completion of that macadamized  road from Bellingham
to Mt. Baker, an enterprise that could not have been a success had it not
been for the energetic efforts  of that peerless leader, Mr. William
Tucker, whose long experience in  the Polar regions,-and at the
Normal--gave him the inspiration for  his great achievement. He has made
our city the cynosure of all eyes.  It seems to me that everybody  and his
dog has been here;-not figuratively,  but literally.  Do you know, I'll
never forgive Ethel Anderson for introducing  that dog fad into America.
She might have known that everyone  would follow her example.  While it may
be all right for one in her  social position to go down the street towing
five or six handsome collies  with as many sky blue ribbons, it gets on
one's nerves to see so  many other people trying to do likewise in order to
keep up with the  fashion.  Now, if she had followed Sarah Moen's example
and founded an  asylum for weather-beaten cats, I am sure humanity would
have profited  a great deal more.  I  can't begin to tell you how many of
the old familiar faces I have  seen during this celebration. They have come
from all corners of the  earth. Even Lady Luzelle C. Hyeborough was moved
to give up her  last series of bridge parties and travel all the way from
England to attend  the opening, so you can see that there must have been
considerable  attraction here.  The governor (or "ess" I should say, for
Tacy insists that Governoress  Clarke is her proper title), was here and
delivered an address.  She has the most charming husband--iron gray hair
and such eyes !  Page Thirty-Eight

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They say he presides over the Governor's mansion very gracefully.  The
grand military ball was the most remarkable feature of our  preliminary
affairs. The grand march was led by Miss Myrtle Kennedy  and Admiral Daniel
Hall of the U. S. N. Some one invented a new  dance especially for this
occasion. It seems to be a combination of the  bunny-hug, turkey-trot,
waltz, three-step and barn dance, with just a suggestion of ragging. They
say that Grace MacKechnie is responsible  for it, but I could not vouch for
that. Anyway it shows off the gowns  to perfection. You should have seen
the Spenger girls and Lily Morrison,  with their multi-millionaire
husbands. Such jewels! "Solomon,  in all his glory, was not arrayed like
one of these." Myrtle Fisher surprised  everyone by appearing in the much
discussed Oriental gown that was designed in Seattle by Edith Anderson and
adopted by nearly  all the dress reform leaders in that city.  Of course
the Marathon was the climax of the entire celelration,  but even that was
not as interesting as the cartoons of the contestants,  which were drawn by
L. Mack. They were the main attraction, in my  estimation. Everyone says
that Lucetta is the cleverest cartoonist on  the market. There  is no doubt
about it.  The only thing that in any way marred the general harmony of 
our week's festival was the deplorable accident which happened on  the last
day, when Nellie Cropper and her new Watkins' Torpedo car  collided with a
stage, and several people were injured, including Miss  Engle, reporter for
the Times. She had a front tooth dislocated. Fortunately  Dr. Marion
Johnson, dentist, was in the crowd and the trouble  was soon remedied. 
These stars indicate an interruption. I have so many of them daring
thildaey . it was only Earl Gibb again. He has been fairly haunting  this
building for a week, trying to talk me into having my picture enlarged, 
but has not succeeded so far.  Speaking of agents, yesterday Anna Brown
called and wanted to  sell me a copy of MeCully's Complete United States,
History, but when  she found that I already had one, she directed her
energies toward extolling  the praises of "Barry's New Cyclopedia of Cute
and Catchy  Phrases."  And day before yesterday Blanche Gawley was here
taking orders  for her new invention, a patent automatic combination
dishwasher and  flapjack griddle. I took one to use on my next camping
trip.  These are dreadfully busy times. I have another interesting case  on
hand in court. Happy Williams and Helen Stevens have brought suit  against
Susie Depew and her botany  pupils for trespassing on their  golf links and
wantonly and unlawfully destroying the shrubbery.  Philip Hogan is attorney
for the defense, and I have been retained by  the plaintiffs. I expect some
interesting developments.  ! !v?x ! ! ! ? There goes my wireless. Excuse me
for a moment  while I answer it.- It was Mary Ossewaarde, dear Malry, who
puzzles  all the world; who has so many suitors and yet refuses to
condescend  to change her name. She wants me to come up to dinner this
evening.  She is going to entertain in honor of Ruth Sears, who has pust
returned  from Central Africa, where she has spent the past two years
introducing  domestic science and dressmaking among the natives of the
Congo.  Of course I'll accept Mary's invitation. She also said something
about  a theatre party afterwards. Grace Barnes is going to play tonight at
the  Gaasland Theatre in Rhea Barnard's latest success, "The Honeymoon." 
Grace always was fond of those sentimental things, you know. and  Page
Thirty-Nine

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since she has become so famous she seems to have molded the public  into
her cast of thought also. Speaking of the opera reminds me of my new hat.
dream, It is a perfect especially in the matter of color blending, and is
decidedly exclusive  in style for it bears the B. K. trade mark. That means
that it is a Blanche Knight model, which you know represents the very last
word in the designer's art, although Blanche herself retired from the
business long ago to enter a more romantic realm.  The afternoon mail just
came in and I notice among my letters a  circular from Miss Fatland, of the
Normal Faculty, advising me by all means not to miss the lecture course
this year, as there are to be several fine numbers, including Hazel De
Haven's lecture on "How Man Has Profited by Universal Suffrage," and
Dunlop, McKay  and Carter's troupe of singers. I also have heard that
Louise Atchison will return from her Arctic missionary trip this fall and
will give her moving picture display at the Normal.  I have another letter
from an old friend. Caroline Halsey, Secretary of the National Y. W. C. A.,
wishes me to subscribe something for their new project, the Uniform Dress
for Women movement. I understand that Virginia Ashby is delivering a series
of addresses against this pro-ject, and it is to counteract her influence
that Caroline is working so indefatigably.  I ran across Belva Waters the
other day in the public library. She  has been traveling for an entire
year, visiting schools in various parts of the world for the purpose of
making a comparative study of disciplinary  methods. She told me some very
interesting things about people that you and I used to know. She said that
Maude Jamieson was teaching osteopathy in a California school, and that
Anna Tromp had worked out a psychological test for backward children, that
promises to rival even the Binet system. Marjorie Arthur and Lois Te
Roller, she said, had both married college presidents. On her Pacific trip
she had as a fellow passenger Lola Glee Smith, who was traveling for a
collection agency, and, when she arrived in Honolulu, whom did she come
face to face with but Ethel Scheidemantel, police matron in that city.  I
forgot to tell you that I have moved. Am now in the new Davis and Wall bank
building, right across the street from the Manford Anderson Undertaking
arlors, and next door to Stoddard and Landen's Hairdressing establishment.
From my window I can look across into Grace  Collins' Needlecraft Shop in
the next building, and watch the fashionable crowds that come to purchase
her dainty wares. This, together  with the trills and thrills that escape
down the elevator shaft from the Egbert School of Music on the top floor,
serves somewhat to break the monotony of this twenty-one story city
existence.  I shall probably be in Chicago for a few days this fall on
business and if so will run out to the University to see you. I am rather
uncer- tain at present as to how I shall travel. May come by rail, for the
biplanes are so uncertain, especially since Wally Sutherland and his
Amalgamated Ozone Travel Company gained control of all the air lines in
America, hot and otherwise.  Gracious! My watch says five o'clock. If I am
going to take dinner with Mary I shall have to hurry some, so please
consider this installment closed. The narrative will be continued in the
next issue. Do write soon and be sure and tell me how your brother's
swimming  school is getting along. You didn't say a word about it last
time. Give my best regards to Bessie Taylor and Irene Schacht, and all the
other  Chicago friends, and don't let them  play any more pranks on the
poor,  suffering professors. Yours in hasty retreat, GRACE HARDIN.  Page
Forty

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[Image] EARLE GIBB-"ICH"  Bellingham, Washington  "With all good grace to
grace a gentleman." [Image] BLANCHE M. KNIGHT-"DUB"  Bellingham, Washington
 "Sweetness is hers and unaffected ease."  [Image] MAUDE E.
JAMISON-"DIMPLES"  Tekoa Washington  "A rosebud set with little wilful
thorns."  [Image] LENORA WRIGHT  Sumner, Washington  "When duty whispers
low, 'Thou must,'  The youth replies, 'I can.' "  Page Forty-One

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[Image] BELVA WATERS-"BELVEDERE"  Waterville, Washington  "Ever gathering
wisdom that to others  she  might give."  [Image] LOIS TeROLLER  Seattle,
Washington  "Her manner gracious, kind and true."  [Image] MYRTLE
ESTERGREEN-"MYRT No. 2"  Everson Washington  "Her modest answer and
grateful air,  Show her sweet and good as she is fair."  [Image] ESTHER
McGRATH-"ES"  Nooksack, Washington   "Her prudence counsels to her wisdom."
 Page Forty-Two

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 43

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[Image] LUCETTA MacKECHNIE-"SPLINTERS"  Port Angeles, Washington  "A
pleasant spirited girl, there's little  melancholy in her."  [Image] GRACE
COLLINS-"PETERANN"  Bellingham, Washington "Hospitality combined with
sweetness."  [Image] CAROLINE EGBERT-"CAL"  Bellingham, Washington "Like
all musical people she is happy."  [Image] GRACE MacKECHNIE-"MAC"  Port
Angeles, Washington  "To every why she hath a wherefore."  Page
Forty-Three

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 44

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[Image] HAZEL CALDEN-"AUNTIE"  Tacoma, Washington  "A dark haired, quiet,
studious girl,  Not much  engaged in society's whirl."  [Image] EMMA
SPENGER  Bellingham, Washington  "A merry heart doeth good like a
medicine."  [Image] ETHEL GRACE ANDERSON-"ANDY"  Bellingham, Washington 
"She is noble in every thought and every  deed."  [Image] L. IRENE
MYRON-"CASEY"  Stanwood, Washington "Fair thoughts and happy hours attend
you."  Page Forty-four

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 45

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[Image] WILLIAM C. TUCKER-"GROUCH"  Bellingham, Washington  "Why all this
gloomy mood." [Image] CHARLOTTE McKAY--"TOT"  Friday Harbor, Washington 
"Music makes her soul and lifts it high.'  [Image] MARGARET LANDEN-"PEGGY" 
Bellingham, Washington  "Like a breath of summer air scented with  roses." 
[Image] RHEA BARNARD  "Heart on her lips, and soul within her eyes,  Soft
as her clime, and sunny as her skies."  Page Forty-five

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 46

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[Image] PAULINE GAUPP-"POLLY"  Tacoma, Washington  "Like most small
packages, she is very precious."  [Image] EVELYN DOBLER-"EVE"  Sumner,
Washington  "Kind eyes and innocent, and all thy  bearing  gracious." 
[Image] HAZEL DeHAVEN-"HADIE"  Bellingham, Washington  "Thy modesty's a
candle to thy merit."  [Image] MARY NORDEEN  Everett, Washington  "To
friends a friend-how kind to all."  Page Forty-Six

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 47

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[Image] JUSTINE ENGLE-"JEAN"  Seattle, Washington  "The mirror of all
courtesy."  [Image] ETHEL P. MORGAN  Seattle, Washington  "Nothing so
strong as her gentleness,  Nothing so gentle as her strength."  [Image]
BLANCHE ALICE GAWLEY  Bellingham, Washington  "Calm and unruffled as a
summer sea"  [Image] LILY MORRISON--'CHILI BEAN"  Bellingham, Washington 
"Good nature is the beauty of the wind."  Page Forty-Seven

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 48

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[Image] ANNIE BROWN-"BARNEY"  South Prairie, Washington  "With her big,
blue eyes and merry smile,  We think her just about our style."  [Image]
HELEN STEVENS-"STEVE"  Bellingham, Washington   "She has a merry wit; she's
clever, too."  [Image] BESSIE TAYLOR-"BESS"  Lynden, Washington  "She  is a
scholar and a right good one."  [Image] DOROTHY SPENGER-"DOT"  Bellingham,
Washington "Whence came that ray of sunshine."  Page Forty-eight

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 49

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[Image] MANFORD ANDERSON-"MANFRY"  Bellingham, Washington  "Modesty is the
color of virtue." [Image] S. ESTER CARVER-'SAM"  Bellingham, Washington  'A
modern Hercules."  [Image] FLORENCE  ROBBIN-"BID"  Waterville, Washington 
"Around her eyes the tresses fell,  And which were blackest, none can
tell."  [Image] GEORGIE CATHERYNE BARRY-GUDGE"  Everett, Washington  "She
strove the  neighborhood to please,  With manner wondrous winning,  And
never followed wicked ways  Unless, when she was sinning."  Page
Forty-nine

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 50

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[Image] PHILIP HOGAN-"PHIL"  Little Falls, Washington  "A prince he was,
blue-eyed and fair in  face. [Image] CRETE TOPPING-"CUTS"  Lynden,
Washington  "The original bunch of sweetness tied with  a golden cord." 
[Image] MAY HUGHES  Bellingham, Washington  "Her yesterdays look backward
with a smile."  [Image] INEZ TOWNLEY  Tacoma, Washington  'True as the dial
to the sun."  Page Fifty

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 51

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[Image] RUTH SEARS--"SPIDER"  Bellingham, Washington  "She is never alone
for she is accompanied by noble thoughts."  [Image] MAUDE WALL  Seattle,
Washington  'A good heart is a letter of credit." [Image] ETHEL M.
SCHEIDEMANTEL-'SHIDEY"  Wenatchee, Washington  "Gentle to hear, kindly to
judge."  [Image] EVA LORRAINE WHITE-"BOOBY"  Seattle, Washington  "Why all
this struggle for triumphs of an  hour."  Page Fifty-One

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 52

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[Image] MRS. E. M. CRAIL  Bellingham, Washington  "Gentle of speech,
beneficent of mind.  [Image] ELSIE STODDARD-BLOOMY"  Bellingham, Washington
 "In every deed of mischief she had a heart  to resolve, a head to contrive
and a hand  to execute."  [Image] SADIE SCOTT-"SCOTTY"  Bellingham,
Washington  "To know her is to love her."  [Image] HAZEL MORSE-"MOSES" 
Port Angeles, Washington   "She is never weary in well doing."  Page
Fifty-Two

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[Image] MARY OSSEWARDE-"DUTCHIE"  Bellingham, Washington  "Most winning in
her personality." [Image] LUZELLE CANFIELD-"PEANUTS"  Bellingham,
Washington  "Ready always for a joke."  [Image] ESTHER LINDQUIST-"QUEEN
ESTHER'  Seattle, Washington  "A maiden never bold, of spirit still and
quiet."  [Image] LUCINDA DUNAGAN-"LUCY"  Bellingham, Washington  "Speech is
silver, but silence is golden."  Page Fifty-Three

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[Image] W. SAMUEL WYLER-"DEACON"  Fairmount, Oklahoma  "Give every man
thine ear and few thy voice."  [Image] VERA DAVIDSON-"SIS"  Seattle,
Washington  'The hand that made you fair hath made you good."  [Image]
DANIEL HALL-"DANNIE"  Chinook, Wash.  "Faithful and courteous, true and
kind  A better boy is hard to find."  [Image] MARIAN JOHNSON-"MARY ANN" 
Seattle, Washington  "Of all girls she is most studious."  Page Fifty-Four

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     ----------

[Image] MAMIE MAE DAVIS-"HONEY"  Bremerton, Washington  'A sweet,
attractive kind of grace." [Image] ADA RANDALL  Kent, Wash.  Her good
nature and sunny smile will brighten  many lives." [Image] GRACE
BARNES-"RED PEPPER"  Tacoma, Washington  "Small, but ah me-!"  [Image]
BEATRICE GIBBONY-'BEE"  Bremerton, Washington  "She liked whate'er she
looked on  And her looks went everywhere."  Page Fifty-Five

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[Image] LILA PATTERSON-"PAT"  Bellingham, Washington  "A noble type of
perfect womanhood." [Image] BEATRICE BELL-"BEE"  Bellingham, Washington  "A
quiet girl with rosy cheeks."  [Image] LOLA GLEE SMITH-"SCHMIDTY" 
Portland, Oregon  "Her presence drives away dull care."  [Image] RUTH
MARGARET LAWSON-'RUFUS"  Edison, Washington  "In maiden meditation fancy
free.  Page Fifty-Six

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[Image] AGNES BIVER-"AGGIE"  Mount Vernon, Washington  "A perfect woman,
nobly planned,  To warn, to comfort and command."  [Image] GRACE
HARDIN-"KITTEN"  Bellingham, Washington  "Sober, steadfast, and demure." 
[Image] EMILY HAUS-"MEM"  Seattle, Washington  "The toils of honor dignify
repose."  [Image] MABELLE BARKER-"MAB"  Bellingham, Washington  "She is
beautiful, therefore to be  wooed,  She is a woman, therefore to be won." 
Page Fifty-Seven

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[Image] VIOLA HOPKINS  Everett, Wash.  "The goodness in herself finds
goodness in  everything." [Image] NELLIE GIBSON  Snohomish, Wash.  "Her
quiet dignity wins many friends."  [Image] DORA FATLAND  Tacoma, Washington
 "Thy hair shall be as light to thy pathway."  [Image] ELIZABETH
GAASLAND-"GASSY'  Bellingham, Washington  "A jolly girl, without care or
troubles,  Whose voice with laughter always bubbles."  Page Fifty-Eight

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 59

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[Image] WINNIE VIRGINIA ASHBY-"BABE"  Bellingham, Washington  "Her value is
in her worth not in her  size."  [Image] LURENA BUSBY  Friday Harbor, Wash.
 "She does her duty without question."  [Image] HELEN KELLY  Bellingham,
Washington  "The mildest manners with the bravest  mind."  [Image] MILLIE
GARRISON  "She seeketh diligently after knowledge."  Page Fifty-Nine

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 60

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[Image] ALICE DUNLOP-"ALLIE"  Aberdeen, Washington  "As frank as rain on
cherry blossoms." [Image] CAROLINE HALSEY-"GIGGLES"  Olympia, Washington 
"I'm sure care's an enemy to life." [Image] MYRTLE FISHER-"RUSTY"  Seattle,
Washington  "Her hair is not more sunny than her heart.: [Image] EDITH
DeLONG-"REX"  Everett, Washington  "One of the few immortal names that was 
not born to die."  Page Sixty

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 61

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[Image] LILY OLSON  Mount Vernon, Washington  "Be good, sweet maid, and let
who will be  clever." [Image] BERGLIOT EVANSON-"BIRDIE"  Mount Vernon,
Washington  'She is gentle and doth gentle deeds."  [Image] MATILDHE
McCONEGHEY  Coudersport, Pennsylvania  "Rare compound of oddity and fun." 
[Image] CLEDA RUTH CHICHESTER-"CHET"  Bellingham, Washington  'She is as
wise as she is good."  Page Sixty-One

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[Image] HARRIET TAYLOR-"HAT"  Arlington, Washington  "And her voice it
murmurs lowly  As a silver stream may run."  [Image] MAE OSIER  Bellingham,
Washington  "She was ever fair."  [Image] EDITH MAY ANDERSON-"MIDGET" 
Bellingham, Washington  "A wee, winsome lassie."  [Image] SARA
MOEN-"NOODLES"  Bellingham, Washington  "Truth is the life of her mind." 
Page Sixty-Two

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[Image] SUSANNAH DEPEW-'SUE"  Bellingham, Washington  "Charms strike the
sight but merit wins the soul."  [Image] ANNA SMITH  Oregon City, Oregon 
"A diamond is thy heart that gleanms  With rays of purest fire."  [Image]
BERYL BATDORF  Portland, Oregon  "A true friend to all."  [Image] ANNA
BELLE  TROMP-"SUNSHINE"  Lynden, Washington  "The woman who deliberates is
not lost."  Page Sixty-Three

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[Image] EMMA HANSEN-"EM"  Bellingham, Washington  "Quality, not quantity." 
[Image] HELGA HAMMER--"SNOOPY"  Bellingham, Washington  "Nothing is
impossible to industry."  [Image] CLARE LOUISE ATCHINSON-"ATCH"  Tacoma,
Washington  "Large is her bounty, and her soul sincere." [Image] MYRTLE
KENNEDY-"MYRT  Bellingham, Washington  'She knows the value of a smile." 
Page Sixty-Four

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[Image] ELINOR ELIZABETH CROPPER--  "NELLIE"  Mount Vernon, Washington  "A
merry heart goes all the way,  Your sad tires in a mile-a."  [Image] RUTH
MARGARET LAWSON-'RUFUS"  Edison, Washington  "In maiden meditation fancy
free.  [Image] NELLIE CARTER-"RATTLER"  LaConner, Washington  "She has a
heart of gold."  [Image] IRENE SCHACHT-"RENE"  Bellingham, Washington "She
is grace itself."  Page Sixty-Five

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[Image] MINNIE MAY CARVER-"FRECKLES"  Bellingham, Washington  "Better than
gold is a thinking mind.  [Image] MARJORIE ARTHUR-"MAJOR"  Vancouver,
Washington  'We love her pleasant smile." [Image] ADELE YOUNG-"DEL" 
Tacoma, Washington  "Frank and simple."  Page Sixty-Six

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[Image] VERNA IRICK-'SKIP"  Oaksdale, Washington  "For she is just the
quiet kind whose natures never vary."  [Image] TRACY V. CLARKE-"TACE" 
Columbus, Ohio  "It was only a glad 'Good morning' As she passed along the
way,  But it spread the morning glory  Over the live long day."  [Image]
MARTHA  SIMPSON-"SIMP"  Kent, Washington  "Staunch friend and true to every
worthy  cause."  Page Sixty- Seven

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JENNIE PIERSON-"JANE"  Priest River, Idaho  "Still water runs deep." 
LUELLA PALMERTON Bellingham, Washington  "Kindness is wisdom."  WALLACE
SUTHERLAND-WALLIE"  Bellingham, Washington  "Where is your likeness, boy?" 
LULU CLARE CRAWSHAW-"LU"  Bellingham, Washington  "Steadfast of thought." 
HAZEL IRENE CRAWSHAW-"HICKS"  Bellingham, Washington  "There's something
exclusive about me."  Page Sixty-Eight

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AGNES COUTURE--"COUTUREY"  Litchfield, Minnesota  "We are sorry we couldn't
get a picture  of you."  MRS. ELLA G. McCULLY  Seattle, Washington  "Thou
hast always been gentle and kind." GLADYS KELLET-"GLAD"  Seattle,
Washington  "Please smile, the camera's waiting."  ISABELLE
WILLIAMS-"HAPPY"  Bellingham, Washington  "Where is that picture."  GRACE
PLUMB  Bellingham, Washington  "Quiet, unruffled, always the same."  Page
Sixty-Nine

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Tacy is both bright and winning  Though her eyes are apt at sinning; 
Aspirations? High and mighty! Though a few you might call flighty.  And
Charlotte-a woman's leader!  Lofty mind--no suffrage squealer! But her
lovely grace and smile  Would you cage them all the while?  These two
maidens, worship pleading,  One Sunday morn to church proceeding  In a row
ahead a handsome face  Dispelled our Tace to have a case.  "A noble face!
chin square! mouth firm!  A man! and silver greyed side-burn!  A collar of
the latest kind!"  The stunner of all Tace's find.  They left the church
without ado  To see where Charming Prince went to.  Alas! Poor Tacey! Fate
is cruel!  To dark the sky and prospects too.  All day she raved about this
case  And Tace was bound her man to trace;  She went to town, to rink, to
show!-  And there she found the man-you know-  A Gypsy singer at the Grand!
! !  Page Seventy

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Juniors  Page Seventy-One

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JUNIORS    Page Seventy-Two

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Juniors  CLASS OFFICERS  President
................................................. GLEN HILL  Secretary and
Treasurer......................... YSABEL PATTON  Vice-President
........................................ HELEN BOUCHER  Sergeant-at-Arms
.................................. ROBERT YODER  COLORs-Cardinal and Gray
CLASS TEACHERS-Miss Sheafer, Mr. Epley.  CLASS YELL  She Bim! - - - - - ---
She Bim!  She Bim, Boom, Bah!  Juniors! Juniors!  Rah! Rah! Rah!  If you
let your memory travel back about nine months you will recall  when we
first entered the Class of 1914. We entered the Normal  School with a
feeling akin to that which we had when we were little  green Freshmen in
our home High School.  Our vim and spirit soon  came to the surface and we
were working  together like Trojans.  Our first venture in the social line
was during the football season,  when we entertained the Everett High
School boys. It was the most  unique affair of the season, carrying out the
idea of a football game  throughout.  Next in line came our character
party, given in Society Hall. The  air fairly breathed of Colonial days,
college spirit and loved characters  of  literature. We almost lived the
days over when we wore blouses  and pinafores.  On the afternoon of March
14, you could have heard a bustle and  stir in the regions of the Music
room. If you had inquired the  cause of  Page Seventy-Three

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this extra energy you would have found out it was simply a preliminary  to
the Junior reception. It was a grand success from beginning  to end. A most
enjoyable program was given in the Auditorium the  first part of the
evening.  After the program we adjourned to the Music room where the
reception  took place. Several members of the Faculty stood in the
receiving  line and assisted us in giving our colleagues and honored 
guests, the Seniors, a hearty welcome. The rooms were  decorated very
effectively with pennants and with fluted crepe  paper in both the Junior
and Senior colors, cardinal and gray and green and yellow. The Normal
colors, blue and white, carried  out the color scheme in the hall. The
potted plants  and palms and cut  flowers put the finishing touches to an
already beautiful arrangement  and made us think of the joys and beauties
of the Springtime. During  the evening we were greatly favored with musical
selections by Mrs.  Deerwester, Mrs. Thatcher and Mr. Trimble.  Of course
we have not forgotten the Junior Jubilee which was given  at the Aftermath
Club House, and the jolly time we had. It was given  in honor of our girls'
champion basketball team.  We are now all looking forward to our picnic on
Cypress Island.  We will charter a boat in the near future and make a day
of it and we  expect one jolly good time.  One of the events of the year
will be our Class plays, which will  be given the latter part of May. The
plays  we decided upon are "An  Interrupted Proposal," by Arlo Bates, and
"How the Vote Was Won,"  by Cicely Hamilton.  "HOW THE VOTE WAS WON." 
Horace Cole ................................................... Arthur
Smith  Ethel, his wife .................................................
Frances Williver  Winnifred, her sister
...................................... Helen Burnham  Agatha Cole
................................................... Frances Riggs  Molly,
Cole's niece ........................................ Dora Polley  Madame
Christine, his distant relation........ Mary Field  Maudie Spark, his first
cousin ...................... Lucy Hawley  Miss Lizzie Wilkins, his aunt
......................... Bertha Holst  Lily, his maid of all work
.............................. Carrie Wesp  Gerald Williams, his neighbor
..................... Lee Merriam  "AN INTERRUPTED PROPOSAL." The following
people will take part:  Mr. Stone ............................ John Arnold 
Mrs. Stone .......................... Hilda Snyder  Helen Stone
....................... Sydnia Caldan  Mr. Howard ........................
Rudolph Knaack  Mr. Tracy ............................ Lois Barker  Mrs.
Ramsey ...................... Gladys Stephens  The Maid
............................ Jessie Hazeltine  After such a happy year of
joy and surprises we cannot help but  sigh when we have to leave it all
behind us this Spring. We shall  always remember the year of 1913 as the
most successful and the happiest  of all our school life. Page
Seventy-Four

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Class Song  TUNE-"I Want to Be In Dixie.."  Oh, have you seen?  Oh, have
you seen?  The Juniors! Classy bunch and pretty keen,  Ne'er losers!  In a
game or team  They're hard to beat, you can see..  I'm glad to be,  I'm
glad to be,  I'm glad to be,  A member of this great and noble multitude; 
Let me tell you the reason is because,  CHORUS  You can't surpass  The
Junior Class,  For its stands without an equal;  It's the liveliest crowd
in all the land  And the way it does surely beats the band.  Our colors
gay, Cardinal and Gray,  We'll stand by them  With gallant daring.  So with
one good rousing cheer we'll end: J--- U-N---, we don't know how to spell
it!  But crix-crax, crix-crax,  Juniors, Juniors, Crackerjacks!  Page
Seventy-Five

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Psalm of the Student Teacher's Life  Tell me not in mournful numbers, 
"Lesson plans are but a dream!" For they keep us from our slumbers  And
"See Me's" are not what they seem.  Plans are real and plans are irksome, 
And the Critic's desk their goal;  "You will flunk if you don't work some,"
 Does not comfort one's poor soul.  Not enjoyment and not pleasure,  Is the
student teacher's way;  But to teach that she may treasure  On her credit
slip an A.  School is long, the pupils fretful,  And tho' we plot and plan
and ponder,  How to make them less forgetful,  Still their thoughts astray
will wander.  In the schoolroom's field of battle,  Before the Supervisor's
eyes,  Don't try to bluff with senseless prattle,  Be pedagogical and 
wise.  Lives of Critics all remind us  We can mend our many faults,  And
departing leave behind us Records in that fire-proof vault;  Records that
future committees,  When they're asked to recommend, Wondering what to say
about us,  Finding shall take heart again.  Let us then be up and training,
 With a heart for calling down,  Still expounding, still explaining,  Learn
to face the Critic's frown.  -- G. H., '13. Page Seventy-Six

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SOPHOMORE  Page Seventy-Seven

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[Image] Sophomores  Page Seventy-Eight

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SOPHOMORES  OFFICERS  President
............................................. LEW GREENE  Vice-President
.................................... ANNA BREUM  Secretary
.............................................. EDITH BROWN Treasurer
............................................. NETTIE RUEGER 
Sergeant-at-Arms ............................... ELIZABETH EGGER 
Rickety-rack, rickety-rack,  Sophomore colors, yellow and black.  CLASS
FLOWER -Blackeyed Susan  CLASS TEACHERS-- Miss Jensen, Mr. Bever  S-O
-F-O--M -O-R-E Normal Sophomores are we.  We can work and we can grin,  We
are the Class that is going to win, Razzle, dazzle, zis, boom, rezz,  We
are the Sophs of the B. N. S.  Although the Sophomore Class is small, still
it is large enough for  our members to have the best of times at social
functions of our own. We proved this at the party given by Elizabeth Eggers
last fall. No  large class could have been entertained at a private home in
that way  and had as glorious a time as we had.  Then February fifteenth we
gave a valentine party for the Freshman  Class, and we are sure that the
Freshies can vouch for the good  time they had. Thanks to Miss Jensen's
untiring zeal the party was a  perfect success.  Still a small class has
its drawbacks. Only six or seven girls turned  out for basketball practice,
Brown, Breum, Eggers, Westerlund, Ericson,  and Pickens, and as we were
unfortunate enough to get Friday  Page Seventy-Nine

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 80

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night, which is proverbially an unlucky night, for practice, when several 
of the girls had to be out of town, the result was that the team did  not
come up to the standard. As Edith Brown sprained her ankle twice while
practicing, two new girls, Belle Sturgill and Alma Moe, played  in the
final games. But never mind, next year we will be Juniors, and  we hope to
win prestige in that Class. At least we know that Elizabeth Eggers will
star in the Junior team, for when she takes a notion to sit  on the ball
nobody will dare to take it away from her.  The Sophomores are a
wide-a-wake Class. Perhaps if we did not  say this ourselves nobody else
would, but there is hardly a member  that does not belong to some
organization or other in school and many  hold positions of prominence.
There is Lew Greene; besides being our  own chief executive, he is also
Vice-President of the "Students' Association"  and President of the
Philomathean Society. Marie Reese is  the Secretary of the latter
organization and other members that belong  are: Miss Jensen, Miss
Westerlund, Miss Brown, Mr. Stevenson, Mr.  Owen and Mr. King. Anna Breum,
Blanche Barrett and Alma Moe belong  to the Alkisiah Club; Mr. Sloane to
the Thespians; Hazel Baker to the  H. L. S.  In the late Declamation
Contest Lew Greene and Jean Hinds took  part, and although they did not
carry off any laurels, we love them all  the same.  Many of the members
have shown their loyalty for the Class, although  they really belong to the
upper classes. Miss Westerlund became  a Senior last semester and the
Misses Brown, Breum and Hinds  are Juniors. We thank those young ladies for
staying  with us and helping  to make this year a successful one.  ~L 9 
Page Eighty

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FRESHMAN  PageEighty-Orne

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 82

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[Image] FRESHMAN CLASS    Page Eighty-Two

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 83

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Freshman    CLASS TEACHERS-Miss La Verne Knowles, Mr. H. C. Philippi  CLASS
COLORS--Red and Black CLASS FLOWER-Red Rose  CLASS YELL  Rah, rah,
rah,--rah, rah, rah, Freshmen!  Rah, rah, rah,-rah, rah, rah, Freshmen! 
Rah, rah, rah,--rah, rah, rah, Freshmen!  Rah, rah, rah,-rah, rah, rah,
Freshmen!  MOTTO-To make every day a preparation for the morrow  OFFICERS 
President ........................ I.B. SMITH  Vice-President
............... MADELINE NICOL  Secretary-Treasurer ....... IRMA WRIGHT 
Sergeant-at-Arms ......... J.C. INGMAN  The Freshman Class has shown a
great deal of life and class spirit  during the school year.  Despite the
fact that the Class is composed mostly of special students we have done a
great deal in a social way. We have held in all three parties: Our Class
Acquaintance party, a party to the Freshmen and their friends, and a
conciliation party given to the Freshman  and Sophomore teams on the night
of the game  The Sophomore Class held a "Saint Valentine's" party in honor
of  the Freshman Class the fifteenth of February, which was enjoyed by 
thirty- four Freshmen. Cupid games wer ethe events of the evening. At 
present we are planning a launch party to be given in honor of the 
Sophomores, and to be held in the near future.  From these events you will
perceive that the year has been a most  eventful and pleasant one for all
Freshmen, and I am sure the Class  of '16 will look back to their Freshman
year with only pleasant memories.  'Twas a morning in sunny September  When
we entered the Normal school,  They quizzed us and gave us a program,  Some
 class to these programs, I ween,  For they grouped all the live ones
together  And labeled them "Freshmen '16."-I. B. S., '16.  Page
Eighty-Three

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 84

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[Image] TENTH GRADE    Page Eighty-Four

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 85

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Tenth Grade  OFFICERS  President ..........................................
PAUL THOMPSON  Secretary .......................................... WINNIE
LEWIS   Treasurer ......................................... TOM ALLISON
MOTTO-"Try not, or accomplish."  Since the organization of the High School
four years ago, our Class has had a steady increase both in numbers and
that quality known as  ability. At the beginning of the school year
1911-12, our enrollment  was seventeen; we now county forty-two at our
Class meetings. Last year we ventured to present our first play. It was so
successful that we have decided to put on a better one this year. It will
be  given May 16. The cast of characters is unusually strong and we fully
expect to give something that compares favorably with the productions  of
the Normal classes proper. Watch the date, May 16, and be sure  not to have
some other engagement that interferes with your support  of this, the best
play presented in the Normal this year.  We near the completion of the
Tenth Grade with genuine regret.  Since there is no Eleventh Grade in the
Training School, we are soon to  sever  relations with the Normal High. We
hope our successors will  steadily continue to advance the interests and
uphold the good name  of the Normal High School.  Some one has said of
them, "Now, we may notice China; but after  a while we must." May we
suggest, "Now, you may notice the Tenth  Grade, but after a while you
must"?  Page Eighty-Five

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 86

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[Image] NINTH GRADE  Page Eighty-Six

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 87

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OFFICERS  President ............................................. PHILIP
MONTAG  Secretary ............................................. MILES
BURPEE  Treasurer ............................................. KATIE LOUGH
 During the year the Ninth Grade has shown that age is not the only  thing
that counts. While we can easily show a lower average of years,  both in
respect to age and time spent in school, we are not making this  an excuse
for inactivity.  We have furnished our share of the Normal High Basketball
team. This team was beaten in but one contest during the season and on that
 occasion so frightened their opponents that they refused to allow us a 
return game. We are represented on the Normal baseball team  and  expect to
make our influence felt there too.  A year ago this spring we won first
place in the Chuckanut Marathon  and our showing this spring will be
equally good. We are not  staking our reputation  wholly upon our athletic
record. In the Class  room, the literary society, the
laboratory,-everywhere-our work is  the very best we can make it.  Who
gives the best recitations? Who always knows the answer to every question?
Who solves all the hard problems? The Ninth  Grade, to be sure.  Only by
consistent effort and continued reliance upon hard work  can we maintain
this position. Look out for the Ninth Grade,- we are  bound to let you know
we are in the institution.  Page Eighty-Seven

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SOCIETIES   Page Eighty-Eight

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 89

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[Image] Y.W.C.A. CABINET    Page Eighty-Nine

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 90

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Y.W.C.A. This year the Young Women's Christian Association of the Normal 
School passed the goal of two hundred members. The Chairman of the 
Membership Committee was a hustler and she, with her committee,  made a
complete canvass of the School. As a result wc have had two  hundred seven
members during the year.  The work of the Association girls began even
before school opened.  Some of them arrived two days in advance and were
busy every minute.  Do you remember the first day you came to Bellingham?
Those  were Y. W. C. A. girls that met you at the train and helped you
safely  through the first of the "five formal steps" in your Normal lesson
plan-the  step into Miss Gray's office.  The next pleasure the Association
girls had was the delivering of  bouquets to all the new girls. Many a
homesick girl was cheered by  this little remembrance.  The devotional
meetings of the year began with a vesper service  the first Sunday
afternoon. They were held regularly during the year  at 4:10 on Thursdays.
The girls who have attended most of these meetings  tell of the inspiration
and help they received. We have had many  interesting speakers, among whom
were Dr. and Mrs. Mylrae, Miss  Fox, Miss Hillis, Mrs. Jones, Miss Fuller,
Miss Tingley and Dr. Gordon,  besides members of the Faculty. Then the
meetings conducted by the  girls were so good! One we all enjoyed was the
conference meeting  in charge of the three cabinet girls who were at
Gearhart last summer.  I'm sure many of us felt after hearing their talks
that we wanted to go  next time.  During November the World's Week of
Prayer for Missions was conducted under auspices of the Missionary Chairman
Period. Miss  Hawthorne, of Tacoma, gave the closing address and her talk
on the  mountain people of the South will long be remembered by those who 
heard it.  One of the most enjoyable social affairs of the year was the
membership  banquet, at Edens Hall, Nov. 22. Miss Abbie Johnson, formerly 
a President of our association, made a charming toastmistress. Miss 
Worden's poem delighted us all. The allusion to the "Five Formal  Steps"
used in the  opening paragraph of this article was borrowed from  Miss De
Long's toast. Especially interesting to the girls present who  had been in
the Bellingham Normal for more than one year was Miss  Wilson's "Memories"
of former association girls.  In February we held our Sixth Annual Bible
Institute. We were fortunate this year in having four splendid Bible
teachers with us: Mrs.  Staat, for many years a worker in the China Inland
Mission; Mrs. C.  H. Black, of Seattle; Mrs. Beattie of Bellingham; and one
who has come  Page Ninety

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to be an absolute necessity to our institute, Mrs. J. A. Campbell, of
Seattle.  Mrs. Campbell's lessons on the Book of Revelations were
enthusiastically  attended. The power of prayer was deeply impressed upon 
our hearts by the testimony of the lives of these noble women. Mrs.  Staat
told us how the work of the China Inland Mission is supported  entirely by
prayer.  ELECTED OFFICERS  President ....................................
RUTH DERIFIELD  Vice-President ........................... NELLIE GIBSON
Secretary .................................... ALIENE PIERCE  Treasurer
.................................... ETHEL PATTEN  COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN
APPOINTED  Devotional ................................................
PAULINE PAULSON  Temperance .............................................
LENORE THOMAS  Missionary ................................................
CLARICE HENRY  Bible Study ................................................
DORA REIPMA  Extension ...................................................
LAURA DERINGER  Publicity
.................................................... MYRTLE PARKER 
Cafeteria .................................................... PEARL
LENHERR  One of the very successful departments of the Association this
year  has been the Cafeteria. It has furnished a nutritious and appetizing 
lunch to the members of the school and at the same time has provided  for
the finances of the Association. Under the supervision of Miss Lawrence 
and  a competent Chairman of this committe have received helpful  training.
This is proved by the fact that the new Chairman has  been a member of the
Cafeteria Committee all year and now is well able  to carry on the work of
the cafeteria.  Besides planning the Bible Institute mentioned above, the
Bible  Study Committee have organized thirteen Bible classes during the
year.  These have been taught by Faculty members or by Bible teachers
living  near the Normal. John's Gospel, the Life of Christ, Life and
Epistles of Paul, and the Old Testament have been the topics of study.  The
Publicity Committee has done good work this year. Besides  providing
posters for the meetings they have carried on correspondence  with a number
of the Normal Schools and Colleges of the Northwest.  One of the Thursday
meetings was devoted to the messages from other  schools and from these
letters we got an idea of the work of the Y. W.  C. A. in our sister
schools.  The Cabinet Conference was held in Tacoma this spring and as a
number of the Cabinet could not attend, the retiring President, with  Miss
Sperry's aid, planned a one-day conference to be held in the Normal 
School. On April 15th, at nine o'clock, the program began with a Bible
lesson. The Secretary of the city Y. W. C. A. gave us a survey of  the
National work. This was followed by a discussion of the work of  the
departments of our Association. At noon a luncheon was served to  all
attending, at the close of which toasts on the Summer conference  were
given. The meeting was well attended and was voted a great success.  We
feel that we have been indeed fortunate this year in having for  our
President, Miss Scheidemantel. She has shown herself very capable  in
managing the executive affairs of a society and untiring in devotion  to
the work of the Master. She, with a most helpful advisory Board,  has been
able to make the work of the Association a real joy.  Page Ninety-One

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ALKISIAH  Page Ninety-Two

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Alkisiah  The Club work started in September with five or six members from 
the preceding year but with as many more older ones. These latter  added
much to the power of the Club by bringing back new ideas.  The  task of
filling the Club membership was pushed steadily on until the  roll was
full.  There has been no attempt to take up any certain line of study this 
year as has been the custom of previous years. However, we have had 
several programs of sociological interest. Among these were "Pure  Food,"
"The Strikes," in which the present "Shirt Waist Strike" was  discussed,
and the talks given at our open meeting on "Mothers' Pensions,"  "Juvenile
Courts" and "Prison Reforms."  Although we had several other  heavy
programs, our work has given  much pleasure and many enjoyable evenings.
Among our lighter programs  was "Vacation Rambles." We will always remember
the trials  and funny stories as described by Misses Lucetta MacKechnie,
Hogle  and Dawson. Another evening we followed Mrs. Ella Higginson in her 
trip through "Alaska." Our "February Program" initiated us into the 
secrets of some great men and women, among whom were Longfellow,  Lowell,
Washington, Lincoln and Susan B. Anthony. We always enjoy  Miss Baker's
talks and her report on Miss Anthony's life that evening  left a lasting
impression. Our  musical program was assisted very  materially by the
Victor machine.  Every year the Underclassmen of the Society entertains the
Senior  members at a banquet. This year that most enjoyable affair took 
place April 24th. After the more material side the rest of the evening  was
spent in toasts and songs. We recommend Clarice Henry to anyone  needing a
capable and charming toastmistress in the future.  One year the Club took
up the study of the legends of the Holy  Grail. As a result the Club
possesses a Copley print of "The Oath of  Knighthood," one of Abbey's mural
paintings, illustrating the Holy  Page Ninety-Three

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Grail. The Bulb Sale which took place in December, 1912, was for the 
purpose of raising enough money to frame this picture. It will be hung  in
the building temporarily awaiting an "Alkasiah Room," which latter  we hope
may be realized at an early date.  Not the least part of the work of the
second semester was the  ful-filling  of our promise to the Students'
Association last year; namely,  the Alkisiah pennant.  Through the
influence of our President, Minnie Carver, we obtained  permission to enjoy
a Saturday and Sunday at  Ravenswood Camp, at  Lake Whatcom. Once more,
upon this occasion, we were thankful  that our membership is limited to
girls. Weenies, baked potatoes, coffee  and accessories disappear rapidly
at such a time, as you all know.  The long tramps and the night spent in
the open brought all back with fresh minds and bodies. Miss Baker, of
course, was chaperon.  It is, indeed, owing to our second semester
officers, that the business  of the Club has been so well finished. They
are:  President ............................................ MINNIE CARVER 
Vice-President ................................... GRACE MCKECHNIE 
Secretary-Treasurer ........................... RUTH BIRKS  Chairman Consul
.............................. LOUISE ATCHISON  I need not write at length
on the "homey" times enjoyed around  Miss Baker's fireside during this
year. Here have been formed many  strong and, we hope, lasting 
friendships.  Page Ninety-Four

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THESPIAN  Page Ninety-Five

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OFFICERS  President ................................ RUTH DEREFIELD 
Vice-President ....................... HELEN  BOUCHER  Secretary
................................. DORA POLLEY  Treasurer
................................. BELLE  STURGILL  Business Manager
.................. HELEN RATHBUN  Literary Reporter .....................
BELVA  WATERS  Sergeant-at-Arms ................... CLARENCE DAHLQUIST 
Honorary Members ................ MISS HAYS, MRS. SMITH,  MRS. McCULLY  The
highest of all arts is the art of expression; true expression of  the soul
in its varying moods. This may be expressed through music,  but best
through that most perfect music, the music of the human  voice, and through
the greatest charm, the charm of personality.  This is the aim of the
Thespian Dramatic Club.  The Club was formed at the opening of the school
year, and besides  purely dramatic work, it has included in its study,
music, essays and  the lives and art of the present day actors and
actresses.  On February 28th the Club presented its first public program,
consisting  of two short one-act farces, "In the Teeth of the Gift Horse," 
and "Her Decision." "In the Teeth of the Gift Horse" is one of Arnold 
Bennett's charming plays, and "Her Decision" is by Margaret  Cameron,  a
delightful playwright.  CAST OF CHARACTERS  "IN THE TEETH OF THE GIFT
HORSE." Dick Butler ............................................. CLARENCE
DAHLQUIST  Florence Butler, his wife ...................... YSABEL PATTON 
Henrietta Williams, his aunt ................ JESSIE HAZELINE  Page
Ninety-Six

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Delvin Blake ................................... DAN HALL   Ann
Fisher...................................... HELEN BOUCHER  Katie, the maid
............................. EVELYN WARD  "HER DECISION."  James Brett, a
clerk in the war office, 33.......................... ARTHUR SMITH  Gerald
O'Mara, a civil engineer, 24................................... ELMER RILEY
   Rosamund Fife, a spinster and lecturer on cookery....... GRACE BARNES 
These two plays proved very successful and the Club decided to present them
at Friday Harbor. March 21, at 8:30 A. M., the Club, chaperoned by Miss
Hays, Miss Brown, Miss Sheafer and Mrs. Termaat, embarked on the San Juan
II. for Friday Harbor. A big Thespian penpant  floated from the main truck
of the launch. The day was perfect  and after cruising about among the many
islands the launch landed at 3:30 P. M. A most appetizing and satisfying
lunch was served cafeteria style in Rebekah  Hall by the chaperons. The
remainder of the after- noon was spent in "seeing the town," and in some
clever work at staging.  In spite of the meagre staging resources the plays
were well given. The return trip began at 11:30 P. M., and was consequently
made by moonlight.  The second social gathering was held at Miss Hays'
cabin on Lake Whatcom, April 17. A delightful picnic supper was served near
the lake shore, where a beautiful view of the scenery was enjoyed. After 
the supper the Club adjourned to Miss Hays' cabin, where a short program 
was rendered and where the remainder of the evening was happily spent.    A
College play of three acts, "The 'Varsity Coach," was presented  the last
week in May.  CAST OF CHARACTERS  Robert Selby, assistant coach of 'Varsity
crew...................... CLARENCE DAHLQUIST  Mousie Kent, a grind
................................................................ CARLETON
TRIMBLE   Howard Dixon, college boy
..................................................... GLENN HILL   Dick
Elsworth, member of crew...............................................
ELMER RILEY  Chester Allen, college boy
....................................................... SAM KELLEY  Ruth
Moore, sweet college girl ...............................................
HELEN RATHBUN  M rs. M oore, Ruth's aunt
........................................................ RUTH DEREFIELD 
Serena Selby, Robert's aunt
..................................................... GRACE UHL  Ethel
Lynn, college girl
............................................................. JOSEPHINE
LOVELY  Daisy Doane, fashionable boarding school girl ....................
BELLE STURGILL  A number of the Club members will be back next year to
carry for- ward, with the help of new members, the work so earnestly begun.
 Before closing, the Club wishes here to express its gratitude and thanks
to Mrs. Smith for the excellent training she has given; and especially to
Miss Hays for the interest she has taken, the invaluable help she has
given, and to the inspiration she has always been in all the work.  Page
Ninety-Seven

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Philomathean  BSNS 1909    Page Ninety-Eight

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Philomathean Literary Society    OFFICERS  President
.................................................................... LEW
GREENE  Vice-President
........................................................... VIOLA HOPKINS 
Secretary- Treasurer ..................................................
MARIE REESE  Sergeant-at-Arms
..................................................... RUDOLPH KNAACK 
Attorney
..................................................................... JOHN
KAUP    The Philomathean Society, which passed  its third milestone,
November  22, 1913, by giving one of its unique parties, including and a
program, games has entered its fourth year with a membership of forty,  and
with promise of a still greater future.  It  is with pride that we note the
success of former Philos. We also have the assurance that the present
members will be a credit to the organization-  for are they not even now
winning laurels, with Viola Hopkins as winner of the first declamatory
prize, Maimee Davis chosen by  the Faculty as the Senior representative to
appear on the Commence- ment program, Anna Brown as Editor-in-Chief of the
Senior Annual, and with Messrs. Greene and Olson as members of the Student
Board of Control.  Early in the year the Society amended its constitution
by adopting the Recall and Direct Primary. The latter became so popular
that it was later adopted by the Students' Association.  The social side of
our activities has furnished much enjoyment,  with spreads following
several programs, two mysterious initiations,  the May "stunt," a beach
party and the famous birthday party. The work for the year has been
instructive as well as entertaining.  Much ability was been gained in
parliamentary drill, debate, dis-  Page Ninety-Nine

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cussions, talks and much pleasure derived from the contributions from  our
musicians and elocutionists. The Philos gave the first public program  of
the year which showed what the society does at its regular programs. Every
program has been carefully planned, prepared and  executed. Among those
rendered were a College program, Spelling  Convention, Patriotic meeting,
May Day parade and Philomathean Phonograph.  +  EXTRACTS FROM THE PHILO
PHONOGRAPH.  EDITORIALS.  A word of Greeting: The  Philos hope when this
paper goes out to  its readers, it will carry with it a breath of school
life, and a little  of  the fraternal spirit of the Philos. All the events
of interest will be recorded,  and all matters of grave importance will be
duly considered in  its pages.  +  HIGH COST OF LIVING.  We propose a
simple remedy for the problem of high cost of living.  We give Horace
Greeley's well-known advice: "Go forth, young man,  and seek a wife; when
you have found her, marry her and go live  with your father-in-law." GREAT
CALAMITY IMPENDING.  Many other weighty problems such as the trusts,
tariff, Mexico,  are agitating the public mind at present, but these evils
are as nothing  compared with the terrible calamity that is about to befall
our Normal  Old Normalites, George Washington and Julius Coesar would turn
in their graves if they knew of this awful possibility. Yea! There shall 
be tearing of hair and gnashing of teeth throughout this broad, beautiful 
Normal world, if this catastrophe be not averted. The handwriting  is on
the wall! Therefore arise in your strength and ward off this terrible 
disaster. For if you do not awake, if you  will not heed the prophet's 
warning voice,-Lake Mathes will surely dry up.  SPORTING PAGE.  Senor
Watkins, our famous "toreador," has just returned from a  series of
successful engagements in Mexico. +  LINE-UP FOR THE PHILO BASEBALL TEAM. 
Batsdorf, catcher; Schiedemantel, pitcher; Westerlund,  first base; 
Patten, second base; Baker, third base; Hopkins, short stop; Reese, 
fielder; Biver, fielder; Evanson, fielder; Schumacher, substitute; De 
Long, substitute.  The team feels sure of success with an attractive mascot
like our  little Rudolph.  Page One Hundred

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 101

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TRACK.  Lundberg and Suffle will be sure to pull down the 50 and 100-yard 
dashes.  When Greene has developed his wind and lengthened his stride  he
will crowd Layton for first place in the mile.  So far, in practicing for
the Marathon, Mr. Kaup has used a motorcycle  to keep him in sight of E.
Thomas.  King and Halsey are regular Greeks when it comes to throwing the 
discus. At last practice no attempt was made to measure the throws,  as we
had no donkey engine to handle the tape reel.  Owen and O'Brien will do the
hurdling.  +  CREW.  Coach Jensen says: "Our prospects for crew are great,
if we can  get Dad Rindal to hollow out a cedar log for us. We have
splendid material  with Mellish, Suffle, Hopkins, Patten, Nevins, Owens and
Watkins,  with Philippi as coxswain. They have been practicing with a fir
plank, which has proven something of a hindrance when it comes to  speed. 
+  CLASSIFIED ADS.  Lost- An A No. 1, strong, manly heart. C. H., care O.
A. C.  Wanted.-A trip to Spokane. B. B.  Wanted- Forestry specimens. H. N.
M.  Wanted.-Someone to help spend my First Prize in Declamation.  V. H.
Found.-If the C. H. who advertised a lost heart will call at Tarte  Hall he
may recover the same. A. B. Lost.-A pumpkin pie. Baker.  For Sale.--H. C.
Philippi's latest book, "How to be Happy, Though  Married."  Notice-John
Kaup takes this means of announcing to the public  his intention of
organizing a singing class. His prices will be reduced  for Normal
students. His methods are dramatic. He has often demon- strated  his
extraordinary vocal powers and his wonderful range of  voice. Nothing like
him on the "sound."  Now is your opportunity to  "grasp time by the
forelock."  "Was its los mit den Philos?  Nicht ist los mit den Philos. 
Mit wemn ist nichts los?  Mit den Philos.  Mit wem? Mit den Philos?  Page
One Hundred One

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 102

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H.L.S.  Page One Hundred Two

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 103

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H.L.S.  The Hays' Literary Society numbers about thirty members with  three
members of the Faculty as honorary members.  The work of the year 1912-13
has been a year of profit and pleasure  to all members. The meetings are
held the first and third Thursdays  of each month. Many very excellent
programs have been enjoyed  during the year among which were a Longfellow
program given on  February 28th, and "An Evening With Great Women" on March
27th.  On the 13th of March a very pleasing darkey program was given as a 
preparation for the coming of Booker T. Washington. These programs  have
consisted of readings, musical numbers and talks upon  questions of the
day. One feature of our work has been a study of the  life and work of the
men who have come to us in the lecture course.  This Society always finds
time to spend an evening at Miss Hay's  cabin, where a part of the
evening's program is always toasting weenies  and marshmallows.  At the
Christmas season the Faculty room, decorated with holly and mistletoe, was
the scene of a delightful program suitable for the  season.  The public
program of the Society was given Friday morning,  April 25th, in the
Auditorium. The program consisted of musical numbers, and the play, "The
Hour Glass," by W. B. Yeats. This Irish  drama was thoroughly appreciated
by all.  An evening of music on May 8th at the home of Miss Hays is to  be
one of the joyous occasions of the year.  On May 9th the first banquet of
the H. L. S. was given. We had  as our guests members of the Faculty and
friends.  As we disband for the year we think of the many pleasant days  we
have had together and wish the H. L. S. of 1913-14 a most prosperous  year.
 Page One Hundred Three

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 104

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CAST OF THE HOUR GLASS."  Wiseman
................................................. LOUISE FIELD  Fool
.......................................................... ANNA TROMP  
Angel ....................................................... BLANCHE
KNIGHT  The Wife .................................................. BERTHA
HOLST  Two Children ......................................... FRANCES
RIGGS, NELLIE CROPPER  Students-
................................................. GLADYS KELLETT, CARRIE
WESP, HAZEL BAKER,  HELEN BURNHAM, GENEVIEVE GRAYNOLDS, LAURA DERINGER 
OFFICERS OF THE CLUB  President ............................... MARION
JOHNSON  Vice-President ...................... ANNA SMITH  Treasurer
............................... HELEN BURNHAM  Secretary
............................... IRENE SCHAACHT  + + [Image] MEMBERS KAMANO
CLUB  Page One Hundred Four

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 105

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Swastika    OFFICERS  President ............................. CHESTER
MCCALL  Secretary ............................. FRANCES ASTELS  Treasurer
............................. HENRY HEFTY  The immediate object of our
Society is to train the boys to speak  with ease and precision. Wherever
one goes these days he meets with  people who lack ability to express their
thoughts clearly and forcibly.  The business and professional world need
men that know how to present  their ideas in a manner that carries weight
and results in conviction.  A man with ideas but without effective
expression is like a ship  without a rudder,--he may move in practically
any direction, varying  perhaps, with each veering mental impulse, but  he
never gets anywhere.  We want to overcome our limitations in the use of our
mother  tongue hence we  have our programs specifically -adapted to
accomplish  this end. It is astonishing how quickly the boys have overcome
their  diffidence. There isn't a fellow in the Society but can get up and
entertain  us half an hour and make every minute count. This practice  is
rapidly preparing us to become effective speakers. There are some in our
ranks who clearly have the capacity to grow  into orators, and we expect
that they will some day make their mark  in the world of eloquence.  Page
One Hundred Five

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 106

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Delphian Literary Society    OFFICERS FOR THE FIRST SEMESTER  President
............................................................ LULU PIKE 
Vice-President ..................................................  MYRTLE
NESLUND  Secretary
........................................................... ANN DORR 
Treasurer ........................................................... CORA
MCM ILLAN  OFFICERS FOR THE SECOND SEMESTER  President
..................................................... ROSE MARTIN 
Vice-President ............................................ CORA MCMILLAN 
Secretary ..................................................... WINNIE
LEWIS  Treasurer .....................................................
NELLIE HESS  MOTTO-More Light COLORS-Old Rose and Cream  Two school years
of existence have brought the Delphian Literary Society to the place where
it can walk alone, and talk in the language  of its elders with
considerable ease. Since its birth in October, 1911,  it has grown with the
growth of the High School, increasing rapidly  in  stature and
independence. Not to any one person, but to the faithfulness  of its
officers and the loyal spirit of its members is this development  due. 
Every Thursday at ten o'clock a meeting is held for half an  hour, 
literary programs alternating with business meetings. On the latter 
occasions, the girls receive good practice from parliamentary drill and 
have now reached the stage where they have successfully represented  the
august members of the Faculty. If some of the measures which  have been
adopted in parliamentary drill were carried out, we should  have an
entrance to Society Hall through the roof and perhaps a new  carpet for the
Study Hall.  Although the most striking trait of all the Delphians is their
remarkably  intelligent expression-thus distinguishing them from the 
ordinary "Beastie,"- they may be further identified by a peculiar marking: 
a small, silver triangle, worn on the left side of the blouse.  Page One
Hundred Six

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Part Two  Page One Hundred Seven

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 108

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[no text this page]

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 109

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LITERARY    Page One Hundred Nine

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 110

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Editorial  Our Annual comes out under a new name this year: "KLIPSUN,"  the
Indian name, meaning sunset; and we trust that the name will help  to call
more attention to our beautiful sunsets. Don't get so absorbed  in your
School work that you can't look out of the window for a moment  to catch a
glimpse of sunsets, the bay and the mountains.  Are you one of the students
who have been in School all year and done nothing for Class or School? Just
pure knowledge is a good thing,  but the ability to get on your feet and
talk, that a literary society gives  you; the companionship and good
feeling that meet you when you do  your duty by your Class; the training in
working with other people that  comes from participation in athletics; the
enjoyment for yourself and  others that is derived from membership in a
musical club,-are these  not worth a great deal, too?  We are glad to note
that our Normal is growing so rapidly that  several  members have been
added to the Faculty this year and we believe  that the School Spirit is
becoming better in proportion to the  growth. Class Spirit and competition
are mighty fine things to have  in a School, especially if the rivalry does
not degenerate into jealousy.  Just one word more: Before we part let's
forget any knocking or  criticism we have indulged in this year and start
being "square" instead. "Smile and the world smiles with you,  Knock and
you go it alone;  For a cheery grin will let you in, Where the knocker is
never known."  Page One Hundred Ten

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 111

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Settling Mr. Martin  "I always use the whites o' 'leven eggs," announced
Mrs. Andrews  decisively.  The Ladies' Aid gasped politely.  "My, that's a
lot o' eggs for one cake,, ain't it?" said Mrs. Hall. "I  never use more'n
nine."  "Well, I've always said that anybody that used less'n 'leven eggs 
in that kind of cake was purty close."  "Maybe they didn't have 'em to
use," put in little Mrs. Gray gently.  "Well, then; they hadn't better try
to make angel cake," snapped  Mrs. Andrews, as she bit off another length
of thread and thrust it savagely  into the needle. "They'd better do like
the man the minister  was tellin'. about last Sunday. Say, did you notice
that button on the  back of his coat? It was just a hangin' by one thread.
I thought I'd die o' mortification. That man needs a wife if ever anybody
did!"  "Well, I should say he does," added Mrs. Davenport. "I'll bet that 
was the last clean handkerchief he had. If he's goin' to stay here in 
Hartville he's got to have somebody to look after him."  "Who would it be?"
asked Mrs. Hall. "There isn't- "  "Yes, there is!" interrupted Mrs.
Andrews. "There's Hannah  Draper that lives over by Morton, would be just
the one for  him. She's  not very good lookin', that's true, but she
certainly can cook and sew.  She's made three 'Log  Cabins' since last
Christmas."  "Maybe Mr. Martin would like to have something to say about
it," suggested Mrs. Gray.  "Well, if he don't know a good thing like Hannah
Draper when he  sees it, this ain't no place for him," Mrs. Andrews
announced with decision.  "Let's make it business-like though. Is there a 
motion?"  But before the motion could be given there was a hasty scramble 
on the back porch; the door flew open, and the Andrews twins burst in. 
"Maw, we're hungry!" they announced.  Mrs. Andrews was plainly annoyed. She
prided herself upon the  rigid control which she was said to exercise over
her children. "Stand  right there by the door," she commanded, and then
went on: "Let's  hear your motion, Mrs. Davenport."  The "aye" which
followed it was almost unanimous. Little Mrs.  Gray was the only dissenting
voice.  The twins stood through the vote and its discussion in bored
solemnity.  At this moment their chief concern in life lay in a
freshly-baked  loaf of bread, a golden pat of butter, and a crimson glass
of jelly  on the third shelf.  "Now you can go, boys," their mother said
leniently. "There's some fresh bread in the kitchen, an' a pitcher o' milk
in the pantry."  "My, how well trained your children are," said Mrs. Blake,
after  they had gone out.  "Yes," smiled Mrs. Andrews, "It's all in
beginnin' right. I've  always  made 'em toe the mark an' they know they
have to."  In the kitchen the twins were tasting the sweetness of forbidden
 fruit. "Say," said Bobby, as he bit down into a quivering lump of jelly, 
"What was them women talkin' about anyway?"  "Sounded like they's talkin'
'bout the minister and that Hannah Draper that lives over by Morton,"
mumbled Billy. "Gee! " he added  manfully, "I'd like to see 'em push
anybody off onto me that way. An'  Page One Hundred Eleven

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Maw's goin' to ask 'em here for dinner next Sunday. I see where we  go easy
on the Brown Betty."  "Say,"  volunteered Bobby. (Bobby's thoughts were
usually gems  when they came, painfully slow though they were, and always
prefaced  by "Say.") "Say, I'll bet the minister 'ud like to know about
that. Le's  write 'n' say we got some valu'ble infermation that we'll trade
for them  two white rabbits of his. I know where I can trade two rabbits
fer a  guinea pig, 'n' Tommy said he'd give us a third interest in his goat
fer  another guinea pig."  Thus it was that among the next morning's mail
for the Rev. Edward  Martin was a very grimy  note, which read:  "Mr.
Edward Martin,  Preacher at the Pres. church.  ......Dear Sir:-We know some
valubul infermation about you  which we will trade fer them two white
rabbits of yours. Is it  a go? respectfuly yours  (SIGNED) Robert Andrews, 
William Andrews.  And so it happened that late the next afternoon the twins
walked  down the minister's neat gravel walk, each carrying a rabbit in his
 arms, while  the minister sat limply in his chair, trying to entangle
himself  from the maze of Ladies' Aid, Hannah Draper and Sunday dinner. 
"Merciful Heavens!" he said, to Mercury on the mantel; "I've got  to be
engaged to somebody before next Sunday or lose my chance. And  I've got to
make good; that's all there is to it! It all depends on next  Sunday, and
if the Ladies' Aid is down on me I might as well- . I  might say it was
Mrs. Adams, but ministers don't usually marry deaf  old housekeepers. But,"
he added in desperation, "I've got to produce  a fiancee between now and
Sunday." Then as a happy thought struck him-"I'll write to Aunt Matilda.
She'll know what to do!"  When Miss Matilda tore open and read the letter
she did not ap-pear  surprised. That was not Miss Matilda's way. For twenty
years  this nephew had been  writing his troubles to her and always she had
 proven equal to the occasion. This was only one of the many, so she  sat
down at once and wrote an answer; short, crisp, and characteristic  to the
letter.  "My Dear Ned," it ran, "I really credited you with more  brains.
Why didn't you ask me to come on a visit? But  since you didn't, I'll
invite myself. All you need to do is to  meet me with a great deal of
tenderness, fatherly tenderness,-  any kind, just so it's effusive, and if
I'm not very wrong, Hart-ville  will do the rest. I shall come Thursday on
the four  o'clock train.  "Your loving aunt,  "Matilda."  For just a
fraction of a second the Rev. Mr. Martin looked puzzled,  then a great
light broke over his face. "Aunt Matilda," he said  with  emphasis, "you're
a brick!"  When the four o'clock train pulled in to Hartville, the usual
crowd  of loafers was present to witness any excitement. Not that there had
ever  been any excitement, but there was always the possibility. The
post-master  stood in the doorway, leaning heavily against one side. The
agent, fully realizing his importance, stood a little in advance of the 
others, a pencil over one ear, 'and the  mail sack thrown carelessly over 
Page One Hundred Twelve

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his shoulder, as though he were not fully aware that Mrs. Andrews'  order
for $2.48 worth of goods from the city was contained therein.  The only
outsiders were the minister, who stood eagerly scanning  every window, and
little Mabel Andrews with a basket of eggs which  she was to exchange at
the store.  There was only one passenger to alight,-a little, young-old
lady,  with bright eyes and faintly flushed cheeks, who looked neither to
the  right or left but ran across the platform straight into the arms of
the  minister of the Hartville Presbyterian Church.  "Ned, dear," she said
very distinctly, knowing well that there were seven pairs of ears cocked to
hear every word, "I've just been dying to  see you!"  Little Mabel Andrews
had been all ears and eyes; and without waiting  for more, she rushed for
home, as fast as her chubby little legs and  the basket of eggs would
allow.  "Maw," she shrieked, as she neared the kitchen. "Maw, he kissed 
her right there on the platform, with everybody a-lookin' on!"  "Who kissed
who?" inquired Mrs. Andrews excitedly.  "The minister!" gasped Mabel. 
"Well, who did he kiss?"  "A lady that got off the train.  She run right up
to him an' he  grabbed her 'n' kissed her three times, 'n' she had purple
flowers on her hat, 'n' once on each cheek, 'n' once on her forehead, 'n'
she called him  'Ned, dear,' 'n' he took her valise, 'n' never looked at
me. 'N' here they  come now!"  "Good land!" gasped her mother, her voice
pitched three  keys  higher than usual. "I'll run over an' tell Mrs. Hall.
We can see 'em  from her front window. Mabel, if that bread gets too warm
on one  side you turn it 'round." But Mabel, who was her mother's own
daughter, was already at the window.  When Miss Matilda went past she was
smiling her prettiest. "Ned,  dear," she said, "you're saved. You're as
good as married. I saw two  women dodge behind those curtains as we went
past."  When they turned into the minister's trim white gate, Mrs. Andrews 
sighed. "Well, it's a real relief to me. I'm glad he's settled  down. He's
saved us a lot o' trouble. I'm glad he picked out a nice,  sensible woman,
even if her hat is a little mite gay. Yes, sir; it's a real  load off my
mind to get  him settled down. I must run right over and  tell Mrs. Blake.
It's been such a worry to her."  "Say!!' said Bobby when he heard the news,
"That'll mean just two  more pieces o' Brown Betty fer us."  '13.  Page One
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Mary Kathleen's Sin  She must have been nearly three feet in height, not
counting the  big, fly-away, pink bow that fluttered and trembled on the
very topmost  lock of her very brown, very straight and very heavy hair.
The  color in her cheeks was like nothing in the world so much as the very 
pink ice-cream she was eating from the cone in her hand. Everything  about
her suggested the happy little girl of five-until you considered  her eyes.
They were big and brown and they looked out at the world  with a great
wonder and with something else-that something which  made people call her a
"queer child." Her name was Mary Kathleen.  The "Mary" was for grandmother
but the "Kathleen" was for herself.  Today Mary Kathleen sat on the steps
of the big, shady veranda  with a far-away look in her brown eyes. Although
she did not know  it  herself she was trying with all her strength to
justify things in her  small world. For there had been a long series of
misfortunes which  seemed to have hurled themselves upon her, together with
the advent  of  Aunt Jane and the departure of her own mother for parts
unknown.  You see, Father and Mary Kathleen had decided, after solemn
deliberation,  that it was much better that Mother should go away for a few
days of complete rest, even though it meant endless loneliness for the  two
members of the family left behind.  Every afternoon of that summer, when
the long, gaspy hours  seemed to drag the very heaviest, Mother had always
found something  to help her little girl endure the heat. It might be a few
hours spent in   the very shadiest spot they could find; or it might be
just a tall, thin,  deliciously frosty glass of sweet, cold lemonade, that
one could sip at  for an hour.  The entertainment of her niece did not seem
to enter into Aunt  Jane's estimation, as one of her duties; and so that
afternoon Mary  Kathleen had wandered around the house dismally. Looking
for  something cool to drink, she had finally come to the sideboard in the 
diningroom. There the first thing that caught her eye was a great, big, 
round, silver dollar. Mary Kathleen breathed a sigh of relief. How  could
she have thought that Mother had forgotten her? This meant   an ice-cream
cone and some beautiful red and white "marbles" to be  had at the little
store on the corner. When it was such a big piece of  money, Mother must
have meant some for each day of her absence.  Why hadn't she thought to
look on the side-board before?  So Aunt Jane found her a few minutes later
on the veranda. Beside  her on the step was a striped bag, and in one hand
she held several   pieces of money.  Aunt Jane had never learned the gentle
art of "counting ten." She  was, also, a firm believer in the force of
"circumstantial evidence," and  Mary Kathleen's case was tried, found
guilty, and dismissed while the  prisoner was still offering her judge a
sticky "marble." "Mary"-(Aunt  Jane thought the  added "Kathleen" entirely
unnecessary). "When did  you get that money."  "On the sideboard!"  Mary
Kathleen was considering with approval and not a little  wonder the little
sparks that seemed suddenly to dance in Aunt Jane's  eyes.  "What!"-Then,
quietly-"Why did you take it!"  This seemed an unnecessary question to the
child, in the face of  Page One Hundred Fourteen

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the cone and "marbles"; still her Aunt Jane should receive nothing but 
politeness and consideration at her hands, so she answered:  "Because it
was hot and I wanted some ice-cream."  "But you knew it was not your
money?"  Again this seemed the height of the ridiculous, but she answered 
patiently: "On, no; it  wasn't mine!" Never had Mary Kathleen noticed 
before how Aunt Jane's curls seemed to bob around on her forehead.  Now,
Mother's curls--  "You will go straight upstairs and prepare yourself for
bed. I  don't want to see you again to-day--! To steal and then
deliberately  - oh!"  Mary Kathleen sat quite still and looked at her aunt.
She was  racking her brain to know why she was to go to bed in the middle
of the afternoon.  "But, Aunt Jane-!"  "Go, immediately! Do you hear?"  Now
she understood. Aunt Jane was tired already of taking care of  a little
girl and wanted her to go where she wouldn't bother any more.  Her upper
lip quivered and her eyes had a hurt, surprised look. But  she must not
only be Mother's little daughter, she must be Father's  brave soldier-boy!
And if Aunt Jane wanted her to go to bed then she must go at once. Only-she
needn't have spoken in that way!  All through the long hours of that
afternoon she lay quietly trying  to adjust herself to Aunt Jane's ideas.
At seven, when the pangs of a  very healthy appetite were beginning to be
felt, she heard quick, swinging  steps on the stair and Father came in.
Behind him was Aunt Jane's  thin, angular form.  "What's this I hear? Not
rebellion in the camp the first day of  the general's leave?"  "Oh, Father;
I don't know-tell me what's the matter?"  "Wise move! Always ask the
questions yourself. Let the other  fellow do the talking. But, little girl;
why did you want that dollar?"  Then the story came out. And Father, being
wise beyond his years  in the ways of small people, caught Aunt Jane just
in time to stop her  outburst and almost forcibly ejected her from the
room. For there  were a few words which he did not care to have explained
to Mary Kathleen  just then, such as "theft" and "unjustly accused."  Then
Mary Kathleen and Father went over the whole thing carefully  and decided
again that, although her ways might seem "passing  strange" to them, it was
only a failure to understand on their part,  and must be met by
never-failing politeness.  Of his interview with Aunt Jane no account is
given; but when  Mary Kathleen came down to dinner, happy and beaming
again, Aunt  Jane came up and kissed her, saying simply:  "I didn't
understand, Mary. We will try to remember after this!" And Mary Kathleen,
out of the sweetness and gentleness of her  heart, opened the striped bag
in her hand and bestowed the largest and  stickiest of candy marbles upon
Aunt Jane.  BEATRICE BELL, '13. Page One Hundred Fifteen

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Contest in Debate  The preliminary contest in debate was held soon after
the Christmas  holidays, upon the question, "Resolved, That Judges Should
Be  Subject to the Recall." From a number of contestants, the following 
people were selected to take part in the final contest: Grace Barnes, 
Joyce Suffel, Martin Hevly and Philip Hogan.  On account of ill health, Mr.
Hevly left school, leaving only three  contestants. The final contest was
held in April. Each of the people  taking part gave evidence of splendid
training and a thorough knowledge  of the question. Miss Barnes supported
the affirmative alone,  while the negative was upheld by Miss Suffel and
Mr. Hogan.  The prize of $40, offered by the Board of Trustees, was won by 
Miss Barnes, while a second prize of $20 was won by Mr. Hogan.  Declamatory
Contest  The annual prize contest in declamation was held in the Auditorium
 Friday evening, April 25.  The following program was rendered:  Overture
from "Faust" ............................................. Gounod  HULDA
ELLENSON "Chariot Race from Ben Hur" ................................. Lew
Wallace  VIOLA HOPKINS  "Man of Sorrows"
..................................................... Winston Churchill 
HELEN BOUCHER  "Polly of the Circus"
................................................. Margaret Mayo  SYDNIA
CALDAN  "Irish Love Song"
...................................................... Lang  DAN HALL 
"Pauline Pavlovna" ................................................... T.
B. Aldrich  ELIZABETH GAASLAND  "Sign of the Cross"
................................................... Barrett  MARJORIE
ARTHUR  Violin Solo
................................................................. Selected 
CARLTON TRIMBLE  The judges were Prof. G. B.  Chichester, Miss Mabel Moore,
and Mrs.  E. T. Nobles.  The manner in which the readings were delivered
were most pleasing  to the audience and showed a marked degree of ability
on the part  of the contestants.  The first prize, $25.00, which was
offered by the First National  Bank, was won by Viola Hopkins.  The second
prize, $15, which was offered by the Students' Association,  was won by
Elizabeth Gaasland.  Page One Hundred Sixteen

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Part Three  Page One Hundred Seventeen

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[no text this page]

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ATHLETICS  Page One Hundred Nineteen

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[Image] FOOTBALL TEAM    Page One Hundred Twenty

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Football    The football season for the year 1912, was one of
uncertainties.  The sweets of victory were mingled with the bitter of
defeat, and while  the year cannot be regarded as one of triumph entirely,
still there were  some things that brought joy to the hearts of the loyal
rooters of the  Hill squad.  The main stumbling block in the way of a good
team was the fact  that games were hard to get. Owing to the geographical
location of  Bellingham it is hard to bring teams here without a big
expense and  the various High Schools of the State did not appear anxious
to play  games with the Normal, taking the position that  the Normal was
out of  their class and there was nothing to gain by beating them and much 
to lose by being defeated. Another fact was the late starting of many  of
the students and the small number of boys to choose from. This  small
number of boys made the maintenance of a second team impossible  and as a
result the first team obtained little or no defensive work  before their
contests.  The victory that brought the most cheer to the Normal was the
decisive  defeat given to the local High School. There has always been a 
feeling of rivalry between these schools and to beat the High School  made
up in part for the defeat received at the hands of the Everett High 
School. This game was in the early part of the year and the team was 
composed nearly entirely of men who had never taken part in a hard 
contest, and the superior team work of Everett and the fact that their 
team were nearly all men of experience proved too much for the Normal.  A
game later in the season was refused by Everett, but competent  judges of
the game credited the Normal with having a better team than  the Everett
one. The game with the University of  Puget Sound was a  repetition of the
experience with Everett; better team play and older  and more experienced
men won. This team was afterwards protested  as playing professional men
and four of their best men were removed  from the team. Had these men been
removed before the Normal game,  the result might have been different.
Burlington, Ferndale and Mt.  Vernon were some of the small games won  by
the Normal.  Captain Wallace Sutherland played at left half-back, taking
part  in every game and displaying marked ability throughout the year. His 
running with the ball in open field work was the equal of any halfback 
that played in Bellingham this year; and on the receiving end of a forward 
pass he was sure and safe.  "Curly" Hawkins played the other halfback
position and his work  was of a high order. It was his first year behind
the line and he was a  consistent ground-gainer, both on line plunging and
on end runs.  Will Tucker and "Nork" Johnson played at the fullback
position,  Tucker taking part in the earlier games with good success,
particularly  in the High School games, where his line smashes had a lot to
do with  winning the game. His attention to the managing end of the team
and  a hard course of study kept him out of some of the later games.
Johnson  was late in entering school and while lack of practice did not
allow  him to show the true speed of which he is capable and which he
displayed  as a member of the fast Burlington team of the year before, he 
must be rated as one of the good backs of the Northwest. His weight  and
speed, coupled with the fact that he is an accurate thrower and  catcher,
made him valuable on either end of the forward pass.  Page One Hundred
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Ross Wilson held down the job of quarterback and throughout the  whole year
played a steady game, running the team in good shape and  getting all our
of the team that was possible. His defensive work was   good at all times
and several times he averted touch-downs that seemed  certain. Wilson did
the most of  the kicking for the team; and while the  team was weak in
punting, Wilson did some good work in that line.  The Normal was
particularly strong in end men, Dick Hanley and  "Sam" Carver being the
equals, if not the superiors of any ends that  played in Bellingham during
the year. Few gains of any distance were made around either end during the
year, and very few pass formations  were successful against them. Hanley
has had more experience, and  showed good judgment in defensive work all
the season, being especially  strong on going down the field under punts.
An injury in one  of the earlier games slowed him up somewhat, but taking
his work as  a whole, he must be given credit for a good year. Carver,
playing his   first year at football, showed the makings of a fine end.
While lacking  the experience of Hanley his work  toward the end of the
season was of  high class. Knaack played part of the year at end and showed
well in  some of the games. His work in the Puget Sound game when he scored
 on them was good.  The tackle positions were the hardest to fill of any on
the team.  The injury to "Col." Sloan in the first game of the year
deprived the  Normal of one of the best of their men and had be been able
to play the  whole year  it would have been a big help toward strengthening
the line.  Sloane is big and strong and has the football  instinct of
following the  ball and being in every play. Dahlquist played part of the
season as  tackle, but a  broken hand received in U. P. S. game compelled
him to  drop out during the last of the season. Dahlquist has always played
 back of the line and changing to the line made it hard for him to play 
the best that he was capable of. His tackling at all times was good,  and a
little more experience at the tackle  position would have made him  a
valuable man for the team. Gay Monks, as the left tackle, was one  of the
most valuable men on the team. Monks is a player of considerable 
experience and each year seems to make him better. At solving  the plays of
the opponents and breaking them up he is better than  many University
players. Monks carries the ball well and pulled off  several very classy
forward passes during the year.  The lack of heavy men made the selection
of the guard positions  a difficult one. Ingman at left guard played a
steady reliable game during  the entire season and was always to be
depended on to make a hole  to advance the runner on line plays. Several
men were used as the  other guard but Bert Jones showed the best class of
any of them. Jones,  one of the lightest men of the team, played against
men that outweighed  him from thirty to fifty pounds, but held his own in
good shape.  Jones was also used as center in some of the games and his
work as  center was fine. In passing the ball and following the play he did
well  and on defensive play he was strong for a small man.  Guy Noyes
played as center in the earlier games and for his limited  experience did
well. His dropping out toward the end of the season  weakened the center of
the line somewhat as the Normal was not very  well supplied with heavy men.
 Among the other men who helped to make the team were Olson,  Walter
Johnson, Emery and Yoder.  All these men show form and only their lack of
experience keeps  them from making the team. Several of them by next year
should be  able to crowd some of the last year men very closely and gain
for  them  Page One Hundred Twenty-Two

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a position on the team. Little Danny Hall, the lightest man who turned 
out, showed fine form the first of the season and only the fact that he 
could not finish the season kept him from a regular job on the team.  The
hardest condition that the Normal school has to contend with  is the fact
that the majority of the students attend the school for only  one or two
years. This makes the building of a team very hard as a new team must be
developed every year, while in the most of the schools  against which the
Normal competes the course of study covers four  years. This is a big
advantage to them, as they can maintain the  same team from year to year. 
Considerable credit must be given the Faculty for their support  of the
game and the encouragement they gave to the team. A good  athletic team is
an advantage to any school, as it serves to draw the attention  of the
students of other schools to the successful school and is   a tendency to
attract them to that school. The Bellingham Normal  School should be in a
position to maintain a team equal to those of any  of the secondary
colleges of the state, and it is the hope of the school  that such will be
the result of the next year. To one who has never  taken part in any games
for a school it is hard to realize the help and  encouragement that is
given to the team by the presence of the student  body at the contest. The
Normal was very fortunate this year in having  such a loyal bunch of
rooters, who at all times stood by their team,  both in the hours of
victory and in the moments of defeat. Several of the team will not be in
school for the next year and  just what will be done in the way of a team
is not certain. It is hoped  that a team will be put in the field and be
able to uphold the honor of  the school. The Normal has never been able to
put a team in the field  that was superior to all of its opponents, but
they have always stood for  good straight football and have never
encouraged the playing of students  for the mere winning of games. The
small number of men attending  the school makes winning teams hard; but
winning games is  only a part of the sport, and good, clean football is to
be more encouraged  that than spirit of winning at all costs.  The team and
school owe much to the kindness of Dr. Turner, the  Coach, for his very
efficient coaching and encouragement. The school  would make a wise  move
if they would endeavor to engage Mr. Turner's  services as Coach for next
year as he knows the old  men who will  be here in the fall; and he could
shape up a good team.  Page One Hundred Twenty-Three

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[Image] JUNIOR BASKETBALL TEAM  Girls' Baskethall  After a season of hard
undaunted labor the members of the girls'  basketball teams, the schedule
of the Kline Cup games was announced.  Each team felt that the prize should
be theirs and each player determined  to carry off the honors for his own
Class. The Freshmen, with  such stalwarts as Lehman and Egbert, backed by
their trustworthy  "team- mates," had a right to feel confident of the cup.
The Sophs. were  handicapped from the beginning by not having a larger
turn-out in  practice. Nevertheless they did their best. The Juniors, with
"Ann"  and "Cassie," true marksmen, and Stalberg and Taylor, able defenders
 of the oppenents' goal, aided by "Shorter" in center, put up a team of 
which the Class might well be proud The excellent team work of the  Seniors
won the admiration of enemy as well as friend. Williams and  Stroup were
"right there" when it came to throwing baskets and with  Stevens as center
and MacKechnie and Myron as guards, who were "on  the job," they showed
excellent form.  The girls had practiced hard and were in good trim, thanks
to the  untiring efforts of their several coaches, when the first game of
the  series was called.  The game was  called at 7:30 and the Seniors and
Freshmen began  the contest. Both teams showed up well and it proved to be
a hard-fought  battle. The Freshmen won the victory by one point, the score
 being 11-10. As the Sophomores failed to appear, they forfeited the  game
to the Juniors.  The second game proved as exciting as the first. Interest
was beginning  to manifest itself among the various classes. The Juniors
brought out their colors, red and gray, but could not outshine the 
Seniors' gold and green!  The contest between Sophomores and Seniors lacked
"vim," as  the Sophs. showed lack of team work and practice. The Seniors
won  24-0.  Page One Hundred Twenty-Four

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[Image] SENIOR BASKETBALL TEAM  [Image] FRESHMEN BASKETBALL TEAM  Page One
Hundred Twenty-Five

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The Freshmen stood up well under the attacks of the Juniors, but  seemed
"out of luck," as many good chances at the basket failed to  put the ball
through. The score was 16-4 in favor of the Juniors. Enthusiasm had been
steadily growing and an intense rivalry was  shown between Junior and
Senior classes at the third game of the  series. Both Classes were out in
full force, colors and horns and yells! Both teams were in splendid
condition. Never before had the Senior  Class of the Normal put out such a
formidable foe as this year. Juniors  seemed to recognize this and every
man went into the game determined  that his team should win.  The score was
first 4-3 in favor of the Seniors at the end of the first half. At the end
of the second half, a tie, 8--8. The Seniors made  the first basket and the
game was over with a score of 10-8 in favor  of the Seniors. The Freshmen
won from the Sophomores, also.  Now the  points stood in such a way that
the next game fell to the  Freshmen and Seniors. After some delay the game
was played with  a score of 7-4 in favor of the Freshmen.  In the next game
the Juniors won again from the Freshmen, making  the final game fall to the
Juniors and Seniors. Never was Class  spirit so in evidence. The gymnasium
was crowded; everyone was expectant.  The game was a tussle from start to
finish. The final wind-up  showed a score of 7-6 in favor of the Juniors.
This ended the series  and won the cup for the Juniors.  The line-up for
the season was:  Seniors Juniors  Helen Stevens ..................center
........... Maud Shorter  Grace McKechnie ............guards...........
Ester Stalberg  Irene M yron ....................guards........... Georgia
Taylor Margaret Strong ...........forwards..........."Ann" Larsen  Isabelle
Williams............forwards........... Cassie Fitzgerald  "Bill" Tucker
...................coach. ............ Edythe Layton  Freshmen             
   Sophomores  Stella Bradford ..............center .................Lena
Erickson  Edith Lehm an ..............center..................Hilda
Westerlund  Hattie Kinnard .............guards..................Elizabeth
Eggers  Harriet Tyler ................forwards................Loma Pickens 
Armide Tappe ............ forwards...............Anna Breum  Herbert Heath
..............coach...................Rudolph Knaack  Page One Hundred
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[Image] BASKETBALL TEAM  Page One Hundred Twenty-Seven

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Boys' Basketball  The basketball season opened with the usual burst of
enthusiasm  and with the determination to put out a winning team. The
material  promised well from the start. With Sam Carver as coach, and such
men  as Nattrass, Tucker, Gibb, Wilson, Hanley, Knaack, Dahlquist, Riley, 
Munks and Davenport to choose from, who could question the strength  of the
machine turned out? The team was broken up twice by men  leaving school,
but when the time for a game rolled around Carver  managed to have a
quintet in good form. Nattrass played a bear of a  game at forward while
the other side was ably held up by Knaack and  Dahlquist. Tucker played the
pivot position all through the season  and showed his usual good form. The
guard berths were filled by Wilson  and Hanley, who both played a good
game. The hill team tied the Y. M. C. A. for first place in the city
league,  but lost the deciding game by a small margin, leaving the North
Side  High third. The decisive victory in football was keenly felt by the
High  and was accompanied by threats of what they would do to us in
basketball.  The two games that were played were fought hard from start  to
finish, but both were won by the Blue and White.  As usual Ellensburg
wanted a game until we were ready to start,  then showed cold feet, but we
were rather surprised that U. P. S. should  yell, "Dates full," at the last
minute and throw us down hard. This  combination of affairs lost  us our
trip east of the mountains, after it  was practically started. The boys
worked hard, however, and deserve  much credit. You can bet your last
bottom dollar we will look for  signed contracts next season. Page One
Hundred Twenty-Eight

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[Image] TRACK TEAM    Page One Hundred Twenty-Nine

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TRACK    On May 27, the Normal and High School held the annual track  meet
at the Fair Grounds, which ended in a complete victory for the  B. S. N. S.
by the score of 72-54. Adams and Hall took first and second  in the
sprints, Adams breaking all city records. The mile was captured  similar to
the half- mile with Hawkins, Burpee and Odle. In the  hurdles Kimball of
the High School outclassed us. Only one point in  them was made by Hall. We
took the weights with King, Sloane and  Cunningham behind them. The high
jump was given to the High, for  we entered no man; but a third place was
taken in the broad jump by  Adams. Richardson and Callow took first and
second in the vault.  Our relay team was "big league," simply outclassing
the High. It was  composed of Adams, Swartz, Hall and Hawkins.  The meet
was a success for us financially, for a goodly crowd  turned out to witness
our victory.  From the dope this  year :another victory can be seen in the
triangular  meet May 17th-Normal, North Side High and South Side High.  The
cross-country runs were started April 5th, in spite of the wintry  weather,
and the boys are  now hard at work on their special events.  The weights
are not giving us much worry, with big Bob Yoder heaving  the shot and
discus, and there is nothing slow about Sloane, King and  Olsen along this
line. For  the jumps and pole vault, much confidence  is placed in
Nattrass, Wilson, Burpee and Wood.  The woods are simply full of distance
men, such as Gibb, Emery,  Burpee, Dahlquist and Nattrass. Some good
records have been made  by the men in training. Manager Danny Hall is the
man we depend  on to show what it means to sprint. Dan was so close to
Adams at the  finish last year that he could pat him on  the back. Riley
and Dahlquist  will probably help him to hold up this end of the meet. All
are working hard under the direction of Carver and expect to "do things." 
+ +  Chuckanut Marathon  The plans for the contest this year have not yet
been completed.  It is expected, however, that the contest will be a good
one in every  way. The boys have shown a great deal of enthusiasm and are
turning  our well for practice. We are hoping that even a better record
will be  made this year than last.  The idea of a race up Chuckanut
Mountain was first suggested by  Dr. Mathes. A committee, Messrs. Philippi,
Patchin and Earl Forrest,  were appointed to arrange details for the race. 
The race was to be of a three-fold nature:  1.  Individual prizes for speed
contestants.  2. Class team, consisting of five members, who should make
best  record for class.  3. Average percent for Class which should register
largest percentage  of members  at the top of the mountain.  1. Prizes-(a)
A $22 gold watch; (b) An $11 traveling bag;  (c) A white sweater.   2.
Class team-Herald Cup.  3. Percentage-Official Normal pennant.  Page One
Hundred Thirty

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Nine o'clock Saturday morning found the campus and  front steps dotted with
members of our School and  down-town people,  eagerly awaiting the crack of
the pistol. Some were talking of politics  or friends far away, but the
question that pressed the heart of almost  every enthusiastic onlooker was:
Who would be victorious?  At the same time seventeen of the strongest and
most ambitious  boys were in the doctor's office undergoing a rigid
examination under  the supervision of Dr. Morrison. After some excitement
on the  side of  the participants there were seventeen pairs of well
developed lungs,  each of which it was hoped and expected would bring home
a gold  watch or some other useful article.  At twenty minutes past nine
our boys, standing with tip-toes to  the line, with excited nerves and
swelling hearts, were anxiously awaiting  the click of the pistol.  Click!
Click! Away they went, on a ten mile tour to the top of  Chuckanut and
back. The last we could see of them was just the mere  outline of a shadow
turning down Garden street.  The steady, easy motion with which our boys
sped on was marked  by hundreds of enthsiastic onlookers, who lined the
boulevards and  parks along the trail. The course was marked out with
little white   flags with B. S. N. S. imprint stamped upon the center. 
With the first three miles left in the background,  the foot of Mt. 
Chuckanut confronted those who thought they could climb Mt. Everest  for a
"morning's exercise." But two miles of Chuckanut and they  would want an
early start on a Monday morning in November before  trying anything else. 
Many steep and hard spots of the rough earth did our boys find while
carefully picking their winding way up the zigzag trail of that  mountain
side. "At last!" the applauding shouts filled the mountain  tops, Sloane
rounded the crest of Chuckanut, followed two minutes   later by Gibson.
Soon this was rapidly repeated by the entire number  of our seventeen
contestants. We turn now to see what has become of our friends in the vale 
far below. To-be-sure! they are anxiously but patiently awaiting the 
return of the dear ones, who went on their errand to the mountains.  Just
one hour, 28 minutes, 10 seconds from the click of the pistol,  Carl
Kalberg crossed the line with the gold watch-not in his hand,  but in
sight-and with anticipations of hearty congratulations from a  little girl
in La Conner. Forty-eight seconds later he was followed by  Odle, who won
second prize. Nine seconds later followed Sloane, who  won third prize. 
All the boys came in in good condition, except Sloane, who suffered  some
pain from a dislocated ankle, while rounding one of those precipices  so
often found along the Chuckanut thoroughfare.  The Herald Cup was won by
the Freshman Class. The Freshman  team consisted of King, Olsen, Smith,
Hawkins and Sloane.  The Tenth Grade of the Training School won the
pennant, by  having a higher percentage of the class registered at the top
of Chuckanut  during the day. All contestants finished the race, except two
boys from the High  School department, who probably had notereceived a
sufficient amount  of training prior to the contest. J. L. S.  Page One
Hundred Thirty-One

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[Image] BASEBALL TEAM  Page One Hundred Thirty-Two

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The National game is on the progressive list this year. The boys  have been
provided with swell new suits by the Student's Association.  The suits are
blue with white trimmings. What team could fail to do  its best with these
classy suits?  Ross Wilson is busy arranging the schedule. The schedule to
date:  April 26.-B. H. S.  May 10.-Ferndale H. S., in Ferndale.  May 24.-B.
H. S.  The Manager is trying to sign Sedro-Woolley for May 3rd and the  U.
P. S. for May 17th or 31st. The University of Puget Sound seems to be
afraid to meet the Normal, as has been the custom. Our team  promises to be
unusually strong this  year. Sutherland and Hill will  do the work on the
mound. They are both hard workers, with lots  of speed.  Manager Wilson
seems to be the only man to show up well  behind the bat. He is an
experienced player and adds a tower of  strength to the team. The infield
is especially strong. Tucker at first  base is playing his last and third
year on that bag. Nattrass at second  and Jones at short are two Bellingham
High stars and will greatly  strengthen the infield. Fritz Anderson at
third is a wonder for his size  and is not so small at that!  In the
outfield will be Reed, Sandberg, Knaack or Dahlquist, all  good men, tried
and true. We feel  that with the support of the student  body the season
will be the most successful in the history of the institution.  FRIDAY
HARBOR GAME, APRIL 19  B. S. N. S. 12-Friday Harbor 2.  The boys began the
season strong by taking Friday Harbor into  camp, 12-2. Hill pitched up
well for six innings and then was taken  out to let Wallie get a little
speed out of his system. Special mention  should be made of the work of
Ross Wilson behind the bat and of Anderson  at third base. Although the
team had not been practicing long  the boys showed mid-season form in the
field, but at the bat a lack of  practice as eleven strike-outs  were
chalked up against the Normal. But  hits came when they were needed and
twelve runs were gathered in  the game.  Pagee Or- Hilndhed Thirt-Tbrep

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[Image] BOARD OF CONTROL    Page One Hundred Thirty-Four

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MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF CONTROL, 1912-13.  President
........................................ (resigned) WALLACE SUTHERLAND 
Vice-President ............................... (acting President) ETHEL G.
ANDERSON  Secretary ......................................... LEW GREENE 
Faculty Advisors ............................ PROFS DEERWESTER AND EPLEY 
Student Representatives ............... ARTHUR SMITH, C. HAWKINS  With this
issue the Students' Association closes a very successful  year, considering
the difficulties under which it has labored. The second  quarter Mr. Noyes,
Messenger Business Manager, dropped the work  to accept a position in a
local bank. He has an excellent successor in  Mr. Sonner; Mr. Hevly, the
bookkeeper, was forced to leave school in  account of ill health. Miss Tacy
Clark has proved,very capable in filling  his place; then, in the middle of
the school year, Mr. Sutherland  resigned as President of the Association.
The office is well handled by  the Vice-President. Among the duties of the
Students' Association's Board of Control is  the financial support of the
Messenger, whose Faculty Advisor is Miss  Bowen; of the store managed by
Mr. Sloane and Mr. Anderson, where  the students purchase all school
supplies at cost; athletics and the  Chuckanut Marathon. Several social
functions in the form of frolics,  picnics and receptions are given by the
Association.  We pride ourselves on being the first student organization in
the  State to adopt the primary plan for election of officers, instead of
the  general nomination system. This plan proved very successful,
interesting  to the Faculty, and instructive to the Student Body. In brief,
the  plan was this:  I. All officers shall be elected by dlirect primary. 
II. Names of eligible candidates receiving the highest number of  votes  at
the primary shall be be placed on the regular ballot.  III. No candidate's
name may appear twice on ballot of regular  election.  IV. In the regular
election the candidates shall be placed on the  ticket for that office for
which he receives the highest number of votes  in the primary.  V. Any
member may be nominated if a petition is signed by at  least twenty-five
members of the Association.  VI. No student may sign more than one petition
for the same  office.  The Board of Control for 1913-14 is:  President
.......................... CLARENCE DAHLQUIST  Vice-President
................. LEW GREENE  Secretary ........................... MARTIN
OLSEN  Student Rep....................... CATHERINE HURLEY, JOYCE SUFFEL 
Faculty Advisors .............. PROFS. EPLEY AND DEERWESTER  Page One
Hundred Thirty- Five

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[Image] OFFICERS IN STUDENT ASSOCIATION  John Sloane, Storekeeper          
               Gerald Sonner, Mgr. Messenger  Tacy Clarke,
Bookkeeper-Treasurer         Manford Anderson, Asst. Storekeeper   Page One
Hundred Thirty-Six

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ANNUAL REPORT OF TREASURER OF STUDENT ASSOCIATION,  B. S. N. S.  STORE FUND
RECEIVED  Balance September 1, 1912........... $ 6.75  Store Sales
...................................... 3,603.25  Total Received
............................... $3,610.00  Total Paid
Out................................ 3,520.56  Balance in Store
Fund................... $89.44  PAID OUT  Stock
.............................................. $3,356.56  Salary
.......................................... 144.00  Drayage
...................................... 20.00  Total Paid
Out............................ $3,520.56  MESSENGER FUND  RECEIVED 
Balance September 1, 1912 .......... $101.56  Advertising Receipts
..................... 509.70  Subscription
.................................. 107.10   Total Receipts
............................... $718.36  Total Paid Out
............................... 635.28  Balance in Messenger Fund.........
$83.08  PAID OUT  Printing ..........................................
$565.98  Commission Advertising.............. 56.60  Commission
Subscription............ 12.70  Total Paid Out
............................... $635.28  GENERAL FUND  RECEIVED  Balance
September 1, 1912........... $35.84  Proceeds Carnival
......................... 91.65  Athletics
......................................... 88.60  Fees
................................................ 478.50  Hand Book
.................................... 47.00  Total Received
.............................. $741.59  Total Paid Out
............................... 644.67  Balance in General
Fund............... $96.92  PAID OUT  Loan
................................................ $250.00  Prize Story
...................................... 5.00  Bonds
............................................. 15.00  Social
.............................................. 17.40  Salary
.............................................. 31.45  Athletics
......................................... 316.92  Miscellaneous
................................ 8.90  Total Paid Out
............................... $644.67  TOTALS  RECEIVED PAID OUT  Store
Fund ...................................... $3,610.00   General Fund
.................................. 741.59   Messenger Fund
............................ 718.36 Total Received
............................... $5,069.95   Total Paid
Out................................. 4,800.51  Bal. on Hand Stu.
Ass'n.................. $269.44  PAID OUT  Store Fund
...................................... $3,520.56 General Fund
.................................. 644.67  Messenger Fund
............................ 635.28  Total Paid Out
............................... $4,800.51      Respectfully submitted, 
TACY V. CLARKE,  Dated May 1, 1913. Bookkeeper-Treasurer.  Page One Hundred
Thirty-Seven

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[Image]  KLIPSUN STAFF  Page One Hundred Thirty-Eight

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Klipsun Staff    ANNIE E. BROWN ..............................
Editor-in-Chief  EARLE GIBB ........................................
Business Manager  BLANCHE KNIGHT ........................... Assistant
Editor CAROLYN B. HALSEY ....................... Organization  MINNIE
CARVER ............................... Class Editor  GRACE MACKECHNIE
...................... Athletics  CAROLYN EGBERT
............................ Music  and Drama  RHEA BARNARD
................................ Literary  MYRTLE FISHER
................................. Jokes  IHELEN STEVENS
............................... Art  LUCETTA MACKECHNIE ..................
Cartoonist DAN HALL .......................................... Advertising
Manager  Page One Hundred Thirty-Nine

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The Tail of the Pennant  Hang up the Junior pennant,  Be sure you don't
forget;  The Assembly Hall will be  filled,  And you'll be there, I'll bet.
 "Where is the Junior pennant?"  It has vanished every trace,  And see, the
Senior pennant  Is hanging in its place.  "The funeral oration  Do speak
loud and clear:  "We fear we cannot hear you,  Dear Junior, what's your
fear?"  "We see, your ardor's dampened  By liquid from above-  Why don't
you keep your places?  Why do you run, my love?"  "You want the Senior
pennant?--  To gel it  you'll fight hard!  No, no! Not while Carver  And
Sutherland stand guard.  "Where is the Senior pennant?" "Be calm, child,
hush your fears.  It's safe, though 'tis in pieces  Which we keep as
souvenirs."  Page One Hundred Forty

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Part Four  Page One Hundred Forty-One

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MUSIC  Page One Hundred Forty-Three

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Music and Dramatics  As Music and Dramatics everywhere play an important
part in  the social life of a school, so in the Normal much interest is
taken in  these two acts.  In musical circles the Choral Club plays the
chief part. The girls  meet every Wednesday with Mrs. Thatcher as Director.
The Club sang  one  morning in Assembly some numbers which were very
pleasing and  furnished one number for the Christmas program.  The big work
of the year was "The Bells of Elfarnie," operetta or  cantata. The score
was very difficult, but after much practicing was  put on as one of the
most enjoyable programs of the year. The stage  was beautiful and the music
with the setting was very exquisite.  By request the program  was repeated
in assembly.  The Club is now working on the music for Commencement, which 
promises to be very good.  We have heard rumors of a Boys' Glee Club but
nothing has been  seen or heard of them.  There is also a wide-awake
orchestra in the school, of about thirty  pieces, under the direction of
Mrs. Engberg, which has given us some excellent  music. They have also had
the honor (with some others of  the orchestra from outside) of playing for
some noted artists: Maude  Powell, violinist; and Mr. George Hamlin, a
noted tenor of New York.  Beside this they have given two concerts which
were very succuessful.  Many students of the school are very much
interested in dramatics  and some very enjoyable plays have been given. 
The Thespians have given one program of two plays, and immediately went to
Friday Harbor, where they won fresh laurels.  The other society, Hays
Literary Society, entertained us royally,  one Friday morning in assembly
with a program, the latter part of  which was one of the deepest little
plays given this year, and also one  of the hardest to act. To their
credit, let it be said,  that everyone was  impressed and thoroughly
enjoyed their splendid work.  + +  FRIDAY MORNING PROGRAMS  The
entertainment and instruction furnished by these programs  cannot be
estimated. The students were indeed fortunate in being  able to see the
splendid views of different parts of the world and hear  the talks given by
such well-known men as Dr. Chas. Sheldon, Dr. S.  D. Gordon and many
others.  Lectures, accompanied with stereopticon views, were given upon 
Yellowstone National Park, Southwestern United States, Yosemite Valley, 
Ireland, Italy, our own Mount Baker, Mexico and many other regions  of
interest.  Very interesting talks were given by Dr. and Mrs. Mylrae,
missionaries,  who were home on a visit from Arabia. The speakers appeared 
in the Arabian costumes and made us acquainted with the peculiar and 
oftentimes sad customs of these strange yet fascinating people.  It was
with great delight that we welcomed Mr. Charles Rice, one  of America's
well-known tenor singers. His singing surpassed even  our expectations.  We
are proud of the fact that many of these programs were given  Page One
Hundred Forty Four

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Choral Club    Page One Hundred Forty-Five

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 146

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by our own Faculty, one by a member of the Senior class, and some by 
ministers and teachers of our city. We are deeply indebted to Mrs. R.  W.
Smith, who gave us a number of readings in such a charming  way,  and to
Dr. Mathes, Mr. Gebaroff, Mr. Epley, and Mrs. McCully for their  lectures;
to Rev. J. R. Macartney, and to Miss Hainke, of the High  School.  Dr.
Charles Sheldon was given an enthusiastic welcome and he repaid  us well
with a talk that was not only interesting, but inspiring.  Our last
speaker, Dr. S. D. Gordon, will not be easily forgotten.  The deep
impression he made is proved by the fact that the  Senior Class  adopted as
their motto the central thought of his discussion: "To know  is good; To do
is better; To be is best."  The Training School has twice rendered
attractive programs, one  at Christmas time and on May 1. That these are
much enjoyed is  shown by the way we look forward gladly to the time  when
one is to be  given.  The Hays' Literary Society entertained us one morning
with the  play "The Hour  Glass." The annuncement that the Choral Club
would  give the Cantata, "The Bells of Elfarnie" was greeted with joy and
the  rendering showed good training and ability.  Space cannot be given to
tell of each in detail but it is sufficient to  say that each program was
well attended and liked by the students.  +  +  One of the greatest
advantages we enjoy, for which we should express  our thanks and
appreciation to  the Lecture Course Committee, is  the Normal Lecture
Course. In no other way would we have the privilege  of meeting and hearing
these, the best of America's men and  women.  The numbers this year were:
Mme. Davenport-Engberg, violin  concert; Mrs. Hayden, dramatic recital;
Representative J. Adam Bede,  "Our Nation, Its Progress and Problems";
Ex-Governor Hoch, of Kansas,  "A Message From Kansas"; Strickland Gillilan,
poet and humorist;  Dr. Harvey Wiley, "Pure Food". Some extra numbers were:
Frederick  Search, 'cello concert; Mme. Labadie, "To-morrow."  One of the
greatest advantages which all Bellingham people enjoyed  through the
instrumentality of the Normal, was the opportunity of hearing Booker T.
Washington. This rare treat was open to all, free  of charge, as the
expenses were met by subscription. Mr. Washington  was given a very
enthusiastic reception and fully repaid the earnest attention accorded him.
 Page One Hundred Forty-Six

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Part Five

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[Book Cartoon]    Page One Hundred Forty-Nine

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 150

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Miss Dawson (speaking in terms of the roll)-Who is thirty-four?  E. P.-I am
thirty-four.  Miss D.-You don't look it.  L. Mack-How does an old maid
talk?  Miss Hogle-What did you ask me for?  When your heart throbs wildly,
your eyes swim with tears and  your arms ache,-that is not love; not on
your life,-it's grippe!- Ex.  +  A little boy on coming home from school
the first day declared to  his mother that he wouldn't go back the next
day.  "Why, Willie," said his mother, "of course you're going back!"  "I
won't go back tomorrow, mamma!"  Here the father interrupted: "Why don't
you want to go back tomorrow?"  "Well, a big  man came today and stood on a
chair and looked all  around the room and said: 'I'll come back tomorrow 
and hang them  all.' "  Ikey (goes to get shaved)-Well, how much do I owe
you?  Barber-Nothing! I always  like to run my razor over a calfskin.  + 
In Eighth Grade-"The girls got the goat and harnessed it to Mary's
surprise."  +  Mr. Watkins in a lesson plan gives words and definitions
among  which is found- "trousseau-a bundle." A note from Mr. Patchin on 
the outside of neatly folded plan reads,---"Look up 'trousseau.' "  Miss
Dock's mind is known to wander occasionally as in teaching  the child's
prayer to her Sunday School Class she was heard to repeat:  "Now I lay me
down to sleep,  I pray the Lord my soul to keep;  If I should die before I
wake,  I should worry!"  Page One Hundred Fifty

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 151

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Mrs. Thatcher-What place should music have in the public school  system? 
Watkins (with usual drawl)- Do you mean what time of the day  we should
teach music?  Heard in Training School when youngsters were unusually
languid  (passing orders)-"Turn! Rise! Beat it!"  Pat is heard in the
hall-"Do you know Booker's neck? Well he  fell in the river up to it." 
Concerning Lamb-  "Forever after the death of his mother he had to give
special attention  to his insanitary sister, who would have fits
frequently."  C-Miss Sands (at the mixer)-There is a spoon for everyone,
isn't  there?  Dan-Ye--es, at least everyone will have a  chance.  MR.
OLSEN'S REVISION OF "THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE."  "The hare and the
tortoise had a spat as to who had the most  speed. The tortoise got peeved
and said they would do the Marathon  stunt, run a race C? So the hare said
he should worry, the tortoise was  a joke, but he'd be game and run  just
for ducks. When they set to, the  hare bucked the tortoise off the boards
P. D. Q., and yelled he would  have to beat it harder if he didn't want to
lose out. The hare had legged  it so far ahead that he thought he'd hit the
hay and snooze awhile.  When he opened his peepers the tort wasn't in sight
so, thinking the old  sport was pokin' along somewhere behind he got a move
on; but he  had another think cming C?' When he got to the starting place
he  was some stung, :ow believe me! there was the tortoise."   Miss Sperry
! I  Quotations in Browning-  "Browning pressed his suit and got married." 
"Mrs. Browning was injured in her teens."  Mr. Evans-What's my grade in
History?  Dr. M.-Just what you are worth.  Mr. E.-I won't accept it then. 
"Define vacuum," the teacher asked,  The doubtful Senior said:  "I can't
think of it right now,  But I think it's in my head."  Page One Hundred
Fifty-One

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Art, as it is Learned-  The level of the eye goes up as we pass away. 
Accent is making lines darkest to show closeness.  Perspective is seeing
things as we see them.  When a circle is above the level of the eye it's an
eclipse.  Classification of Colors: Secondary colors are made by mixing 
the primaries on both sides of them. Colors are classified as hard and 
soft; weak and shallow.  +  Definition of Volcano in Mr. Epley's Geology
Class-  "A volcano is a mountain that goes in convulsions and throws  up
saliva."  + Wyler, after a happy night, in the sleepy morning picked up his
 hair brush and looked in it: "Gee; but I need a shave!"  [Image] Barker Is
Found In Science Annex  Miss Gray-You should treat the Faculty according to
their rank.  Which one is the rankest?  "NOT EVERY GIRL."  Not every girl
who has a switch  is needing it;  Nor every girl who has a rat is feeding
it.  Not every girl who should stop slang is stopping it;  Nor every girl
who should propose is popping it.  Not every girl who has made eyes is
making it;  Nor every girl who gives advice is taking it.  Not every girl
who can win a home is wooing it;  Nor every girl who  says she can is doing
it.  Two of our Senior boys got "A" in Browning-We are all proud  of them,
besides they were given a reception in Court. Joke?  Page One Hundred
Fifty-Two

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PENANCE.  SHE: "He kissed me and I know 'twas wrong,  For he was neither
kith nor kin;  Need one do penance very long  For such a tiny little sin?" 
HE: "I stole a kiss the other night,  My conscience hurts, alack!  I think
I'll have to go tonight  And put the durned thing back!"  SHE: "But, after
all, I'm not to blame,   He took the kiss! I do think men  Are quite
without the sense of shame!  -1 wonder when he'll come again!"  It-tle
Peshy, Seshy, Freshie,  Does oo feel a lit-tle bad?  We will send and get
his bot-tle  He shan't have to cry-wy-wy.  In Class Meeting-  Seniors
propose a half holiday for a picnic; before submitting  it  to the Faculty
they decide to ask for a whole day.  Mr. Deerwester decides we're not in a
class that does things by  halves.  Gibb-It isn't customary to tell the
truth.  Was Lovely Arthur Barns Happy that Knight as Carver?  If the Rose
Gauped would the Wall Fisher (fissure)?  Brown Riley Waters Barry De Long
White.  Green Phil Schaacht King Fisher.  Barker Tucker Holme (s).  + 
Barker (triying to get out of finishing an exam. in Botany V., during  2:30
period)-Guess I'll have to miss that last class.  Mr. Moodie--- What class
have you, Mr. Barker?  L. B.-Phil. of Ed.  Mr. M. (knowingly)-Under Miss
Baxter?  L. B.-Yes! Mr. M.-Well, I'll go and fix it up for you.  L. B.
wilts!  VIII. A English Paper-"Bellingham is a beautiful city well lighted 
with a good streetcar service."  Page One Hundred Fifty-Three

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 154

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[Drawing] Sehome Hill  There is a fellow baching upon Twenty-first street, 
 An enterprising Freshman bachelor;   In the culinary art he excels in but
one feat,  To the frying of flapjacks I refer.  He stirs his flapjack
batter morning, noon and night,  Then fries them up in smoking 'margerine. 
But one morning, breakfast pending, batter stirring, an affright  Seizes
this young chef-no 'margerine.  Long and hard he tho't upon the subject of
his eats,  As he stood and beat his flapjack dough.  When a new idea struck
him, there upon his beat-  "How stupid of me; I'll use buttero."  A smile
come on his countenance as he reached for the plate:  "Great Caesar!
Empty!" Now what shall I do?"'  His Freshman eyes explored the room, but to
reveal his fate-  No butter! no flapjacks! no breakfast! was in view. 
When, ah! his eagle eye alights upon a shelf,  His mind alert, he acts upon
the thought,  He beats his dough and fries his cakes, rejoicing to himself.
 He has taken castor oil, the doctor brought,-  They say J. T. will live! 
SAY, CAN YOU IMAGINE-  Miss Hays without her suit case?  Mr. Deerwester in
a wig?  Mr. Epley weighing two hundred?  Dr. Mathes staying home?  Miss
Baxter not "wandering"?  Miss Baker without a pet?  Miss Bowen with a
grouch?  Miss Wilson with "a smile that won't come off"?  Miss Worden
prosy?  Miss Sperry's ideal?  Mr. Moodie without Mrs.?  Mr. Patchin
married?  Mr. Philippi in a gym. suit?  Mr. Bond without a squint?  Mr.
Bever not talking?  Page One Hundred Fifty-Four

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 155

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Mr. Clark not explaining something?  Miss Jensen languid?  Mrs. Thompson
without a smile?  Miss Norton excited?  Mrs. Termaat stoop-shouldered? 
Miss Drake keeping house?  Miss Felt not being informed?  Miss Montgomery
without her babies?  Miss Brown not all "dolled up"?  Miss Personet
shouting?  Miss Shaefer with rats?  Miss Gray excusing a tardy?  Miss Hogle
at the vanishing point? Miss Dawson peeved?  Miss Lawrence keeping
boarders?  Miss Knowles without her sewing in Faculty meeting?  Mr.
Gebaroff wearing a fez?  They buried the Senior skeleton  With elaborate
display;  But the Senior Spirit roamed the halls  And scared the Juniors
away.  OU BOYS-  Manford playing football?  Bill without a grouch?  Deacon
hilarious?  Watkins without the girl?  Phil out of Normal?  Wallie leading
a Y. W. meeting?  Dan grown up?  Gibb not talking Annual?  Sam making a
disturbance?  Dock being bashful?  Red without his pipe?  Tub without his
Book?  Booker without a Tub?  Smith not managing something?  Kelly getting
an "F"?  Evans without a curling iron?  Glen being dignified?  Pat working?
Dutch fussing?  Eddie with a case?  Yoder with a girl?  Carleton before the
"Court."  Pug with a Roman nose?  Col. Sloane in a hurry?  Ellis admitting
he didn't know?  Arnold with a mustache?  Olson in a rural school?  Page
One Hundred Fifty-Five

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 156

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There was a girl in our class  And she was wondrous wise;  Philosophy she
studied  As long as she had eyes.  And when she got to class,  A
pedagogical fort,  One thing she couldn't define-  A "biological sport." 
Overheard after the Junior-Senior Assembly Fracas-  Miss Sperry--Mr.
Sutherland, did you get excited over the last  part of "Childe Roland"?  W.
S.-Ye-es.  Miss S.-As much as in the Assembly affair this morning?  W. S.
(with a rueful glance at his torn coat and dusty trousers)-  Well, I wasn't
so vitally interested, Miss Sperry.  Mr. Epley (in Geology)-What is the
technical name for this mud?  (globigerina ooze).  Junior-Goo!  +  A powder
puff, a cunning curl,  A dimpled chin, a pretty girl!  A little rain and
away it goes--  Leaves a freckled face and turned up nose.--Ex.  +  Eva
White-Do you have reindeer in Alaska?  Howard Wheeler-No, dear; at this
season it always snows.  +  Subscriber to Messenger--Please send me your
paper for a week  back.  Ethel Anderson-You'd better try a porous plaster. 
Page One Hundred Fifty-Six

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 157

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1. Bread is a necessity.  2. Necessity is the mother of invention.  3.
Steam engine=an invention. A loaf of bread is the mother of  a steam
engine.  +  "Papa," said Bill Tucker, after the doctor had pronounced it a
case of measles, "invite the bunch in; at last I'm in a position where I 
can give them all something."  + Carver says, "eat, drink and die, for
tomorrow you may marry!"  WASH-DAY AT EDENS HALL  (General Chorus)  Were we
like Eve, when she lived on earth,  We would find much pleasure in it.  For
when her wash-day came around  She could do it in a minute.  +  Arthus
S.-"Happy is the people who has no History. I think I'll  move where there
is no History."  Lew Green-"You'll soon make some!"  SENIORS IN NURSERY
RHYME.  "A" is for Annie, our Editor-in-chief,  She's kept us from getting
stuck on a reef.  "B"  is for Beatrice, as well as for Belle,  What's in
her little head no one can tell.  "C" is for Crete, that staid little maid;
 If you make her acquaintance, you'll be well repaid.  "D" is for Dora,
dignified and tall,  With a voice like a lark, that pleases us all.  "E" is
for Ethel, Edith and Esther,  Either you'll find is the very best "her." 
"F" is for Florence, whose dark eyes flash  Woe to the man who thinks to be
rash.  "G" is for the Graces, of whom there are five,  Each one reminds us
that she is alive.  "H" is for Happy, whom every one  knows,  She is
greeted with joy wherever she goes.  Page One Hundred Fifty-Seven

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 158

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I is for Irene, our basketball shark,  Watch her a few years, she'll make
her mark.  "J" is for Justine, well known as Jean,  Where there's work to
be done she's sure to be seen.  "K" is for Knight, a day-time star,  She
solves knotty problems wherever they are.  "L" is for Louise, whose fund of
good humor  Around this old school is more than a rumor.  "M" is for Mary,
of whom we have two,  One we call "Dutchy," to know who is who.  "N" is for
Nellie, with voice like a bird,  When we have programs she always is heard.
 "O0" is for oracles, "Deerwester" and "Hays,"  We trust their good counsel
in all of our ways.  "P" is for "Peggy," that sly little girl,  Who is
bound to keep somebody's heart in a whirl.  "Q" is Questions by the Faculty
asked;  To answer correctly the Seniors are tasked.  "R" is for Rhea, whose
stories we read, And know, as a writer, some day she'll succeed."  "S" is
for "Sam," whom it did tickle,  To make a "Carver" out of a "Nicol."  "T"
is for Tucker, better known as "Bill,"  If he doesn't object, call him
"grouch," if you will.  "U" is for US, the Class of '13,  The most talented
Class that ever was seen.  "V" is for Vera, whose smiles we know well,  Who
gets most of them would be hard to tell.  "W" is for Wisdom, which all
Seniors have,  And which all under classmen crave.  "X" is for 'Xtras, not
given in rhyme,  Because of our lack of space and of time.  "Y" is for the
Yearning the Faculty will do,  For more Seniors like 1913 puts through. 
"Z" is for Zephyrs, which we hope will be fair,  When the time for
graduation draws near.  Page One Hundred Fifty-Eight

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 159

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Calendar    Page One Hundred Fifty-Nine

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 160

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Calendar    SEPTEMBER.  2.-Trains crowded with knowledge seekers. 
3.-Registration. School again. Welcome Seniors! Early arrivals  begin to
look little.  4.-Consignments of new students continue to hit the  hill and
en-ter  the ways of the wise.  5.-Profs. do a rushing business signing
fates of innocents. Profs.: "Oh, you schoolma'ams, maybe, to-be!" "The
mixer" comes off. Every  one feels at home. Their dues are cinched. 
6.-Halls densely populated. Freshies are worried looking for  Class rooms.
Y. W.'s on the job. 9.-Freshies looking for elevators. Faculty parades
across the  platform with usual dignity. New members slightly fussed. 
10.-Seniors decide to report in classes.  11.-Junior: "Are you a Senior?
Well, how do you  know which  class to go to? what day? what time? and
which room?" Senior:  "Watch the bulletin board."   12.-Philos eat Welsh
rarebit.  13.-Two weeks gone. Newcomers lonesome and homesick. Cheer  up!
Look at the happy Seniors! Y. W.'s are skimp on the eats at reception. 
16.-A general uprising of hasheaters-Edens Hall.  18. Echoes of mystic
melodies afloat through the halls. Discovered,  a singer- Alice Dunlop. 
19. Sophs are seen trying to work the '06 fountain.  23.-The Junior Girl
wonders why the boys are so late in enrolling--  stung! poor girl; The
Junior Boy wonders why he is so blessed  with popularity. Every dog has his
day.  24.-Discovered, a Normal girl sans switch. B. C.  25.-Students' Hour.
Freshies all tangled up in crowd.  26.-Philos baby's parents give birthday
party in honor of the  nineteenth birthday.  28.--Our football team
practices upon Sedro-Woolley H. S.  OCTOBER.  1.-Dorm. inhabitants
despondent. Its system of regular, non-changeable  weekly menu is
discovered.  2.---Juniors pray for psychological enlightenment.  4.-Mr.
Watkins appears on public thoroughfares with--his sister?  Let us hope so,
girls!  5.-Everett, 30-B. S. N. S., 7. Nuff sed!  6.-Senior: "Did you ever
take chloroform?" Junior: "No, who  teaches it?"  7.-Lost, book on
"Birds."- Miss Baker.  8.-Dr. Mathes lectures on "Keep Off the Grass." 
9.-Try the soup at the Cafeteria. Nothing stirring! Mrs. Thatcher  shows
the Juniors how to beat time. Miss Personet is heard (?) in  Assembly. A.
Holmes heard to say: "Oh, yes; I'm just crazy about baby Irish." Meaning
(Pat) ?  12.-Boys make the B. H. S. accept the order of their rank. Score 
26-0. Mr. Olsen introduced. Bill Tucker: "Hey, Ole, can you tell  Page One
Hundred Sixty

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 161

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me where the lunchroom is?" Olsen: "Huh! If you can guess my  name just
guess where the lunchroom is." Miss Baxter, (as she lowered  the shade in
Observation)--"Yes, 8 and 2 are 1." Miss Gasland looking  for popularity.
Juniors looking longingly toward Training Department.  25.-Little Freshies
all flustered. A party for them tomorrow  night.  26.-We are convinced the
boys can fight in football.  29.-B. B. material spells "Victory and
Champs."  31.-Ghosts walk. Small girls of all sizes have annual jollity. 
NOVEMBER.  4.-Miss Personet sports a new pose.  5.-Elected-character study
of Senior Class-Blanche Knight.  .- Miss Worden, imploring Juniors: "Use
your common sense." ?  7.-The first dose of soul anguish is received. Heart
failure an epidemic  during siege of exams.  11.-Juniors nervously watch
bulletins for teaching assignments--with  pleasure?  12.-Startling to the
sombre annals of the school, "Happy" enters.  13.-Pure misery greets the
Juniors in the Tr. School. Discouraged  critics take comfort in Seniors. 
14.- Bill drives his flock to the gym.  Page One Hundred Sixty-One

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 162

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15.-Alkisiah initiation. Hopefuls take solemn oaths, carbolic  acid and
worms. Miss Dawson marries skeleton.  18.-Miss Baker-Lost, a book. 
19.-"Miss Grace, where did Solomon get all his gold?" Grace Barnes: "I
don't know; but he got it somewhere."  20.-Seniors look worried and
hollow-eyed and sleepy. Oh, you  Poly. Con. theses!  21.-Wanted-by Sam
Carver, a wife.  25.-Browning Class working wonders on  the Seniors. They
seriously  look for ideals, but--  27.-Going, going, gone--Thanksgiving
vacation. DECEMBER.  2.-Back again and "thanks for small favors." 
3.-Nervous tension high in Chorus practice, anticipating the fall  ot the
baton.  4.-In Hist. of Ed.--Mr. D.--"Bacon believed in 'universal
education' education. Then he was what kind of educator? Martha Simpson, 
"a universalist."  5.--Crete Topping (speaking of Cupid)-"Isn't Dan (Hall)
the  cutest kid?"  .- Miss Knowles braves the student body and makes an
announcement  in Assembly.  9.-Juniors are beasts of burden. Cause,
notebooks.  10.-We go back to our childhood days. Who says coasting is an 
old-fashioned accomplishment?  11.-Eva White wants to know how long a stick
of Spearmint will  keep its flavor on a bedpost?  12.-Miss Hopkins says she
wants Santa to bring her a diamond  ring.  13.-Miss Baker announces the
loss of an algebra text. 16.-One more week!  17. Three more days!  18.
Hours!  19. ! !  25.-Dinner at Edens Hall for (and of) left- overs. Faculty
begins  to worry. They are afraid there won't be a single student left by
June.  JANUARY. 1.-Thank goodness! Now, I wonder if he will propose? 
6.-Back to work. Get busy now, and carry out your resolutions-?  Page One
Hundred Sixty-Two

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 163

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7.-Heard in Tr. School: Teacher-"Describe the stomach."  "The stomach is a
rubber bag full of intestines." Is vacation an evil?  8.-Mr. Bever wants
some one to help him agree with himself.  10.-The Mid-Years are looking
wise,-too wise!  13.-Blue Monday. The History of Ed. Class is surprised at
its own  smartness (?).   14.-The Faculty sits on the Mid-years.
Observation Class wades  to City Schools.  15.-Seniors hold protracted
meeting. Spelling-false alarm!  16.-Bill gets to Hist. Methods on time.
Father Patchin's Beasties  whale the B. H. S. second team.  17.-Great blow
to Tr. School teachers-no teachers' meeting. Sam's pets go after the High
School scalps; 12--15.  18.-B. S. N. S. shows N. B. H. S. how to play
basketball. Dorm  mask.  21.-Senior Decorating Committee go coasting and do
a little  housebreaking. 22.-Student life deadens during final semester
effort.  23.-The whole school a nervous wreck. General chorus: "I'm going 
to study next semester; now, believe me!"  25.-Mid-years depart from hence
to seek their fortunes.  27.-New semester. We get a chance to size up some
different  members of the Faculty. 28.-Nice days; Twenty-first Street
becomes popular.  29.-Kline Cup. Never mind. Don't enumerate your young
fowl  at a date anterior to their incubation.  30.-We're suffering
suspense.  31.-Failures have to be reported. If we only knew. Some W. S. 
C. fellows enter. Looking for a school with plenty of girls-cheap!
FEBRUARY.  1.-"Hen dance," at P. L. F.  4.-O, you North Wind! Another siege
of holding up the radiators.  5.-Heard in Philosophy: Mr. D.-"Give me a
specific term for  the general term 'insect.' " Miss Gaup: "Oyster." 
6.-Senior turn-out to Class meet overwhelms Hevley.  7.-Father Patchin
appears in a spick and span new suit. He suc-  Page One Hundred
Sixty-Three

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 164

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ceeds in side-stepping comps. from lady Faculty members--as usual. 
10.-Girls are all excitement and hopes arise once more--some  (a few) new
boys enter.  [Image] We Get Busy  11.-Seniors and Sophs in disgrace and the
Freshman feel that  their hats don't fit.  12.-Miss Sperry has a
discomfiting experience in  Browning. Boys  all line up in front row. 
13.-Small boys play jailer at Alkisiah initiation.  14.-The Freshies  ate. 
15.-The Seniors play a little basketball. Never mind, Sophs, it  wasn't
your fault.  18.-Mr. Deerwester  appears on all fours.  19.-Many who do not
take astronomy are taking observations.  20.-We show the H.  S. that they
won from Everett through pure  luck.  21.-Juniors are making a lot of
noise. Wonder why? 22.-They are rather quiet to-day; however, ditto. 
[Image] Freshmen Throw a Foule  24.-Bats and small balls initiated on
campus.  25.-Dr. Deerwester sheds one of his props.  26.-Seniors try to
sweeten the school-and make a little money  on the side.  27.-Virtue earns
its own reward, usually, but Mr. Hevly received  a more striking one for
contributing to Browning in The Messenger.  28.-Mr. Deerwester comes to
school on his own two feet.  MARCH.  March is introduced by a lovely lamb. 
We take the lamb to school,  Page One Hundred Sixty-Four

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 165

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4. The Democratic sun rises, but the sun of the Senior quintet  has set
forever.  5.-The boys don light and airy garb and stroll (?) down
Twenty-first  Street.  6.-Mrs. Thatcher tries to freeze the chorus.  7.-Dr.
Mathes begins his lectures "Keep off the Grass."  10.-A stray prize keow
(cow) wandering about the building.  Finder please return pamphlet to our
Ag. Prof.  12.-Wanted--Seniors to follow letters of constitution to avoid
illegal  elections. Grace Barnes.  13.-"Bells of Elfarnie" have a songfest.
 14.-A sad day. We attend the Freshman funeral. However, the  Junior
reception somewhat raises our dampened spirits.  17.-The Juniors buried the
Senior skeleton but failed to kill the  Senior spirit. We behold a Junior
orator.  18.-Wallie and Miss Sperry hold conference in hall.  19.-Juniors
get the Seniors' goat. Sam Carver  looking for a house  to rent. 
20.-Wanted by Ethel Anderson, two minutes. A nowling suffragette movement
aroused at Normal. Several men are converted.  21.-Practical lessons given
in voting. Association Room scene of  initiation of future rulers of
Nation's politics.  23.-Girls are showing Spring styles.  24.--Spring.
Beware the symptoms. Wally rented South Side  library after hours in order
to Cram Philosophy. He isn't sick!  Page One Hundred Sixty-Five

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 166

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25.-Desired by Sex Hygiene Class, a megaphone, for Miss Per-sonet's  use.
For weak voice see Miss Hays.  26.-The awful day before. Bill returns after
a spell at nursing  an infantile disease. You must remember Miss Shafer
says we are infants  until we are thirty--  27.-The quarterly torture. Its
end and result, depopulation.  APRIL.  1.-Mr. Bever "went a-fishing." He
"just had to go."  2.-Fourth Quarter dawns.  Hogan, poor boy! how the class
 works that poor fellow!  3.-Gibbs (in Hist. of Ed.)-"Not much is known of
the Jesuit  Schools. We haven't taken them up in class yet."  4.-Senior
passes Observation exam. with honors. Miss Baxter  wakes up to the fact
that she had dictated Prin. of Teaching questions.  5.-For hints  on latest
fashions, go to Room 15, Edens Hall. Margaret  Waters possesses a secret of
how to make credits and not go to  school.  6.-Room 21 receives a proposal.
Mr. Arthur gives the girls a  spread.  7.- The manager's father takes a
bunch of girls to the movies.  8.-Riley had a hair cut.  9.-Rushing
business at Class meets.  10.-Spring fever raging-pest house located on
Twenty-first  Street bridge.  Page One Hundred Sixty-Six

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 167

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14.-Miss Baker (calling roll)-"Is it Amelia Pfiffner?" Amelia:  "S'ma'am
S'melya!"  15.--Spring vacation must  be to blame. Nobody has settled to
real  work yet.  16.-Absences are numerous. Sociology theses are getting
overdue.  17.-Tace Clark has shown herself an admirable pusher, even tho' 
there is not much to pull. Senior vaudeville postponed.  18.-Miss
Sperry-"Where did the Bishop get the stone he  buried?" Grace McK.-"Swiped
it, I guess."  21.-Mr. Bever-"A fairy story will hold the attention of a
child."  Yet, that does not explain (?) the attention (?) at 10:30---11:20.
 22.-E. A. (in Assembly)-"You'll find the tennis schedule down  next the
green blackboard." Miss Gray's office deserted, even by seekers  of
excuses. 23.-Marjory Arthur "gets busy" in Class meet and makes the 
Seniors feel sorry."  24.-Faculty amateur typewriter manipulators see how
it is done--discouraged.  Clarice Henry at Alkisiah: "We will now hear a
duet  by Miss Mossop."  25.-Junior picture for Annual is a Jonah. It rains!
 28.-Dora F. succumbs to a somnambulistic attitude in Sociology. ? 
29.-Georgia B. looks busy; also worried. Vaudeville.  30.-Joke Editor
collapsed. Three real jokes contributed.  MAY.  1.--We wonder why Miss
Drake is so anxious to get away.  2.-Miss Baxter breaks in new shoes. 
5.-Boo! Mr. Moody resurrects Winter suit.  6.-V. H. says  her diamond will
cut glass. Must be real.  7.-Bill hasn't been seen fussing for several
days. S'matter?  8.- Congratulations are in order, Sociology thesis in.-C.
F.  12.-Cupid is barred from the Botany Room.  13.- Miss Baker has a
pamphlet missing.  14.-The Deacon says he would like to change Miss
Carver's name.  It takes two to make a bargain.  15.-Miss Gray (calling
upon Miss Knight)-"Miss Day-"  16.-Just how did the kangaroo court handle
the Seniors who chaperoned  (?) the Junior jubilee?  19.-Heard in
Hall--"What makes Eva White? Because she can't  Page One Hundred
Sixty-Seven

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 168

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get Red." In Office-"What can you do better than anyone else?"  "Read my
own writing."  22.-Wanted, by Juniors (before) a showers from Critic
teachers.  (After) Handkerchief showers from any sympathetic source. 
29.-Training School closes. If you want to know just how much  you are
worth, ask your Critic. She knows you better than you know  yourself. 
30.--Holiday.  31.-The Annual Alumni Banquet. Wow! JUNE.  2.-Class Play.
Seniors do themselves proud. Seniors everything.  3.-Junior Reception. They
promise to be a fine lot of Seniors,  especially proving capable of
handling social affairs.  4. Seniors look dreadfully wise; some sorry.
Commencement is  inspiring.  Class 1913 Enters History! All gone but the
summer school.  Page One Hundred Sixty-Eight

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 169

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In Memoriam    MAUDE GAMBLE  Class of Nineteen Thirteen  Died November 7,
1912  NELLIE E. BROOKS  Assistant Librarian  Died October 16, 1912  "This
world is not conclusion,  A sequel lies beyond;  Invisible as music,  But
positive as sound."  Page One Hundred Sixty-Nine

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 170

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The Graduate    Here's to the Graduate, busy and gay,  With volumes of
learning, armed for the fray,  For the battle of life her Philosophy she'll
need,  She waits for us all to bid her "God Speed."  With spirit undaunted
no failure she fears,  As she glances down the dim vista of years.  The
world lies before her, her future is bright;  With courage she'll strive on
the side of the right.  And loved ones with pleasure, half mingled with
pain,  Smile as they live o'er their school days again,  And sigh as they
pray that the Fates may be kind  To the girl who is leaving "Old Normal"
behind.  Oh! brave little graduate, all gladsome, to- day  In Life's fitful
drama great parts you may play,  May you always be ready with courage and
love  To meet the tasks set by the Teacher above.  Page One Hundred
Seventy

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 171

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Alumni    Page One Hundred Seventy-One

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 172

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Alumni  CLASS OF 1900  Kate Schutt-Stenographer-Ithaca,  N. Y.  Hattie B.
Thompson, (Mrs. Rowland) -Nome, Alaska.  Emma Mythaler, (Mrs. Paul Oliver- 
Quincy.  Ruth Pratt, (Mrs. T. E. Doult)-Chicago. Clara
Norman-Teacher-Nordland  Margaret Clark, (Mrs. F. B. Salisbury  -Everett. 
Florence Griffiths (Mrs. G. G. Hannan)  -Waterville.  Pauline Jacobs (Mrs.
H. C. Camp)-  Lakeside.  CLASS OF 1901  Gertrude E.  Bell (Mrs. Reynolds)--
 Deceased.  C. H. Bowman-Municipal High  School, Corvallis, Mont.  George
R. Bright-Teacher.  Lily Buckles-Secretary, Dawson, Y.  T.  Edith Burgess
(Mrs. J. G. Little)-Tacoma.  Sarah  A. Clark (Mrs. John Ryan-  Tacoma. 
Harriet M. Dellinger (Mrs. P. H.  Brown, Belingham.  Maude E.
Drake-Supervisor S. N. S.,  Bellingham.  Edith Fouts (Mrs. G. H
Dress)-Pittsburg,  Pa.  Pearl Galliher- Teacher, Walla Walla.  Bessie
Griggs (Mrs. D. B. Brown-  Bellingham.  Anna Iverson-Teacher, Seattle.
Martin Korstad-Attorney, Seattle.  Thomas Korstad-Farmer, St. Mary's, 
Idaho.  Pearl Lee-Teacher, Bellingham.  Sadie Llewellyn-Teacher,
Belling-ham.  Ethel Luce (Mrs. J. S. Yuill)-Vancou-ver,  B. C. Mary A.
McBride-Teacher-Belling-ham.  Lillian Miller-Teacher High School, 
Bellingham.  Calla E. Montux- Teacher, Walla  Walla.  Alice Muldoon (Mrs.
W. S. McCall-  Seattle.  Elonora Oerthi (Mrs. George Ruswick)  -Bellingham.
 Emma Ratcliffe-Teacher, Mt. Ver-non.  Ada Shidler (Mrs. W. T.
Burke)-Se-attle. Frances Siders-Teacher, Seattle.  Emma Whitworth-Teacher,
Belling-ham.  Carrie Wilmore (Mrs. W. J. Roberts)  -Olympia.  Maude Woodin
(Mrs. Ralph Oakley)-  Bellingham.  CLASS OF 1902  Blanche Charon (Mrs.
Sellen)-Soap  Lake.  Bessie Boyer-Mrs. E. Loop-Shelton.  Susie
Arnett-Teacher, Spokane.  Violet Bourgett-Teacher, Cordova,  Alaska.  Ethel
Chamberlain (Mrs. C. R. Berry  -Seattle.  Ethel Church  (Mrs. - )-Oakland. 
Cal.  Edna Cochel (Mrs. W. Wyckoff)-Seattle.  Eva Comegys-Teacher, Everett.
Charles Currey-Deceased.  Laura Doerer-Teacher, Skagway,  Alaska.  Evva
Eckerson-Teacher, San Diego,  Cal.  Emma Greer-Teacher, Denver, Colo.  Maud
Hopkins (Mrs. Charles King)  -Seattle.  Grace Huntoon (Mrs. H. Sheerer- 
Cocmopolis.  Annie Leque (Mrs. 0. J. Ordal)-Red  Wing, Minn.  Ella
Lindstrom  (Mrs. J. Engstrom)-  Wrangel, Alaska.  Ida McMillan (Mrs. W. A.
Hitchcock)  -Couer d' Alene, Idaho. Thomas Monnet-Immigrant Inspector 
-Sumas.  Alice Nichols (Mrs. T. H. Laurence)-  Endora Oliver (Mrs. C.
Wilkinson)-  Port Townsend.  Minnie Penfield (Mrs. J. J. Penfield-  Silver
Beach.  Page One Hundred Seventy-Two

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Page One Hundred Seventy-Three  [CLASS OF 1902]  Olive Edens-Teacher, B. S.
N. S.,  Bellingham. Alicenia Engle (Mrs. A. F. Gookins-  Elma.  Estelle
Fletcher (Mrs. Harrison-Juneau,  Alaska.  May Gilligan (Mrs. Sabine Carr)- 
Bellingham.  Jessie Laurence (Mrs. - )-Seattle.  Hattie Pratt-Teacher,
Bellingham.  Annie Raymond (Mrs. T. A. Stiger)-  Everett.  Jennie Sickles
(Mrs. Illingsworth)-  Seattle. Gertrude Streater-Teacher, Seattle.  Laura
Sweet-Teacher, Seattle.  Myrtle Trott (Mrs. -- )-Seattle. CLASS OF 1903 
Effie Bates-Teacher, Stanwood.  Statira Biggs-Attorney, Bellingham.  Bertha
Breckenfield-Teacher, Los  Angeles, Cal.  Alice Carman-Teacher, Everett. 
Lily Carter (Mrs. W. B. Mayer)-Montesano  Alice Clerk (Mrs. Sidney Barker)-
 New York.  Frances Copeland-Teacher, Seattle. Lou Dobler (Mrs. E. GI
Doherty)-  Tacoma.  Emma Gruber (Mrs. Walter Emery)-  Doty.  Ben F. Hovies-
Teacher High School,  Prosser.  Cecelia Jacobs Teacher-Raymond.  Evelyn
Jones-Teacher, Ferndale. Lucius Jones-Teacher, Copper Center,  Alaska.  May
Knox (Mrs. George Bond)-Bell-ingham.  Olive McGinnis-Teacher, Issaquah. 
Earle Morris-Artist and Engravei,  Seattle.  Ethel Nelson-Teacher, Tacoma. 
 Mary Patric-Medical Student, Taco-ma.  Minerva Pettit (Mrs. J. B. Love)- 
Seattle.  Ida Pillman (Mrs. W. E. Townsend)-  Seattle.  F. W.
Rhodes-Teacher in High  School, Seattle.  Effie Rear (Mrs. L. E. Knapp)-
Seattle.  Bertha Ross-Principal of School-  Lowell.  Ella Rucks-Teacher,
Puyallup.  Minnie Sapp (Mrs. W.  Blair)-Arlington.  Margaret Schneider
(Mrs. E. D. Stunock)-  Port Townsend.  Gertrude C. Smith-Teacher,  Everett.
 Irene Smith-Teacher, Wakefield,  Mass.  Josephine Snyder (Mrs. J. H.
Wallace,  Black Diamond.  Hjalma Stenvig (Mrs. Sverdrup)-  Minneapolis,
Minn.  Myrtle Stuver (Mrs. Charles Miller)  - Spokane.  Mrs. Annie
Temple-Deceased.  Lucy Vestal-Teacher, Snohomish.  Belle Williams-Deceased.
CLASS OF 1904.  Emma Aldridge-Teacher, Everett.  Katherine Anderson (Mrs.
A. R.  Strathie, Port Townsend.  Julia Arges-Teacher, Buckley.  Grace
Auld-Teacher High School-  Bellingham.  Ella Barbo-- Teacher, Bellingham. 
Alice Bowen-Teacher, Carbonado.  Ethel Brown-Teacher-Blue Canyon.  Ida
Charroin-Teacher-Bellingham.  Bessie Darland-Teacher, Blaine.  Burton
Doran-Lumberman-Vancouver,  B.  C.  Ethel Everett, Deputy County
Superintendent,  Bellingham.  Julia Fritz-Teacher, Friday Harbor.  Lottie 
Graham-Nurses' College, Boulder,  Colo.  Wilhelmina Haack (Mrs. J. Hess)- 
Seattle.  Anita Noel (Mrs. Thomas Mason)-  Tacoma.  Mrs. Margaret
O'Keefe-Teacher-Tacoma.  Loretta O'Loughlin-Teacher- Lakeside.  Carolint O.
Risedorph-Teacher, Monroe.  Elsie Schneider (Mrs. C. B. Peck)-- 
Bellingham. Florence Sears-Mrs. E. Charrion-  Oakland, Cal.  Beryl Shahan
(Mrs. H. C. Nicholson)  -Tacoma.  Minnie Shumway-Teacher, Bellingham. 
Freida Stark (Mrs. Coleman)-Deer  Lodge, Mont.  Bessie Stearns (Mrs. M.
Scoville)--  Bellingham.  Page One Hundred Seventy-Three

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[CLASS OF 1904]  Jessie Havens-Teacher, Seattle.  Sadie Hubbell-Teacher,
Seattle.  Alice Kellogg (Mrs.  Win. Miller)-  Pateros.  Annie
Keene-Teacher, Bellingham.  Lena Kohne-County Superintendent  - Coupeville.
 Lea hLovejoy-At Home, Seattle.  Abbie Lynn (Mrs. J. V. Padden)-  North
Bend.  Mabel Steen- Teacher, Los Angeles,  Cal.  Genevieve Stone (Mrs. W.
H. Coursen)-  Scranton, Pa.  Effie Wheeler (Mrs. Willis Langworthy)- 
Bellingham.  May Williams (Mrs. Howard Steel)-  Tacoma.  Vinnie Winchell
(Mrs. J. Bathurst)-  Tanana, Alaska.  CLASS OF 1905  Gertrude
Aldridge-Teacher, Everett.  Susie Andrus- Teacher, Burlington.  Else
Anthron (Mrs. Theo. C. Frye)-  Seattle.  Edith Austin-Teacher, Oakland,
Cal. Lillian Burke-Teacher, Snohomish.  Meda Carlson (Mrs. Byrd Anslow)-- 
Bremerton.  Stella Carlson (Mrs. Jess Hansen)--  Everett.  Grace Dickey
(Mrs. Herman Smith)--  Goshen.  Lena Dodd-Teacher, Bellingham.  Grace
Drake-Teacher, Seattle.  Anna Drummond-Teacher, Tacoma.  Mrs. C. H.
Eldridge- Teacher, Hartford.  Isabel Gibson-Teacher, Seattle.  Cassie
Gifford (Mrs. H. Thompson)-  Everson.  Edna Hallock-Teacher, Seattle. 
Louise Hannebohl-Teacher, Seattle.  Adelaide Hanlein-Teacher, Shelton. 
Myrl Hays (Mrs. G. E. Ludwig)-Bellingham.  Katherine Houts-Teacher,
Seattle.  Lissa Howlett (Mrs. F. H. Dillabough)  Bellingham.  Jessie
Jameson (Mrs. S. B. Eames)-  Bellingham.  Alice Kibbe-Teacher High School- 
Winlock.  L. A. Kibbee-County Superintendent,  Olympia.  Evelyn Kirkpatrick
(Mrs. C. C. Turner)   -Seattle.  Josie Little (Mrs. Walter Wells)- 
Everett.  Winnie McMiullen (Mrs. Arthur R. Mason)-  North Bend.  Isabel
McRae (Mrs. Percy Dearie)-  Everett.  Violet Morgan-Teacher, Carbonado. 
Albra Paddock- Bookkqeper-Farmington.  May Pillman (Mrs. W. E. Allen)- 
Seattle.  Nellie Ramsey (Mrs. E. H. Haniger) -Rex, Ore.  Harry T.
Raymond-Student of Music  -New York.  Nellie Roberts-Teacher, Port Angeles.
Bessie Service (Mrs. Guy Hayden)-  Kennewick.  Charlotte Stewart (Mrs. Ward
Mosier)  -Spokane.  Opal Swank (Mrs. Strauch)-Wallace,  Idaho.  Marie
Wheeler-Teacher, Tacoma.  Myrtle Williams--Teacher, Everett.  Birdie
Winchell (Mrs. F. W. Rhodes)  -Seattle.  CLASS OF 1906  Lena
Barker-Teacher, Seattle.  Beatrice Benson-Teacher, Port  Townsend.  Ethel
Birney (Mrs. Fred Laube)-Bellingham.  Jessie Cowing- Deceased.  Georgia
Ellis-Teacher High School  -Newport.  Lotta Fleming-Teacher, Issaquah. 
Tressie Flesher (Mrs. P. H. Ashby)-  Marysville.  Lillian K. Fogg-Teacher,
Dayton.  Selma Glineberg-Teacher, Granite  Falls.  Anah Gooch-Teacher,
Bellingham.  Mrs. J. C. Meyers-Teacher, Rosario.  Helen H. Miller (Mrs. G.
M. Davidson)  -Wichita, Kan  Minta A. Morgan-Teacher, Pasadena,  Cal. 
Leonie M. Nohl- Teacher, Seattle.  Mary O'Loughlin-Teacher, Drydad.  Ethel
Peck-Teacher, Seattle.  Pearl Peime- Deceased.  Rosalie Rourke (Mrs.
Taylor)--Marblemount.  Lena Smith-Teacher, Bellingham.  Lillian Smith-
Teacher, Bellingham.  Pearl Smith-Teacher, Custer.  May Strand-Teacher,
Bellingham.  Page One Hundred Seventy-Four

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[CLASS OF 1906]  Ellen Graham-Teacher. Mt. Vernon.  Judith F. Hawes (Mrs.
Frank Knight)  - Wenatchee.  Isabelle Holt (Mrs. Chas. Graham)- 
Bellingham.  Ethel Jones-Teacher, Arlington.  Nellie Jones (Mrs. S.
Curtis)-Ferndale.  Elma Krausse (Mrs. Robert Lacey)-  Colfax.  Carrie A.
Lewis-Teacher, Plaza.  Lettie Look (Mrs. F. F. Dean)-Aberdeen.  Katherine
McNeff-Teacher, Puyallup.  Bertha Mauermann-Teacher, Olympia.  Floy
Sullivan-Teacher, Spokane.  Frankie Sullivan-Teacher of Music  - Olympia. 
Christine Thiel-Teacher, Bellingham.  Nellie Thompson-Student U. of W.- 
Seattle.  Anna Wahlstrand-Teacher, Bellingham.  Clara Warriner (Mrs. J.
Adkinson)---  Everson.  Edna Waples-Student Teachers' College,  New York. 
Luella Whittaker-Teacher, Bellingham.  Elizabeth Williams-Teacher, Seattle.
 Mildred Wilson-Teacher, Anacortes.  CLASS OF 1907  Guy S.
Allison-Merchant-South  Bend. Myrtle Alexander (Mrs. Edward 
Hoem)-Snohomish.  Andrew Anderson-Mt. Vernon.  Byrd Anslow-Clerk,
Bremerton.  Frances Arnold (Mrs. Alfred Black,  Jr.)-Bellingham.  H. W.
Copeland-Teacher, Seattle.  Nora  Corbett-Teacher, Seattle.  Helen
Goldthwaite-Holtville, Cal.  Minerva Lawrence-Teacher S. N. S., Bellingham.
 Emma Liedl-Teacher, Goldendale.  Minnie LeSourd (Mrs. C. B. Bantz)- 
Coupeville.  Armee Lowe-Teacher, Gig Harbor.  Alice McCullough-Teacher,
Everett.  Grace Mansfield-Teacher, Kirkland.  Ada  Meyers-County
Superintendent,  Shelton.  Frances Moncrief-Teacher, Olympia.  Stella
Mott-Teacher, Seattle.  Aimie Moyer-Teacher, Bellingham.  Walter
Nichols-Principal School, Gig  Harbor.  Ellen O'Farrell  (Mrs.
Swain)-Seattle.  Gladys Patric-Teacher, Los Angeles.  Bertha Elda Payne
(Mrs. R. M. Saunders)- Bend, Ore.  Gretta Pattison-Teacher, Spokane.  Ada
Pence-Teacher, Bellingham.  Mrs. Faith Pope- Teacher, Bellingham.  Grace
Purington (Mrs. J. D. Fletcher,  Tacoma.  Lola E. Records-Teacher, Everett.
 Grace Smith-Teacher, Bellingham.  Elizabeth Souders (Mrs. H. W. Diehl) 
-Bellingham.  Ellen Sweet- Teacher, Seattle.  Tyra Thompson (Mrs. James F.
Lee)  -Tacoma.  Pearl Van Ostrand-Teacher, Ferndale.  Anna Walden-Seattle. 
Tena Wahl-Teacher, Mt. Vernon.  Elsie Ware-Student U. of W., Seattle. 
Roger Williams-Principal Schools,  North Bend.  CLASS OF 1908  Lillian
Arke-Teacher, Ketchikan,  Alaska. Abigail Arntson (Mrs. A. A. Wells)- 
Bellingham.  Grace Baviett-Teacher, Tacoma.  Lucy Bayton (Mrs. Fred Grubb)-
 Port Angeles.  Cora Burr (Mrs. A. N. Thompson)-  Seattle.  Ione
Canfleld-Teacher, Bellingham.  Sart Cochran-Teacher, Centralia.  May
Copeland-Teacher, Aberdeen.  Minnie Dow (Mrs. - )- Centralia.  Sadie
Fasken-Teacher, Cashmere.  Edna Kerr-Teacher, Tumwater.  Agnes Morrison-At
Home, Bellingham.  Ericka Nordberg-Student U. of W.,  Seattle.  Minnie
Osberg-Student U. of W., Seattle. Mabel Osgood-Teacher, Bellingham.  Mary
Lea Pemberton (Mrs. G. F. Kendall)-  Centralia.  Gertrude Peterson-Teacher,
Seattle.  Caring Peterson-Teacher, Lyman.  Ethel Revelle (Mrs. W. W.
Wainwright)- Tacoma.  Alice Schumaker (Mrs. A. J. Hoffman)  -Edison.  Page
One Hundred Seventy-Five

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[CLASS OF 1908]  Stella Fowler-Student U. of W., Seattle.  Annie Harned
(Mrs. Jones)-Seattle.  Grace Hedger-Teacher, Walla Walla.  Tillie
Henry-Teacher, Bellingham.  Dollie Jennings (Mrs. A. A. Foster)-- Quincy. 
Gladys Kreiter-Teacher, Bellingham.  Eva McDonald-Teacher High School 
-Kirkland.  Merrie Meocill-Teacher, Douglas  Alaska.  Louisa Markham (Mrs.
S. V. Warren)  -Pe Ell.  Louise Miller-Teacher, Bellingham.  Mazie
Moore-Teacher, Seattle.  Annabel Noble-Teacher, Centralia.  Martha
Welton-At Home, Seattle.  Beth Shoemaker-Teacher, Vancouver.  Ray T.
Smith-Principal School-Seattle.  Louise Walker-Teacher, Walla  Walla. 
Winifred Walter-Teacher, Tacoma.  Maude Wescott-Student U. of W., Seattle. 
Maude Whipple-Teacher, Bellingham.  Wilma J. Wills-Principal High  School,
Sedro-Woolley. Jane Wilson-Teacher, Wenatchee.  Myrtle Wright-Teacher,
Sumner.  Inez Wynn-Teacher, Seattle. CLASS OF 1909  Christine
Abild-Teacher, Auburn.  Gertrude Armstrong-Teacher; Seattle.  Anna
Atkinson-At Home, Seattle.  Edna Audett-Teacher, Seattle.  Myrtle
Auer-Teacher, Portland, Ore.  Lydia Brackett-Teacher, Seattle.  Margaret
Chappell (Mrs .J. M. Alvis)  -Manila, P. I.  Mabel Coffman-Teacher,
Bellingham.  Lida Copeland-Teacher, Ashford.  Lucy Crocker-Teacher.
Anacortes.  Emma Currier (Mrs. W. L. Burch)--  Ellensburg.  Noah
Davenport-Student U. of W.,  Seattle.  Morfydd Evans-Teacher, Spokane. 
Ethel Elzey-Teacher, Bremerton.  A. D. Foster-Quincy.  Ethel Gerding (Mrs.
J. J. Hoffman)- Woodland.  Roy Goodell-Principal Schools, Yacolt.  May
Greenman (Mrs. W. P. Dyke)-  Forest Grove, Ore.  Anna Grue (Mrs. A. J.
McKeon)--  Leavenworth, Wash.  Alma Hildebrand-Deceased.  Hazel Horn (Mrs.
-)-Bellingham.  Fanny Johnson-Teacher, Pearson.  Elsie Keene-Teacher,
Bellingham.  Julia Kimball- Teacher, Bellingham.  Inez McLaughlin-Teacher,
Shelton.  Grace McNeill-Teacher, Hamilton.  Mary McPherson-Teacher,
Goldendale.  Mildred Marston--Teacher, Avon.  Ruby Marston-Teacher,
Burlington. Bertha Meyer-Teacher, Edmonds.  Erma Misel-Teacher, Wenatchee. 
Margaret Moore-Teacher, Bonner's  Ferry, Idaho.  Ether Moy-Teacher,
Seattle.  Gretta Pattison-Teacher, Spokane.  Bessie Prickman- Teacher,
Olympia.  Merle Rogers-Teacher, Sultan.  Alfred Ross-Principal
School-Bellingham.  Grace Ross-Teacher, Port Angeles.  Marris
Schwartz-Attorney, Bellingham.  Herman Smith-Principal School, Wahl. 
Hannah Spedding-Teacher, Everson.  Olive Splane--Teacher, Sedro-Woolley. 
Mattie Stanton- Teacher, Little Rock,  Cal.  Carl Storlie-Student U. of
Chicago,  Chicago.  Olive Switzer-Teacher- Bellingham.  Warenna
Thayer-Teacher, Olympia.  Addie Thomas-Teacher, Kalama.  Minerva Tower-
Teacher, Seattle.  Freda Uhlman-Teacher, Bellingham.  Frank
Umbarger-Principal School,  Burlington. Celia Wahl-Teacher, Walker.  Grace
Warkle-Student, Pullman.  Lena Watrous (Mrs. Chas. Hughes)- Yelm.  Harriet
White-Teacher-Colfax.  Martha Wiburg-Teacher, Bellingham.  Ruth
Wilkinson-Teacher, Blaine.  Novella Ziese-Teacher, Bellingham.  CLASS OF
1910  Ethel Agan-Teacher, Tacoma.  Nellie Akan-Teacher, Alger.  Julia
Ambrose-Teacher, Bellingham.  Grace Armstrong-Teacher, Monroe.  Vivian
Johnson (Mrs. S. Lawrence)-  Raleigh, Ore.  Clara Junk-Teacher, Olympia. 
Ida Kreidl (Mrs. Grassmeyer)- Bow.    Page One Hundred Seventy-Six

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[CLASS OF 1910]  Juanita Ambrose-Teacher, Bellingham.  Lucy Bonker-Teacher,
Port Angeles.  Anna Bowie-Teacher-Goldendale.  Margaret Bowie-Teacher,
Goldendale.  Myrtle Brown-Teacher, Custer.  Stella  Brown-Teacher, The
Dalles,  Ore.  Phoebe Buell-Teacher, Tacoma.  Erminie Calder-Teacher,
Bremerton.  Ada Campbell-Teacher, Everett.  Lillian Carleton-Teacher,
Everett.  Florence Charroin-Teacher, Bellingham.  Helen Clark-Teacher,
Spokane.  Mabel Clark-Teacher, Bellingham.  Claude Clifford-Teacher Manual 
Training, Raymond.,  Harriet Clouston-Teacher, Tacoma.  Margaret
Clouston-Teacher, Tacoma. Jessie Coleman (Mrs. R. L. Campbell) 
-Bellingham.  Florence Connell-Teacher, Bellingham.  Florence
.Currier-Teachery Ellensburg.  Frances DesAulmers-Teacher, Arlington.  Moe
Dolson-Student U. of W., Seattle.  Edna Dow-Teacher, Douglas, Alaska. 
Florence Drysdale-Teacher, Dayton.  Mary Dubois- Teacher, Vancouver,  Wash.
 Rossie Elzey-Teacher, Chehalis.  Ida A. Felt-Supervisor S. N. S.,
Bellingham.  Amelia Fisk-Teacher, Clinton.  Gladys Fuller-Teacher, Almira. 
Helen Gildersleeve-Teacher, Holtville,  Cal.  Ethel Goerig-Teacher,
Woodland.  Donna Griffith-Teacher, Tacoma.  Nora Haffley-Teacher, Tacoma. 
Grace Heaton-Teacher, Bellingham.  Elizabeth Hemphill-Teacher, Auburn. 
Pearl Hoffman- Teacher, Davenport.  Freda Honrath-Teacher, Prairie,  Wash. 
Adele Huntington-Teacher, Sumner.  Abbie Johnson-Student U. of W., Seattle.
 Clara Jones-Teacher. North Yakima.  Eleanor Keel-Teacher, White Salmon. 
Ina Landon (Mrs. L. C. Wright)-  Blaine.  Leona E. Laube (Mrs. - )  Edna
Lawrence-Teacher, Bellingham.  Hilda Lobe-Teacher, North Yakima.  Mrs. Amy
McDaniel-At Home, Weston,  Ore.  Florence McKean-Teacher, Avon.  Grace
McLeran-At Home, Bellingham.  Effle Morgan-Teacher, Dayton.  Hilda
Musgrove-Teacher, Bellingham.  Bessie Nicoll-Teacher, Lebam.  Ethel S.
Nichols-Teacher, Richardson. Vale Nixon-Teacher, Stanwood.  Margaret
Oliver-Teacher, Colfax.  Esther Parkyn-Teacher, Mountain Grove, Mo. 
Elizabeth Pease-Teacher, Davenport.  Huldah Peterson-Teacher-Seattle.  Lou
Preble- Teacher, Arlington.  Nita Richford-Teacher, Sedro-Woolley.  Mina
Rowell-Teacher, Spokane.  Viola Ryan- Teacher, Vancouver.  Minnie
Sanderson-Teacher, Malden.  Margaret Sharkey-Teacher, Sunnyside.  Alta
Shephard-Teacher, Lyman.  Grace Sillix-Teacher, Tacoma.  Lenore
Snodgrass-Teacher, Vancouver. Laura Souders-Teacher, Bellingham.  Betsy
Stenberg-Teacher, Bellingham.  Herbert Studebaker-Student U. of  WV.,
Seattle.  Lillian Tapping-Teacher, Bellingham.  Mayme TeRoller-Teacher,
Seattle.  Rosalena Thibert-Teacher, Portland,  Ore.  Emma
Wahlstrand-Teacher, Anacortes.  Margaret Walton-Teacher, Snohomish.  Mary
Watrous-Teacher, Bellingham.  Vida Welbon-Teacher, Bellingham.  Gladys
Wheeler- Teacher, Tacoma.  Lena Wilson-Teacher, Tacoma.  Myrta
Wikey-Teacher, Prescott.  Sarah Wiseman- Teacher, Auburn.  CLASS OF 1911 
Adelaide Abercrombie-Teacher, Twin  Falls, Idaho.  Daisy Allason-- Student
U. of W., Seattle.  Ida B. Anderson--Teacher, Oneida.  Pearl
Hightower-Teacher, Sedro- Woolley.  Carrie Hildebrand-Teacher, Bellingham. 
Jessie Jeans-Teacher, Earlington.  Page One Hundred Seventy-Seven

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[CLASS OF 1911]  Georgia Alderman-Teacher, Bellingham.  Laura
Angst-Teacher, Ferndale.  Lucinda Bailey-Teacher, Olympia.  Rilla
Ball-Teacher, Bellingham.  Gertrude Barker-Astoria, Ore.  Marian
Bascom-Teacher, Twin Falls,  Idaho.  Florence Benson-Teacher, Coquille, 
Ore.  Olga Bergstrum- Teacher, Bellingham.  Florence Bras-Teacher, Grand 
Mound.  Raoul Brinck-Teacher, Lyman.  Josephine Brown-Teacher, South  Bend.
 Elsie Buchanan-Teacher, Halleck,  Cal.  Ruth Burke-Teacher, South Bend.  
Charlotte Busby-Teacher, Chelan.  Agnes Caldwell-Teacher, Bellingham.  Lora
E. Chalmers-Nehalem, Ore.  Beatrice Clark-Teacher, Salem, Ore.  Bernard
Davenport-Principal Schools  -Nooksack.  Ethelyn Davis-Teacher, Orting. 
Genevieve Davis-Teacher, Enumclaw.  Teresa DeReamer-Teacher, Tacoma.
Augusta Dickie-Teacher, Seattle.  Dorothy Donovan-Teacher, Conconully. 
Emma Dubuque-Teacher, Seattle.  Lucy Dulitz-Teacher, Aberdeen.  Olga
Emerson-Teacher, South Bellingham.  Blodwen Evans (Mrs. R. R. Sidebotham) 
-Spokane.  Ella Evans-Teacher, Waukon.  Helen Finch-Teacher, Spokane. Helen
Freeborn-Teacher, Seattle.  Mabel French-Teacher, Sedro-Woolley.  Clayton
Gibson-Principal School, Seattle.  Karen Gilbertson-Teacher, Tacoma. 
Blanche Goodrick-Teacher, Northwood.  Mary Gray  (Mrs. - )-Winona,  Minn. 
Cyrus Hanks-Principal School, Port  Orchard.  Christine Hemingsen-Teacher,
Oak  Harbor.  Mabel Aspenwall-Student U. of W.,  Seattle.  Josephine
Brown-Teacher, South  Bend. Hersalora Goodspeed-Bellingham.  Geneva
Johnson-Student U. of W.,  Seattle.  Violet Johnson-Teacher, Douglas, 
Alaska.  Mrs. Mabel Johnson-Teacher, Winlock.  Hazel Jurgens-Teacher,
Bellingham.  Eva Jurgenson-Teacher, Everett.  Gwendolyn Kellett-Teacher,
Renton.  Mabel Kimball-Teacher, Kalama. Agnes Lamar-Teacher, Hamilton. 
Ellen Laurence-Teacher, Mt. Vernon.  Arthur McCoubrey-Principal School, 
Pt. Roberts.  Gertrude McDonald-Teacher, Tacoma.  Laura Mason-Teacher,
Tacoma.  Laura Mellish-Teacher, Centralia.  Teresa Miller-Teacher, R. F.
D., Lynden.  Jessie Modesitt-Teacher, Napoleon.   Phila Nicoll-Teacher,
Blaine.  Andrea Nord-Student U. of W., Seattle.  Esther Nyland-Teacher,
Astoria, Ore.  Walborg Olsen-Teacher, Bremerton.  Alice Peacock-Teacher,
Buckley.  Florence Plumb (Mrs. -)- Seattle.  Verna Prader-Ashland, Ore. 
Etta Rand-Teacher, Seattle  Alta B. Reichert-Teacher, Kahlotus. Florence
Remley-Osceola, Wis.  Emma Rexroth-Teacher, Sedro-  Woolley.  Marie
Ryan-Teacher High School,  Kapowsin.  Gertrude, Scott-Teacher, South
Bellingham.  Ella M. Scoville-Teacher, Tonasket. Mary E. Sexton-Teacher,
Marysville.  Loraine Sherwood-Student, Oskaloosa,  Iowa.  Elizabeth
Shields- Teacher, Coolidge.  Mary Shoultes-Teacher, Arlington.  Pearl
Stanton-Teacher, Shelton.  Margaret Stark- Teacher, Seattle,  Frances
Stewart-Teacher, Chehalis.  Ellen Thomas-At Home, Seattle.  Laura
Thompson-Bellingham.  Hedwig Utzinger-Teacher, Astoria,  Ore.  Leonora
Wahl-Teacher, Roslyn.  Retta Walker-Rosberg, Ore.  Myrtle Wall-Teacher,
Bellingham.  Helen Wright-Teacher, Spokane.  Ida Hibbard- Teacher,
Bellingham.  Hana McMahon-Teacher, Lynden.  Zera Nielsen--Teacher,
Ferndale.  Mildred SoReille-Teacher, Olympia.  Page One Hundred'
Seventy-Eight

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CLASS OF 1912  Molly Bolick-Teacher, Asotin.  Mabel Bragdon-Teacher,
Bremerton.  Ruth Buchanan- Teacher, Yacolt.  Alice Case-Teacher, Port
Blakeley.  Inez ClaWson-Teacher, Olympia.  Sylpha Cole- Teacher, South
Bellingham.  Gertrude Conant-Teacher, Olympia.  Anna Conmey-Teacher,
Sedro-Wool ley.  Lillian Cooke-Teacher, Kent.  Charlotte Davis-Teacher,
Bellingham.  May C. P. DeCrane-Student U. of W.,  Seattle.  Hazel
Doolittle-Teacher, Index.  Jessie Ruerr-Teacher, Dewey.  Eulalie
Durfee-Teacher, Phillipsburg,  Mont.  Irma Durkee-Teacher, Tacoma.  Grace
Allen Erkelens-?  Gladys Farley-Teacher, Bellingham.  Gertrude
Fisher-Teacher, Lynden.  Mabel Foran-Teacher, Everett.  Era
Franklin-Teacher, Quincy.  Esther Franzen-Teacher, Adna.  Lorena
Frey-Teacher, Sumner.  Nondus Gaines-Teacher, Vancouver,  B. C.  Carrie
George-Teacher, Petersburg,  Alaska.  Carrie Getz-Teacher-Sumner.  Nancy E.
Gilbreath-Teacher, Dayton.  Harry F. Heath-Teacher, ?  Hazel H.
Henkle-Teacher, Tekoa.  Grace Headrick-Student U. of W.,  Seattle.  Arne S.
Jensen-Teacher, Coupeville.  Eleanor Johnson-Teacher, Mt.  Vernon. 
Ingeborg Johnson-Teacher-Montera  Sidney Johnson-U. of W. ,Seattle.  Mabel
Jordan-Teacher, Lynden.  Helen Kalbus-Chehalis.  Helen Linden-Prosser. 
Lovell, Bessie-Seattle.  Elizabeth Mann- Wickersham.  Jessie Meeks-  Abbie
Mills-Seattle.  Emma Montgomery-Bellingham.  Olga Olson-Port Blakeley. 
Violet E. Payne (Mrs. Jensen)-Bellingham.  Mary Pilz-Lowell.  Agnes
Pitsch-Yacolt.  Kate Potts-Havelock, Iowa.  Grace Proctor-Everett.  Winnie
Salvo-Bellingham.  Nellie Salvon--Astoria.  Albert G. Stinson-Ravensdale. 
Hazel Thulin-Bellingham.  Martha Tiffany-South Bellingham.  Anne C.
Troedson- Ione, Ore.  Lois Webber-Eagle Cliff.  Zoe V. Wherry-Goshen. 
Ethel M. Wold-Stanwood.  Iva Wright- Sumner.  Herbert R. York-Newberg ,Ore.
 Ida M. Zobrist-Wickersham.  CANDIDATES FOR GRADUATION IN JULY, 1912 
Jessie Battle-Seattle.  Charles E. Becker-Little Falls.  Isabel Boaler-
Quincy.  Minnie Burroughs-White Salmon.  Carrie M. Busby-Friday Harbor. 
Mabel Cain-Seattle (?)  Clara  Collins-Bremerton.  Elizabeth Cook-Puyallup.
 Terrence Cunningham-Van Wyck.  Cletus Elvins-Puyallup.   E. H. Evans-Mt.
Vernon.  Veda Forrest-Bellingham.  Ruth A. Gottlieb-Student U. of W., 
Seattle.  Lola G. Golden-Bellingham.  Carol Johnson-Centralia.  Jennie
King-Bellingham.  Lois Pebley-Dayton.  Grayce Phelps-Seattle.  May
Reasoner-Bellingham.  John Richardson-Hoquiam.  Agnes Stewart-  Gertrude
Stevenson-Yacolt.  Mary Strahberger-Seattle.  Dorothy Treutle (Mrs.
Conant)-Bellingham.  Marian Valentine-Everett.  Marietta Yolton-Bellingham.
 CLASS OF 1912 1/2  Mabel Brown-At Home, Grand Dalles  Hetty
Burnett-Student U. of W.,  Seattle.  Belle Comstock.  Marguerite
Crocby-Teacher, Bellingham.  Lillian Guie-Teacher-Leavenworth.  Dorothy
Hughes-Teacher, Raymond.  E. B. Martin- Teacher, Bremerton.  Jennie Kesler
Rall-Tacoma.  Jennie Robbin-Teacher, Bellingham.  Gracia Robinson- Teacher,
Arlington.  Opal B. Spinning (Mrs. Kilkoran)-  Seattle.  Page One Hundred
Seventy-Nine

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 180

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[Image]  KLIPSUN--Sunset  Page One Hundred Eighty

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 181

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ABSOLUTE SAFETY  We Cash all Checks of the Normal  Students Without Charge 
Northwestern National Bank  Mason Building Bellingham, Wn.  KEMPHAUS   CO. 
206-208 W. Holly Street  WHERE PRICES ARE ALWAYS RIGHT  COME IN AND LET US
SHOW YOU THE  PRETTIEST LINE OF WASH GOODS  AND WHITE FABRICS IN TOWN - - 
C-B a La Spirite and La Victoria Lace  Front Corsets Pictorial Review
Patterns  KEMPHAUS   CO.  Page One Hundred Eighty-One

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 182

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Ford's Parlor of Dainties  MILK, CREAM, WHIPPING CREAM, ICE CREAM, BUTTER, 
EGGS, CANDIES  and HOME COOKED MEALS  FANCY BAKING TO ORDER IS OUR
SPECIALTY    1309 Dock Street : :  : Bellingham, Washington    BELLINGlAM
NATIONAL  BANK  Issues  "A.B.A." Cheques for travel in any part of the
civilized world. These $10, $20, $50 and $100 cheques are the safest, most
convenient kind of "travelmoney." There is no red-tape in their use; no
vexations delay or embarrassment--you simply sign one of them and pay your
bill. Your signature identifies you. Ask for booklet.   Page One Hundred
Eighty- Two

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 183

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Special to Students  WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED A NEW AND  DISTINCT LINE OF 
Whiting's Latest Styles  Boxed and Pound Papers 20 per cent off  Until July
1, 1913, to Normal Students  This is the finest  line of Ladies' and
Gentlemen's  Stationery ever shown in this city  Union Printing', Binding  
 Stationery Co., Inc.  Phone Main 265  The Vienna Dry Cleaning and Dye
Works  J. J. GRAHAM, PROP.  Ladies' and Gents' Garments Cleaned,  Dyed and
Neatly Repaired  DRY CLEANING A SPECIALTY  Work called for and delivered 
1200 Elk St., Cor. Chestnut Bellingham, Wash.  STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
Bellingham, Washington  Fifteenth year opens September 3d, 1913  Three
courses of study are offered for   High School Graduates:  Primary Course 
Rural School Course  General Course  General facilities include
laboratories, library, museum, gymnasium,  athletic field, literary
societies and practice school Send for illustrated catalogue E. T. MATHES,
Principal  Page One Hundred Eighty-Three

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 184

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MAIN 427  IVIORRIS J. SC I- WA FRTZ  ATTORNEY AT LAW BELLINGHAM  First
Student-Teacher (confidentially)-How do you pronounce  r-e-c-e-s-s?  Second
Student-Teacher (diplomaically)-The way all my  pupils do.  -o-  For Sale
at $2300, or Rent at $17.50 a Month  Our 7-room house close by Normal
School, with ventilating  grate in fireplace (heating aroom above),
porcelain  plumbing fixtures, and possibly the use of a square  piano and
Majestic range. Place has two lots, each 50  by 100 feet, on high  dry
site, 15 fruit trees and shed arranged  for cow and chickens. Parties
engaging this  place soon can have some choice in the selection of new 
paint and paper  ROSA D. HANN  Phone 3081 417 Indian Street  t BREAK THE
MONOTONY OF YOUR BOARDING  HOUSE MEALS BY DINING AT - - -  THE CAFE
RICHELIEU ON SUNDAY  JUST THE PLACE FOR A DINNER PARTY  Dock Street,
Opposite Metropolitan Theatre    Page One -Hundred Eighty-Four

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 185

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Larson's Livery and Transfer  Established in 1895  WOOD AND COAL  HACKS AT
ALL HOURS  HEAVY TRUCKING t  FURNITURE AND PIANO   MOVING A SPECIALTY 
EXPRESS AND DRAYING  BRICK STORAGE ROOMS  FIRE PROOF BUILDING  AUTOMOBILES
FOR HIRE  AMBULANCE, BAGGAGE HAULED DAY OR NIGHT  AT DAY PRICES   We
operate under contract with steamers and railways. Messengers on trains and
boats  W. B. LARSON, Manager  1328-30 Elk Street Phone Main 70   Get Your
Commencement 4  Flowers Now  BARKER  Can sell you a fine line of  Roses and
Carnations BARKER'S FLOWER STORE  117 West Holly Street  Page One Hundred
Eighty-Five

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Page 186

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I'll Make You One in a Jiffy  He:- "This certainly has been an enjoyable
evening-  I enjoyed the play, also the walk home in the  sharp frosty
air-and I would enjoy a Welsh  Rarebit, were it not so much of a bother to
you."  She:-"Oh !-No bother at all-you forget the electric  grill-I'll make
you one in a jiffy."  He:-"Oh !- Yes, let's have a Welsh Rarebit-that  G-E
Grill is a magical little stove."  The G-E Radiant Electric Grill is now
considered  an essential in every up-to-date household. We  handle ths
wizard of electric cooking devices.  PUGET SOUND TRACTION,  LIGHT   POWER
CO.    Page One Hundred Eighty-Six

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Back Cover Verso

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     Klipsun, 1913 - Klipsun, 1913 - Back Cover

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