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1918

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     Klipsun, 1918

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Cover

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page [2] of cover

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Vlki  Aj  "Olt  F:  Alk  AT  tA ;  A,  m  3.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 1

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THIS IS OF SPECIAL  IMPORTANCE TO  GRADUATES  The policy of this school is
to always keep in touch with its grad-uates  and former students so as to
be of assistance to them whenever  needed.  The Normal Book Store, being a
part of this institution, also desires  to keep in touch with its patrons
and has this proposition to make:  To those of you who will be located in
places where it will be im-possible  for you to get many of the things
needed in teaching we will  agree to fill any order sent us providing we
have the goods in stock and  providing cash is sent to cover. You are all
more or less familiar with  our prices, so in making your remittances
please send enough to cover  the article or articles, together with the
postage. If there is anything  left we will return the balance to you or
give you credit for same.  Those of you who are located handy to regular
dealers, we advise  that you buy of them. It is not our desire to secure
business that right-fully  belongs to them.  NORMAL BOOK  STORE  C. C.
BAUGHMAN, Manager

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 2

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Montague   McHugh r,  ,  Montague   McHugh  IN C.  10 per cent discount to
students and faculty.  -- IN C  WHEN YOU THINK-NEW CLOTHES-think  of this
store with a large, well selected assortment of all  the latest styles in
dependable wearables for young women.  WHEN YOU THINK-DRY GOODS-think  of
this store-because it is offering the most complete var-iety  of silk,
woolen and cotton materials by the yard to be found  in this section.  WHEN
YOU THINK-ACCESSORIES AND FINERY  such as gloves, neckwear, hosiery,
underwear, umbrellas, nov-elty  jewelry, etc., think of this store as you
will always find  the  best selection of smart styles here.  WHEN YOU
THINK-OF SAVING MONEY  and securing the highest quality always think of

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 3

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When in need of anything in  STATIONERY OR BOOKS  See  GRIGGS  Stationery 
and Printing  Co. LUDWIG'S  BIG LITTLE STORE  The biggest values for the
least  money, consistent with quality. Diamonds  Pearls  Bracelet Watches 
La Vallieres  Complete line of the best goods  that money and experience
can  buy.  REMEMBER-We make every-thing  run that has wheels  Geo. E.
Ludwig  WATCH EXPERT  Alaska Bldg., Bellingham, Wash.  Battersby Bros. 
Always Reliable  Farewell  Seniors  We have appreciated your loyal 
patronage and thank you for  foir same. Your commnendation  to your
friends, of our methods,  merchandise and prices would be  appreciated. 
May all vour ambitions materal- ize  and your career )e one of un-bounded 
success.  When Wearied by Trick  Ads go to  Macklin  for DRY GOODS,
HOSIERY,  LADIES' AND MEN'S  FURNISHINGS  1320 Bay Street

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 4

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THROUGH OUR MEMBERSHIP  in the Federal Reserve Banking System, we are
placed in a stronger po- sition  than ever before to take care of the
requirements of all our deposit-ors,  whether large or small, whether they
keep checking or saving ac-counts;  and at the same time to give them the
most modern banking ser-vice.  WVhy not open an account with us and begin
at once to participate  in these benefits and the additional protection
which this system gives  to your money deposited with us.  BELLINGHAM
NATIONAL BANK  MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM  Dupar-Blythe Co.  PHONE 55 
HEATING AND  PLUMBING  1313 R. N. \xe.  1004 \White ll1dg.  SIE\TTLE. \ASi
l.  You will find the Best and Fresh-est  the Market affords always  on the
table at Reasonable  Prices  Walter S. Armstrong-1511 Dock

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 5

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The First National Bank  Bellingham, Wash.  DIRECTORS  J. J. Donovan  F. J.
\Wood  Lin 11. Hadle; E. W. Purdy  P. P. Lee Alex.  D. Campbell  M. Muir 
OFFICERS  E. W PURDY, President J. J. DONOVAN,  Vice President ALEX
M.MUIR,Cashier  H. C. HEAL, Asst. Cashier A. L. FA WCETT, Asst. Cashier
TOTAL RESOURCES OVER THREE MILLION DOLLARS  \Iemlber of Federal Reserve
System  I Wish to Thank You  For Your Valued Patronage  During the School
Year  FOR THE BEST IN CANDIES  AND ICE  CREAM  119 East Holly St.  Absolute
'Safety  ()pen your checking account with  us and pay your bills by check. 
\\e cash all checks of the Normal  Students with out charge.  NORTHWESTERN 
NATIONAL BANK  i\1 e ens li1ig. I niglh Iai l\m1, n \V 11.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 6

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Congratulations to the  Senior Class of  1918  May Success Crown Your
Future Efforts  Union Printing, Binding and  Stationery Co.  Most modernly
equipped Printing and Bookbinding  plant in the Northwest

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 7

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The J. B. WAHL Store  NORMAL GIRLS APPRECIATE  The Opportunity of Selecting
Up-To-Date Clothes  Ready-to-Wear  At Very Reasonable Prices  "Your mother
would approve Wahl styles"  Dr. E. T. MATHES  is at the front  In the
Service of His Country  \Ve are at the fro it with the la:.e;t  anid )best
in Stationery  Fiction  Fountain Pens  School Supplies  Flags  Service
Flags  Pennants  Greeting Cards Typewriters  Pathephones  And are at NY()UR
Service  E.T .M \T lES BOOK CO.  110 West Holly IEGLGLIENSGTH aAnMd'S  IST 
AMERICAN  Theatre  Home of first run Photo-Plays  and latest Theatrical
Attractions  YOUR PATRONAGE IS  CORDIALLY INVITED  ,1  i~t

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 8

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I,,  FOR EIGHT YEARS  Has stood for Pure, Clean,  Wholesome  CANDY AND ICE
CREAM  The Ideal Place to  Room and Board  while attending the Normal is
Mr.  and Mrs. L. Johnson's home at  630 HIGH STREET  Phone 3448 References
Required  Reasonable Rates  The  SPRAGUE STUDIO  Extends thanks to Normal
students for a generous patronage.  Our combined efforts were put forth to
please you SPRAGUE STUDIO  201 Quackenbush Bldg.-Entrance on Dock St. 
eelue:

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 9

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Costumes for Every  Occasion  can be secured from  BROCKLINE COSTUME CO. 
1322 Fifth Avenue, Seattle  Phune \1M54 33  Write for Estimates and
Information  Masquerade and Theatrical Costumes, Wigs, Tights, etc.,  for
Rent or Sale  GREASE PAINTS, POWDER, ROUGE, ETC.  Phone 416 1017 Elk St. 
SANITARY  MEAT MARKET  Hlans ()lcerleitner, PIrop).  BEST FRESH, CLEAN 
MEATS, FISH AND POULTRY  At Lowest Prices  If you wish a tasty dinner with 
elegant appointments, come to  the Leopold Hotel.  Our evening Table d'Hot2
D in-ners  are known for their excel  lence.  --  I 1.1l INGR! .\M~

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 10

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New York Office Holly and Commercial Streets  1133 Broadway Bellingham,
Wash.  PANTONS'  -- Present-  The Newest in Spring and Summer Fashions  IN
READY-TO-WEAR  For Social Events, Street, Travel, Shopping, Graduating,
Home and  Sports Wear  ALL PRICED RIGHT  7:X FACINATING MILLINERY  For the
Matron, Maid, Miss or Child, suitable for all occasions  NO DISCOUNTS-Just
one Price and that Price right  THE LEADER STORE  Bellingham, Wash.  Good
Goods  are the Cheapest at any price  See  "Keen Kutter" Tools and Cutlery 
"Quick Meal" Ranges  "Laun Dry Ette" Electric Washer  "Keen Kutter" Lawn
Mowers  "Volo" Electric Sewing Machines  at the  Jenkins=Boys Co.  Cash or
Terms 210 East Holly  E. K. WOOD  LUMBER Co.  So. Bellingham, Wash. 
Wholesale and  Retail Lumber  No Order too Small or too Large  for us to
Furnish  GET OUR PRICES

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 11

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Printed By  The IRISH PRINTING CO.  BELLINGHAM, WASH.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 12

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To our classmates  Somewhere in France  We, the Senior Class of 1918, 
Dedicate this book.  4

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 13

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Fi  19 18  oftg  SMNIOR 0LASS  'WASIfINO-T@iN STATE N@RX*AL SGl3H@@L
BELLI.7%U,9AX WA23H.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 14

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f E  .- ~  ~~s-~--~;t

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 15

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AAA! rA Al ~"tt

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 16

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Aw answe ~ ~red4 ur countm'\ ca11., an OrM w e A lhave w1" lW cn  statr
uiii w ur service Hal

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 17

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#5  C)  C)   lt;is  , ~ b.0  V) b.0

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 18

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i .  IN PROSPECTUS  Dedication  Honor Roll  Trustees  Senior Album 
Publications  Distinguished Visitors  Calendar  Oratory and Debate 
Organizations  War Relief  Literary  Dramatics  Office Force Training
School  Alumini  Athletics  Board of Control  Extension  Engineers 
Gardeners  Class Poem Prophecy  Will  Jokes  Student Life  Frontispiece: 
School Spirit  Faculty  Art  Musical  History  Junior Class  Student
Employees

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 19

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Somewhere in France  Sunset lingered on that day  To rise again in the
east,  And it wove a shroud of sombre ray  To encircle our nation's peace, 
Everlasting peace we had hoped.  Now the sunbeams spread  apart again, 
Opening a nation's heart of pain,  Roused by the voices from afar  Made
helpless by a maddening war,  And off to France a mighty throng,  Leaving
behind in each heart a thorn.  Spirit of love, spirit of peace  Cheer you
onward to that release,  Honor and justice within your power  Over here we
await the hour  Of your return-our nation's joys,  Loving angels watch o'er
you-God save you boys.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 20

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School Spirit  In every institution there comes after a time an indefinable
something  which is known as school spirit. The school spirit is not an
artificial loyalty,  but it is the very soul of the institution which
permeates the life of every in-dividual.  It is the heart or essence of the
school, which breathes life into its  foster children, leaving an imprint
which becomes in them a power not only  for today or tomorrow, but for 
time to come.  The Washington State Normal School as its name implies is a
school'  whose purpose is to train teachers that they may efficiently lead
others to ful-fill  their missions in life. It does not forget that
spiritual influence is the  vital force of every life.  School life does
not consist alone of the study of books and professional  methods but of an
enthusiastic ambition, co-operative activity, for the inti-mate  and
splendid fellowship and, greatest of all, the pervading atmosphere of  the
spirit of democracy.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 21

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TRUSTEES  C. M. (lsen ...... -----.....---.-............ .B.e.ll.in.g.h.a.m
 F . J. B arlow .......................................B.
.e..l.l.i.n..g.h..a..m.........  Thomas Smith
.......................M..o.u.nt. .V.e.r.n.o.n.............  BOARD OF
EDUCATION  Mrs. Josephine Corliss Preston
...............(.)l.y.m..p.ia..............  Arthur Wilson
..................... ......--------------------............ Olympia  Dr.
Henry Suzzalo ...........................Se.a.t.tl.e...........  Dr. E. O.
Holland .........................P.u.l.l.ma.n..........................  D
r. George W . Nash
......................Be.l.l.in.g.h.a......................  C. R. Frazier
................ ................................. Everett  H .  M . H art
........................................S.p..o..k..a.n..e.......
...........  G eorgian D onald .........................O.
k.a.n.o.g.a.n.........................

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 22

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C. M. )SEN  Chairman Board of Trustees  22

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 23

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Klipsun Staff  Olive Edens
..............................-------------------------...............
Literary Critic  Marie Druse .................................. Art Critic 
Cassie Cales ..................... .......................... Business
Manager Editors  Josephine Converse
........................................ Editor-in-chief  Vera JuuI
....................................... ssociate  Carl A. Friske
..................... . ........................ ... Literary  Mary Nathan
.........------------------......-.-..-.-.-..-........
.........O...r..g..a..n. izations  Wyona Graham ............... .
........................ Art  Florence Bush ..............
....................... Dramatics  Herbert Davis
...................................... Athletics  William Edson
................................ Musical  Fannie Abbey
.................................................... Senior Class  Georgia
Springer ...................... Training School Mable McFadden
....................................... Publications  Ruth Pettite
............................ ......... History  Bessie Windley ............
....... ................. ... Faculty  Amy Estep
.......................................... Extension  Ruby Morganthaler
.................. .. .................. Athletics  Albert Booman
............... .............. Oratory and Debate  Stacy Tucker
................................ Junior Class  Paul Waschke
............................................... Calendar  John M iller
.............................................. ........................
Snaps  23

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 24

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Rainr on Oreas  By GLENN HU(;HES  Rain in the islands,  With the black
clouds flying.  And the fast faint spots of sunlight fading on the sea. 
Changing, hurrying, shifting of shadows,  And the high grey fan of
rain-streaks in the east.  Darker, darker,  With the wind rising and
falling more loudly in the trees,  The waves' slap sounding stronger and
quicker on the sand,  Where the drift-wood,  Sad, spent, weather- weary
travelers of the deep,  Lie grimly, white and naked to the rain.  When it
shall come.  Swift whirr of the branches.  An audible sigh. as from the
heavens.  A closing in of shadows,  And the parting flicker of white light:
 Spatter on the rocks,  Steady settling-down of the ominous grey-blackness.
 A strange earth- murmur of languid resignation:  From the ferns  And the
hill-flowers  A soft and sleepy rustle,  As of gratified desire,  And
then---the rain- the rain

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 25

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DR. (El()R( ;t \\. NASH  President Bellingham State Normal School

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 26

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'MISS EXIAN \VOODARD,  Dean of Women, liellingham State Normal School

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 27

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Ur "'' _ I : ' ' :I .I. . .'.:. : ~z'G :I; e .:~ "' .:.'] ':':'~ -' '' ''"i
~. :t:  : :'. .2"'~'  :;  '

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page [28]

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I £  Margaret McCarthy Eleanor Gray Delia Keeler  Ida A. Baker
Chas. R. Scudder Victor H. Hoppe  Dr. Irving E. Miller Grace Brower J. V.
Coughlin  Ruth M. Boring Glenn Hughes

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page [29]

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John F. Caskey  E. A. Bond  Effie Sands  Florence May Morse  Nellie Lee  J.
W. Rindal  Nora B. Cummins  Nellie McCown  Rheba D. Nickerson  Freeman G.
Chute

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page [30]

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Gladys Stephen  Harriet Willoughby  Hope Mowbray  Jared M. Knapp May Mead 
Florence F. Thatcher Ethel Gardner  J. M. Edson Kathleen Skalley  Mrs. Edna
Samsor

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page [31]

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Sarah S. Ormsby S. E. Carver James A. Bever  Florence O'Conner Mlme.
Davenport-Engberg M. Belle Sperr3  L. A. Kibbe Albert C. Herre Dorothy J.
Milne  Harriet WVilloughby Alabel Zoe Wilson

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page [32]

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Mrs .H. W. Spratley  E. J. Klemme  Dr. J. W. Kaylor  Abbie Summer  Bertha
Crawford  J. W. Thompson Mary L. Jensen  Helen Beardsley  W. F. Parish 
Maude Drake  H. C. Philippi

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 33

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SMITH CARLETON  President Students" Association, First Semester  ALBERT
BOO3 MAN  President Students' Association, Second Semester

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 34

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MR. JAMES A. BEVER  Senior Class Advisor  34

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 35

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10iA

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 36

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C. HOLBROOK  President Senior Class  36

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 37

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SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 38

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AERNI LYDIA ..................... Oregon City, Oregon  AGEE, BESSIE  Blaine
High; Philomathean, Choral Club, Oratorio.  ALM, REBUEN A.  Nooksack High;
Philomathean, Junior Debate  Oratorio 1917-18, Track 1917, Philo-Alethian
Play  Track, 1918, Senior Play, Messenger Staff.  ALINDER, CLARA F. Ballard
High; Y. W. C. A., Studio Art, Seattle Club.  AMES, EVA LeCOUNT
.......................... Nooksack   ABBEY, FANNIE MARIE ........
Anacortes, Wahs.  Oratforio Club 1917, Rural Life Club, Y. W. C. A.,
Klip-sun  Staff.  ANDERSON, EDN AM. ................ Redmond, Wash. 
Alethian, Seattle Club, College Club.  ALMOND, JEAN E.
........................ Qubec, Canada  Hoquiam High 1916; Pres.
Philomathean, Y.  W. C. A.  Cabinet, Choral Club 1917, Messenger Staff
1918.  1917,  191'd,  w , .

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 39

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ANDERSON, LILLIAN .............. oquiam, Wash.  Hoquiam (Wash.) High;
Alkisiah Club.  APPLEBY, EVELYN SCOTT  Whatcom High, Bellingham.  ANDERSON,
O. R.  College Club.  ANDERSON, MARGARET G.  Stadium High, Tacoma; College
Club, Hyades.  • * . . .. . ..  ACKER, FREDA
........................ Washougal, Wash.  Philomathean, Y. W. C. A. 
ARMSTRONG, MAIE  Whatcom High; Junior Play Cast, Thespian Play 1916, 
"Milly Dilly," "Quality Street," Thespian.  ATKINSON, ALMA Laurel High. 
ATKINS, RUTH  Whatcom High, Bellingham.  rr  r t

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 40

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ASTELS, FRANCIS D. .............. Bellingham, Wash.  Normal High,
Bellingham, Wash.; Rural Life Club, Sour Dough Club.  ARENSMEIER, LILY S.
.................. Salem, Oregon  Y. M. C. A.  ASPLUND, VERA BANTA, EULA
V.............V...a..n..c..o..u. ver, Wash.  Vancouver (Wash.) High; Choral
Club, Alkislah. BEAUFORT, PAUL ........................ Chehalis, Wash. 
BARRETT, BERNICE C.  Ferndale High; Choral Club.  BASSET, HATTIE
.................................. Bellingham  BARRETT, MRS. WINIFRED
LINDFORS Mt. Vernon High.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 41

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BACKMAN, EMMA S. ................ ochester, Wash.  Olympia High; Alkisiah. 
BARRETT, LOLA  Ferndale  High.  BAYLEY, FLORA .....................
Portland, Oregon  BISH, CLARA M.  Richmond High; Rural Life Club. 
BERGSTROM, ARENE .......................... Bellingham  BERGER, ALMA  Upper
Iowa University; Y.  W. C. A.  BLAKESLEE, MRS. CARRIE ....Portland, Ogeron 
BLETHEN, FLORENCE  Woodland High; Y. W. C. A.  sr  rfi:

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 42

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U  BRAY, MYRLE  Cashmere High; Adlelante Club, Red Cross.  BOOMAN, ALBERT 
Lynden High; Board of Control 1917, Philomathean,  President of Student
Association, Messenger Staff, Klip-sun  Staff,  Y. M. C. A.  BRADLEY, EDNA
K.  Lynden High; Rural Life Club.  BLOOM, FRANCES MARIE "BLOSSOM"  Lynden
High; Rural Life Club, Choral Club, Y. W. C.  A., Oratorio, Senior Play
cast. BRYANT, HELEN MURIEL  Broadway High; Seattle Club, Philomathean. 
BROTNOV, MARGUERITE ................ Bellingham  BRENTS, MRS. JENNIE
....... Stephen, Minnesota  BRINKER, VIVIAN ................ Freewater,
Oregon  Choral Club.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 43

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BURNETTE, ROSE E .......... Lecompton, Kansas  College Club, Orchestra. 
BRANNICK, MAY Whatcom High; Rural Life, Choral Club.  BELCH, JEAN
................................ Anacortes, Wash. Stadium High, Tacoma.;
Studio Art, Y. W. C. A.  BUSH, FLORENCE ...............................
Burlington BRASHIER, INA A. ............... ...... Dryad, Wash.  BROWN,
HELEN  Centralia High.  BURK, MARY K. .....................................
Blaine, R. 2  Lynden High School; Rural Life Club, Choral Club,  Y. W. C.
A. BROWN, ELMER J. ........... Bellingham, Wash.  Glee Club, Alethian,
Klipsun Staff.  AR

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 44

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'5  CALES, CASSIE C. ................... ...................... Bucoda 
Normal High, Bellingham; Pres. Y. W. C. A. '16-'18, H.  L. S., Student
Council, Mgr. Cafeteria '16, Messenger,  Klipsun Staff, Hyades Club.
CLAUSSEN, CHARLOTTE .............. elm, \Vash.  Y. W. C. A., Cafeteria Mgr.
1917-18, Alethian, Choral Club.  COATES, SELMA GENE ....................
Coupeville  CARLSON, LYDIA  Lincoln High, Seattle; Seattle Club, Y. W. C.
A.  CARRICK, ELLA  Whatcom High; Alethlan.  CARY, BERTHA E. ...........
Edmunds, Wash.  Choral Club, Alethian Club.  COLLINS, FRANCES  Whatcom
High; Philomathean Club, College Club.  CARLSON, SINGNIE BURTON

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 45

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CONVERSE, JOSEPHINE  McMinnville College; Editor-in-Chief Klipsun,
Asso-ciate  Editor Messenger, Y. W. C. A.  CRAWFORD, ETHEL E. ..........
Bremerton, Wash.  Studio Art.  CONDIT, FAITH ..............................
Juneau, Alaska  CLEARY, AMY M.  Fairhaven High, Bellingham; Choral Club.
CHARROIN, RUTH G. ............ Bellingham  Fairhaven High, Bellingham. 
CONNELL, NETTIE  Dryad High; Choral Club, Hyades.  CHRISTENSEN, MARIE 
Centralia High; Thespian, Orchestra, Sisters' League,  Senior Play.  DAY,
ELIZABETH B.  Whatcom High; Adelante Club.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 46

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DRIVER, AILEEN .............................. Port Orchard  DU LIN, DONNA 
Burlington High.  DRAKE, RUBY H. .................. Seattle  Alethian Club,
Seattle Club.  DOLMAN, RUBY .................. Spokane  DODD MARTHA
...................................... Bellingham  DICK, NELLIE  Lincoln
High, Seattle; Choral Club, Oratorio Chorus, Y.  W. C. A., Seattle Club,
Ladies' Quartette.  DINKLE, RESSA  Harmony High; Rural Life.  DAVIS,
ELIZABETH B. .................... Bellingham

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 47

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DAUBINSPECK, MIRIAM  DAVIS, "GIG" HERBERT  Lincoln High, Tacoma; Athletic
Editor Messenger 1916-17, Sec. Alethian Society 1917, Football 1917, Vice- 
Pres. Tacoma Club 1917, Basket Ball 1917- 18, Vice-Pres.  Rural Life 1918,
Athletic Editor Klipsun 1918.  DAHLQUIST, JOSEPHINE  Laurel High; Choral
Club.  ELLIOTT, DORA LEE ................................ Seattle  Seattle
Club.  ENGER, EMIL C ....................................... Everett 
EVERETT, ESTELLE M'CLURE ........ Sunnyside  ESTEP, AMY JOSEPHINE 
Messenger Staff, College Club, Oratorio.  ENDRIGHI, CARRIE T.  Snohomish
(Wash) High;  Hyades Club, Sisters'  League Club, Choral Club.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 48

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ENGLISH, ADA ELLEN  Choral Club, Alethian Club.  ELANDER, RUTH E.  Broadway
High, Seattle; Thespian, Junior Play, Sen-ior  Play, Choral Club, Oratorio,
Y. W. C. A., Seattle Club.  ELLINGTON, RUBY
...................................... Seattle  Thespian, Y. W. C. A.,
Choral Club.  EAGER , MARION C. .............. Vancouver, Wash-  EDSON,
WILLAM O.  Whatcom High; Editor-in-chief Messenger, Adelante  Club, Track,
Oratorio, Pinafore Senior Play, Y. M. C. A.  EGGERS, HELOISE
....................... Seattle, Wash.  Lincoln Park High, Tacoma; Alkisiah
Club, Sourdough  Club.  EASTERBROOKS, LAEL Whatcom High; Rural Life, Y. W.
C. A., Choral Club.  EDMONDS, MRS. GEORGIA ...... Lakebay, Wash.  
Oratorio, Ohiyesa.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 49

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FREDERICK, BORIS O.  Whatcom High; Ohiyesa.  FOSS, IDA  Broadway High;
Seattle Club, College Club.  FRY, ORREN F.
....................................... Oakville  FREIHEIT, ELSIE LENA 
Rural Life, Sisters' League.  FRISK, C. A.  Southwestern U., Texas; Klipsun
Staff, Messenger  :Staff, Social Democratic Club.  FINCH, MADGE  Burlington
High.  HURM, MARY F .......................... Standpoint, Idaho  Choral
Club, College Club, Y. W. C. A.  FIFIELD, CTAHERINE  Janesville (Wisconsin)
High; Alkisiah Club.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 50

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FATLAND, ELSIE R.  Washington High, Portland, Ore.;  GRAHAM, GLADYS .. 
Stadium High, Tacoma; ean.  ..................... Sylvan, W ash.  Board of
Control, Philomath-  GODLOVE, REIN  Waterville High; Choral Club, Ohiyesa. 
GRAHAM, WYONA  Whatcom High; Studio Art Club.  GUNDERSON, JULIA O.
.......... Stanwood, Wash.  GOERIG, MARIE  Woodland High; Alkislah, Y. W.
C. A.  GETSMAN, ALBERTA. L  Chehalis High; Choral Club, Oratorio, Pinafore,
Y. W.  C. A., Philomathean, Board of Control, Klipsun, Student  Council. 
GUSTAFSON, ELVIRA  Blaine High.  I Ad  College Club.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 51

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71  GIBLIN, CLARA  Chehalis High.  GEMMELL, NINA E ......................
Bellingham  GEHRING, MARY ...................... Bellingham, Wash.  Monroe
High.  HUELSDONK, ELIZABETH  Rural Life.  HANSEN, NINA I.  Ferndale High;
Choral Club.  HOLBROOK, C. RAY ....... Vancouver, Wash.  Philomathean, Y.
M.  C. A., Pinafore, Debate, Senior  Play, Orchestra.  HEPTON, GLADYS
........... Lewiston, Idaho HENDERICKSON, EDITH  Kelson High; Alkisiah
Club, Choral Club, Studio Art,  Oratorio.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 52

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HENDRICKSON, RUTH H. .............. Kelso, Wash.  Alkisiah, Choral Club,
Pinafore.  HUGHES, HOWARD G................  Rural Life.  __Bellingham 
HARDIN, EDITH  Whatcom High; Choral Club, Oratorio.  HANSEN, SEGNA
................B.e.ll.in.g.h.a.m.......  HAGEN, GINA CONSTANCE  Lawrence
High; Basket Ball, Ohiyesa.  HACKETT, LAURA MAE  Shelton High; Y. W. C. A. 
HAVILAND, HARRIET THAYER  Sister's League.  HALEY, OLIVE MAE  Chehalis
High, Chehalis, Wash.; Rural Life Club, Y. W. C. A.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 53

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if  HAIL, IONA  Broadway High, Seattle; Seattle Club, Philomathean 
.Society.  HARTMAN, ELSIE ................................ Bellingham 
Bothell High; Alkisiah Club, Seattle Club, Y. W. C. A  HANNAN, GLADYS MAE, 
Everett High; Everett Club, Y. W. C. A.  HARPER, SYLVIA ................
Bellingham HARTH, BEATRICE ...........  Everett High; Everett Club, 
.......... Whidby Island  Y. W. C. A.  HORWITZ, NORMA  Whatcom High,
Bellingham.  HARTH, ADA .................................. Whidby Island 
HANNAH, MARGARET EVELYN ............ Seattle  College Club, Seattle Club,
Ohlyesa.

     ----------

     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 54

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RLE,JESTIIER ..ED-NA  . S: uu.er- High; Rural Life, Y. W. C. A.  IRELAND,
FRANCES M.  Bradford High, Bradford, Penn.; Board of Control,  Alkisiah,
Choral Club, Oratorio, Pinafore.  JUUL, VERA  Auburn High; Tacoma Club,
Messenger Staff, Klipsun  Staff, Ohiyesa.  JULSEN, EMMA
................................... Bellingham  JOHNS, A. LOUISE  Whatcom
High, Bellingham.  JENSEN, ALFREDA  Faii haven High. JAQUITH, MYRA  Amherst
High, Amherst, Wisconsin; Y. W. C. A., Al-ethian.  JENSEN, LOUISE
............................ Goshen, Wash.  Rural Life Club.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 55

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JOHNSON, ELLEN C. ............................... Ferndale  JOHNSON, STELLA
.......... White Salmon, Wash.  Sec. and Treas. College Club, Ohiyesa, Sec.
and Treas.  Choral Club, Pianist for Orchestra, Assembly, Pinafore. 
JOHNSON, EDNA  Stadium High, Tacoma.  JOHNSON, MRS. HULDA  JOHNSON,  HATTIE
...................... I)ecooah, Iowa  JOHNSON, GILBERT H.  Ferndale High;
Rural Life, College Club.  JOHNSON, ESTHER C. .......... Bellingham,  Rural
Life, Y. W. C. A.  Wash.  KORTHAUER, ESTER  Whatcom High; Oratorio, Choral
Club, Sec. Studio Art  Club, Messenger Staff.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 56

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KELLY, ADA ............................ Bellingham, Wash.  Ferndale, High. 
KNAPTON, FLORENCE .................------- Seattle, Wash.  College Club,
Ohiyesa, Seattle Club.  KLASELL, ESTHER  Port Townsend High, Hyades. 
KNUTSON, ROSE ..................................-------------- Bremerto 
KINER, EDITH ..................................... ....... Govan  KENNETT,
HOMER .................................... Prosser  KLEEB, FLOSSIE M
.-.-............ ...... Woodbine, Iowa  Choral Club, Y. W. C. A.  LITTLE,
ALICE M .......................... Goshen, Wash-  Rural Life.  56

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 57

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LAKE, ALICE L. .................. Port  Ohiyesa, Sister's League. 
Townsend, Wash.  LYON, GERTRUDE ............ Canyon  Alethian Society,
Sister's League.  City, Oregon  LOPP, KATHARINE  Lincoln High, Seattle;
Seattle Club, Hyades, Y. W. C.  A., College Club.  LEMON, ALBERTA
.................................... Everett  LITTERNEAU, FERN  Queen Anne
High, Seattle; Seattle Club.  LITTERNEAU, ANNA, .................. 
LAYTHAM, MARY  Monroe High; Philomathean,  ... Bellingham  Klipsun Staff. 
LARSEN, ESSIE M. ....................................... Tolt  "1 Mw

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 58

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LAUER, ELSIE .............................. Pomeroy, Wash  Philomathean
Club.  LAMMERS, FRIEDA ........ Port Townsend, Wsah  Ohiyesa.  LARSEN, ALMA
 Shelton High; Y. W. C. A.  McCOY, LELA ........................ Walla
Walla, Wash).  McMURRY, BILLIE ........... ..................... Alaska 
Sourdough Club.  McLAUGHLIN, KATHRYN .................. Arlington  McLEOD,
BESSIE  Whatcom High; Rural Life, Y. W. C. A.  McGHEE, LUCILE  Whatcom
High; Choral Club, Oratorio, Seattle- Cub-,  Ohlyesa, Students'
Association.  A

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 59

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McILVAINE, MYRTLE  Stadium High, Tacoma; Tacoma Club, Hyades, Choral 
-Club.  McFADDEN, MABLE ESTHER  Chehalls High; Hays' Literary Society 1914,
Philom-athean  1918, Klipsun Staff. McKIRDY, JANET  Lincoln High; Seattle
Club, Choral Club, Oratorio.  MacDOUGALL, CICILY ANN ..Stanwood, Wash. 
Alkisiah Club.  McABEE, EVA ................................... ....
Seattle  McCLELLAND, HAZEL  Olympia High, Olympia, Wash.; Y. W. C. A.,
Sister's  League, Alethia Club.  MARTIN, MABEL ..................
Bellingham, Wash.  McDONALD, MRE JESSIS HASTINGS ..........
..................................------------ ------... Portland, Oregon 
President Aletheian Club, Y. W. C. A.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 60

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MANLEY, MAUDE  Franklin High, Seattle; Messenger Staff, Alkisiah. 
MERCHANT, JESSIE H.  Mt. Vernon High; Haydes, Y. W. C. A., Choral Club, 
Hockey Team.  MERRITT, CHARLES B.  Lynden High; Rural Life, Y. M. C. A.,
Oratorio.  MELANG, PEARLE .......... Everett, Wash.  Alethian, Spark Plug
Club.  MILLER, JESSIE .......................... Winslow, Wash.  Ohiyesa
Club, Sister's League.  MERCHANT, MABLE  Mt. Vernon High, Y. W. C. A.,
Social Democratic Club.  MILLER, LOUISE  Whatcom High, Bellingham. 
MEREDITH, HARRIET  Whatcom High, Bellingham; Ohiyesa Club.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 61

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IMARTIN, MARY FRANCES  Whatcom (High) Wash.  MANNING, DORIS C.  Ferndale
High; Y. W. C. A.  MILLER, VERA CORAL  Broadway High, Seattle; Y. W. C. A.,
Seattle Club.  MILLER, JOHN H. Whatcom High; Thespian, Basket Ball, Track,
Senior  Play, Klipsun.  MITCHELL, HELEN L.  Coupeville High.  MOLES, ALICE
......................................... Ferndale  MORGENTHALER, RUBY 
Harmony High, Everson, Wash.; Basket Ball, Rural  Life, Klipsun Staff 1918.
 MOORE, MAMIE ................................. Bellingham  Alkasiah Club,
Choral Club.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 62

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MINKLER, FLORENCE ECHO..Vancouver, Wn.  Y. W. C. A.  MILLISON, NEVA M. 
Broadway High, Seattle.  MURRAY, MARGARET E.  Winslow High; Rural Life,
Choral Club.  MOHRMANN, GRACE A Ferndale High; Y. W. C. A.  MONTAG, PHILIP
J.  Whatcom High; Thespian, Messenger Staff, Thespian Play cast.  NICHOLAS,
LYDA  Whatcom High; Rural Life Club, Captain of B. B.  Team '18.  NIELSON,
CLARA F.  Ferndale High; Messenger Staff, Ohiyesa, Choral Club.  NASH, ILA
................................. .................... ... Seattle  Lincoln
High; Y. W. C. A., Alkisiah, Choral.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 63

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V FO  NASI, HELGA K.  Nasel High, Nasel, Wash.  NILES, ELANOR N.  Everett
High; Everett Club. NORDGREN, HANNAH  NELSON, ALMA
............................... B....elligham  Spanish Club.  NYQUIST,
EDITH A.  Rural Life, Minnesota Club.  NEWELL, MABEL ..............
Bellingham  OGDEN, MABEL E. Chelan High; Studio Art, Choral Club.  OLSEN,
AGNES ............. Chicago, Illinois  Rural Life, Y. W. C. A.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 64

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OLIVER, ESTHER ........................ Douglas, Alaska  Douglas High,
Douglas, Alaska; Philomathean, Sour-dough.  O'NEILL, CLARA  Laurel High;
Choral Club.  ONSTINE, MERLE HELLEND  Ferndale High; Rural Life.  ONSTINE,
LUELLA  Ferndale High; Rural Life.  OSBURN, MARION
........................................ Seattle  OSBORN, ADA VIOLA 
Snohomish High; Y. W. C. A.  PRICE, ZETTA  Pendleton High.  PAINTER, LETHA
E.  Everett High; Spark Plug Club.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 65

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PUGSLEY, MYRTLE  Bend High, Bend, Ore.; Junior Play cast, Thespian 
Dramatic Club, Messenger Staff, Sec. Thespian Club, "Mil-ly  Dilly" cast. 
PRICE, GAIL  Arlington High; Alkisiah, Sister's League, Y.  W. C. A. 
POWELL, MAUDE  Woodland (Wash.) High; Hyades Club, Sisters'  League, Choral
Club. POLING, EVERETT ................ Bellingham, Wash.  Alethian. 
PANCHOT, RUTH V.  Lincoln High, Seattle; Hyades Club, Oratorio Club, 
Seattle Club, Y. W. C. A.  PENTTILA, A. LILIA  Nasel High, Nasel, Wash.;
Studio Art Club.  PETITE, RUTH  Vancouver High; Y. W. C. A., Rural Life,
Klipsun  Staff. PALLAS, ELISA MARGARETHA ................. 
..................................................... .... M ukilteo, W
ash.   Everett High; Alethian, Choral Club, Everett Club.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 66

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PETRY, GLADYS  PIERRE, ADELAIDE  Franklin High, Seattle; Choral Club, 
ethian.  Seattle Club, Al- PETERSON, MINNIE A. ......................
Bellingham  PECKHAM, MARCIA  Aberdeen High; Alethian Club.  PEERY, LYDIA
RADIS  Central High, Great Falls, Mont.  I'ARKER, CO)ILA .........
........................ Bellingham  RYEN, AGNES  Lincoln High, Seattle;
Seattle Club.  RICKHART, FLORENCE  Union High, Bremerton, Wash.; Rural
Life.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 67

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iX  IRISSER, RUTH  Lincoln High, Seattle.  ROBINSON, GARNETTE  Chehalis
High; Rural Life, Studio Art, Choral Club.  REINSTEDT, MAMIE
................B..o.th.e.l.l...........  ROWSE, HELNA B.
...................S.e.at.t.l.e................  RAMSEY, IRENE  Lincoln
High, Seattle; Sec. Junior Class 1917, Treas.  Senior Class 1918, Seattle
Club 1918, Hyades 1918.  ROBERSON, MAUDE  Olympia High; Hyades Club. 
RODOLPH, HAROLD A. .................... Bellingham  RANKIN, ESTELLE A. 
Ohiyesa.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 68

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RICE, M AY .......................................... Seattle, W ash. 
Rural Life, Seattle Club.  REHORN, LULU Walla Walla High; Choral Club,
Sisters' League, Col-lege  Club.  RUEGER, IRIS
.............................. Birdsview, Wash.  Normal High; Alethian. 
ROANEY, VELMA RUTH  Whatcom (Wash.) High; Rural Life Club.  ROMAINE, LECIL
................................. Bellingham  ROCHEFORT, YVETTE
................... Bellingham  SANDHEI, RUTH  Whatcom High.  SHARPE, RUBIE
A.  Broadway High; Sister's League, Alethian, Seattle  Club.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 69

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SZYMANSKI, KATHERINE ................ Bellingham  SCANZON, ANNA  Tacoma
High; Y. W. C. A., Philomathean, Choral Club,  SANFORD, JOSEPHINE  Pomeroy
(Wash.) High; Alkisiah Club, Choral Club.  SCHWEITZER, MARCELLA HELEN 
Alkisiah Club, Oratorio.  SHANNON, EMERINE ...........................
Seattle  SCHAFER, ANNA LOUISA ....Montesano, Wash  Alethian Club. SAWYERS,
DENABELLE  Elkton High, Elkton, Oregon.  SEYMORE, PHYLLIE C.
..................... Charleston  " ~1;;-) 7

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 70

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STEELE, MABLE ........................ Kahlotus, Wash.  Rural Life. 
SPEDDING, ALTA B. .................... Everson, Wash.  Alethian Club. 
SPRINGER, GEORGIA E. ....................... Olympia  Klipsun Staff,
Alkisiah Club, Oratorio, Pinafore.  SHULER, PAULINE  Centralia High; Y. W.
C. A., Adelante, Alkisiah. SMITH, WINIFRED MARY  Anacortes (Wash.) High;
Rural Life Club.  SICKENGER, RUBY C. Snohomish High; Choral Club, Rose
Maiden.  SIXEAS, BLANCHE ........................... Bellingham Whatcom
High.  SMITH, MRS. GENEVIVE ........ Skagway, Alaska.  Y. W. C. A.,
Ohiyesa.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 71

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,  STALLINGS, GUSSIE  East Tennessee Normal School.  SILL, JUNE WV. 
Coupeville High.  SHIELDS, EVA ................................ Milton,
Oregon  Choral Club, Y. W. C. A.  TAYLOR, EDITH R ....................
Seattle, Wash.  Rural Life, Tennis Club, Y. W. C. A.  TICKNOR, MARJORIE E
.......... Everson, Wash. Studio Art.  THOMAS, GRACE .......... Black River
Falls, Wis.  Faculty Stenographer, Thespian Club. TEESDALE, MINNIE E.
............. Rockford, Mich.  TOWN, MYRTLE
................................... Darrington Snohomish High; Rural Life
Club, Everett Cadet.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 72

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THOMAS,. IAZEL  -,, :,.er-Wooly High; Rural Life.  THOMAS, GWENDOLYN E. 
Whatcom High, Rural Life.  TIMMERMAN, ELSIE ANNE  Whatcom High, Rural Life.
 TOMLINSON, MARY  Everett High; College  C. A., Sisters' League.  ELIZABETH
.... Arlington  Club, Spark Plug Club, Y. W  TURPLE, GEORGIA  Arlington
High; Alethia Club, Seattle Club,  Guard, Y. W. C. A.  Honor  TYLER, EVA V.
Lawrence High; Rural Life, Basket Ball 1917-18, Hock-ey  Team.  THRALL,
GERALDINE  Everett High; Sister's League, Hyades, Everett Club,  Y. W. C.
A.  TEI GARDEN CHESTER ................ Bellingham Bandon High; Thespian,
Senior Play cast, Thespian,  Play casts, Pinafore.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 73

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TASSELA, NANNA S. V.  Astoria High, Astoria, Oregon.  UPPER, HELEN
ELIZABETH .................. Seattle  Thespian, Seattle Club, College Club,
Messenger Staff,  Thespian Play, Senior Play.  VAN SYCKLE, CALLA
................................ Everett  Home Economics Course.  WEIR,
FRANCES JEAN Alethian, Studio Art.  WASHKE, PAUL R.  Wh-tcom High:
Alethian, G'ee Club, Oratorio. B, se-b.  ll, Minnesota Club, Thespian,
Pinafore, Senior Play.  WEEKS, MARJORIE J ................... San Francisco
WINDLEY, BESSIE A.  Auburn High; Klipsun Staff, Messenger Staff, Ohiyesa, 
Tacoma Club. W\I1.LSON, IDA MAE  S~imme, High; Studio Club.  I; i~W 'il

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 74

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WORKMAN, MAUDE E. ........ Washougal, Wash.  Thespian Club.  WEST, DOROTHY
........................ Winlock, Wash.  Ohiyesa, College Club.  WALKER,
EVA  Whatcom High, Bellingham, Wash.  WYNNE, VIVIAN  Ferndale High; Y. W.
C. A.  WILLISON, MABLE E.  Ferndale High.  WILLIAMS, LILLIAN OLWEN 
Franklin High, Seattle; Alkisiah, Rose Maiden, Seat-tle  Club, Choral Club,
Hockey.  WEBBER,  EMILY ....... Battle Ground, Wash.  Camas High; Studio
Art, Y. W. C. A.  WEBSTER, ELIZABETH  Roy  High; Choral Club.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 75

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WILCOX, ETHEL GRACE .......... Bellingham  Rural Life Club, Sec. Elementary
Class 1917.  WILKEN, ELLA .............................. Colville, Wash. 
Wilbur High; Ohiyesa, Sister's League, Y. W. C. A.  ALLEN, ESTHER  Lincoln
High, Portland, Ore.; Choral Club, Rural Life,  Honor Guard.  BRASHIER, INA
A. ..................................... Dryad  HEMPEL, LILY E.  West
Seattle High; Seattle Club, Choral Club, Ora- torio.  WITTE, HARRIET
.......................... ........ Granger  CHABERT, ROSE MARIE
.............................. Yelm  FOWLER, RUTH E.  Lincoln High; Choral
Club, Oratorio, Seattle Club, Orchestra.  FUERST, EMMA A.
.................................. Sunnyside

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 76

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ANDERSON, A. MAY  Franklin High, Seattle; Oratorio, Studio Art.  BELCH,
ALICE  Anacortes High; Studio Art.  BUSSFIELD, JESSICA B. Meadowdale Beach,
Wn  College Club.  CAVE, MARGUERITE Whatcom High; Studio Art Club. 
CHARROIN, FAY ............................... Bellingham  COOK, ROSETTA
................................... Seattle  Y. W. C. A.  CREIGHTON, OLIVE
M ............................  We.s--s-i-n--- g--t-o---n--
...S....p...rings, South Dakota  ELDER, HARRIETTE TEFFT .... Anacortes, Wn.
FUNKHOUSER, MYRTLE  Ridgefield High.  KAYLOR, MAURINE  Blaine High. 
KLEINWACHTER, ANNA  M.. .......... Atlanta, Ga.  Choral Club, College Club,
Y. W. C. A.  OLIN, RUTH M.  Nooksack High, Everson, Wash.  PETERSON,
WILHELMINE  Fairhaven High.  PHILLIPS, MARY ELIZABETH ...... Bellingham 
SHANNON, MINNIE EMERINE ........... Seattle  Philomathean Club, Seattle
Club, Choral Club.  SHEEDY, CASSIE ...................... Bellingham, Wash.
 Rural Life.  SHUMAN, EDITH -- .................. ..... Yakima, Wash.  El
Paso High, Illinois.  SIMPSON, KRISTY E.  Nooksack High, Everson, Wash. 
STRYKER, ENID I.  Broadway High; Y. W. C. A., Studio Club, Seattle Club.
SULLIVAN, GRACE M. .......... Bellingham, Wash.  Red Cross. Y. W. C. A.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 77

     ----------

lzl  77

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 78

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MISS MARIE CAREY DRUSE  Head of the Art Department, and Art Critic of the
Klipsun  78

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 79

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Every new era brings to us a new need and a new ideal. This period of  -war
through which we are passing  is no exception. It is forcing upon us with 
ever increasing emphasis a new ideal for citizenship. The outcome of the 
war seems to revolve itself largely into a question of efficiency,-the
ef-ficiency  of democracy versus autocracy. We are placing the burden of
the  deadly efficiency of Germany on her educational system, and there can
be  no doubt that the burden of our own efficiency or the lack of it, will
ulti-mately  fall back on our own educational system. Before the war had
fairly  begun in Europe we felt a tightening of the lines in our own
curriculum.  People began to cry for the elimination of non-essentials, the
emphasis of  those subjects that tended toward an efficient, loyal
citizenship.  Perhaps the art department has felt the change more than any
other.  In our art teaching we have had to give up art for art's sake and
take up art  for life's sake. We no longer believe that beauty is its sole
excuse for being, because we have added a demand for usefulness, and we
say, with Kenyon  ,Cox, that the highest aim of  art is to make some useful
thing beautiful.  ,TIhis has meant taking art out of the hands of a few and
placing it in the  hands of everyone who wants it and needs it. And who
does not want and need  it? Art in  its new development has become the most
universal and demo-cratic  of our modes of expression. The man choosing a
letter head for his  business, the woman arranging the furniture of a room
or choosing trimming  for a dress, the child thinking about the arrangement
of an arithmetic paper,  the poet describing  a sunset--one and all,
consciously or unconsciously, ex-ercise  the art faculty. It is this
development of judgment, of choosing one  thing in preference to another,
of weighing one thing against another, that makes art teaching of such
value in the development of a democratic citizen-ship.  It is our business
as art teachers to develop the principles which under-lie  all good
judgment. We must establish a standard which any child may  use, and give
to all who come to us a better and nobler vision of what life  in its
fullness ought to be.

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 80

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ii  '  -

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 81

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ntuhin Art (lub  The Studio Art Club was organized in 1916 in response to
the demand  for an organization  whose purpose it was to develop
appreciation and knowl-edge  of art in various phases. Under the efficient
guidance of Miss Druse  this aim has been fulfilled to a wonderful degree. 
In order to cover as wide a field as possible the work of the club has 
changed with each quarter of the current school year. The first quarter was
 devoted to the study of charcoal as a medium. The work of the second
quarter  took  up costuming designing and interior decoration. During
December the  various painters of the nativity were studied and formed the
basis of the pro-gram  for the Christmas meeting of the club. The work of
the third quarter  began with the study of-art appreciation and took up
especially the study of  landscape. This  included not only the study of
representative landscape ar-tists  but also the making of original
landscapes in various mediums.  The last quarter took up the study of
applied and commercial designs. This included the study of design
principles, the suitability of the design to  its purpose, and the actual
application of the design to the various articles,  such as boxes,
textiles, hand-woven materials and rugs.  The posters made by the club for
various school activities have received  an unusual amount of comment.  The
most practical evidence of this lies in  the fact that some of the business
men of the city have offered  their poster  work to the club, all posters
so made to be paid for at the usual rates.  The club has had interests
outside of its splendid work program. Its  Valentine party, held at the
home of Miss Druse, will go down in the history  of the club as one of the
prettiest, best-planned and best-managed affair of  the school year.  The
programs have included a social hour which gave the girls a splen-did 
opportunity for more intimate acquaintanceship. As a part of the club  work
the girls took charge of the teas given in connection with the art
exhibits.  Taken altogether the year has been a pleasant and profitable one
for the  club. It has deepened the interests for all its members in the art
field and  many have decided to make some line of art a subject for more
extensive  study.  OFFICERS.  First Semester-  [President ...........
................... ....... Jean Belch  Vice-President - ---- a-....s.
...H...e..p..t.o..n...........Glad  Secretary- Treasurer .............
....... .. .... L, elia Pentilla  Sponsors .................... .
............. M iss Druse, M iss Boring  Second Semester-  President
.................- _....Enid Strvker  Vice-President
.......................... .. abll.e. ...O. gden  Secretary
.------.................-------------........-------....................
Esther Kortauer  Treasurer  ............. . .................. .... Clara
Alinder  Sponsors ...........................------------- ... ... Miss
Druse, Miss Boring

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 82

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01r Art TEi-itb  It was this democratic tendency of art that struck one
most forcibly in  the exhibits held under the efficient supervision of Miss
Druse and her as-sistants,  Miss Boring, Miss Milne and Miss Smith. There
was no lack of the  more traditional phases of art teaching, but naturally
it was the newer fea-tures  that caught and held the attention.  One of
these new features was that of toy making, which used thin  wood, coping
saw and oil paints. This section attracted particular attention  from the
leaders and workers in schools, because of the opportunity it of-fers  for
hand work that is worth while, and yet does not require expensive 
equipment. Each pattern was original and there were more than one hundred
varities. The types of patterns easily available include animals and birds,
 Mother Goose figures, historic figures, such as the Quaker, and industrial
fig-ures.  The types of projects to be developed include toys made on a
base or on  wheels, jointed toys, furniture, book racks and window boxes. 
Another feature was a village street, showing the various buildings to be 
found there-the church, the school, the butcher, the baker, the blacksmith,
 the pstoffice, and other buildings typical of village life. The interiors
were complete to the last detail, not even the flowers on the teacher's
desk in the  school house being omitted,  let alone the Hoover signs in the
stores. The  making of this problem involved the use of every bit of
ingenuity and re-sourcefulness  the class could muster. It involved a study
of rural condi-tions,  buildings and industries. It was a problem in
geography, sociology,  history, arithmetic, drawing, construction and
painting rolled into one.  An entirely different class of work was that
found in the weaving sec-tion.  During the year a number of pattern looms
and a large rug loom had  been added to the equipment of the department.
The teaching of the weaving-process  is begun in the first grade of the
Training School, in the weaving of  paper mats, and continued thru the work
of the various grades until it cul--  minates in the work done on the large
commercial looms. On these looms  the student learns the process of warp
stringing, of making a piece of cloth  or a rug, and of weaving a pattern.
The products turned out included rugs,  table runners, pillow tops and
bags.  Other phases of the exhibit might be taken up, but enough has been
said  to show that the art department has worked consistently to make its
courses  varied and broad enough to give the student a fair foundation on
which to  build a reasonable standard of appreciation  and judgment as well
as a reason-able  skill of execution.

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The Weekly Messenger  Devoted to the Interests of the Student Rody,
Washington State Normal School KUT jUD  THE  , \M \  Published by the 
BELLI NG1A M,  IUNIOR  B. S. N. S. Industrial Dep't Press WASIIIN(;TON,
JANUARY, 1918  The Exchange  WASHIlNGTON STA'T NORMAl 'CHOM  February I,
1918 I:rlli ghami. Wash ngton Vol. I, No. I  Vol. 2 No. I  J

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OLIVE EDENS  Censor of all Normal Publications, Liec:ay Critic, and
Associate in English

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.: .G  -IF t

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WILLIAM EDSON  Editor-in-chief of WVeekly Messenger

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When the Messenger was first published in 1901, it was an attractive 
little paper in magazine form containing news of the school, short stories,
ac-tivities  of the clubs, athletics, and social affairs. For the mid-year
and May  Seniors a larger Messenger was printed containing pictures and
special ac-tivities. The demands for the school magazine became so numerous
and frequent  that it was decided to publish the Messenger every week.
Since that time it  has served the students as a weekly school newspaper,
telling the news and  doings of the student body and faculty, giving short
stories and especially  has it enabled the student body to keep in touch
with our alumni, hundreds  of whom are reading the Messenger  each week. 
Its continued success has been due to the untiring efforts of its editors 
and staff, the faithful  and efficient work of Miss Edens as literary
critic, the  loyal support of the student body, and the business men of the
city, who have  so generously advertised.  The Klipsun, the name given to
the annual  that is published by the Sen-ior  Class each year, was first
published by the class of 1913.  It was the aim of the graduating classes
of 1918 to make this Klipsun  bigger and better than any that have preceded
and the result is the patriotic  edition which you hold in your hand.  Thru
the efforts of Miss Cummins, The Junior was published by the  students of
the Training School for the first time in the fall of 1916. The  material
was furnished by students representing each grade and the printing  was
done by the seventh and eighth grade boys, in connection with their  Manual
Training work. The Junior is now a semi- annual paper. The first  one
printed this year was published entirely by the seventh and eighth grade
students. It has furnished an inspiration to the teachers and students
alike,  for there is no greater honor for work well done than to have it
printed in The  Junior.

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KLIPSUN STAFF  t '

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JOSEPHINE CONVERSE  Editor Klipsun  89

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0  KLIPSUN COMMITTEE  9O

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CASSIE CALES  Business Manager of Weekly Messenger  Business Manager of
Klipsun  91

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VERA JUUL  Associate Editor of Klipsun  L. P. ROSCH,  Business Manager
Klipsun  92

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,0  Oo  o oO  osii o2  re  o  It  I  ao Q a  PJ~1  i  r r

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OROTORIO SOCIETY  The Oratorio Society, which was organized after the
beginning of school  in September, has been under the able supervision of
Mrs. Thatcher, doing  some very excellent and beneficial work.  The mixed
chorus has been meeting for practice every Monday evening.  All the members
have worked with a great deal of enthusiasm and interest.  Our first work
began with a rehearsing of several extracts from the  great Oratorios.
After mastering these, with the assistance of Mrs.  Nash,  Mrs. Spratley
and Mr. Harrison T. Raymond, the annual concert was success-fully  given on
December 15th.  PROGRAM OF ORATORIO CONCERT.  Chorus, Gloria in Excelsis;
from "Twelfth Mass..................................--------------Chorus, I
Waited for the Lord; from "Hymn of Praise".. ........M endelssohn  (Duet
Obligato) Mrs. Spratley and Mrs. Nash  Tenor Solo, In Native Worth; from
"Creation"................-------------------...................Mr.
Harrison T. Raymond  Chorus, The Heavens Are Telling; from
"Creation".............-----..................------Soprano Solo, Open Unto
Me; from "Eli".......------.-.-.- .---.--.--.-..-.C.-o..-s..-t.a.-..... ...
 Mrs. G. W. Nash  Chorus, He Is Watching Over Isreal; from
"Elijah"......................Mendelssohn  Tenor Solo, If With All Your
Hearts; from "Elijah".................. Mendelssohn  Mr. Harrison T.
Raymond  Chorus, When Thou Comest; from "Stabat Mater".----------
..............................--(Soprano Obligato) Mrs. G. W. Nash 
Contralto Solo, He Shall Feed His Flock; from
"Messia"........................Handel  Mrs. H. W. Spratley  Chorus,
Hallelujah; from
"Messiah"..................................................-------------------------Chorus,
America  Audience  Director-Mrs. Thatcher.  Accompanists-Miss Gardener,
Miss Johnson, Miss Zane.

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THE LADIES' QUARTET  The Ladies Quartet was organized by Mrs. Thatcher
during the winter  of 1917- 1918. It has been assisted several times by
Edith Hendrickson and  Eva McAbee, to whom the quartet is much indebted as
it is also to Edith  Miller, accompanist.  The quartet has provided musical
entertainments in programs at the  Normal and other places, and have been
very successful in their desire  to  entertain. The members are:  Frances
Ireland, first soprano; Nellie Dick, second soprano; Alberta Getsman, first
alto; Lillian Foss, second alto.

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Flo"  ii ~\OF  I. ,96

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CHORAL CLUB  Under the directorship of Mrs. Thatcher the Choral Club spent
a very  pleasant and profitable year. The enrolled numbered about seventy.
The  club met every \Vednesday.  A concert was given one evening in which
old home songs and patriotic  numbers, solos, quartets, semi-choruses and
full choruses were sung.  Many members of the club are singing in the
various churches of the  city.  The club is grateful to Mrs. Thatcher, not
only for her competent leader-ship,  but also for her kind attitude which
added much to the pleasure of the  work. The officers for the year were: 
First Semester-  President  .............--------------.............
....... Edith Hen drickson  Vice-President ---------------............
......... .....-. ----  Ruth Elander  Secretary-Treasurer
....---------------------........................... Stella Johnson 
Reporter .....------ ---
------------------..........................-----...... Nellie Dick  Second
Semester-  President
..............................................----------------------------
Lillian Foss  Vice-President ..... ...................................
Mildred Stenvig  Secretary-Treasurer
.......................................------- Garnet Robinson  Reporter
........................... ....... ..........M iss M acllvaine

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The Normal ( )rchestra furnishes music at numerous public occasions  given
by the school, staged by the  various clubs and societies, the annual 
class play and cInmieincement: gives programls fior the school ,ccasi*
nallv at  assembl. Itt als, accmallnie- the various oratorios and operettas
present-ed  I)y the Choral  So1cietv, and ccmulined musical departments of
the insti-ttution,  which include such wxorks as the .Iessiah- endel,
Elijah-Mend-elss(  hiin. ''The Iholy CitY -Caul. Hi awatha- (oleridge
Taylor, Incidental Music to idsummner N iht's I)ream .1 enelms;hln, The M
ikado-Sullivan,  and The Rose .l1aideni. Particular care is taken in
selectin the nmusic to be worked on thruout  the year to fitt he particular
needs  *,fev ery student. The advanced player  has sufficielnt
resipnsiblity ace1  lt;ln hin to) make the practice of inestimable  value,
\while the parts f)r the le-s advailced are simplified sufficiently to
re-main  within their  limnitati(n . The w\rl-k thus planned, and carrited
out under  the rii di --iplinlle (f thile ald lire  gt;r ai rds a m )t
excellenlt ()ppirtunity  of becomii familiar with the (requirements f the
bhest works in (rchestral music.  PERSONNEL OF ORCHESTRA.  Nladam i)a venip
rt Enrl'er', I)irector  First Violin  Miss Dorothy Sxwartz, C(,mcert meiter
Mir. Mlilton (Grell, second Concert  meister; M iss Rose 1arniett, M r.
Ellmer \\'ebster, Mr. Ralph Engberg,  Miss Maud iruce, Mrs. Ilunt, Miss
Montague.  Second Violin  Miss Edith Keiner, Mrs. Mlc.lillai, Nliss Mlari m
\Vesterlund, 'liss V\alentine  Newell, Miss Anna \Wilson, NMiss I.,vda
Nichols, Mrs. Estell  Keifer, Miss Irene Bradsford  Cello  Miss Bernice
Robinson, Miss Grace Collins, Mr. Austin Bond  Bass  Miss Alice Markham 
Flute  Mr. Homer Mathes  Clarinet  Mr. Arthur Cranshaw  Cornet  Mr. Willard
Yerkes  Trombone  Mr. C. R. Holbrook  Drums and Accessories  Mr. Edgar
Foster  Piano  Miss Stella Johnson, Miss Miller

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page [99]

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Al  NORMAL ORCHESTRA

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100  i  4  -~4~

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H. M. S. PINAFORE  The Oratorio Chorus presented the opera "H. M. S.
Pinafore," or "The  Lass That Loved a Sailor," under the direction of
Martin E. Robinson on the  evening of March 16th.  The opera revolved about
the love of the captain's daughter. Sir Joseph  Porter, the Lord of the
Seas, wishes to marry Josephine, but she loves Ralph  Rackstran, the common
sailor. Josephine and Ralph plan to elope,  but are  betrayed by Dick
Deadeye. The captain swears at Ralph and is overheard  by Sir Joseph who
sends him to his cabin in disgrace. But when Sir Joseph  learns the cause
of the captain's words he sends Ralph to the dungeon. At  this state of
affairs Buttercup tells that in her girlhood she took care of two  little
boys whose identity she exchanged. The one is the captain of the ship,  the
other, Ralph. Sir Joseph is then ready to let Josephine marry Ralph while 
Hebe, his cousin, proves ample consolation. The  captain in turn finds that
 he has always loved his foster-mother, "Buttercup."  The parts were very
well sung and acted while the chorus also deserves  much praise. Rainhardt
Hanson as Sir Joseph, and Willard Yerkes as Cap-tain  Corcoran, were
dignified as their positions required. The common sail-or, Ralph Rackstraw,
aroused pity and admiration in his sorry plight, as  acted by Leslie
Sorensen. Mr. Holbrook, as Dick Deadeye, Mr. Washke, as  Boatswain, and Mr.
Edson, as Sing Woe, supplied the humor.  Josephine, the captain's daughter,
was well sung by Lillian Schoenberg.  No one could be angry with Buttercup
(Alberta Getsman) even after her  astounding confession. Hebe was clever
and skillful in consoling Sir Jos-eph  and showed good acting by Carolyn
Hammond.  THE CAST.  Rt. Hon. Sir Joseph Porter, K. C. B ...........
Rainhardt Hanson  Captain Corcoran
..........----------------...............------........ Willard Yerkes 
Ralph Rackstran ..................... ...................... Leslie
Sorensen  Dick Deadeye ------------ ---....................................
C. Ray Holbrook  Boatswain
............------------............---------------................. Paul
R. Washke  Boatswain's Mate
...................----------------------.................. Beryle Nevrit 
Sergeant of Marines ...................................... Chester T.
Garden  Mid Shipmate ...................---....................------... 
F. Bloom  Sing Woe ....------......................... ...----------W.....
..O. Edson  Hornpipers ...........-..-.-..-..-.-..- ..-.-..-..-.-..-..-.-.
Mary and Elizabeth Smith  Josephine ...................
...................... Lillian Schoenberg Hebe
..................----.............-------------------...................
Carolyn Hammond  Buttercup
...............................................--------------------------
Alberta Gatsman  101

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Sir Joseph's sisters, his cousins, and his aunts-  Vivian Bettman, Hlazel
,each, ~iabhel Dumar, Jennie Fries, H arriet  Harnpson, Ruth Hendrickson,
Esther Knox, Josephine Nelson. Anna Brown,  Carrie Bradlee, Hazel Evans,
M\arv Gehring, Edith H1endrickson, Grace  Johnson, Janet clcKirdv Anna
Olson, Margaret Pallas, May Rice, Mary  Smith, Ilazel Velty, Alice Polley,
Elizabeth Smith, Frances Taylor. Sailors and marines-  B. Bayor, G. Belvin,
V. Broadbent. C. M. Brotnov. F. MM. Bloom, F. J.  Caskey, M.  A. Chisholm,
I. V. Eaton, E. Everett, L. Foss, C. R. Holbrook, F.  M. Kleeb, P.
Lovegren, R. Schwartz, M.'Stemke, G. Day, W. O. Edson, A.  Frank, C. T.
Garden, H. Huntsberger, A. V. Lane, E. WV. Pallas, H. Schwartz,  E.
Webster.  Accompanists-  Piano ................. ............... Miss
Stella Johnson  First Violins ............................. ilton Grell,
Dorothy Swartz  Second Violins ............ Mrs. E. E. Miller, Marion 
Westerlund  Cellos .............................. Benicey Robinson, Grace
Collins  Bass ....................... . ................ Alice Markham 
102

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JUNIOR DOUBLE QUtARTET.  The Junior Double Quartet was organized in
September under the sup- ervision  of Mrs. H. W. Spratley.  The Head of the
Extension Department of the Normal arranged for sev- eral  Lyceum Tours.
Some of the places visited were Alki, Geneva, Laurel,  and the Eureka
school. Some of the memelrs contributed other numbers to  the program. At
the Eureka school \Villard Yerkes gave a reading which  he had written. 
During the winter the members were entertained by Mrs. Spratley. by William
Edson at Marietta and by LJeslie Sorensen at Iaurel.  The members of the
Quartet are:  Leslie Sorensen, First Tenor; Williard Yerkes, Present Second
Tenor;  Emil Enger, Second Second Tenor; Luiton Bozarht, First Second
Tenor; Paul  Washke, Substitute Second Tenor; Lillian Schoenberg, First
Soprano; Car-olyn  Hammond, Second Soprano: Margaret Burnhaml. Second \lt
o: Nina  Lusk, Second Alto; William Edson, First Bass; Rainhardt Itanson,
Second  Bass.  103

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Our Distinguished Visitors  On January Eight Dr. Edward A. Steiner, Head of
the department of  applied Christianity, Iowa college, delivered his
inspiring lecture on "The  Challenge of the American Spirit." Dr. Steiner
is one of the most popular  authors, educators and lecturers of the day.
Famous of his works are "On  the Trail of the Immigrant," "The Russian
Revolution," "Anarchy, Its Causes  and Cures," and "Tolstoi, the Man and
His Message."  Dr. Steiner has close acquaintanceship with the foremost
people of  nearly every nation of the globe. Because of extensive travel
and careful  study, he is considered an authority on present day problems
and as such is  made the target for many questions concerning the outcome
of the war, but  to all such queries his response is that the future is a
sealed book. He did  say, however, that never before had there been a
cleaner set of men in the  cantonments under the stars And strips than
there are today.  Dr. Steiner emphasized that the determining factor of an
American is  not that he was born here, but that he was born again after he
came here. It  is spirit rather than blood. The two factors which make a
nation hold its  people are its language and its history. This country is
destined to be arn  English speaking nation. Its language has remained
triumphant, even creep-ing  into the speech  of foreigners. America is a
history of people rather than  a history of kings or dynasties.  Dr.
Steiner, tho born in Austria, is a true American, and says he would  shed
the last drop of his blood to prove it.  REV. JAMES A. BURNS  One of the
rare treats of this year was the lecture given by James A.  Burns. "Burns
of the Mountains," as he is lovingly called, stood before us  that evening
and as we looked as his tall, gaunt figure and listened to his  slow spoken
words, we thought of the hardships of poverty and the struggle  for a great
cause, thru which he had passed, up until the time, and even since  he
became the founder and president of the Oneida Institute.  "Burns of the
Mountains" told us in his simple manner the story of his  own life, how
before he found his mission in life he had been a bitter partici-pant  in
the mountain feuds in Kentucky. When God spoke to him he heard  and he went
to work with a zeal to educate his people. From its humble be-ginning  in
1889, the Oneida Institute now has an enrollment of five hundred  students,
the limit which can be accommodated. Today in that lonely place  in the
heart of the Cumberland Mountains, forty miles from any railroad is a 
school with property valued at over $100,000, four fine buildings, a twelve
 hundred acre farm, a saw mill and a wood working shop. A little community 
of three hundred people has grown up around the campus and for beauty of 
surroundings it can be hardly equalled. Some of the first graduates are the
 pillars of the institution today, and are so devoted to their work that
they  have refused much more renumerative positions offered them by schools
of  higher education. The graduates take with them the Christian spirit of
the  school and remain loyal to their training.  Burns is a man of
broad-vision and a man of prayer. There have been  many hard days for Burns
and his people but his implicit faith in the Good  God above has helped him
to surmount every obstacle. Though he is com-pelled  to spend so much time
away from Oneida, seeking funds for its sup- port,  we know that his heart
is with his students at all times. The sim-plicity,  sweetness and force of
this  unique character left an impression and  an inspiration to do with a
vim, the work before us.

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JOHN MASEFIELD  While not on our lyceum course, John Masefield was brought
to Belling-ham  largely thru the efforts of our English Department, and the
privilege of  hearing him was considered by the students one of, if not the
most, important  event of its kind during the year.  DR. SLOAN.  Out of his
rich experience as a teacher and editor, Dr. Sloan, of Colum-bia 
University, brought a timely message to us. He spoke on "Democracy,"  And
said that if there ever was a holy war it is the one we are now in and that
we are forced into it without desiring it. He says we have to learn to 
think in order to realize that we are fighting side by side with other
types of  democracy, just as enthusiastic, as determined as we are. He
explained that  much-used term, saying that democracy is a state of mind,
which primarily  shows itself in every individualistic expression of will,
but the real individ-ualistic  person is the one who throws himself, body
and soul, into the co-op-eration  of his fellows for the welfare of all. He
said our diplomats of the fu-ture  must know the ruling iassion of Europe,
must know the man as it was  before the war and as it will be after. He
urged us to abandon our narrow  ideas of a democrat and to try to think
somewhat as an Englishman, a French-man,  or a citizen of other great
democracies. He said that we must get in touch with the aspirations of
other great democracies of the universe and re-nounce  some of the pride we
 have in our own country that we may share the  pride of other countries.
It is up to us to set the example of kindliness, help-fulness  and
furtherance of equality among men, to those who are striving to  be
democratic.  DR. CONWELL  While 1918 was still young and in the
resolution-forming period, the most popular lecturer in the world today
came with his message which has harn-essed  rivers, built bridges,
irrigated deserts and supplied weary hearts with  new dynamos. This
lecture, "Acres of Diamonds," which  is one of his seven  that have met
with almost incredible popularity, was delivered for the five  thousand six
hundred and ninety-fifth time. "Acres of Diamonds" drives  home like a
mallet the fact that success is as likely to be found in our own  back yard
as any place else in the world. One of his numerous illustrations  was the
true story of a man who spent years studying oil, until "he knew all  about
oil" so that he could go into the oil fields of Canada and make his 
fortune. He sold his little farm in Pennsylvania for eight hundred and
thirty  three dollars and no cents (no sense). Shortly after he left, his
successor noted on the little brook in the field a scum which for years had
been held  back, so that the cattle would drink the water. Investigation
proved it to be  an oil well whose flow had been dammed for years by the
man who "knew  all about oil." Today it is worth millions of dollars, but
the oil expert sold  it for eight hundred and thirty-three dollars and
again he said "no sense."

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Dr. Conwell is a man who has made a science of success. He says that 
wherever there is a human need  there is a great fortune. He showed how 
the cotton gin, the dustless crayon, the sewing machine, the safety pin,
the  incubator and many inventions which are indispensable to us now, came
on  the scene of activity when some person recognized in his homely
surround-ings  a demand to be filled.  Dr. Conwell is a miracle of
achievement. In 1876 he started a definite  program of donation and for
forty years has followed that vision, helping  over three thousand young
men to win success. However, each must first show an effort and
earnestness, for Mr. Conwell helps only those who first  help themselves.
Altho seventy years of age, he presents a striking ap-pearance.  He is tall
and powerful and when he grips your hand looks you  in the eye, and voices
that old statement: "You can do what you will." You  cannot help but
believe it. He inspires you with a fresh determination to  strive on and on
and on.  HENRI SCOTT  A very delightful and brilliant number of the lyceum
course was given,  by Henri Scott, the bass baritone of the Metropolitan
Opera Company, ac-companied  by Arville Belstad. Mr. Scott had a commanding
presence and a  physique that goes well with a soloist. His voice was
melodious, expressive,  and excellently trained. His enunciation was so
clear that each word re-sounded  throughout the hall. All of his  numbers
were enjoyed, but perhaps,  "A Little Winding Road" and "The Siege of
Kazan" will linger longest in our  memories.  DR. ARTHUR WALWIN EVANS  Dr.
Arthur Walwin Evans, the nephew of David Lloyd George, told us  his
impressions of America in a lecture entitled "What America Means to Me." 
Dr. Evans came to America to take the pulpit formerly occupied by
the-distinguished  author and preacher, Dr. Edward A. Steiner, at
Springfield,  Ohio. Here his work attracted the attention of the Lyceum 
Bureau and calls  for his service became so insistent that he resigned his
pastorate to devote his  entire time to lecturing. In the past four years
he has filled almost one-thousand  and two hundred engagements.  Dr. Evans,
who is commonly known  as the Welsh wit and humorist, was not long in
proving to us that this title  was approriately chosen. His lecture bubbled
with humor, which spared  neither English, French,  American, king nor
pauper. In one of his striking  witticisms he said in reference to the
English form of government, "Surely  we have a king over there, but who
pays any attention to him? Of course  he signs the papers. We use him in
place of a rubber stamp." Thus we  saw that altho the element of fun
predominated, his points were well taken.  He left with his audience food
for reflection. With the intense illustrations he  pictured for us the
spirit of every nation of the globe; America meant not  democracy nor
liberty, but fraternity. The common people everywhere are  hungering for
wider opportunities to live and this can be accomplished only  thru
fraternalism or universal brotherhood, which must come in order to save 
the world from monarchy. For this reason, after having traveled
extensively,  Dr. Evanrs has chosen America for his home.  i)1,

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PROF. M. V. O'SHEA  Dr. M. V. O'Shea, of the University of Wisconsin,
author of several  books on psychology, spoke to us of the "Mental
Development Needed in  War Times."  Among the important things he said:
"The world is likely to slip back  into darkness during the war. If the war
were to stop today  this would be the  condition in England and possibly in
Germany. The exigencies of their war-fare  have taken the school teachers,
leaving the public practically disinter-gated.  The same situation
confronts the United States. Twenty per cent  of the educators are employed
in patriotic occupations, which makes the cer-tification  of untrained
teachers necessary in many sections of the country.  France and England
have  recognized their danger and are impressing upon  their people the
patriotism of school work and the training of children after  the war. The
United States must also recognize this. The twenty per cent  of teachers
who leave the school room during the time of war to carry on  Red Cross,
factory, and various other lines of work, will remain away when  the war is
over. They will become established in their lines and  will to an  extent
forget the training which the school room demands. This means that  the
children of the nations, upon whom the future depends, lacking trained 
instructors, will not receive the degree of education otherwise possible.
The  Government should recognize the importance of teaching and exclude the
 teachers from the draft.  "From somewhere must come a supply to take the
place of those who  are being killed in Europe at the present time and to
fill the demand that the  future will hold, whether it still be  upon the
battlefield or at home. Chem-ists,  mechanical, constructive, and civil
engineers should also be conserved  in all colleges for they will be needed
in the work of reconstruction."  107

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EXTENSION  That Bellingham Normal believes in letting her light shine in
all parts  of the state where teachers have gone from under her
guardianship has been  abundantly proven by the excellent quality of work
carried on this year by  the extension department. The slogan for this
year's work has been effic- iency  and community service.  The extension
work of this school falls into five divisions which are: ex- tension 
classes, correspondence work, extension lecture courses given by the 
faculty, field work, and institute lectures.  Excellent developments have
taken place in the organization of extension  classes, which promises much
for the future. In order that work of this na-ture  be divided evenly
between the three Normal schools, the state legislature  of this year voted
that the state be evenly divided for extension purposes. The  state Board
of Education then so divided it that the district for this school  should
be the city of Seattle and the countries around the Sound with the
ex-ception  of King and Pierce counties. Extension classes have been
organized  in various parts of this section principally at Seattle and at
Bellingham. A  teacher goes from the Normal School as often as once a week
to meet these  several classes and gives double periods in actual class
work. Courses given  in this way are sociology, psychology, child study,
principles of education, and  practice teaching for teachers. For the
practice teaching service credit is giv-en  and for the other work the same
credit is given that is received for resident  work of the same kind.  The
extension lecture courses are igiven in communities from whom re- quest 
comes for lectures. These have been given in several parts of several 
counties, viz, Klickitat, Island, King and Whatcom. These courses are well 
received in the various communities where they have been given, and the
out-look  is favorable for another year. Those teachers engaged in giving
the lec-tures  this year have been Mr. Parish, Mr. Klemme, and Mr. Hoppe. 
Large numbers of teachers in all parts of the state are engaged in
cor-respondence  work with the Normal school. A large number of courses are
given through the mails by many members of the faculty. These courses are 
largely duplicate of the regular residence class work, and the same credit
is  given for the satisfactory completion of them. Bellingham Normal school
 has been a pioneer in correspondence work, having had large courses in
this field up to and including the present time. New courses have been
added  from time to time as the need arises.  The Bellingham Normal is
organized with the view of keeping in touch  with her students in service.
This is done by visiting the communities where  they teach. A large portion
of this work has been carried on by Mr. Klemme  this year.  Aside from
these four fields of extension the faculty has also stood ready  to supply
various institute lectures. A great many of the faculty were busy  this
fall speaking before  large bodies of teachers.  Members of the faculty
have also, on various occasions, delivered com- mencement  addresses in the
High schools.  108

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109

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Sept. 10--Registration.  Sept. 11-First Quarter begins.  Sept. 11--Opening
Address by Prof. T. E. HIulse. Sept. 15--()pening School Mixer.  Sept.
17-Address by Prof. M. V. O'Shea.  Sept. 21--Y. \\. C. A. Reception to
students.  Sept. 25--Montague Light Opera Co. in recital.  ()ct. 5 ---
Reception to Normal students at Garden Street 'Methodist  Church.  ()ct.
12--()pen IiHouse at Eden's IHall.  ()ct. 13 ----Junior Mixer.  ()ct.
20--Trainin, School Mixer.  ()ct. 23-Liberty Bond Fire.  Oct. 26--Field Day
"Hlikes and Tramps."  Oct. 30-Y. \W. C. A. Banquet.  Nov. 3- Senior Nlixer.
 Nov. 7---l erri Scott liasso.  No%. 10 - College Club Vaudeville.  Nov.
1I-lBovs' Iasket Ball; Juniors \-s. Seniors.  Nov. 21-Rollo H. McBride. 
Nov. 2(6-Frances Nielson  Nov. 28--Thanksgiving Recess begins.  Nov.
29-Thanksgiving "Eats At Home."  Dec.  3-Thanksgiving Recess ends.  Dec. 14
-- Open House in Nichols Hall  Dec. 15.-Oratorio Recital.  Dec.
17-"Soldier" White of Chehalis Speaks.  Dec. 19-Christmas Mixer. "Pop corn
balls."  Dec. 2 0-Joint Christmas Program.  Dec. 21-Christmas Recess
begins.  Dec. 25-Christmas Day. "Merry Christmas." Jan. 1-New Year's Day.
"Happy New Year."  Jan. 7-Christmas Recess ends.  Jan. 8-Rev. George C.
King speaks.  Jan. 10-Basket Ball; Ellensburg High School vs. W. S. N. S.
Here  Jan. 16-Theo. Maynard. "Correlating the Home and the School."  Jan.
18-Dr. R. H. Conwell, "Acres of Diamonds."  Jan. 19-Mid- Year Reception. 
Jan. 19-Junior Frolic.  Jan. 19-Basket Ball, Vancouver, B. C. Ex-Normal vs.
W. S. N. S. There.  Jan. 21-Rev. Marshall speaks.  Jan. 22-Exercises by
Training School.  Jan. 22-Mid-Year Class Day Exercises.  Jan. 25-Mid-Year
Commencement Class by Prof. G. B. Chichester, of  Fairhaven High School. 
Jan. 26-Basket Ball Game, Cushman Indians vs. W. S. N. S. Here.  Jan.
28-Second Semester. Registration.  Jan. 29-Mr. Harrison Raymond. Musicale. 
Jan. 30-Mr. Litchfield, o( Public Service Reserve,  speaks.  Feb. 1-Miss
Ormsbv. " War Cookery."  110

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Feb. 5-Rev. Reagor. "lMaking the IMost of our Opportunities.  Feb. 5--Miss
Helen Schuman. Violin Recital.  Feb. 6-Y. W. C. A. Tenth BIible Institute
Begins.  Feb. 7-I r. S. 11. lamer Reads S")one of Ilis ()wn 'Poems.  Feb.
8--Dr. E\dwvard A. Steiner. "On the Trail c(f the Irmnligrant."  Fe.b
9--Basket Ball. C. P. S. vs. W\. S. N. S. H ere.  Feb. 10-Y. \\V. C. A\.
Bible Institute Ends.  Feb. 12---ncoln's Birthday. Re\-.  Duncan lcT'hail. 
CALENDAR-SECOND SEMESTER 1917-18.  Feb. 12-Dr. Short, "Sinileage Books.'
Feb. 14--St. Valentine's )aN-, "T I l D)ear T'acher."  Feb. 14-Rev. Duncan
McI 'hail Speaks.  Feb. 15- Choral Club Concert.  Febl. 16--Basket Ball, U.
of V. Freshmen vs. W. S. N. S.  Feb. 1-D-)r. \. Evans, "\What America Means
,.'  Feb. 19--Rev. W\ilson Speaks.  Feb. 19--Basket l all, Cu-shiinm
Ilnd(ians v,. W\. S. N. S  Feb. 20--Basket Ball. C. P. 5. . V. S. N. S. 
Feb. 21--lBasbet Ball. Ellensibureg High School  vs. WV. S. N. S.  Feb.
21---Mr. Walter \Whitc~nmb, "';es,. \ashin.t ."  Feb. 22-Washiniton's
Birthday. Feb, 25-James A. Burns, "The Conservation cf Life in the
Cnumberland  Mountains."  Feb. 26-Rev. V. Engebretson, "NobilitV."  Feb.
28-Glenn Hughes Reads Original Poems.  March 1-Basket Ball. Trainin-"
School vs. Anacortes, HIere.  March 1-Thespian Club Play, "Mary Jane's Pa."
 March 2-Basket Ball. Vancouver Ex-Normal vs. . S. . S.. S. lere.  March
4-Kline Cup Games, Seniors vs. Juniors.  March 5- Miss Ruth Reagor,
Recital.  March 7-Geo. Downer, "Facts About the War."  March 8-Basket Ball,
Whatcom High School vs. W. S. N. S. There.  March 9-Basket Ball, Whatcom
High School vs. W. S. N. S. Here.  March 12-Rev. Geo. Hartvig Speaks. 
March 16-H. M. S. Pinafore.  March 19-Dr. Reed, of Belfast, Speaks.  March
20-Dr. O. H. Richardson, "England."  March 21-Second Rural Life Conference
Begins.  March 21-Address, Gov. E. E. Lister.  March 21-Pres. E. 0.
Holland, of Pullman, Speaks. March 21-Response, Mrs. Josephine C. Preston,
State Superintendent  of Schools.  March 21-Recital. Music Department. 
March 22-Pres. G. H. Black, of Ellensburg, Speaks.  March 22-Address. Pres.
N. D. Showalten, of Cheneyv, Speaks.  March 22-Prof. T. E. Hulse Speaks. 
March 22-Thespians Entertain with  Three One-Act Plays.  March 22-Kline Cup
Game. Seniors vs. Juniors. Basket Ball.  March 22-Rural Life Conference
Ends.  March 26-Miss Keeler Speaks.  March 27-Spring Recess Begins.  March
30--John Masefield., "The War and the Future."  111

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April 2-Spring Recess Ends.  April 4-Attorney W. H. Abbott Speaks.  April
9-Mrs. T. M. Barlow Sings. April 11-Baseball. Seniors vs. Juniors. 
Aprill2-Thespian Banquet.  April 12-Prof. V. H. Hoppe reads "The Fortune
Hunter."  April 15-Dr. David Starr Jordan, "German Philosophy of War
Making."  April 16-Miss Nellie Dick Sings.  April 17-Faculty Picnic.  April
18--Mrs. Haight, "History Sketches of Puget Sound." April 19-Baseball. W.
S. N. S. vs. Blaine.  April 20- Annual Chuckanut Marathon.  April 23-Miss
Woodard Speaks.  April 25-Mr. Klemme, "Trials and Smiles."  April
27-Baseball. W. S. N. S. vs. Whatcom High School There  April 27-Junior
Play, "Quality Street."  April 30-Junior-Senior Debate.  May 1-Awarding of
Athletic Emblems.  May 3-Baseball. Blaine High School vs. W. S. N. S.,
Here.  May 4-Annual School Excursion.  May 4-Baseball. W. S. N. S. vs.
Ferndale High School, There.  May 8-Miss Hazlett, Traveling  Secretary of
Student Voluntary Move-ment,  Speaks.  May 9-Annual May Day.  May 11-Junior
Class Picnic.  May 16-Baseball. W. S. N. S. vs. Ferndale High School, Here.
 May 17-Thespian House Party. May 18-Baseball. W. S. N. S. vs. Whatcom High
School, Here.  May 21-Junior Class Day.  May 24- Training School Closes. 
May 24-Residents' Reception to Graduating Class.  May 25-Alumini Banquet.
May 26-Sermon to Graduating Class; Dr. Henry Southwick, of Boston.  May
27-Senior Class Play.  May 27-Senior Class Day.  May 28-Junior Reception to
Seniors.  May 29-Nineteenth Annual Commencement.  May 30-Memorial Day. 
112

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'p  DR. E. T. MATHES  Our first President now in Y. M. C. A. service in
France  Our first school building 113

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SCHOOL HISTORY  THE FIRST FACULTY.  Dr. Mathes
.....................--------------.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-.-
..-.-.-......... President  Sarah Rogers
................----------......---............----- Supt. Training School
Catherine Montgomery .............................. Primary Supervisor 
Frank Eppley ................ ................................ .. Science 
Ida Baker
........---....-----------------...........-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-......
Music  Jane Connell
....-------------.............------...-----..................-------
English  Robert Vaite
......................-----------------................ Assistant in
English  Avadana Nellet (Mrs. Tucker) .........-------..----
-----......----........---...-- Art  Hattie Trompson
..........................------------------------.............. ....
Librarian FIRST BOARD OF TRUSTEES.  J. J. E dens
..................................................................... P
resident  Leslie Darwin .......----------------.......-.-.-.-.-.-
---............... Clerk of Board  Judge (Jerry) Netherer R. C. Higginson 
Twenty-five years ago the citizens of Bellingham were anxiously await-ing 
the decision as to where in the county the new state Normal School was  to
be located. On Feb. 19, 1893, the newspaper enlightened them with these 
words: "Now that Anderson's Normal School bill has passed, West Geneva and
Longtry Point, on Lake Whatcom, are mentioned as desirable locations  for a
site." However when two companies gave ten acres of land at the pres-ent 
site all other locations were forgotten. In 1896 the first building was
erect-ed  at a cost of about $45,000. The school opened its doors to
students on Sept. 6, 1899. The faculty thot that if one hundred students
attended this would be  a flourishing "Institution of Higher Learning."
They were made glad the  first year by the presence of three hundred and
forty-nine seekers after knowl-edge.  The first assembly room was rather
small, being a part of what is at pres-ent the library, so when
commencement time came the exercises were held in  the Bellingham Theatre
in Old  Whatcom.  The first office of the president was the room which Mr.
Bever now uses  as an office. The present offices were used as recitation
rooms for the "large"  classes.  The one large ivy-clad stump upon our
beautiful campus acts as a re-minder  that in the early days there were
twenty-four such gems, set in a  squashy, mosquito-inhabited swamp which
lay between the knoll and the  Normal building.  The east end of Sehome
Hill was excavated and this swamp filled in. At  that time there were not
many trees on the hill and those few stragglers which  were striving to
cling to the steep sides were only four or five feet tall.  From a small
beginning has grown our present institution. The  training school building
was added in 1901; Eden's Hall in 1905; science an-nex  in 1907; the manual
training shop and an additional annex to the training  school in 1913. 
114

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Dr. G. W. Nash became the head of the Normal in 1914. Under his di-rection 
each department has steadily improved until our school has recog-nition 
throughout the entire United States. It is the purpose of Dr. Nash to  keep
the school abreast of the times and we have even been told by visitors 
that we are in  advance of many schools of high standard. By his untiring 
efforts courses are now offered that attract students from all parts of the
 state and other states as well. The result is seen in the large student
body.  The unsightly trails and stumps have disappeared from the campus and
a  beautiful and well kept lawn has developed in which all the students
take a  pride.  This year a newly installed and adequate heating plant has
been in-stalled.  On account of the war other improvements that Dr. Nash
had planned  for the benefit of the students, have been indefinitely
postponed.  115

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BOARD OF CONTROL  116

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DEBATE AND ORATORY  At the beginning of the year the prospects for debate
and oratorical work  - were very bright. A movement was started for forming
a school debating  team to challenge other schools of equal standing. But
owing to the excep-tional  conditions of the year that hope was not
realized. But the debating  spirit was not quenched so easily. A
round-table discussion class was organ-ized  with Professor Bever as
sponsor, for the puprose of developing freedom  and ease in the
presentation of views and a closer examination and analysis  of world
movements. The first meeting opened with a heated discussion of  the
Russian situation. After Mr. Alm had led off, arguments flew thick and 
fast between Tucker, Webster, Scott and Booman on one side and Holbrook, 
Johnson, Broadbent and Montag on the other. Finally the decision was 
reached that material aid might be expected from Russia, but at subsequent 
meetings the idea was disproved.  Questions of parliamentary law and social
principles, such as govern-ment  ownership and compulsory military
training, were warmly contested,  making a fair division of the honors in
favor of both sides of all questions.  At the beginning of the last quarter
the tryout for the Junior-Senior ora-torical  contest was held. The
successful candidates, from a very represent-ative  group, were, for the
Juniors. Misses Zehla and Farrington and Mr.  Kabett, and for the Seniors,
Miss Merchant and Messrs. Holbrook and Boom-an.  The old scheme of holding
a declamatory and extemporaneous contest  together with a debate was
abandoned and only a debate was recognized. De- clamers  and readers would
be cared for in the various dramatic courses offered.  The tryout was based
on the question of military training in high schools. The  question decided
upon for the final debate was, Resolved, that: Japanese in-tervention  in
Siberia is beneficial to the Allied cause. After it had been de- cided 
that the Juniors should represent the negative, considerable enthus-  'iasm
was displayed in regard  to the statement of the question. After much 
parleying the above proposition received the stamp of approval of both
sides.  The arguments in the final debate dealt largely with the moral,
economic, mil-itary  and political advantages and disadvantages of
intervention. The Jun-iors'  flashing arguments and brilliant play on
technicalities overcame in  the final debate the Seniors' maturer
experience and depth of thought.  The debating season ended with general
satisfaction for all  117

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SOUL OF AMERICA  Oh Thou, who stretches forth thy mighty arm  Across the
troubled angry sea;  Who  sendest forth thy bravest and thy best,  In the
name of sweet democracy.  I love thy every inch of fertile soil,  Thy soul
of liberty.  Oh towering snow clad peaks with glittering ridge,  Oh rolling
plains with richness rife,  Thou monarch trees which gird the mountain
side,  New York metropolis of strife.  Those surging toiling human souls  I
love their throbbing life,  Their Common Soul for which that emblem floats
Above; their brotherhood of right.  May men not soil nor lose by lust for
gain  Those sacred principles for which they fight.  Though blind and often
false their steps toward thee,  Shine on, Oh Holy Light.  Oh hills of
vision. fraternal home of man,  Ever look to Him above.  Whose Spirit binds
earth's nations, races, One.   Reach out and spread the gospel, love.  Into
every fettered land where despots rule,  Soul of America!  - Amy Estep. 
118

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Ss  119

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Among the Thespians  The Thespian Dramatic Club, in spite of several
drawbacks during the  school year  1917-1918, did not fail to make its mark
among the clubs of the  school. It was necessary for Mr. Hoppe to be gone
for two quarters and the  club felt his absence keenly. However we were not
left without a leader, for  Mr. Glenn Hughes, an honorary member of the
club, manifested a great in-terest  in the club and helped materially in
the realization of its plan. There  was a scarcity of boys this year, but
those among us were true Thespians and  added much to the success of
dramatics during the year.  After the tryouts in the fall, the club began
its year's work by giving a  royal reception to the new members. At the
close of a splendid program and  good time, the members were guided to the
cafeteria-dining room where most  delicious refreshments were served,
followed by "speeches" from the new  members, which promised much for the
club.  One of the earliest programs was on Riley, and it was thoroughly
en-joyed. Shortly following this was the Hallowe'en party. The club room 
was attractively decorated and appropriate  games were played after a
fitting  Hallowe'en program.  Another evening the club studied Irish Drama.
Interesting papers were  read and two short plays by Irish dramatists were
read and discussed.  Before Christmas the expression students of the club
gave an evening of  pantomime in the auditorium. Keen appreciation of their
efforts in that line  was shown by the rest of the members. An interesting
one-act play entitled  "The Teeth of the Gift Horse" was presented at one
of the regular meet-ings.  Those who took part in the sketch were: Miss
Ruth Elander, Miss  Ella Lee, Miss Maude Workman, Miss Marion Wheaton, Mr.
Raihardt Han-sen,  Mr. Arthur Crawshaw.  A review of "The Taming of the
Shrew" was given  at another program,  and at the proper time in the review
John Miller, Myrtle Pugsley and Emma  Zehle presented the dinner scene in
that play.  The study of "The Children's Educational Theatre" by Alice
Minnie  Herts, and "How to Produce Children's Plays," by Constance Darcy
MacKay,  together with the reading of one of Mrs. MacKay's plays, afforded
another  interesting program. The papers were carefully written and
pleasingly read.  Mention might be made here of the Thespian Male Quartet,
which made its first appearance on that evening.  Another profitable
program which the members will long remember was  in the form of a
discussion: "Theatres of Europe as I Saw Them," by Miss  Edens, w'ho told
in her usual charming way some of the interesting things  concerning the
great theaters, plays and players of the Old World.  It has been the custom
of the club to banquet at the Hotel Leopold, but  in view of war pressures
this elaborate affair was dispensed with, and a simple  repast was enjoyed
in the cafeteria dining hall. The club this year has been quite
philanthropic, for with the ninety dol-lars  cleared by the presentation of
"Mary Jane's Pa," substantial contribu-tions  were made to the Y. M. C. A.,
Belgian Relief and Red Cross.  120

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-W T  ®r  121

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SEATTLE CLUB  The Seattle Club was organized early in the fall of 1917 as a
social club.  Officers:  First  Semester-  President
............................-------------------------...........---.......
Fern Litterneau  Vice- President ................. ..........
............... Faith Condit  Secretary and Treasurer
........................................ Helen Upper  Reporter
................................. ............. ..... Irene Ram sey Second
Semester-  President ..................................
...................... H elen U pper  Vice-President
...................................... Margaret Hannah  Secretary and
Treasurer ............................... Gladys Hammond  Reporter
................................................................ Fern
Litterneau  The club is very grateful for the faithful and willing services
of Miss  Morse. The first event of the year was a contribution to the
College Club  program. It was a drama in "Three acts." Everyone will
remember the  changing of scenery.  Just before Thanksgiving the club gave
a Kid Party. Program and  games were enjoyed in the little gynasium while
the "kids" industriously  sucked sticks of candy. Later in the evening
animal cookies  and candy were  enjoyed. Even the baby had a good time. 
Another party was given in January in the Thespian Club room.  March 22 the
members of the club went on a hike. A beach party was  also enjoyed.  All
the members feel that the year has been a successful one for the club  and
hope it will continue and prosper in the coming years.  122

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COLLEGE CLUB  First Semester-  President
.---------------.......................-.-r.-i.-e.-.-.- -............... 
Vice- President .......................Ed.n.a. ..A.n.d.e.rs.o.n....--- 
Secretary-Treasurer ....................E-ls-i-e- -F-a-tl-
a-n-d---------................  Second Semester-  President
.............................. ...-.-.-.O-. -r.r-i.n-. -.-F.-r.y-.e- .... .
 V ice-President ...................................e.l.e.n.. ...U.. p
.p.er.......  Secretary-Treasurer .................A.n.n.a.
.K.li.n.w.a.c.h.te.r........  Since the College Club was organized as a
social club and its members  :are not bound by any constitution or iron
clad rules, there is a great oppor-tunity  for freedom of action.  The big
event of the first semester was the famous College Club Vaude-ville,  given
in the auditorium. The club furnished the idea, while the various  other
clubs of the school helped turn out a finished "Regular Vaudeville," by 
;presenting clever song hits and sketches. The proceeds from this program 
were divided with the Sisters' League for the benefit of the Red Cross. 
The second semester the  members of the College Club enjoyed themselves 
-by taking excursions, hikes and beach parties. As the club was organized
with  a view to wholesome good times, the aim has been successfully
accomplished  123

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124

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EDENS' HALL  Edens' Hall has no connection with the Garden of Eden, as some
have  the nerve to ask. It is more like the Garden of Eden with the Adams
driven  out and the Eves left in.  During the present year the girls of
Edens' Hall have made life gay in  various ways. There have been birthday
parties, slumber parties, experience  meetings, spreads, chafing dish
parties, hikes, jitney rides, kimona parades,   vaudeville, aesthetic
dancing, light opera, song festivals, dances for females  only, room
stackings, and othier diversions too numerous and delicate to  mention. 
One does not easily forget the time there was a beau in the beau parlor 
and the screen drawn in front of a door with Miss Curiosity peeking thru
the crack. Other Eves coming thru the hall gently closed the wings of the
fire  screen, shut Miss Curiosity in, and pushed the screen forward until
the inside  tripped and fell crashing at the feet of the astonished beau. 
Oct. 12 the Hall held open house during the hours from seven till ten p. 
m., in which the rooms were open to inspection and visitors were ushered 
about and treated to punch and wafers. At this time once a year the boys 
have the opportunity of seeing what the girls' rooms look like, and of
turn-ing  their pictures around.  Sat., Oct. 27, a Hallowe'en masquerade
party for girls only was given, at  which we wore  hilariaus costumes and
danced hilariaus steps. Our only re-gret  was that the boys were omitted. 
Friday  morning, Dec. 21, the dining room guests were surprised by the 
Christmas carol procession in which Miss Woodard and the girls dressed in 
white, carried candles and sang songs.  Two group parties were given during
the last quarter.  Edens' Hall has self government. Mrs. Ida M. Powell, our
house mother, has been at the Hall for years. Miss Eleanor Gray, our
preceptress, came to  us at Christmas. OFFICERS  Fist Semester-  President
...................... Emerine Shannon  Vice-President
................................................... M arion Eagers 
Reporter ............... .................................... Faith Condit 
Second Semester-  President
............................................................. M arion
Eagers  Vice- President .................................................
Miriam Dolman  Reporter
............................................................ ....Dorothy
Beech  125

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All of our girls are either talented or distinguished:  Peggy Andrews,
talented linguist and distinguished entertainer of Ho-mer  Kennett.  Carrie
Blakeslee, matrimonial advisor.  Dorothy Beach, talented ukelele fiend. 
Mable Carlson, chum of "Lucy White Sock."  Nellie Dick and Eva McAbee,
vocalists.  Avis Dodge, ragtime specialist.  Nellie Dick and Nellie Dock,
related to "Hickory Dickory Dock."  Heloise Eggers and Happy Hannan,
distinguished by mice, dimples,  r,,mAI 23, Saturda\ baskets, lights after
ten thirty, ouija board music.  Gina Hagen, Alice Polly and Eva Tyler,
basket ball artists. Eva Tyler  further distinguished by Orrin Frye.  Clara
Jensen and Pearl Malang, celebrated hypnotists. Clara Jensen.  further
distinguished as "Vinnie, the Vamp."  Ailene Driver, imitator of wild
animals.  Anna Kaeinwachter, mule driver, catcher for Geo'gia.  Phroso
Klinker had the measles five times.  Alice Kinnear, artist and K. K. Dicey
Mackey, ring leader (?) at midnight feasts.  Marcia Packman, leading man
for Vinnie the Vamp, Pearl Melang, lead-ing  lady.  Lelia Pentilla,
celebrated artist.  Lisa Prest, celebrated entertainer of Reuben Alm and
Willard Yerkes.  Foy Stevens, Kewpie model.  Jeanette Truesdale, Babe in
the Woods. Dora Squires, clairvoyant and specialist on eugenics.  Bertha
Thomas, celebrated rat catcher and councilman for third floor.  Also rapid
fire conversationalist.  Ella Wilkins, born in Berlin.  The remaining
members have talents too numerous to mention.  126

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Rural Life Club  The purpose of the Rural Life Club is literary and social
improvement,  and the fitting of its members for the betterment of the
community.  During the first of a regular meeting, sections meet separately
and hold  parliamentary drill, debate and discussions. Parent-teachers'
organizations  are formed, plans for club work are suggested, all of these
things proving very  helpful to a rural teacher, for it is she who must
lead in all these undertakings.  The programs are planned with the idea
that they could be used in any  rural community. One meeting was held in
the gymnasium where Miss Nick-erson demonstrated folk dances and games
suitable for a rural school. Each  quarter a frolic is held in the
gymnasium where everyone has the jolliest and  best of good times, likewise
many good things to eat. Rural Lifers are always willing to work and to
share their ideas with  each other, so that when they have gone forth into
service, they will have  many ideas to carry out in their separate
communities. Many of our  former  members are in the service of their
country, others are successful teachers and  all including those who are
yet in school, are loyal and faithful to the club  which has given them so
much pleasure and help.  Then give three cheers for the Rural Life, the
biggest, best and busiest  club in school.  127

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Cassie Cales.  Ruby Ellington.  Esther Klasell.  Alberta Lemon.  Ruth
Panchot  Hazel Armstrong  Marie Broulette  Vivian Kellam  Nettie Connell 
Carrie Endrighi  Harriet Hampson  Clara Locke  Effie Locke  I CHARTER
MEMBERS.  6. Irene Ramsey  7. Edna Hackett  8. Miss Florence May Morse  9.
Miss Rheba  D. Nickerson  10. Miss May Mead  NEW MEMBERS.  9. Katharine
Lopp  10. Myrtle McIlvaine  11. Jessie Merchant  12. Vera Merchant  13.
Maud Powell  14. Maude Roberson  15. Geraldine Thrall  16. Ethel Andrews 
17. Miss Gertrude Earhart  128  ;;

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The Hyades Club is a new club, formed this year "to give opportunity  to
develop native ability to promote social life and service among its
mem-bers."  The club takes its name "Hyades" from a cluster of seven stars
in  the form of a V, located very near the Constellation of Orion.  The
mythological story is that the seven sisters were faithful in their
ser-vice  to one of the gods who would have died but for their care and for
this  they were given a place in the Heavens.  The work of the club has
included the study of various peoples, includ-ing  the Irish, Swiss,
Belgians, Italians and American Negroes.  One of the very interesting
meetings was held at Squalicum Beach, where  after the club had enjoyed a
delightful picnic lunch Mrs. J. Roy Williams, who  was born and raised in
the South, gave us personal pictures of the Negroes  in their home
environments.  There were two other social events during the year. One a
"Kid Party,"  the other an evening spent with Miss Morse and Miss Cales at
their apart-ments  on Forest street.  In the benefit for the Red Cross, in
which the College Club invited all  other clubs to contribute one  number,
the Hlvades twinkled out as chorus  girls in "45 Minutes From Hyades."  In
keeping with its ideal  of service the club has raised the money for  and
adopted a war orphan. The money was secured by the Hyades having a  fern
sale, by selling pop corn balls after a basket ball game, and by each Hyad
pledging by her own efforts to raise the sum of one dollar.  The club has
tried to live up to the ideal of service set for us by the or-iginal 
Hyades.  12J

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Ohiyesa Club  First Semester-  President
................................................................ Lucile M
cG hee Vice-President ............................. Merle Davis  Treasurer
....... ........................... ............. Frieda Lammars  Secretary
.......... .......... ................... Renie Godlove  Reporter
................................................ rs. Edmonds  Second
Semester-  President ...................... .................. Renie
Godlove  Vice-President ..................... .................. Frieda
Lammers  Treasurer ........................... Marjorie Hannah  Secretary
.................. ...................... Ella Wilkin  Reporter
............................... ....................... Aileen Driver 
Sargeant-at-arms ............................................ Lucile McGhee
 130

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At the beginning of the year the total number of club members in the 
school was six. But Ohiyesa spirit and enthusiasm were there and it was not
 long until our roll assumed its regular length.  Our first social event
was a Hallowe'en party in the small gymnasium.  Initiation was held at this
party. Miss McCown was our chaperon and we  surely enjoyed her presence. 
Just before the holidays we were entertained by Miss Beardsley, Miss  Gray
and Miss Milne at Miss Beardsley's apartments. This time we remem-bered our
two club members who are in the service, Ernest Stowe and Roy  Farwell. We
are proud of these boys and they have remembered the club  with several
very interesting letters.  We also had a Valentine party. Each member
received a hand-made val-entine,  such as we used to get.  Miss Milne is
our new faculty advisor and we considerourselves very  fortunate to have
her affiliated with us. We owe to her and to Miss Gray a  great deal of our
success. They have ever been ready with helpful sug-gestions  and aid of
various kinds.

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Alethian Society  First Semester-  President ........................
.................... E. J. Brown  Vice-President
.................................. Mrs. Jessie MacDonald  Secretary
.................. ..................... Pearl M elang Treasurer
................................. Mabel Shotter  Sargeant-at-arms
................................. Florence Townsend  Reporter
............................... Ruth Fowler  Sponsor
............................................... M iss Bertha Crawford 
Second Semester-  President .............................................
Mrs. Jessie MacDonald Vice-President ......................
..................... Alta Spedding  Secretary
.......................................................... Gertrude Lyons 
Treasurer ...................... . ...................... Hazel McClellan 
Sergeant-at-amrs ................................................ Mrs.
Brown  Reporter ................................. Mrs. Tillie Gish  Sponsor
....................... ... ................. Miss Bertha Crawford 132

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As we make a resume of the activities of the Alethian Society for this 
year, we realize that our time has been profitably as well as pleasurably 
spent. During the first semester our social evenings were devoted to the 
study of the lives of great men. Early in the year we decided to Hooverize 
and consequently our social evenings were not distinguished by the serving 
of refreshments, as formerly. However we think with  pleasure of that
de-lightful  evening we were entertained at the home of Mr. Brown, when
re-freshments were served.  The second semester the work of the society was
characterized by a  general effort for the upbuilding of the society, and
through the combined  efforts of its members this end has been attained. To
Miss Crawford, our sponsor, who has helped us, inspired us and been  one of
us, we owe our sincerest thanks.  We look with sorrow to the time which
must of necessity mark the dis-persion  of our band; but pleasant will be
the memories of happy evenings  spent in congenial fellowship, that will
linger in our hearts, safe from the  power of time.  Members of Alethian
Society.  Edna Anderson  Mr. E. J. Brown  Ella Carrick  Charlotte Claussen 
Gertrude Lyon  Hazel McClellan  Ruth Fowler  Claudia Hull  Mrs.  Jessie
McDonald  Pearle Melang  Marcia Peckham  Adelaide Pierre  Mrs. Mabel
Shotter  Florence Townsend  Anna Shaffer  Georgia Turple  Alta Siedding 
Myra Jacquath  Phyllis Seymour  Rose Knutsen  Bertha Carey  Dorethea
Forrest  Mrs. Tillie Gish  Mr. Webster  Mrs. Drake  Edith Froom  Margaretha
Pala,  Olive Ja'quith  Flo etta Schmitt  Mary Stemke  Everett Poling  Ruby
Sharp  Sybil Wade  Dora Squires  133

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SPARK PLUG CLUB.  The month of February, 1917, heralded the organization of
the Everett  Club with the slogan of the city of smoke stacks: "The Spark
Plug of the  West" as our name. The officers are: President ..............
................... Emma Zebble  Vice-President
........................................ Clara Locke   Secretary-Treasurer
........................ ............ Alice Polley  Even tho we are a
social club we have exhibited our ability in other lines.  Who will forget
our typical scene of a training school at the Vaudeville?  Our  Hallowe'en
party with apple cider and mince pie will remain with us as one  of the
fondest memories of our club. The party at Chuckanut beach was  one of our
liveliest social affairs. The followers of the blue and gold are:  Emil
Enger  Clara Locke  Geraldine Thrall  Vera Winchester  Ruby Owens  Mabel
Painter Emma Zeble  Caroline Hammond  Mary Tomlinson  Hazel Welty  Marion
Johnson  Ada Harth  Beatrice Harth  Letha Painter  Naurien Stauffer  Anna
Olsen  Anna Brown  Adelsa Stevens  Alice Polley  134

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PHILO DIARY  Sept. 20 The "Would be" Philos were entertained with a picnic
at Deadman's  Point. Sept. 22 The new Philos received little slips telling
them that they were to  be Philos.  Oct. 11 Initiation. Many of the Philos
were very uncomfortable the next  day, after doing the "Stork Walk." All
the new Philos were branded  with the Philo sign.  Nov. 24 Birthday party.
We canned the Kaiser and shook Philo dice. Toasts  were given by Marie
Johns, Smith Carleton, Lou Green and Jean Al-mond.  Our soldier boys  were
remembered with boxes of birthday cake  and scrap-books.  Dec. 20 We were
all dressed like children at the Christmas program. Each  one brought
something that he wished very much to get rid of. After  the program these
gifts were distributed to the children by Mr. and Mrs.  Santa Claus. We
will never  forget the ruffles on Mr. Rausch's collar  or Albert Booman in
short trousers.  Feb. 7. Valentine party. Our  hall was beautifully
decorated with Kewpies  and hearts for our Valentine party. Everyone made a
valentine for some-one  else and wrote an original love poem on it; these
were given out at  the Valentine Postoffice.  May 9 We enjoyed the week-end
party out at the beach. Every two weeks  we have regular meetings at which
an interesting program is given. Each  week the Philos are asked to write a
letter to some of our boys who are  in the service and tell him what the
Philos are doing this year.  135

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ALI-5IAJ eLUb  The Alkisiah Club is celebrating its twelfth anniversary
this year and re-viewing  its history as one of the successful and as the
oldest clubs in the  school.  The club was organized in 1906. We look with
pride at our first pres-ident,  Luella Whittaker, who is at present making
her Master's degree at Columbia University.  The club was organized for
literary work on the ideals of the state fed-eration  of women's clubs. In
1917 our society joined that federation.  This year the cloud of war has
affected the interests of the work. Our  programs on women and war relief
have been followed earnestly. We have studied the stories of the
ministrations of Queen Isabella of Spain to the work  of the women of
today. Parliamentary drill under able supervision of Miss  Baker was also
an interesting feature of our programs. The school life of the year began
with a fudge party for the new mem-bers,  continued with initiation a week
later and culminated during the Christ-mas  season in a delightful evening
at the home of Miss Baker.  The second initiation was in the form of a
valentine party at which  new members were received with fitting rites and
ceremonies.  Soon after this a series of hikes was a feature of the spring
activities. Most appreciated of all was the annual outing at the beach on
Lummi island  at Miss Baker's cottage and at the home of Dorothy Swartz. 
During the year we have replaced our social life by war relief work, not-
ably  the banquet usually given by the under-classmen for the Seniors. In 
this case the funds were donated to the federation of women's clubs to aid 
in establishing libraries for the boys in the camps.  At the annual bulb
sale eighty bulbs were sold netting a sum of money  for the club and giving
experience in bulb culture.  This year a delegate was elected to the
federation of women's clubs. The  report will be received during the summer
session.  By faithful and harmonious work the club has accomplished its
original  aim and the interest of the new members gives encouragement for
the fu-ture.  We all feel that we  owe our success to the unfailing
inspiration of Miss  Baker.  136

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{  i  -_  __Y---:  h h

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Sisters' League  Our Sisters' League is a patriotic organization of the
school, organized  for the purpose of  helping, in any way possible,
brothers who are in the ser-vice  of the United States, either as soldiers
or sailors. Any one is eligible  to membership who has a brother in the
service.  We work with the Women's League and the Fathers' and Mothers'
Clubs  in doing anything we can in knitting, writing cheery letters, making
little  comforts, boxes of cookies and candy for the boys in the hospitals
as well as  for those in the cam'ps. The girls do individual work for their
brothers.  There are twenty-five active members in our League and we meet
every  Friday evening in the sewing room of the Home Economics department.
At our first meetings we hemmed dish towels, made joke books, and bed
socks.  At Christmas time we worked with the Women's League in preparing
Christ-mas  boxes for the boys in the hospital at Camp Lewis. We also
filled a large  box with Christmas tree decorations. In the top of each box
we placed a copy of the Messenger and some interesting illustrated letters.
 The Students' Association purchased the material for the service flag  and
the Sisters' League made and presented it to the school.  OFFICERS
President ................... .............. .. ........... Hazel M
cClellan  Vice-President ...................... .........................C
lara Endright  Secretary and Treasurer
.......................................---------------- Mary Carlson  138

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WAR wJORK  139

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KNITTING CLASSES  Under the able supervision of Miss Jensen, knitting
classes were organ-ized  and hundreds of girls were taught to knit, who
have been doing active  work since. The College Club raised money with
which to buy yarn and  fifty pairs of socks were quickly turned out by the
girls.  One hundred Christmas boxes were made by the students and sent to 
the boys in France. These packages contained  a Christmas number of the 
Messenger, handkerchiefs, pencils, stationery, dates, raisins, milk
chocolates  and a package of playing cards. Many knitted garments have been
turned  over to the Red Cross and busy fingers of the students and women of
the fac-ulty  are seen knitting in every social gathering, as well as
during the morn-ing  assembly.  Red Cross and Y. M. C. A., in making their
drives found a ready response  among teachers and students of our school.
Mr. Bond was at the head of  the campaign and proved to be a successful
manager.  Thru our book store the sale of thrift stamps has amounted to
more than  four hundred and fifty dollars.  -A Junior Red Cross was
organized in the Training School, and thru  the efforts of Miss Cummins and
Miss Gray, the membership quickly extended  thru all the grades. The
children in the sewing classes have made little gar-ments  for the war
sufferers, while the boys in the Manual Training depart-ment  have made
puzzles, checker board tables and other articles for the  soldiers.  Miss
Cummins organized a class in surgical dressings and the girls of  her
department have not a minute to spare, so busy are they in war relief 
work.  140

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WAR COOKERY  During the third quarter Miss Ormsby conducted a class in war
cookery,  and Miss Ormsby's class consisted of the entire student body.
Demonstra-tions  were given at each meeting of the class and much studied,
careful, and  valuable information was given by the instructor. The work of
Miss Ormsby  was greatly appreciated by the students, as was shown by the
application of  the recipes. Nearly every girl has a neatly kept notebook,
in which no other  work is found except from Miss Ormsby's class.  IN THE
LIBRARY  When the call for books was made, Miss Wilson lost no time in
urging  the students to respond to the call. Miss Wilson explained the
purpose  of the books and the kind of books wanted and also kept alive the
interest  she had begun. Thru her earnest efforts two hundred and fifty
books were  soon collected and sent to the boys in the service. Miss Wilson
turned the gov-ernment books on food, that are sent to the library to be
displayed, over to her  able assistant, Miss Gladys Stephen. Each week Miss
Stephen has a new and  attractice display which is most pleasing to the
users  of the library. Miss  Stephen also assisted Miss Wilson in collecing
books for the soldiers.  At the close of the year, the student body voted
to give $500 to the Red  Cross. That amount was taken from the students'
association fund.  The proceeds of the Senior play were also donated to the
Red Cross Fund.

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The Business Girls' League  The Business Girls' League is an association of
young women who en-- gage in some forms of employment in addition to their
regular school activ-ities.  The following list gives the various kinds of
labor and the number-employed  in each:  Student help ..................
... .................. 70  Clerking
.............................................. 22  Occasional work
................. ..... ....................... 34 Janitor service
................................... ............ 15  Cafeteria Manager
......................................... 1 Cafeteria work
.......................................... 28  Library work
......................... .......... 2  Office work
...................................... 9  Laundry ......................
................. 1  Jitney service ........................... 1
Canvassing .................... .................... 2  Collecting
................ ...... ................ 1  W aiting table ............
......................... ... 9  Serving
................................... 2  On the evening of March 8th, the
Business Girls held their first annuar  banquet, a la Hoover, in the dining
room at the Normal School. The toasts  centered around the theme of the ups
and downs of business life (with em-phasis  on the ups) and  set forth the
supreme importance of health and hap-piness.  Business Girls, Business
Girls,  Bound to win out, are the Business Girls,  Business Girls, Business
Girls,  Overcomers are the Business Girls. 142

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 143

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143  x  Yy ii h  14

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 144

     ----------

:t ' Cil-.:.. -'Y.:  r e: ' I  : -.~i~.  ::~.%~:~ ~ :RI.~'  . I  i . .,; .
; . ,- :: q: ; ':' ' ~  ..r :i.::~: ~ .. .~ ; ;r i  :1  I ~. ~.:; I: :. ~ 
ri'  B. : ...  ;CC  t;.r 2  iI'.' I:  ;I;  'L 't  : :2  ~  r' ~: :: :: ::~
.:~I.~~::: r;  .. , .... ~ ii ,  ii II ~ ' "  i.  //~  . . .1 ,.~ :'*= 1 
": ::: -Sj  ~:, ;  .i-" ;: ~TiC~'r=~i~-T'~r ~~i  l-Cil

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 145

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n W  MISS CHARLOTTE CLAUSSEN,  who, regardless of the High Cost of Living,
has successfully managed the  Cafeteria, and was unanimously re-elected to
serve in that capacity for the  ensuing year. MISS EVA McABEE  President of
the Y. W. C. A., who pledged $1,700 for the Normal to the  Y. M. C. A. Fund
for the boys in France, and who was instrumental in raising  the sum of
$2,500.  145

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 146

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S14

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THE Y. W. C. A.  The Y. W. C. A. began its work in earnest, even before the
first day of  school, by meeting new girls at the trains and boats.  Cassie
Cales was obliged to resign the presidency and Eva McAbee was  .elected to
fill this vacancy.  On September 21st, the annual Y. W. C. A. reception to
the faculty and  student body was held.  Instead of going to the Hotel
Leopold for a banquet this year, the money  was given to the Y. M. C. A.
Student Friendship Fund. A series of wartime  parties, with light
refreshments, have been given and were enjoyed much  more than elaborate
affairs.  The Y. W. C. A. track meet was very much enjoyed. The Freshies, 
Sophs, Juniors and Seniors were all there to take part in the contests. The
 Freshies carried off all the honors.  We will not forget the grand march
led by the victorious Freshmen.  November 24 the Y. W. C. A. entertained at
a guest party and the even-ing  was spent sewing for the Red Cross.  At the
beginning of the second semester a military party was given to the faculty
and the student body in honor of the new students. All depart-ments  of the
service were represented. The most conspicious of the drills  was that of
the awkward squad.  The meetings have not only been interesting, but
profitable as well.  Visiting speakers were: Miss Blackmoore and Miss
Stevens,  missionaries from  China; Dr. Allen and Mrse. Andrews, who have
spent many years in India;  Mrs. McAbee, of the Salvation Army, gave us a
most beautiful and inspiring  Christmas message entitled "The Cradle, the
Cross and the Coronation." We  were very fortunate in having Mrs. Stark, of
St. Louis, with us during the  world fellowship week.  The tenth annual
Bible Institute, which was in February, was a source ,of great spiritual
help to all who attended. Mrs. Campbell, of Seattle, and  Mrs. Neth, of
Vancouver, were the speakers.  The association has had over two hundred
students enrolled in Bible  Study classes this year, taught by members of
the faculty and other well pre-pared  leaders. We are expecting to have
three hundred enrolled by the end  of the year in Mission Study classes. 
Another practical service is a well conducted Cafeteria of which Char-lotte
 Claussen is manager. The members of the Y. W. C. A. would be un-willing 
to give up this phase of their school life.  147

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CITY Y. W. C. A.  We know you would not think this book complete without a
few re-marks  from the Y. W. C. A. Sisterhood. It is the happiest place,
for 'how  could it be otherwise with the crowd of Normalites who stay
there? You  may not know them all personally so I will introduce them to
you.  First of all comes  the war brides. Marion Schofield has taken the
name  of Johnson. Myrtle Shull and Jack Horrigan were the first couple to
be mar-ried  at the Y. W. C. A. We were all invited. Good luck, girls, on
the sea  of matrimony.  Our artists are Alice and Jean Belch. Major Jean
trips the light fan-tastic  up and down the halls with Grandma (Gladys
Hamley '19) at her  heels.  We also have an artist in the dramatic world-
Myrtle Pugsley. She  is authority on all movie actors.  Irene Ramsey, no
other than the treasurer of the Senior Class, is not  only a diver for
money, but if one chanced to take a peep into our swimming  tank, you would
see her diving and swimming like a fish.  Certainly you have heard of our
rare type of walking pin cushions, Isla  Nash. From morn 'till night you
can hear, "Isla, oh Isla."  In cell 301 lives Gail Price and  Mary
Tomlinson, otherwise known as  "Susie" and Willie," the champion pugilists.
 Just down the hall lives the beautiful society belle, Pauline Shuler, who 
is always trying to keep peace on the third floor. She is also noted as the
 early riser, for at 6:45 you will hear her gentle tap at the door and
"Time to  get up, girls."  We are sorry that Alice Belch and Alethia and
Marjorie Weeks left us  at mid-year. We wish them success in the teaching
profession.  We feel quite honored to have Clara Melcher, the first
salaried cadet  in Bellingham, as one of us.  We have as custodian of our
"zoo," Lelia McCoy, who with jealous care  guards our gold fish.  The
commissary department is in room 307. Here, Florence Blethen and Marie
Goering generously gave us the proteins and carbohydrates which they 
receive in their boxes from home.  Ruth Panchot (Waffles) lives with Katie
Lopp. One would almost think  they were attending college, but actions
speak louder than decorations  (words).  Mary Kirchoff and Marie Broulette
came to live in our happy home for  the second semester.  148

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, 41  -mi  -I :  149)

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PRAYER  By Glenn Hughes  The wild rose blooms but for a day  Along the road
in June,  And as at night  I pass that way  Beneath the silent moon,  I
lift the fallen petals up  Tenderly, one by one,  And in my hands they form
a cup  That one time held the sun.  The night's soft tears are on them yet,
 The dawn still  haunts their cheeks;  And my own face is sweetly wet  With
fragrance that it seeks.  High up, with white arms in the light,  I lift
them to the moon-  A perfect prayer this summer night,  Along the road in
June! 150

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ONE BATTLE:  Mrs. Stewart was knitting, seated in the bay window of her
little sitting  room. Her sweet face with its sunken eyes had a musing
look, and her wasted  throat moved slightly as she worked, as if in time to
the rhythmic weaving and  clicking of a thousand other needles in the hands
of a thousand mothers.  She turned at the sound of a striking clock.  "Now
he's through drill," she thought, "and I'd better be getting sup-per." 
Since Bob Stewart bad been at Camp Grant his mother had followed as closely
as possible the schedule of his meals. She liked to think that the row  of
hungry boys, with Bob in  the midst, were eating at the same time she had 
her dainty tea. Once she said with an exalted face, "I'll not eat anything
that  he can't have. Sometimes I think I'll sleep on the ground if he has
to."  Prosaic Mrs.  Jensen, to whom she spoke had turned uncomfortably from
 her fervor.  "Well I guess the boys are pretty  comfortable now," she had
said sens-ibly.  The widowed Mrs. Stewart and her only son had been more to
 each other  than the bustling Mrs. Jensen with her four stolid children
and stolider hus-band  could imagine. It had been remarkable that Bob
Stewart had included  his delicate little mother in so much of his life and
thought without acquir-ing  the stigma of sissyism. It was a tribute to his
brezzy, hearty boyishness  that no such suggestion was felt, for though Bob
had many friends, he had  no intimate but his mother. Their bond had been
one of complete confidence  -a blending of the spirit. The bars of dumb
reticence which separate most  growing boys from their practical parents,
had never been raised between  them.  Mrs. Stewart was thinking of this as
she wandered into his bedroom after  tea. What was he doing  in this quiet
twilight hour? He used to dress at  this time after his work at the garage,
calling gay bits of information and  questions to her as he dashed between
bedroom and bath.  Tonight she imagined whimsically as she glanced 'round
the faint out-lines  of the bare room, he seemed more than ever to be with
her. She started  lovingly arranging the clothes hanging in the closet. 
"He never had any use of this jersey," she mused, "it seems a shame  he
can't wear it when its whole and warm." She patted it into shape, for the 
hundredth time thinking of the pathetic limpness of these clothes without 
their vivid wearer.  Next she glanced at the evening clothes in their
shroud-like bag. What  heart burnings and self denials the sleek black
things had meant! After the  years Bob had braved formal dances without
them, and the super human boy-ish  efforts to save the required money, he
had worn them but once. She stroked them tenderly as she stood dreaming of
that night. He had been so  splendid with his handsome sunburned face and
his muscular shoulders. The  picture of the gallant young figure in uniform
followed.

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I needn't be afraid he won't succeed, she thot now. "He IS a regular 
fighting Stewvart, and he DOES look just like his grandfather."  She sighed
as she made this great concession. When she had first mar-ried she had
resented the tradition of the "fighting Stewarts." The picture  of her
husband's father, a dashing mustachioed veteran of the Civil War, had 
overpowered her little room, and her husband's innumerable stories of his 
bravery and recklessness had touched a sore point. Her own father in the 
clutches of poverty of the unsuccessful pioneer, had not left his sick wife
and  four babies in their desperate helplessness. She liked to think he had
been  actuated by a certain courage and she longed to retaliate to her
husband's  claims that Bob in all his brave youth resembled "Wild Dan
Stewart." Now  she thought with satisfaction that Bob was a happy-go-lucky
act-first-think-afterward  Stewart, and that she monopolized the Wilcox
brand of introspec-tion.  The mysterious feeling of Bob's presence drew her
restlessly from the  little room to the porch of the cottage. She stood for
a moment looking at  the lights of  the town and at the shimmering streak
of moonlit marsh beyond.  A hurrying figure turning in at the gate gave her
a sharp reminder of her  boy's innumerable homecomings. She started forward
with a sufficating heart beat-but it was only Willie Jensen from the
telegraph office.  With shaking fingers she tore open the yellow envelope
and read the  curt announcement that Bob's orders for France had come. And
then-his marriage.  When Weston received thru the papers the news of Bob
Stewart's mar-riage,  the town was shaken by conjecture and curiosity. 
Mrs. Jensen was authority for the fact that "Mrs. Stewart hadn't heard  a
breath of it yesterday at six o'clock. I declare I hate to see her," she
con-tinued  pityingly. Of course Bob had a right to marry even if she did
scrimp  and borrow to send him through school. But they were so awfully
close to  each other-someway I can't think of them apart. He'd start
calling 'Moth-er'  the minute he got in the door just like a little child,
and the plans he  made to fix up her house and take her to  California-. I
often told Joe there  was one woman who was going to have solid comfort
with her child."  To  the less sensitive and more curious friends who did
not hesitate to  call, the little widow was inscrutable.  She went about
the house as usual, painstakingly arranging familiar or-naments.  She had
no tears, just a swelling wave of misery, and her mumb  brain refused to
consider the details of preparation. The telegram had stated  that they
would arrive on Bob's brief leave before sailing.  Suddenly she stopped her
dusting and faced the picture of "Wild Dan  Stewart." It seemed to her
grieving nerves that his leering eyes followed  her about the room.  "It's
just the brutal thing you brave Stewats have always done," she said with
white intensity. "My boy-never to tell me-and he comes with  that intruding
girl to say goodbye to me. It won't be my son leaving as  much as it will
be that silly young thing's husband."  152

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She thought with sharp distaste of the unknown girl. The girl Bob had 
never seen two months before. She  couldn't know anything about him. How 
little things made him suffer while he covered his sensitiveness in a
careless  laughing way. That girl would share in sending his boxes and see
the diary  that was to have been sacred to just two.  Mrs. Stewart sat down
in her accustomed place, where the cold light of  a sunless day fell on her
silent brooding figure. "Why didn't he tell me?" went  thru her mind in a
sick refrain. In her dull suffering she stared with unsee-ing  eyes at the
grey room, but as if in answer to her questions she was seeing  once more a
flood of summer sunshine. A chubby sunburned youngster with tears washing
dirty furrows down his cheeks, was pulling a lumbering puppy  down the
walk.  "That was the first time he ever asked me for a pet," she thought
with  a set face. "I said I wasn't strong enough to care for a puppy, but
even  then I didn't want anything else between us, and he understood in
some clairvoyant childish way. My heart used to ache when he wanted things
I  couldn't give him, and I thought I  was self sacrificing, but I never
let him  have a chum. Now he's taken what he wanted most-and because I
didn't  give it to him-isn't that the bitterest thing?"  She sat for a long
time, wrapped in a reverie of sick questionings.  Realization came with
cold accusations against that tender care which  cringed with fear that
some one else could contribute the best things to her  son.  Why did she
shrink from sharing the last  minutes-the poignant pain of  the last
straining look which is transmuted to joy by the splendor of its sac-
rifice.  After all this was the real farewell with its aching hunger and
sense of  irreparable loss. She would stay in this little room where he had
been en-tirely  hers and let their flaming lovers' farewell take the place 
of her last  blessing.  From the exaltation of this mood she roused to the
immediate effort to  be made. It would be hardest of all to achieve a
cheerful unclouded welcome  to the young wife. Sensitive Bob would be
nervously apprehensive and the  beauty of their last days depended on her. 
Finally she drew herself up, on her face a great serenity. Her beautiful 
worn eyes met the opaque one's of the warrior in the portrait, as she
turned  toward his unresponsive face.  "I was ever a fighter, so-one fight
more," she quoted.  -Catherine Fifield.  153

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The Gift of the Rose Master  I  The Rose Master was a famous scientist who
had specialized in flower culture and now devoted himself exclusively to
roses. It was not known  whether his culture was for the purpose of
developing a high degree of art  or merely sheer beauty. His roses
possessed both qualities in a high degree.  The ignorant people of the
country around said he was mad and named him  the "Rose Master."  His
gardens extended about a ruined palace in a sunny climate. He him-self 
lived in an apartment of the palace and his door opened onto the rose 
garden. Early in the morning and after sundown he was busy digging,
spad-ing,  watering, pruning. During the day when the sun beat hot on the
sands  outside the palace, deep in a cool, dark vault of the place he was
mixing chem-icals,  pouring over  musty books or dreaming on an old couch.
Some of the  good people said he was a wizzard and that in his dreams he
talked with the  Devil, bargaining for human souls to put into his roses. 
The selected roses  grew in an old garden surrounded by a high stone wall 
which guarded the courtyard of the palace. The wall was crumbling, clink-ed
 with moss and crept over by vines. Owls hooted among the stones in  the
moonlight. The roses themselves exotic in their profusion, breathed  out a
heavy and intoxicating fragrance.  One evening when the Rose Master was
sitting on his threshold drink-ing  in the beauty of his garden, a gentle
breeze stirred the leaves, and he heard  his favorite tree breathe a deep
sigh. He regarded it with attention. It was  the most responsive of all his
creations. The thick velvet softness of its blooms resembled human flesh in
texture and in color, white veined with pink  deepening in the center. A
single bloom more perfect than the rest, topped  the bush. In its stillness
and its perfume, it seemed a little human heart up-lifted.  "What is the
matter with her sister?" said a voice.  "She is in love," said one with a
ripple of laughter.  "Well, that is nothing," said a third, "we are all in
love. Jack is in love-with  a bat,  Ivory loves a big, gray moth, and I am
in love with the moon.'"  "But Beauty-"  "Sh-h!! !" An ominous rustle 
passed thru the garden.  154

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Beauty is in love with the Rose Master, sang out a spiteful voice.  Silence
fell, deep and deadening. An overpowering perfume thickened  the air. For a
long time the Rose Master heard his pulse tick in the stillness.  The moon
was high, the light streaming down with an eerie radiance, when  a tiny owl
hooted and a white mist began to creep along the ground.  "He will never
go," said a low voice.  "Let us dance before him," said another.  "Come,
let's," they all murmured.  The mist rose higher, creeping, spreading,
thickening, until it filled the  garden. The plants were no longer visible.
The air was full of something indefinite, alive, moving. The mist began to
individualize into many columns.  The air grew clearer. The columns formed
themselves into human shapes,  nymphs or fairies, fantastic and beautiful.
They danced and marched as  gracefully as the Northern Lights, whirling,
racing, receding, leaping, bend-ing,  bowing. As the moon sank lower and
the shadows fell slantwise across the fol-iage  the fairies formed a semi
circle. Into their front stepped Beauty, the  queenliest of them all.
Bowing low, she saluted the Rose Master. A low,  weird music played by the
wind, swept up from the earth and the dance motif  began. The  ballet was
in action. The movements of Beauty were as inde-scribably  beautiful as the
rush of sea waves, the flight of birds or the leaping  of fire flames. When
she had finished, the music died out with a low wail and  murmur. The moon
was low, the shadows long, and the ballet receding in-to  mist.  "Come!
come, sister!" cried many little voices. But Beauty stepped into  a circle
of light and knelt before the Rose  Master.  "What do you want, little
sister?" he asked.  "A soul like your own," she replied.  "Why ?" "Because
when I look at you there is always something I cannot under-stand.  You are
not like the sun nor the flowers nor the birds. You have  something we have
not. It is torturing me that I can never understand.  Make me human like
yourself."  "You can never again be the tranquil and joyous flower," he
replied.  "I do not care."  When the sun rose in the morning, a messenger
in search of the Rose  Master found him seated on his threshold. Crushed in
his hands were the  petals of a rose, flesh like in texture and color,
white veined with pink. He  was dead.  Some of the old gossips whispered
that he had sat up to see the fairies  dance, and no man can see the
fairies dance and live. Others said he had gone  home to his master, the
Devil.  155

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An American millionaire bought the old palace to please his daughter 
Rosalind, whom he loved more than  anything else in the world. Part of the 
palace was fitted up to live in, and the family moved in for a season. 
Rosalind spent her time wandering about the old gardens and halls.  Once,
in a dark vault, she found some books musty and yellow with age.  After
that she spent most of her time in the rose garden. The gardener was-given 
special directions for the care of the roses, and Rosalind herself watered 
and cut  the blooms. There was one bush which had not blossomed since the 
days of the Rose Master, which opened its buds for her. The flowers were 
lovelier than any of the others, flesh like in texture and color, white,
veined  with pink deepening the center.  When the fiance, Herman, saw the
old palace, he was delighted. On hear-ing  the legend of the Rose Master,
he said to Rosalind:  "It seems as if I were once that Rose Master and you
were the rose."  The wedding day was a holiday for the whole countryside.
There was  a magnificent banquet, music, flowers, wine, dancing,
everything. In the  midst of the revelry, Herman and Rosalind stepped into
the cool night of the  rose garden. The air was heavy with the scent of the
roses. It was very still  except for the scraping of insects. The sounds of
music and dancing came  to them as from a far away world. The one rose
which was lovelier than the  rest beckoned to them. As Herman reached to
pluck it, Rosalind seized his,  hand and prevented him. Her face was pale. 
"What is the matter, Rosalind? You are sad."  It is nothing."  "Why are you
sad ?"  "I do not know. I seem to be afraid."  "Afraid of what ?" 
"Nothing, only I wish-"  "What do you wish?"  "I wish to God I could give
my soul back, and be again that flower, tran--  quil and joyous."  -Miriam
Dolman..  156

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Sartling I  First prize poem  _A sluggish brown stream oozes o'er the
sodden Flemish plain.  They're marching! Hear the throb of tramping feet- 
Dogged feet that lurch through cold black pools, and stumble on again - 
.Hunched shoulders shrinking from the icy sleet.  He started out
high-hearted in the acrid foggy morn,  He shouldered eighty pounds with
buoyancy.  Now each step's an intolerable torture to be borne.  With
drifting thoughts he counts steps rhythmically.  'Transported from that
slime and mud to slopes of cool green lawn,  To tingling swims and lounging
on the shore,  Wild speeding through warm scented nights-dancing to rose
staked dawn-  And questioning-was life to mean no more?  And when as if  in
answer that deep clanging challenge came.  'The high adventure youth was
longing for,  If boys confused their duty with a longing for the game- 
'Their singing blood delights the gods of war.  He marched at first
exulting; but heartsick pity then  -Stifled the hate of ineffectual sings. 
In sanctuary of his heart, thoughts of bright martyred men  Are sealed,
while lips dwell on the trivial things.  'Vhat is the meaning of it now?
boy with the haunted eyes.  "Calm eyes that gaze past horrors at a goal, 
Exalted- inarticulate-the supreme sacrifice  Your spirit freed-that white
flame we call Soul.  -Catherine Fifield.  157

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THE OWL  -Second Prize Poem-  In slow and measured flight,  His dark wing
cleaves the sombre night. Drifting by the naked trees,  Moaning low in
minor keys;  Or perches he perchance  Upon some deadened  branch,  From
where with fixed stare  Surveys the earth and air,  Gloomy, silent,
taciturn,  Wildwood comrades doth he spurn.  Loves he neither day nor
night,  Pale, uncertain, transient light,  Twilight shadows doth he love; 
Misty light below, above,  Like a fog, so indistinct  Where earth and sky
are interlinked.  Still the branches moan and croon,  As doth rise the
fire-orbed moon,  Peeping from behind a  cloud,  Fugative that nightly
shroud.  Hides again the moon from sight,  Outlines all blend into night. 
The  old owl tells the hours in flight,  His vigil keeps till morning
light.  -Jack Lansen.  DAY'S DONE  - Honorable Mention-  The pink-flecked
clouds  Scurry across the sky,  A flock of pearl-white seagulls flutter by.
 The blood-red sun  Dips into the west,  As I hear the rippling waves 
Lulled to rest.  The dying sunbeams  Flare and are gone,  And the deep
grows dark,  Day's done.  -Cassie Cales.

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The Prize Essay  C. R. HOLBROOK  TIlE RF(O)R(GANIZATION ()F THI \WV fRLI)
()N A DEMI1()CRATIC  t/ ASIS FOR PEiACEFUI. II) EVEI ()l'MI ENT  The need
for such reconstruction is too) apparent for discussion; the only  question
in the minds of thoughtful people of today is how this may be ac-
complished.  It is not the purpose of this article to convince the reader
that  this is the best or only feasible plan but being different in many
fundanlental  points from others it may suggest new possibilities. The sole
aim of this  essay is to awaken a deeper interest in the world prolens of
to-day and tio-morrow; to stimulate an independence and breadth of thought
in the citizens  of the world which is essential to successful democracy;
and which may re-sult  in the formation, the adoption, and the ratification
of a much better plan,  whereby the nations of the world may live in
harmony, and the people learn cooperation instead of competitive
destruction: The people of the world are  fast losing confidence in their
self-appointed leaders and present system of  government, which have
developed the national spirit to such a destructive  stage as to convince
the various groups of peoples that their neighbo)rs are at  all times
plotting their destruction. Consequently it has become a question  of
destroy, or be destroyed. Some (lay when )peopl)le awake to the realization
 of the folly of it all, and turn from their deceptive o)ppressors, what
then shall  we, as champions of democracy, have to offer?  First, as a
basis for consideration, a few fundamental p)riincil)les, which  embody
many of the causes and suggest some of the remedies for the present  state
of affairs, should be set forth.

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All government should be for the largest number of its subjects, not for 
the protection of wealth or for the undue promotion of the governing class.
 The state is for the people, not the people for the state; therefore, the
peopi  possess the sacred right of revolution, or the right to choose what
government  and what kind of government they will have. In any geographical
unit con-tiguous  to another nation, where a majority of the people of this
unit desire  to become subjects of the other nation, wishing to sever the
ties which have  bound them to their own, they should be allowed to do so. 
The fact that a nation has been first to discover, explore, and subdue 
certain sparsely settled, unorganized, undeveloped, and uncivilized parts
of  the world-later known as colonies-does not give that nation eternal
title  to them. Neither is any nation, who because of a better organized
navy and  army is or has been able to take forcibly such territories from
other nations,  justified in such action nor has it any better title. These
territories should belong first to the native peoples, and the world at
large should have second  claim.  A highly organized nation that it growing
so rapidly in numbers as to be  cramped for room, should have the right-in
the present age as well as in the  past-to expand so long as there are
large undeveloped or nearly uninhabited   areas. Other nations should join
in peaceable arrangements for such expan-sion.  No nation has the right to
hold large territories that it is not using, nor  will be able to use soon,
when some nearby nation has not enough room for its  people. To illustrate:
Russia has no right to all of Siberia, of which she has little use, while
Japan is crowded and needs more room for her overflow of  population. 
International control and ownership of all strategic waterways neces-sary 
for the commerce of the world is not only desirable but indispensable  for
world peace. Neutralization of all the seas, in peace and war, would ben-
efit  all, and is only fair and just to neutrals.  Universal suffrage,
except in the case of illiterates, should be  a principle  of democracy. A
democratic state should have no moral right to declare war,  except in case
of invasion, without referendum to its people. Nationalization  of
manufacture of necessary armament would abolish the desire for war on  the
part of a large class of capitalists. All owners and publishes of papers 
and magazines should be citizens of that country in which their
publications  are issued, and should own no property nor have interest in
any foreign  state. And finally but without doubt the most important
individual right,  every man should have the privilege to worship God or
not, just as he sees  fit, without intereference from anyone. Religion is a
personal duty toward  God and is no affair of the state; consequently,
religious freedom and a com-plete  separation of church and state are most
important principles.  160

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Assuming the foregoing principles to be recognized by all as essential  for
peaceful developments, a plan whereby this may be accomplished is in 
order. Let us divide the world into three great geographical and partly
racial  divisions or units, with the several states of each unit federated
for certain  definite purposes of government.  The central unit would
include all of Europe, Africa, and that part of  Asia west of a line drawn
from the Arabian Sea in the south, along the west-ern  boundaries of India,
China, and Mongolia, continuing northeast through  Siberia to the Arctic
Ocean to a point near the mouth of the Lens River. Th'ls  divides Siberia
racially also, as the part to the east of this line has many more 
Mongolian people than Russia. Let us call this great central unit
tEurafrasia,  and the union we wish to form among the nations of this unit,
The Federated  States of Eurafrasia.  The eastern unit would include the
remainder of Asia east of the lpreviou-\  ly drawn line, as well as the
adjacent islands, taking in the oriental peoples  of the Mongolian and
Malay races. Geographically, Australia would be in  this unit, but since a
large majority of the inhabitants are Caucasiaiis of tlh  English type and
are somewhat isolated, they would, no doubt, p)refer to be  placed in the
central unit, or Eurafrasia. I et us call the eastern unit lMon-golasia.
The western unit would include the two continents of America with their 
adjacent islands. America would be the most apl)ropriate name for this
west-ern  unit.  Such a federation as we wish to form in each of these
great units is prob-ably  most needed in Eurafrasia, the central unit;
nevertheless, tho very dif-ficult,  the results will iustify the effort. If
fully explained it will be seen that  such a plan would work equally as
well in the western and eastern federations  which would be similar but
less complex.  \What kind of a federated government will be best for the
natis ns of  Eurafrasia? How much power shall be vested in it? How much
shall be re-served  for the separate nations? These are difficult
questions, but when the nations are once agreed on these, the rest is
comparatively easy. An empire  or a kingdom would be unsatisfactory for
many reasons; for instance, there  would be too many contenders for the
crown \iwhich would mean the continu-ation  of strife and bloodshed for
kaisers and kings. A form of democracy will then be the only safe
government for such a federation. It is well known  from experiences of our
critical period that a government which can reco-mend,  but has no power to
enforce, is a failure. Consequently, what ever  duties are placed upon the
federal government, it must have power to perform.  All will agree that
each of the states should retain the right to have the kind  of government
that seems best suited to the needs of its people. Each state  should have
power to regulate its own affairs within its boundaries, so  long  as it
does not endanger the rights of another. The federal government should 
have power to settle disputes between the states; to regulate interstate
and  foreign commerce, tariffs, and postal or telegraph service; to control
all canals  and strategic waterways necessary to interstate commerce, as
well as the man-ufacture  and use of all armament. It should guarantee to
all religious liberty,  and to every non- illiterate the right of suffrage.
 161

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For the purpose of government, Eurafrasia will be divided into states and 
territories. These states will be known as Advanced States-those highly 
developed, whose populations are less than fifty per cent illiterate, such
as  England; and Retarded States-those less highly developed whose
popula-tions  are more than fifty, but less than seventy-five per cent
illiterate, such as  Russia. Sections sparcely settled and undeveloped
whose inhabitants are  more than seventy-five per cent illiterate will be
called Federal Territories  Illiterate is defined as meaning the inability
of all persons over ten years of  age to read and write.  As to government,
there shall be three departments-the legislative, ex-ecutive,  and
judicial. The legislative shall consist of an upper house, or sen-ate,  and
a lower house of representatives. As to representation in the senate,  the
states shall be classified according to population. States having a popu-
lation  of twenty-five millions or over, shall be in the first class and
entitled  to five senators, which shall be  appointed by the state
government in any way  it sees fit and would serve until recalled. This
class will include the great  powers of Europe. States having a population
of less than twenty-five mil-lion  or over shall be in the second class,
and entitled to three senators. All  states having a population of less
than ten million shall be in the third class  and entitled to two senators.
Each state shall send one representative to the  lower house for every
million of non-illiterate population, which shall be elect-ed  by the
people for a term of ten years.  It will be interesting to note the
personel of this congress. England, Germany, France, Italy, Austra-Hungary,
Russia and perhaps Ukrania will  each send five senators. Spain  will send
three, but Turkey even tho having  twenty million, may not be entitled to
any, as it is doubtful if she can be  classed as a retarted state, so many
of her people being illiterate. Belgium,  Holland, Denmark, Sweden,
Finland, Roumania, Bulgaria, Servia, Greece,  Switzerland, Portugal,
Ireland, and Australia will each be entitled to two  senators. This will
make in all about seventy-five senators. In our lower  house,
representation being based on non-illiterate population, there will be 
about forty English, four Irish. thirty-four French, eight Spanish, two
Portu-geese,  Twenty-two Italian, twenty-three Austrian, fourteen
Hungarian, three  Swiss, sixty-five German, six Belgian, six Dutch. two
Danish, two Norwegan, five Sweedish, two Finnish, fifty Russian, ten
Ukranian, eight Polish, three  Roumanian, three Bulgarian, two Servian, and
two Grecian representatives,  making in all about three hundred fifty. 
162

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This senate and house of representatives, or congress, shall convene once 
each year, remaining in session not more than sixty days. The first
difficulty  when congress convenes will be the matter of the language to be
used in con-gress.  On thinking of the many nationalities present it seems
quite an ob- stacle,  but in reality most of the educated people of Europe
speak several of  the more important languages; at any rate the ballot
should be the judge in  all such cases, and once a language is adopted it
should be a matter of study  for the representatives.  The lower house
shall elect a premier or president,  who shall form a re-sponsible 
ministry to carry out the executive functions of the government,  but who
may be recalled at any time congress is in session. The senate shall 
appoint or elect fifteen noted judges-not more than two from any one
na-tion-  who shall form the judicial department or federal court, to 
which all  appeals shall be made. This court shall interpret the laws,
decide the juris-diction  of appealed questions, and try all cases charged
with breaking fed-  ,eral laws. In case the offender is a state the court
shall present its verdict to  the assembled congress for approval. 
Congress shall have power to impose taxes on the states and territories 
,directly proportional to population. Upon organization of the federal
gov-ernment,  the various states shall surrender all naval units, except
any which  congress shall prescribe as necessary for police duty within
each state's own  territorial waters and ports, to federal government to be
used for policing  high seas and strategic waterways included under
jurisdiction of unit. Each  state shall be given credit on its share of
support of the federal government  for the value of its navy given over to
federal government. Each state shall  furnish to federal government its
quota of men, based on population. to form  a federal army for purposes of
policeing boundaries, enforcing laws, and gov-erning   territories. No
state shall be allowed to maintain a military force  larger than is
necessary for police duty within its own boundaries. This  should be a
certain per cent of population decided upon by congress, probably  not more
than one to one thousand. Congress shall have the right to spec-ify  the
form of government for the special states classified as Retarded States. 
Other important duties and powers of congress shall be the regulation  and
government of federal territories which are Africa and Southwest Asia. 
Congress shall maintain order, establish schools, keep open to
non-illiterate  immigration, regulate trade, and develop and govern these
territories with  the idea of protecting and promoting the welafre of the 
native people and home  seekers, that they may ultimately become states. 
One very important question is that of where our federal government  shall
be established. As Constantinople is the geographical and logical center 
of Eurafrasia, it should. without doubt, be the capital. Its strategiv
import-ance  demands that it be held and controlled by an international
government.  rather than of the vacillating but vicious Turk.  163

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One of the most desirable results of this reorganization will be a \Vorill 
Council, which shall be formed by the three great world units selecting
fromii  their congresses forty-five members. Each congress shall elect ten
of its  representatives and five of its senators to meet at Constantinople.
once every  two years, to consider world problems, and to formulate
treaties and plans  to report to their respective congresses. The special
function of this World Council shall be to act as a final court  of appeal
to decide matters hopelessly dividing any one of the federations or  units.
()ther very impmortant duties shall be to reach an agreement or maNxi-mum 
armamenits, universal weights and measures, money standards, and a
universal conmmercial language: to establish rules for traffic on the high
seas,  and zones of jurisdiction for each unit to p)olice.  After the
countries of the world have been more closely bound together  by railways
and lines of communication, and the peop)le of the states ha \ve  learned
by a few centuries of experience the value of cooperation in groups.  it is
to be expected that the federal idea will devlop until all  of the nations
()  the world are united in one great federal union.  Shall this war be
settled in the old way, by one group of people being  reduced to submission
to another group, or shall the people of the world be  offered a real
democratic peace?  164

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,...,  ~.~~  :1 j  ~:::::it  i.~:~r:i ''~'  ::::.::.\ m*.  :~' ~:-:i
:~~~:::  !T::. .lx-!: 'I ~  : ::~~ ~i9-  :  ::1 :: : :: :;-:. r . .  : .::
:  .:ZC;  :  jL:J~t  I::I : :' :,;::  : ' -i ... ., :~,, . -.: .:.,i  .. 
:I :~:: :. i:::'::i. r:v::;~~I  : I::- :  ."jr '"'  : .::::'' ;; ;D~ :.  t:
::~1 ~:. ~~  ::a i ::~ ;:: -r. :~':i:;.t :s .::. t  :u:r  ;-. ....;. .:.:-:
;~~::~; ~I:~~.;: 'f;i:: - - :~:: ::.::sl~ :: "'": 'C~- : ~' ~:::_-~ :1:: ~:
 i: w  : .i~. . ..-. ~~-,.~  .-ix-i~  i_ i' i_;5r -ir. l~.- ) '  :~:-:1.~:
i , : ..  ~F:- . ~i~. :::  :1f: .il~r~l::- -:~ '~: ::  ...: ; r  -' :c:
'.:t' l'it",  ~ i ~' ~ i-~:  :~jy  .II-;  ;- 1i : l :,,. .~~i::l::::::
I::i:l';i~rlj L::?  :: :: ;t ... -...,. :;~  ,,..: .,..,..:i.. I 'L: ''
r::~::I: ~ ~':::I:~ -,;~i-i~;~~~l~,~:g  r . ;- ~':: :. ::~:~I : ~1~:  165

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 166

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166

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nary clarE's Pa  The Thespian Dramatic Club played "Mary Jane's Pa" before
a crowded  auditorium on the night of March 1st. In the production the
Thespians pre-served  their splendid reputation and gave the audience a
theme for future  conservation.  Tho we might think from the title that
"Mary Jane's Pa" is a childish  comedy, in reality it is a lively dramatic
reproduction of the American small  town.  Mr. Glenn Hughes excelled in the
interpretation of Hiram Perkins, the  capricious, whimsical, cultured
tramp, who walks in unannounced after an  absence of eleven years, to find
his children older and his wife "mellower"  than when he last saw them. 
Portia Perkins, played by Bernice Ober, was an efficient editor of the 
local  "Clarion." Her role as the mother of Lucile and Mary Jane was
splen-didly  taken and she surprised both the audience and herself in
offering Hi-ram  "board and room with Thursday afternoons off, and twelve
dollars a  month" for his services as general housemaid and cook.  The
Perkins daughters were charming.  Lucile (Nina Lusk) was worthy  of Barrett
Sheridan (Gaines Beasley) the qouthful actor in love with her. Mary Jane
(Ella Lee), a winsome little maid of eleven years won the hearts  of all. 
Rome Preston, an honest man, was played with strength by Rainhardt  Hanson.
His rival, Joel Skinner, as played by John Miller, was a most wily  and
dishonest old politician.  Humor was frequently supplied by Ivy Wilcox
(Helen  Upper) the vil-lage  belle, Miss Faxon (Hazel Hunasberger) the
milliner, Star Skinner  (Chester Garden) the village "catch," and Lewellyn
Green (Montford Al-sop)  the printer's devil. One look at Claude Whitcomb
"goin' down to meet  the 2:45," or at Line Watkins sweltering in his fur
coat, would suffice.  The  entire cast was composed of:  Portia Perkins
................................ ................. .... Bernice O ber
Lucile Perkins ............................................ Nina Lusk  M
ary Jane Perkins ........................... ....... ................. Ella
Lee  Ivy W ilcox .................................. .. ...................
H elen Upper  Miss Faxon -------
--------...................---------.............. Hazel Huntsberger 
Barrett Sheridan ......................... ................... Gaines
Beasley  Star Skinner ................................. .................
Chester Garden  Joel Skinner .............  ................
................. John M iller  Claud W hitcomb
................................................. Philip M ontag  Line W
atkins .......................................... ........ Paul W ashke 
Lewellyn Green .......................................... Montford Alsop 
Rome Preston ......................................... Rainhardt Hanson 
Hiram Perkins ......................--------------------............... Mr.
Glenn Hughes  The play was most ably directed by Mr. Glenn Hughes.  167

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00ality Street  CAST OF CHARACTERS  Valentine Brown
...............----R-a-i-n.ha.r.d.t. .H.a.n.so.n...........  Recruiting
Sergeant .................. ....--.--E-lm--er. .W..e.bs.t er  Ensign Blades
............-.-.-.-.............. ..I.. ..es..l.i.c.
.S.o.re-n-s-e-n----------------  Lieutenant Spicer
---------........................  .S.ta.c.y. .T.u-c-k-e-r -----  Major
Linkwater ............---------W-.il.la.r.d.
.Y-e-rk-e-s-----.........--...........  M ajor Budd ......................
..........E..r.n.e..s..t.. .K. o belt  1'hoebe
................------..-.-..-.-..-.... .a.e ..A.rm..s.tr.o.n.g  Miss Susan
........ -----....-.-.........-..-... .- --....e.rn..ic.e. . ber  Miss W
illoughby .............. ..............-.-M.--.a--r.- -. Roberts  Miss
Fanny \Villoughby ............M.a.r.g.a.r.et. .B..ur.n.h.a.m.  Henrietta
Turnall .................M.ar.t.h.a.
.C..ov.i.n.g.to.n.......-----------------  Patty ........---.--
---------------------- -....... ...... ...E.m..m.a Zahle  Children in
School-Hazel Armstrong. Carolyn Hammond,  Mildred Stenvig. Agnes Lane,
Laura Richards, Betty Lee.  Extras at Ball-Mr. Saterbow, Miss Cummings,
Elmer Web-ster.  Carolyn Hammond, Hazel Armstrong.  "Qualtiy Street" was
chosen by the Junior Class for their play this year-  This play was made
famous by Maude Adams. It is a quaint English comedy,  the scenes being
laid in a small English town of the Victorian period.  Valentine is very
attentive to Phoebe who lives with her older sister, Miss  Susan. But war
comes and Valentine enlists. During his seven years' ab-sence Phoebe and
Miss Susan loose most of their fortune so they both become-school 
teachers. Valentine, upon his return, is not as interested in Phoebe,  the
spinsterly school mistress, as he was in the curly headed campfire girl 
whom he had left. Phoebe, despairing, goes to a ball disguised as her own 
neice. Valentine's interest is again aroused and they "live happily ever
after-ward."  "Quality Street" was given April 27, under the efficient
direction of Miss.  Summer. The play was an artistic success from beginning
until the end. The  stage settings were worked out with a finish seldom
seen in professional per- formances,  and the costumes were not only true
to the historic period, but  blended with the stage setting in striking
harmony. The acting of the entire-cast  passed the standard of amateurs. 
The school feels the deepest gratitude to Miss Summer and the Junior  Class
for the pleasure of such a perfect artistic performance.  118

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THESPIAN PLAYS  The Thespians entertained their friends in the auditorium
March 22.  The first number on their program was a piano solo by John
Miller. Fol-lowing  this a one-act play. "Showing up Mabel," was presented.
The play  was written an(d directed by 7Mr. Glenn Hughes.  MIabel (Anne
Bennett) is a western girl who is brought to the home of  M rs. Landers,
(Bernice ()ber) and her daughter Helen (Marion \\heaton) by  her friend,
Jimmie Blake (John Miller). Mrs. ILanders, with the help of her  daughter
and Harold Ilinr ham (Chester Garden) endeavors to "show up"  Mabel as
being an entirely unsuitable person and lacking in culture. But at  a
crucial moment the maid (Petty Lee) enters and annotunces a telephl1ne call
 for the famous actress, Florence Burnham. Mabel explains that she is Miss 
Burnham and has come  to the Landers' home with Jimmie Blake, her fi-ance, 
who is a playwright, in order to gather proper atmosphere for a play  which
he is writing for her. The parts were all splendidly taken and the  play
was a decided success.  "The Mad Tea Partyv." from "Alice in Wonderland,"
dramatized by Mr.  Glenn Hughes, was then given. Betty Lee made a charming
Alice, while  Mr. Hughes as the Mad Hatter, and Chester Garden as the March
Hare  were as mad as one could desire. John Miller yawned and stretched his
way thru the part of the Door Mouse in a very realistic way.  Miss Kathleen
Skally gave a beautiful solo dance between the plays.  "Milly Dilly,"
another one-act play by Mr. Hughes, featured Myrtle  Pugsley as Milly
Dilly, a girl of the mountains. Ned Holbrook (Mr.  Hughes), a lawyer from
San Francisco, finds that there is no mud and smoke  in the mountains,
while Millydilly discovers, because there is no smoke to  cloud her vision,
that Mary Holbrook (Maie Armstrong) has a soul and that  she loves her
husband.  The plays were all ?iven well and the Thespian Dramatic Club
proved  to be an organization of which the school may well be proud.  169

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The Lion and The Mouse  CAST  Shirley .. ........................
.......M.y.r.t.le. .P.u.g.s.le.y.......  M iss N esbit
...........................H. e.le.n. .U. .pp.e.r......................... 
Mrs. Rossmore -------- ................M.a.r.io.n.
.E.a.g.e.r..................  Mrs. Ryder
.............................................. Ruth Elauder Kate Roberts
......................M.ar.i.e. .C.h.r.is.t.e.ns.e.n.........--------------
 Jane Deetle ..........................F.r.an.c.e.s.
.B.lo.o.m..................  Eudonia .........................M. .is.s ..D.
a.u.b.e.ns.p.e.c.k...................  Maid
.......................................E..l.s..ie.. .
T.i.m.m..e.rm..a.n..... Jefferson Ryder
............................................. Paul Beaufort  John B. Ryder
.......................C... .R.. .H..ol.b.ro.o.k..................  Senator
Roberts -------------...........J.o.h.n
..M-i-ll-er---------.....................  Judge  Rossmore
.................-----Wi-l-l-i-a-m- -E-d-s-o-n----..................... 
Ex-Judge Stott .....................-Ch-e- s-t-e-r
--G-a-rd-e-n........-----.......---  Bagley
..............................P.a.u.l.
.W.a.s.h.k.e.............------------------ --------------  Rev. Deetle
.........--------------...P.h.il.ip. --M-o-n-ta-g-----............... 
Jenkins .-------.....------- .........P.h.il.i.p.
.M.o.n.t.a.g.....----------------.....................  170  xz i z zz
zz;;-Lj

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The Senior's choice of play, "The Lion and the Mouse," is a well-known 
standard play dealing with the powers and influence of money.  John B.
Ryder, a money-giant. a Wall street "king," instigates the im- peachment 
of Judge Scott because of a decision unfavorable to him. Shirley,  the
daughter of the ex- judge, succeeds in obtaining the position of secretary 
to Mr. Ryder under an assumed name, in hopes of obtaining a certain paper 
which will prove her father's innocence. The plot is further complicated by
 the son, Jefferson Ryder, who falls in love with Shirley. The prolems are 
finally all solved, the complications straightened out and the play ends
hap-pily.  The play was staged under the direction of Mr. Hopl)pe and in
spite of the  busy time of commencement days, the house was filled and the
play much  enjoyed.

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C. C. BAUGHMAN  Normal Book Store Manager  Student Assistants  Rudie
Oltman, Marie Johns, Willard Yerkes,.  Hazel Huntesberger, Anna Litterneau,
Paul Ru-dolph  Washke.  172

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MARGARET MacKINN(ON  Assistant to Registrar  MRS. LIDA J. SNYDER  Secretary
to President CALIA VAN SYCKLE  Office Secretary  MRS. ETllI. LR()WN\\N 
Recorder  173

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BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB  THE INDESPENSABLES  Hendershot Grady Lemach Cunningham
 174

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1~  F-  /  175

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Junior Class Officers  First Semester-: :  First Semester--  President
............  V\'ice-Plresident .  Sec. and Treas...  Class Advisor .... 
Secondl Semester-  President ............  Vice-President ...  Sec. and
Treas..  ----S-t-a-c-v 'ucker  ----I1-a-ze cl iiinear  .Iainharit Flan-oii,
 ..----r-. - io d  ........ Stacy Tucker  ... ....  Agnes ILane  ...
largaret Laizure  JUNIOR CLASS.  The Junior Class. mighty in numbers, have
distinguished themselves in  many ways during the year "Quality Street"
scored success o)f which we are   justly proud, besides our athletic
contests in which we held our own. We  had to lose the Kline cup, but our
debating team won the victory. with both  Holbrook and Booman on the
opposing team. \We are the Seniors to come.  Iurrah!  176

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ft-M-b~

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GERTRUDE EARHEART  Principal Training St hool  178

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/s^------  ' INA , 7 \  L/  NNi  179

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The Training School, the rasion d'etre of the existence of any Normal,  has
enjoyed on exceptionally happy and prosperous year. The work of 1917-  18
has both enlarged and intensified over that of last year.  Everett, as well
 as Bellingham, has welcomed into its city system a number of student
teach-ers,  which  has necessitated the residence in Everett of one of the
Normal critic  teachers, Miss Drake; while war conditions, with the desire
to contribute to  the work of the Red Cross, has been keenly felt in the
adjustments to the  course of study.  In the kindergarten and primary
grades Misses Graves and Mobrav have  followed the ideas of allowing the
pupils to solve their own problems, their  cultivating self-control,
independence and helpfulness. These pupils have  identified themselves with
the Junior Red Cross, and have invested their sur-plus  pennies in Thrift
Stamps. The more advanced classes have knitted-scarfs  for  their dolls, to
be sure, at first, but later expect to knit socks for  soldiers. War
gardens have also been planned.  180

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Miss Willoughby, the critic teacher of the third and fourth grades, has  d
lt;lone much inspirational work with the students in raising money for the
Red  Cross. In the Nature Study classes the children planted hyacinth bulbs
and  ,cultivated war gardens, and realized from these enterprises
considerable mon-ey  for war charities. Time has been devoted in making
slips for pillows, gun  wipers and trinket bags.  In the fifth and sixth
grades art and dramatization have been stressed this  year under the
guidance of Miss Gray. All students are enrolled as members  .of the Junior
Red Cross.

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Miss Cummins, of the seventh and eighth grades, has displayed great 
versatility in her class tvork in the raising of money for war purposes.
During  the latter part of February the girls made a great amount of
marmalade in  their l)omestic Science classes, then later sold it at a
considerable profit.  tBoys and girls knit, make ambulance pillows and
bags. Active practice in  basket ball has been enjoyed and splendid
sportsmanship displayed in contests.  The Junior library was this year
moved into the Training department.  It comprises 1500 volumes. The books
are in constant demand, and a scheme  has been worked out, where credit is
given for home reading.  The work of practice teachers in the city schools
of Bellingham has main-tained  a high standard this year, due to the
guidance of Misses Lee, O'Conner  and  Crawford.  On the whole the past
year has been the most successful in the history of  the Training School.
No small measure of its success is due to Miss Earheart.  the principal.
Iler executive ability, resourcefulness, sincerity and untir-ing  energy
have lightened the burden of many faltering practice- teacher, and  won for
her the respect and admniration of the school at large.  182

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183  C_--I---~_ -  ~~--- --------  --- -

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ALUMNI  Come, all ye underclassmen, draw nigh unto us, the mighty seniors,
for  we have buried the hatchet. From hence forward we promise to be your 
friends loyal and true. We go to join the Alumni and await your coming. 
Let us tell you of some things of those who have preceded us. Among  the
Alumni in the Normal faculty we shall find Olive Edens, L. A. Kibbe, J.  W.
Kaylor, Gladys Stephen. Sam E. Carver,  Kathleen Skalley, Grace Brower, 
Maude Drake and Bertha Crawford. In this city we shall find Ethel Everett, 
county superintendent of schools, Bernard Davenport, her assistant,
Har-rison  Raymond, the able soloist and Richard Ewing, principal of the
South  Side High School; Betsy Stenberg, Lillian Miller, Hay Reasoner,
Cathleen  Casey, Lena Smith, Helen Boucher, Aliene Pierce, Helen Vaile and
Misses Selby and Woodhouse.  We shall find Theresa Stone and May Anderson
teaching in Glen Echo,  Lydia Stone at Weiser Lake, Dorothy Herre, daughter
of Dr. Herre, is at  Northwood; Clara Sponheim at Stanwood, and nearby at
Utsalady is Georgia  Sharples. Elsie Sweet and Ethel Calkins are at Lynden,
while at Nooksack  we shall find J. H. Banfil as superintendent working
with Grace Beaven,  Grace Allen and J. S. Turnbull; Bernice Welsh at Alger;
Helen Stenvig and  Appleton Fisher at Glendale; Gerald Van Horn is
principal at Clearbrook;  Mable Shanley in a school at the head of Whatcom
Lake; Mable Larm Gil-filen  at Silver Beach; Ralta Nichols, Martha Brown
and Hilda Van Liew at  West Mountain View: Helen  Johns at Gig Harbor;
Marie Anderson Wise at  Grand View; Margaret Meyers in the Point Roberts
High School; Gertrude  McMahan at Mt. Vernon and Gladys Gernagham near by.
Frances Reedy,  Nell Harden, Christene Hermans. Lucy Meyers and many more
noble Alum-ni  are teaching near their Alma Mater this year. P. J. Marshall
is at Maple  Falls.  In Seattle We shall find N. C. Davenport, Kathryn
Anderson, Fri-da  Stark Coleman. ,Kathryn Houts, Ruth Beth Sears, Floy
Sullivan,  Mary Sharkey, Clara McKinzie, Edna Kerr and Florence Charroin 
teaching in the public schools. Also Anna Keene, Clayton Gibson,  Lena
Wilson, Herman Smith, Leah Lovejay, Edna Hallock, Ida Char-roin,  Bertha
Mauermann, Frankee Sullivan, Grace Drake, and Roy  Smith, principal of the
Woodland school. In the High Schools of Seattle  we shall find F. W.
Rhodes, Noah C. Davenport and Gertrude Streator. Genie  Watrus, Harold
Rudolph, Cosby Jackson and Lenore Thomas are at the  University of
Washington.  In Tacoma are Grace Barrett, Emily Crawford, Florence Dodge,
Gen-evieve  Dove, Nora Marie Haffley. Grace Liddell, Xenita Walender and
Min-nie  Teesdale.  184

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Sarah Lop is at Enum Claw, Rachel Van De Vanter at Bremerton and  Mable
Ziese in Eastman. In the High Schools we shall see E. WV. Gibson, 
principal at Lacy in Thurston county, and Miss iladesitt. one of his able 
teachers; Ethel Elsey at Aberdeen; Alice Kibbe at Adna. in L.ewis c(oulntv;
 C. Corpenter, superintendent at Avon in Skagit county: B. F. iovies,
sup-erintendent  in Blaine; Ella King, principal at Berena in Yakmina
county. At  Burlington Caroline Halsey is teaching in a High School. and
Henrietta Walker is in Centralia. C. J. Storley is principal of the
Hlarmo(nlv High  School in Whatcom county; Edgan  Norton in the High School
at NI1, urray,  in Skagit county; Fay Smith at Concrete; C. HI. Bowmanl,
principal of the De  Moines High in King county; A. G. Stinton of El'be. in
Pierce county : F. IE.  Beal at Elma, in Grays Harbor county and Bertha
Sk-rtve It, principal at  Ewan in Whitman county. Annie Airth is teachingi
iilth : File High School  in Pierce county, and H. G. Gague in the Finley
High Scholol. in Bento coun-ty.  At Friday Harbor, in San Juan county we
shall find Itlez Brassier. ()ther  High School teachers and principals are
H. O. Button, superintendent iat  Hamilton, and A. O. Button, principal;
Anna Conmev in Yakima county: A.  D. Foster at Kittitas, in Kittitas
county, where he is assisted 1y his wife,  whom we  knew as Dollie
Jennings; Roy Goodell. princil)al at Index: 11. R.  York, principal at Lake
Stevents, and 'Maude Birdnev of this county. At  Lacery, in Thurston
county, we shall find E. \W. Gibson as lprincilal and Miss  Modesitt as a
faculty member.  In Island county we shall find Rina Hjort, superinten(lent
at Langley,  and Virginia Richards, teacher in the High School at Oak
Harbor. In ()kani-ogan  county Juliette Moran is in the High School at
Loomis and Gladys Fras-er,  Laurietta Holmberg and Elizabeth Umbarger in
the grade work there.  Here are some high school teachers whose
acquaintance may prove prof-itable as well as pleasant to you
underclassmen: V. T. Meyers, Olympia;  George Bright, principal at
Napavene;  Dessie Dunagan at Pataha, in Garfield  county; Grace Haight, of
Pateros, in Okanogan county: Frances Cochel, prin-cipal  at Port Madison,
Klitsap county; Grace Uhl. of Roslyn, in Kittitas  county; Walter Nichols,
former superintendent of Gray's Habor count', now  at Snoqualmie, in King
county; Ethel Nelson. of Tacoma; Mabel Aspinwall,  185

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of Tenino, in Thurston county; Roger Williams, pritcipal at Tolt, King 
county; Josephine Gardner, principal  at Toutle, in Cowlitz county: Frank 
Peterson, of White Salmon, and Frank Hubbard and wife at Carrol.  In 
Thurston county we shall find May Dean. Mary Hlatt, Jessie Snyder,  E. H.
Evans, Martha Bustrack, J. H. Jones, Elva Uhler, Helen Leghorn. lMar-ion 
Havcox, E. W. Gibson, Anna L. Williams, Hazel De Haven,  Ethel Alex-andler,
 Edith Everham, Agnes Howell, Arta Lawrence, Claude Manley, Faith 
Hluggett, Mable  Spencer, Mamie Crossman. Yola Barrett and Kathrine 
Ilughes.  In v\-erett, H elen Brown and Myrtle Towiine: at Iawrence. VIary
beih-e  Stella Johnson at Granite Falls: Lydia Aerni at Anacrtes: Nina
(;emmell  at Mt. Vernon; at Veasie, near Enum Claw, I,,luise DIitlefsen and
Anna  Plough Mrs. Elsie Miller at Crescent Haror: ,M rs. Rose I)avis at
Elma, in  iMason county, and Mrs. Ethel Hass, nee Martin'.  at \Vintlrop:
Frances Ionell  at Puyallup, Margaret Brressler and Mina Merrick at
Centralia. and Donaid Croy at Grand Mound. At Summer we shall f4l L oretta
Mur)phy. Adele  Huntington, Iva \Vright (Mrs. Ivan Atkinson), :a n Mrs. I,.
A. Petersn, wh  was formerly Rose Peterson.  186

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/Al  pei  f  187  Y\:

     ----------

     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 188

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SENIOR GIRLS' HOCKEY TFAM  188

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 189

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GIRLS' HOCKEY  Hockey this year has been one of the events in athletic
circles. This is  the first time that the girls had a chance to) play
matched ganes. The first  meeting was called Sept. 28, '17, for all girls
interested in HIockey. At this  meeting each class elected their Captain
and Manager.  Senior- Captain, Kochefort ; Manager, Tyler.  Junior-Captain,
Polley; Manager, Campbell.  Both teams showed interest and eagerness to
learn the game. ()n both  rainy and pleasant (lays the hockey grounds were
crw(lc(l. l'ven the faculty  organized a team and had their regular
practice days. They threatened to  enter the contest wit hthe Juniors and
Seniors, but on account of bad weather  they were disappointed in their
plans. The (nly games that were played were  between the junior and Senior
teams, and these iwre evenly  matched.  The first game. Nov. 9, 1917,
between the Jninors and Seniors, ended  with no score on either side. Both
teams were determinle(l to win in the next  contest and began vigorous
practice. Seniors made  a goal in first half of the  second game, Nov. 16,
1917, while the Juniors still had no score. The Juniors were not
discouraged, and began their practice with new vigor, tbut to the 
disappointment of all, the rainy season began, before the scheduled gamine 
had been played.  LI N E- U IP  Seniors :  Center-Tyler  R. Inside-
Merchant  L. Inside-Newell  R. \Ving--Ramsey, Hartman  L. Wing-Williams  C.
Halfback-Klassell, Rocefort  R. Halfback-Rachefort, Brinker  Walker  L.
Halfback-Dodd  L. Fullback-Morganthaler, Lake  R. Fullback-Macllvaine, Lake
 Goal Keeper-Bergstrom.  Itniors :  ('en ter---'vler  A. Inside-Evans,
Newell  i. I nside-Polley  R. \\ing -Locke  R. \Wing--lhale, I. Locke  I.
\Wing- Evans, Locke  C. Il alfback -Frank  R. Ilalfback-- Kinman  I.. IH
alfback--l urnham  .. Fullback--DI)iglas, \Wilson  R. Fullback--Smith,
I)coglas (;1al Keeper--lIocke.  189

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U  JUN)R (IRLS' H()(-I{- FY''1 'TAIM  F ()

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 191

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ALICE POLLY-Center;  Junior ; "W"  MARTIIA 1)())1)-  Center; Senior  MABEL.
NEWELL-Played  forward on Senior Team  4"W"  Center; Senior  0  191  -

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 192

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VALENTINE NEWELL-Captain  of Junior Team; forward;  Junior "W"  RUBY
MORGENTHALER-Manager of Senior Team; guard;  Senior; "W"  GINA HAGEN-Guard;
 Senior; "W"  HALLIE CAMPBELL-Manager of Junior Team; for-ward;  Junior;
"W"  192

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'U  EVA ']TYLER-Captain  of Senior Team; forward;  Senior; "W"  RAGINA
FRANK-Junior;  guard ; "W" wearer  TELMHA KOEHLER-Guard;  Junior; "W" 
G(EORGIA TURPLE-Forward;  Senior; "W"  193

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YVETTE ROCHEFORT-Senior;  Sub.  FREDA LACKY-Junior;  Sub.  194  :..I

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As in the previous years, Basket Ball was the principal game played by  the
girls this year. The teams represent the different classes and have
oppor-tunities  during the year to contest for class honors. The winners of
two games  out of three have their class name and date of winning game
engraved on the Kline cup. This is considered a great honor, and the teams
drill hard and  long to gain it for their class. On account of hockey,,
basket ball was a little late in the field. Not until  December first did
the two teams, Juniors and Seniors, have a meeting and  decide to play
modified boys' rules. The girls began to practice with a vim,  and the gym.
was a scene of excitement every spare hour of the day.  A captain and
manager was chosen to represent each team.  Senior Team-Eva Tyler, Captain,
and Ruby Morganthaler, Manager.  Junior Team-Valentine Newell, Captain, and
Hlallie Campbell, Manager.  The following schedule  as arranged:  February
13-Senior 17; Junior 18.  March 4-Senior 29; Junior 16.  March 21-Senior
22; Junior 21.  The first game played between the Juniors and Seniors ended
in a score  of 18 to 17, in favor of the Juniors. The Seniors were not
discouraged with  the result of their first game, and began to practice 
more diligently and ar-ranged  their team in a different way, so that they
were able to defeat their  Junior opponents by a score of 29 to 11 in the
second game.  Of course the third and final game was the most exciting of
all events.  In the halls and on the streets the girls were constantly
planning for the  game. At last the hour arrived. A large crowd gathered
for the final game.  At five o'clock the whistle blew and the game was on!
Both teams played  fast and furious, a clean game to win, for their class.
During the second half  the Juniors played with determination and their
score began to rise. At last  the whistle blew for time, and the Seniors
again won, but only by one point.  The Junior girls were disappointed, but
took their defeat-woe be upon the  person who says a girl is not a good
sportsman!  We must not leave out the  important factors in Basket Ball.
Miss Nick-erson,  who was always there to see that the girls were doing 
their best; always  giving suggestions, and never showing any favoritism. 
Miss Skalley, whose duty it was to tell the girls of their weak points, 
would willingly fill out the game during practice.  LETTER GIRLS.  
Seniors: Eva Tyler Juniors: Valentine Newell  Ruby Morganthaler Hallie
Campbell  Genie Hagen Alice Polley  Mabel Newell Thelma Kohler  Georgia
Turple Regina Frank  Bessie Agee  BASE BALL  As soon as the basket ball was
over, baseball began. Both classes are of  equal strength and have proven
good matches for each other in base ball as  well as basket ball.  TENNIS 
This year tennis is a great success,  thanks to the early spring weather. 
Now and then during the winter months, the tennis courts were busy.  In 
April almost every girl carried a racket. The girls are looking forward to
the  tennis tournament which will take place near the close of the year,
and we  are hoping it will be a great success.  195

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FRY DAVIS K  HUGHES MILLER A  196  ENNETT CARVER, Coach  PLIN BARTRIFF

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 197

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ATHLETICS-MEN  WINNERS OF THE "W" FOR YEAR OF 1918.  Basket Ball  Harold
Aplin Orren Fry Harry Bartriff Howard Hughes  Herbert Davis Homer Kennett 
John Miller  THE BASKET BALL TEAM, 1918.  Position Name Weight  Forw ard
............. ................. arold A plin
.................................. 141  G  uard
.................................. H arry Bartriff
.................................. 135  Guard
.................---------------- ................. Orren Fr
..............------------.....------.............. 144  Center
.......-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-... Howard Hughes
.............................. 140  Forward ..............................
Homer Kennett (Capt.) .-------- ................. 170  Forw ard
.............................. John M iller ..................
....................135  SCHEDULE OF BASKET BALL GAMES, 1918  Dec. 11,
1917-W. S. N. S. vs. Fairhaven.  Dec. 17, 1917-W. S. N. S. vs. Fearhaven. 
Jan. 12, 1918--W. S. N. S. vs. Ellinsburg.  Jan. 19, 1918--W. S. N. S. vs.
Vancouver. Jan. 26, 1918--W. S. N. S. vs. Cushman.  Feb. 9, 1918-W. S. N.
S. vs. College of Puget Sound.  Feb. 16,  1918--W. S. N. S. vs. U. of
Washington Freshmen.  Feb. 19, 1918-W. S. N. S. vs. Cushman.  Feb. 20,
1918-W. S. N. S. vs. College of Puget Sound.  Feb. 21, 1918-W. S. N. S. vs.
Ellensburg.  March 2, 1918- W .S. N. S. vs. Vancouver.  March 8, 1918--W.
S. N. S. vs. Whatcom.  March 9, 1918, W. S. N. S. vs. \Whatcom.  197

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198

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SAM CARVER  has coached all of our games, and to him goes the credit for
our success. \We  take our few defeats upon ourselves.  CAPTAIN HOMER
KENNETT.  Kennett is the only man left from last year's championship team.
Those  who saw him play last year predicted a wonderful future for him. He
has  lived  up to his reputation and has been in the thickest of the fight
from the  first to the last whistle. This is his last year with W. S. N. S.
and his loss  will be keenly felt.  HAROLD APLIN  "Hattie" has been
handicapped with injuries at different times thruout the  season, but this
has not kept him out of the game. In the games in which he  -played he has
proved himself to be right there all the time. He fights hard  and when it
comes to handling the ball "Hattie" has no peers. He will be  -back next
year.  HARRY BARTRIFF  Harry, our diminuative guard, has proved the
surprise of the season. He  looked small at the beginning, but when the
ball was in play little Harry  fought 'em off their feet. He will be
remembered by his  "spunk." which was  ,clearly shown whenever he was on
the floor. This is his first year and great-   lt;er things can be expected
from him next season.  199  * I

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200

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HERBERT DAVIS  Our small gym has been dubbed the "bull pen" and, if such it
is, "Gig"I  ought to have lived in the days of bull fighters. There is no
one more at  home on our floor than he. The forwards were mighty lucky that
shot bas-kets  on "Gig" in that little old gym. "Get the ball off the wall"
is his sloga!n, and when he decides to get it, there are few things that
stop him. He grad-uates  this year.  ORREN FRY  "Old Reliable Fry" played
in every game of the season and not once did  he falter. Fry is not a
spectacular player, but one on edge every minute. Al-tho  this is his first
year at guard he soon showed his worth and before the  schedule was half
played he had earned the reputation of being one of the  most  valuable men
to the team. He is a Senior and will leave a large gap for  "Sam" to fill
next year.  HOWARD  HUGHES  Neither large nor tall, yet Howard Hughes is
all there. He has a queer  habit of going down the open places that is most
bewildering to opponents.  Howard played more than any member of the team
and as for wind and en-durance,  it could be measured in barrels. He is a
member of the class of '18,  and  will not be back next year.  JOHN MILLER 
John, altho small, is a whirlwind in a basket ball game. He is the fastest 
man on the team and a dead shot. He brought dismay to the hearts of more 
than one guard by his long rainbow goals and when it came to team work 
there was no smoother running cog in the Carver machine. John graduates 
with the class of '18.  201

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Landeal, Beaufort, Pratt, Coach Carver, Whiatker, Washke  202

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 203

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At the beginning of the present year of basket ball Sam Carver had a 
school record of sixteen successive  victories to uphold.  With football
out of athletics on account of the war conditions, the  basket ball season
was started early in December and immediately after the  holidays suits
were given out. From then on thruout the season the team  improved with
each game and finally when Whatcom was defeated in the  final game of the
season, the opposition had to be mighty strong to crack the  Normal
machine. On Dec. 11 our team journeyed to Fairhaven and started the season
by  annexing a 46 to 12 victory. Altho slow and wild at times, the quintet
showed  signs of ability and it was clear that greater things would be done
in the  future.  Another week of strenuous practice brot us face to face
with the same team. This time W. S. N. S. played with a weakened line-up,
but had little  difficulty winning, 23 to 10. Ellensburg 19, W. S. N. S.
32.  Ellensburg, the champions of eastern \Vashington High schools, came to
  avenge the defeat of the previous season. They defeated the NWhatcom
High,  and the following night they came up to the Normal ready to take our
scalp.  With steady tread and set faces our team ran on the floor and after
40  minutes of speedy, desperate playing W. S. N. S. had put away another
victim. Vancouver 46, W. S. N. S. 22.  On Jan. 19 \W. S. N. S. was defeated
for the first time in over two years. A tiresome day of travel and an
immense gym, spelled defeat for our five.  203

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 204

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Cushman 21, W. S. N. S. 43.  When these warriors trotted onto the floor an
audible murmur was per- ceptable  in the audience.  The game started with
W. S. N. S. jumping into the lead with amazing suddenness and at the half
were enjoying a comfortable lead. The Indians  came back with avengeance in
 the second stanza and for a while the pace was  fast and furious.
Gradually, however, the Normal forged ahead and were rap-idly  increasing
their lead at the final whistle.  The feature of the game was the
sportsmanship of the Indians.  College of Puget Sound 9, W. S. N. S. 46. 
This Tacoma team with an excellent record entered our gym on the even-ing 
of Feb. 9th. The Blue and White quintet, fresh from their  victory the 
previous Saturday, and realizing the strong opposition they had, played a 
wonderful brand of ball. When the first half was over W. S. N. S. had a
lead  of 24 points.  U. of Washington Freshmen 25, W. S. N. S. 18.  Beaten
by one man! This sums up the hardest fought game ever wit-nessed  in the
local gym. W. S. N. S. quickly jumped into the lead, but not for  long. 
After all was over, Silk. our tall center friend had annexed nine baskets, 
a total of eighteen points out of his team's twenty-five.  A feature of the
game was the work of the Normal guards. They  held their forwards to one
lonely goal for two points. Cushman 16, W. S. N. S. 35.  W. S. N. S. played
Tacoma on the Cushman floor for the first time. The White and Blue fought
the Cushman team to a standstill and won handily.  The whole team played a
stellar brand of ball, the guards again featuring  by holding the Indian
forwards to one goal apiece.  College  of Puget Sound 22, W. S. N. S. 17. 
Once again the White and Blue was trampled down, this time in the   large
Stadium High gym. This floor, which is large enough for two or three 
ordinary floors, thru some mistake was laid out into one. It is the largest
 basket ball playing area that any member of the team had ever seen and the
 Normal quintet was lost. Their short, quick passes were useless and their 
team work was shattered.  204

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 205

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As it was the game was close and fast thruout and only in the last minutes 
of play did C. P. S. forge ahead to victory.  The defeat was more than made
up for by a previous victory when C. P.  S. was beaten to the tune of five
to one.  Ellensburg 24, W. S. N. S. 32.  After an eventful trip over the
mountains the team arrived in Ellensburg  only to find that the game had
been forgotten about. After some good, direct suggestions and hasty
preparations, things were soon adjusted and that night  the local gym was
packed.  The brand of basket ball dished out that night against the
champions of  eastern Washington will  not soon be forgotten by those who
witnessed the  contest. Playing on their home floor and before a crowd of
wild, cheering  fans, the Ellensburg five fought to the last ounce of their
strength. But the  fast and furious teamwork of the Coast boys was not to
be denied and they  finally merged from the fight, the victors.  The
defense of the White and Blue was away above par, but the credit  for the
victory goes to the Normal forwards. Little John Miller was darting  in and
out like a streak, shooting his long rainbow goals time and again. In  the
meantime he was passing swiftly and surely to Capt. Kennett, who never 
played better in his life. His 170 pounds of bone and muscle was everywhere
 in the fight and his queer way of shooting with one arm was working with 
deadly accuracy. This combination was too much for Ellensburg and they had 
to be satisfied with second best.  Vancouver 30, W. S. N. S. 27.  On the
evening of March 2, Vancouver again defeated the White and Blue  five. We
accept the defeat with good grace, but still wish that the game might  be
played over.  The Canadians came down with but five men. The champions of
B. C.  started with a rush and before the local five awoke they had a
comfortable lead.  In the second half the Normal came back with a vengance
and easily  outplayed their opponents, the score being 15 to 9 for this
period. The Van-couver  lead was too great, however, and the game ended
with our team on the short end of the score.  205

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The W. S. N. S.-Whatcom Series.  After a great deal of arguing and
meditating the Normal and Whatcom,   authorities arranged to play a series
of basket ball to determine the champ-ionship  of the city.  Finally on
Friday evening, March 8, the White and Blue crossed the town  to the North
Side school and before a crowd estimated to be the largest that  ever
attended a basket ball game in the Northwest, the contest began. Altho  on
a strange floor the superior team work of the Normal was evident and at 
the half was 15 to 9 with Whatcom on the short end.  The second half
started as the first and then the baloon went up. What-com  got away with
some long shots and for about three minutes the visitors  went all to
pieces. Shot after shot found the hoop and when their short  rally was over
the Northsiders had a comfortable lead.  Then began the uphill climb of the
Normal. They played rings around  the High school, but when time was called
they were on the wrong end of  a 24 to 32 score.  The desperate W. S. N. S.
players held  their alibis until the following  night when they again mixed
with the Crimson and White. The small gym was packed to the overflowing
stage and many were turned away from the  door. From the first whistle it
was evident which team was stronger and the-  White and Blue quintet had
come back with a vengance. The W. S. N. S.  scored 13 times from the field
and 4 from the foul line, the final score being  30 to 15. The Normal team
is clearly the champions by virtue of decisively win-ning  three of the
four halves, scoring  far more field goals and making a totat;  of 54
points as compared to 47 by Whatcom.  206

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 207

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Coach Carver Capt. H1 ansen Miller  Grell \Vashke Bartriff Cales Aplin  207
 Brown  Davis  Elder  Pratt

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 208

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BASEBALL  When Coach Carver issued a call for baseball candidates the first
week  of March there was a surprising large turnout. The warm sunny days
put the-fever  into the men and the old ball lot was covered with restless,
hustling  athletes.  Competition for places on the White and Blue nine was
keen and as a  result the rough edges were soon smoothed off and by the end
of March suits  had been given to the twelve successful players. Nearly all
of the men are  from high school teams with a few very promising youngsters
to fill in.  "Nate" Coles landed the backstop job. He is a good hitter and
whips 'em down to second with deadly accuracy. The pitching end is held
down by  Milton Grell and Raymond Elder.  Both are steady, with good
controll and  a fine assortment of curves and speed. In the infield are
Capt. "Rein" Hansen  on first, Roy Pratt at second, Harry Bartriff holding
third and John Miller -  guarding short. They work together as one man and
are due to cause worry  to more than one team.  The outergardens are
occupied by Paul Washke in left, "Gig" Davis in  center, and Jack Whittaker
in right. All three field well and are there with  the bat. Elmer Brown and
"Les" Sorensen are ready to jump in any time  they are needed. Coach Carver
has, on the whole rounded out a well balanced  aggregation that will leave
an enviable record behind it.  The 1918 Schedule.  W . S. N. S. vs. Blaine
................................... April 19 at Blaine  W. S. N. S. ve.
Whatcom.........................................................April 27 at
Whatcom  W. S. N. S. vs. Ferndale ................................. May 3
at Ferndale  W . S. N. S. vs.
Blaine.............................................May 4 at Bellingham  W.
S. N. S. vs. Ferndale..........................................May 15 at
Bellingham  W. S. N. S. vs. Whatcom.................. May 18 at Whatcom 
208

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 209

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leiAYL  209  r

     ----------

     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 210

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210

     ----------

     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 211

     ----------

2S?0M  POPU LAR~  \\AYS OF  C 0I AN G  TO  SCHOOL  1-HIS WAY % S Qre 
YENEVRALLY 1% U.SE AwD  IS AL.R%iT t you  ST4Irr EA~.RY oa.-    I.  SI-.- 
SMEOF TW-E VUUTE h0QALiTts MAY VV  A 1 ME WT, l0 WNr4  ON 06iD -%%An. S s. 
211  ALWAY4, V100in r0Q ! p I x 0 Q S %0 - -l T

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 212

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0 l A  212  7  c~3c.  :c:

     ----------

     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 213

     ----------

E-\  I-v  l-c0  U  213  A  I~yv "  .'~Y  Ni 144 i  P.WASHKE-A5 HE LIKES TO
THINK OF HIIMSELF.  o~C

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 214

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K  $79  ~j -\  11(114  4-  dU  O.GrM~At'~  ~_____________  ~ ,~' ~  t~ 7~ L
-~  /  214

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 215

     ----------

C0J~~J~IErA I I0  C~rAI- Pt  GETTINGF JUJ3T A LVFFL[  ee13NEDllAT EBLN5
1R1Mi.  215

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 216

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a  216

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 217

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IN THE BALFQNYDOURINII WAR~ CO(I NL-OWJ1L  l lJF4 J UL i  217

     ----------

     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 218

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218

     ----------

     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 219

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ALL INTO MELT NI TANO CE UT TEACH  i gt;77  \  /  - C . . G m (-N nh - - - 
219  Illr  t";";

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 220

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CLASS HISTORY  It was in the fall of 1916 that students from all over the
state of Washing-ton,  and many from Alaska. Montana, Oregon, Idaho and
various other places  assembled at the Normal on the hill  to create the
largest and most versatile  class in the history of the institution. We
started out from the first to be  leaders in all the school's activities.
The girls won the Kline cup, the boys  lent their assistance  toward
gaining honors for the school in baseball, basket-ball,  and other athletic
events. In a social way we had parties, mixers and  picnics full of
enthusiasm and good times. The big social events of the year and the class
play, "Merely Mary Ann," and the Junior-Senior reception.  Then came
vacation.  A few weeks passed and we were wending our way up the hill to
enroll  again as members in the biggest class in the history of the Normal
school-the  1918 Seniors.  Altho we lost some of our most valued members-
many to teach, but  many more responded to the call of their country and
are now serving Uncle  Sam here and Over There-new faces appeared to take
their places in our  ranks.  We have had parties. picnics,  mixers, hikes
and outdoor sports of various  kinds, but we have observed the strictest
war-time economy at all times, and  have been happier for it.  We won the
Herald cup by having the largest percentage of members to  the top of Mt.
Chuckanut on Saturday, April 18.  Our Senior girls won the Kline cup and
most of the players received let-ters.  A large number of Senior girls
received letters for successful playing   in the hockey games.  The boys,
not to be outclassed by the girls, won the majority of the basket  ball
games played with other schools and received their letters, also.  A happy
and prosperous year terminated in the commencement exer-cises  where over
three hundred received their diplomas.  -Mabl McFaddera.  220

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 221

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THE '18 CLASS HAND.  (Madam X., Clairvoyant.)  Line of the Head-Shallow and
short, but very thick. Line of the Heart-Deep and tortuous, crossed and
recrossed by many  -deep creases.  Line of L ife-Very crooked and
unfortunately long.  Bracelet of Business-Entirely absent.  Mount of
Mars-Atrophied, showing  lack of sand.  Mount of Moon-Highly developed,
showing intense lunar proclovities.  Thumb-Broad and thick, indicating
stubbornness, arrogance and unwill-  -ingness to admit error.  First
Finger--Short and clubby, indicating cruelty. In fact the paddle  shape is
very noticeable.  Second Finger-Long and slim, indicating grafting
tendencies and adapt-tion.  Third Finger-Pointed, indicating love of finery
and desire to please,  (especially unwary school-boards).  Fourth
Finger-Character lines not well defined, showing indecision be-tween 
pedagogy and matrimony.  Remarks-Callous spots not in evidence.  221

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 222

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Reminiscences of a Senior  We cannot bid Thee last forewell,  Our Alma
Mater of the hills,  For Thee our hearts in fervor swell  With songs we
cannot sing.  Oh vast expanse of shining sea,  And sweetly smiling isles of
verdure green,  How oft our thoughts have turned to thee  When bound by
daily tasks which irksome seem.  Our feet again in thought will tread 
Those footworn paths, up Sehomee climb;  Where we  can see the mighty sun 
His flaming chariots ride to lands sublime.  Oh comrades dear whom we have
loved,  Whose common thought and purpose we have shared;  Our lives
together we will knit,  That those who follow us may know we cared.  Oh go
with us thou visions fair,  Thou shining sea, inspiring hills, and flaming
skies;  And comradeship of fellow beings,  Oh keep us near to thy great
truths throughout our lives.  222

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 223

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LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF THE  CLASS OF MAY, 1918.  We, the Senior Class
of May, 1918, being of sound mind and in full po-ssession  of the required
amout of sense and nonsense, do hereby make and de-clare  this our last
will and testament for the purpose of disposing of our mis-fortunes,  cares
 and responsibilities, also of our pleasures and ideals, and of 
bequeathing the same to our successors, do solemnly devise and bequeath as 
follows, to-wit:  Article I  To our beloved Alma Mater, we bequeath our
superfluous knolwedge,  .skill, diplomacy, and books on methods of pedagogy
which we shall no longer  -need in this life or the next.  Article II  To
Dr. Nash and the faculty, we leave (A) our sincere love and appreci-ation 
for their inspiring personalities, their high ideals, and their ever-ready 
sympathy and help; (B) our concentrated sympathy for the set of pills corn-
 -tained in the Junior Class.  To Miss Earheart and the training school
supervisors, we give. (A) our  eternal gratitude for their human
understanding of us: (B) a set of automatic  lesson plan adjusters and
graders: (C) a carload of emotionless phonograph  -records to be used for
conference purposes.  Article III  To the next Senior Class-  First: We
bestow our beloved Father Bever, class advisor and program  adjuster. We
admonish our afore mentioned successors to treat him kindly  and to
remember him with pies and other dainties when he sits up late, and  goes
without his dinner in order to adjust their programs, as he has been  -
known to do for us.  Second: We leave our empty class rooms, empty heads,
empty hearts.  and empty seats in assembly, hoping all such may be adorned
as well as here-  -toofre.  Third: We leave our loyalty and our class
spirit to the next Senior  Class, and we leave our enthusiasm to the entire
student body to be used at  basket ball, base ball, and all other athletic
turnouts.  Fourth: We leave the Kline cup with a short treatise on how to
keep it.  Article IV  To the Junior Class-  First: To the Juniors, we
bequeath our school interest in the Red Cross,  -our knitting bags, and the
counsel of Miss Jensen, with a special request that  they continue the good
work at their leisure and in assembly, also with a  -proviso that they use
no crochet hooks for the duration of the war.  223

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 224

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Second: To the Juniors we leave our text books, in order to clear the  book
store from any intimation of profiteering.  Third: To the biology students,
we leave our mouse eaten collection of  dessicated bugs, also the good
grades Dr. Herre forgot to give us in Evolution.  Article V  Collectively
and individually, we do  bequeath the following:  First: To the practice
teachers. we give (a) frosted glass doors, a set  of shock absorbers, a
series of automatic, spit ball recuperators, and a burglar  alarm; (b) our
yellow passports and  the key to the cipher code, "N. B. C."  (c) our old
lesson plans.  Second: To Dr. Miller, we leave a coal oil  stove, two hot
water bottles  and a set of Russian sable furs, so he will not need to wear
his overcoat in the classroom.  Third: To Miss Ormsby, we leave a can of
Crisco, a cup of dry bread  crumbs, a dash of paprika and a pinch of salt.
Also an appreciative class of  boys to take war cooking.  Fourth: To Miss
Wilson, we give a case of Lethe water, that she may  forget the call number
of her thoughts upon retiring; a fumigator, and her  choice of new books,
with a special provision to not put them all on the one  day shelf. We
leave in the hands of Miss Wilson's evening assistant, a re-ception  room
for the use of lovers and salamanders, so that those wishing to  use the
general library for the purpose of study after 7 p. m., will not seem to 
intrude.  Fifth: To those becoming ill during examinations we recommend
Miss  Meade and her favorite prescription.  Sixth: To all enthusiasts in
anatomy, we bequeath the rectangular zinc  box of dead cats, skinned
puppies, and bisected hens, in the physiology lab-oratory.  Seventh: To the
best looking boy in the class, we leave the Messenger  jokes on Paul
Washke.  Eighth: To Mr. Grady, we leave a reserved seat on the assembly
plat-form.  Ninth: To Miss Boring's Social Science classes, we leave our
sympathy,  400 reams of paper, 100 gallons of ink, and an individual
calendar, in order  that they  may keep their note books up to date. 
Tenth: To Mrs. Thatcher, we leave our love and thanks for the good  music
arranged for us; a baton and two gold medals of John Philip Sousa, for  the
propagation and dissemination of "The Stars and Stripes Forever." In  order
that Mrs. Thatcher may not be at a loss for a choral club after our
de-parture,  we leave her the well trained voices of the frogs in the lake
on the campus, and recommend that Dr. Herre be appointed musical director. 
Eleventh: To our successors, we leave an augumented collection of the 
speakers who bored us in Assembly, with direction on how to appear
interest-ed  while preparing the lesson which followed.  224

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Twelfth: To Miss Beardsley, we leave Forebel's Kindergarten Princi-ples, 
by Kirkpatrick, and urge that it be studied diligently: "Nous laissons par 
testament, beaucoup de bonne salnte, toute notre amour, et ci desire-ci;
qu'elle  conserve nous un peu de souvenir et de bienveillance que nous
conservons lui." Thirteenth: To those who come after us, we leave our
beautiful grounds.  the campus free from unsightliness, and admonish our
successors to "Follow  in our footsteps."  Fifteenth: To Miss Druse, we
leave our love and appreciation, and a  little volumne containing a
complimentary sentence from each member of  the class, to be read by her
only when at leisure, if that time ever comes.  Sixteenth: To Miss  Keeler,
we leave the whole world with the exception  of Whatcom County. 
Seventeenth: To Miss McCarthy, Just as much love, and a little bit more 
than has ever been left to her before.  Eighteenth: To Mr. Klemme, we leave
a chestnut colored toupee, to  save him the trouble of adjusting his "Fan."
Nineteenth: We leave to Mr. Philippi a lapse of memory so that he may 
forget the grinning grimaces at which he was forced to peer thru his
camera,  while taking pictures for the Klipsun.  Twentieth: To Miss Boring,
just a hint of the love and esteem in which  she is held by every member of
the class.  Twenty- first: To Mr. Hoppe, we leave a box of pacifiers to be
distrib-uted  by him among his country audiences, so  he may not be annoyed
by the  munching of pop corn while making a speech.  Twenty-second: To
Gladys Stephen, we give a regiment of boy scouts.  Twenty-third: To Mr.
Coughlin, we give our love and best wishes; a  storage battery for
receiving the pep given off by him in his classes, the  afore mentioned pep
to be distributed among Miss Crawford's cadets.  Twenty-fourth: To Miss
Morse, we leave a paradise for her sunny dis-position.  Twenty-fifth: We
disinherit Miss Edens, because anything bestowed  upon her would be
"censored."  Twenty-sixth: To Miss Summer, we leave our congratulations for
the  success of her production of "Quality Street;" we bequeath also, a
motor  truck, a search warrant, and a police star, so that she may go the
limit when  looking for scenery for stage settings.  Twenty-eighth: To Dr.
Nash, we  leave a board of censors, before whom  prospective Assembly
speakers be given a "try out;" we recommend that  this committee be
composed of Miss Wilson, Miss Druse and Dr. Herre. We,  one and all, leave
our love; our assurance of loyalty and lasting friendship;  our
appreciation of his high ideals and excellent principles; a long and happy 
service as president of the Normal School.  225

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Article VII  We of the Senior Class appoint Dr. Nash, President of the
Bellingharr  Normal School, County of Whatcom, State of Washington, U. S.
A., as sole  executor of this, our will.  Article VIII  In Witness Whereof,
we have hereby signed, sealed and published and,  declared this instrument
as our last will and testament, at Bellingham State  Normal School, at four
o'clock on the fourth day of May, Nineteen Hundred!  and Eighteen.  Signed
and Sealed:  SENIOR CLASS OF MAY, NINETEEN EIGHTEEN.  The aforesaid
document, purporting to be the last will and testament of  the Senior Class
of the Bellingham Normal School, is on this twenty-seventh  day of May,
1918, admitted to probate.  C. R. HOLBROOK, President of Senior Class.  In
testimony of the validity of the foregoing will and testament of the 
Senior Class of 1918, I hereby affix my hand and seal this twenty-seventh
day  of May in the illustrious year of 1918.  ALBERT BOOMAN,  President
Students' Association.  FRANCIS IRELAND,  Secretary  226

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227  V  iF

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228

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1  229  now

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2,i0

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231  ~CP~ i  j ;  bri  ~:~ ~E~iBkgg . .r  F9

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'I  232

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 233

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I  *  .  233  441" a, L  ,412~

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234

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235

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236

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ROSLYN COAL  (None Better)  FOR SALE BY  FAIRHAVEN TRUCK   TRANSFER CO. 
'Phone 508, 600 Harris Ave.  D. F. TRUNKEY   SONS  'Phone 112, 1715 Elk
Street  THE  RED CROSS  is the Mother of our Boys.  When we support the Red
Cross  we are caring for our own flesh and blood. There is  nothing  too
great to sacrifice for our own people; therefore let us give, give, give 
to the Red Cross.  237 ~

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Pacific  Laundry  Established 18 9  Charles Erholm, Prop.  I'rsapt-Reliable
 Up-to-date and Sanitary in ev\er\  respect.  \Ve are at vour service. 
Phones 126-127  1728-1738 Ellis Street  THE UNIVERSAL CAR  Authorized Sales
and Service  Diehl   Simpson Co.  Cor. Dock and Champion  Students and
Faculty The following firms and those whose advertisements ap-pear  in the
front of this book have helped make it possible to  place this Klipsun in
your hands. We heartilythank the firms  for their support. Can they thank 
us for giving them our trade?  We believe in Reciprocity.  DO YOU?  CASSIE
C. CALES,  Advertising and Business Manager.  238  I

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 239

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North Pacific College  DENTISTRY AND PHARMACY  Advanced students operating
for patients in the dental infirmary.  The annual session begins September
30th.  Students taking a regular degree course are required to)  beginning
of the session.  REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION:  enter at the  To the course
in Dentistry, graduation from an accredited four-year  high school, or the
equivalent. Fifteen units of credit. (Thirty credits.)  To the course in
Pharmacy, the two year course for druggists and  drug clerks leading to the
degree of graduate in Pharmacy ('Ph. G.)-  two years of high school
training or equivalent, eight units.  The three year course for physician's
assistants and manufacturing  chemists leading to the degree of
Pharmaceutical Chemist (Ph. C.)--  high school graduation or equivalent,
fifteen units.  DENTAL HYGIENE. A special course of one session (eight 
months) is offered to young women who do not want to  take the full  course
in dentistry. This training is to prepare the student for work in  mouth
hygiene and to become an efficient dental assistant.  An illustrated
catalog of information will be sent upon application  to   TIHE REGISTRAR, 
North Pacific College  East Sixth and Oregon Sts.,  Portland, Oregon.  239

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 240

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The Following Firms Have Helped to Make It  Possible to Place This Klipsun
in Your Hands.  We Believe in Reciprocity. Do You?  Adams Style Shop 
Atwood, Seth  B. B. Furniture Co.  Bellingham Harness Collins   Co.  Empire
Meat   Groc  Floral Exchange  Frolich, H. J.   Co.  Gage, Dodson   Co. 
Highland  Creamery  Hotel Columbia Mrs.  Kramer's Shoe store  Laube, J. M. 
 Son  Liberty Theatre  Morlan, E. D.  Morse Hdw. Co.  National Barber Shop 
New York Dentists  Northwest Hdw. Co.  Olsen. C. M.  Owl Pharmacy  Pelegren
  Martin  Runner, Chas. F.  W\eiser Drug Co.  V'oll, J. P.  Co.  ery  Value
First Store  Pictures, Art and Gift  Trunks and Bags  Original Cut Rate
Drug  Co.  126 E. Holly  Shop 212 W. Holly  Bay and Prospect  211 W. Holly 
Store 208 E. Holly  1303 Dock  102 W. Holly  Society Brand Clothes 108 W.
Holly  203 W. Holly  H. A. Lyle, Prop. Confectionery Etc. 629 High  Tarte,
Mgr. Ladies' patronage solicited 1247 Elk  1305 Dock  Auto Repairs 1234
Elk.  W. H. Quinby Commercial and Holly Shoe Repairing 1224 Elk  1025 Elk 
J. D. McDonald 1304 Dock  W. G. Longwood Bell. Nat'l. Bank Bldg. 213-215 XV
Holly  Bonds and Guaranteed Investments 1323 Dock  Dock and Holly 
Clothing, Furnishing2nd floor Bell. Nat. Bank Bldg  W atch Repairing 110 W.
Holly  Prescription Specialists Bell. Nt'l. Bank Bldg.  Optometrist and Op
tician 205 "W. Holly  240

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 241

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COMFORT  for /4 an hour-  During the Hot Weather  Puget Sound Traction,
Light   Power Co.  Ireland   Pancoast  1321 Commercial St.  Phone 2473 
BELLINGIIAM, \\VASH.  If it is good to eat we have Exclusive dealers in 
FERNDELL  COFFEE  SPICES  PRESERVES  PICKLES  CANNED FRUITS  AND VEGETABIES
 These goods are guaranteed to  comply with the national pure  food law. 
We solicit vour business based  on quality an(t price.  This ad is taken
with the expectation  that we will receive some of your favors  This is to
remind you that it is  good patriotic military service at  this time to buy
 Liberty Bonds and  War Savings Stasmp  to the extent of your  ability. 
financial  The A. N. Palmer Co.  New York, Boston, Philadelphia,  Cedar
Rapids, Iowa.  The Palmner Ietli,d ,,f Business  \\riting  241

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 242

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~t  THE TABLE OF FREEDOM  25 Cents: 1 Thrift Stamp.  16 T'. S.: 1 War
Savings Certif-icate.  1 \W. S.  C.: I ,iberty Bond.  2 L. B.: 1 Red Cross
Nurse.  2 R. C. N.: 25 Saved Soldiers.  50 S. S.: 1 Sector Held.  2 S. II.
: I)ownfall of Autocracy.  1 D. of A.: 1 Free World.  1 F. 11.: Everything.
 Buy Thrift Stamps and help free  the world.  EAT CANNED  SALMON  Brain,
Blood, Bone and Muscle  Food Values  Per Cent. 21.s CANNED SALMUN  16.5
Sirloin Steak  14.2 Sugar Cured Hamn  13.4 Macaroni  13.1 Fresh Eggs 12.8
Spring Chicken  9.2 Bread  Pacific American  Fisheries  SOUTH BELLINGHAM, 
WASH.  242 Kemphaus   Co.  Bellingham's Lowest Price Cloak and Suit Store 
206-208 W. Holly Pictorial Review Patterns  NE1WV WHITE FA LBRICS  Select
your Graduation Gown now while the Stocks are  complete  and at their best.
 All smart new weaves are here in larger assortments than  you will find at
any other store in town.  You will find our Prices Right---White Kid
Gloves, White  Silk Gloves, White Hosiery, Dainty Lingerie.

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Headquarters for  Groceries, Fresh Fruit and Vegetables  HOME BAKING  Cakes
of All Kinds for Special Occasions  We appreciate the liberal patronage
extended to us in the  past by the Normal students, and we shall try to
give our -est  attention to all business in the future.  SWEET GROCERY CO. 
1021. Elk Street  The  Home Store  A. LA\V\S(UN  1312 1314 Bay St.  DRY
GOODS, MEN'S AND  WOMEN'S FURNISHINGS.  BOOTS AND SHOES  At Prices You Can
Afford to Pay  Is Better Goes Further WHOLESALED BY  P. P. LEE   CO.  243 
*I ,

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 244

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The Largest  Ready-to-Wear Store  in the Northwest  HIGH GRADE GARMENTS AT 
REASONABLE PRICES  LOBE'S  FOR THE  GRADUATE  Diamond Rings  Wrist Watches 
La Valliers  Pearl Beads Brooches  Boquet Pins  Signet Rings  Hair
Ornaments  Hat Pins  Fountain Pens  1918 Class Pins MULLER   ASPLUND 
JEWELERS  To the Normal School  Next to First National Bank  THE
NORTHWESTERN  STATE BANK  of Bellingham,  at South Bellingham, Washingtun 
244

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 245

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JUST WHY  Should you have your Films developed by:us?  It is to our
interest that your Films are develop-ed  and printed right.  W hy Because
the better result you get from your Kodak  the more films you will buy, and
we sell 85 per cent  of all the films sold in Bellingham.  For This Reason
We take more pains taking care  indoing thiswork, than all others  who do
not make a specialty of the Kodak and Film business.  Remember We do not
send your work out to be done  by some photographer. We employ an ex-pert 
and have an exclusive Photo Finishing Department.  Remember Also There are
no other drug stores  in Bellingham doing this work,  in spite of the fact
that some of them carry advertising to the contrary.  Engberg Drug Co. 
245

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W. L. SUTHERLEN  I  Printing Co.  COR. DOCK-HOLLY  The Oldest Established
Printing Office in BELLINGHAM  Using the Most Up-to-Date Methods and 
EQUIPMENT  QUALITY OF MATERIAL STANDARD OF WORKMANSHIP  GUARANTEED  SCHOOL
WORK SPECIALISTS  246  The Irish PHONE _272  A. H. MILLER

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     Klipsun, 1918 - Page 247

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DESIGNING  ILLUSTIJING  ENG NG  for Particular  WESTLERLN  ENGPVING  
COIOIT  COM PANY 915 L. James at BDoadway  S E AT T L E  247

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/  I  II  9

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