Primary tabs

1920

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920


     ----------

[no text this page]

     ----------




     Klipsun, 1920 - Cover


     ----------

[no text this page]

     ----------




     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [2] of cover

     ----------

pl_ _ _ _

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [i]

     ----------

THE BOOK OF THE  SENIOR CLASS  VOLUME VIII  Washington State Normal Briool 
Bellingham, Washington  MCMXX

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [ii]

     ----------

Dedication to Elias A. Bond  A man whose gospel of  hard work and whose
ready helping hand has been an inspiration to every serious minded student,
we the Class of Nineteen Hundred and Twenty respectfully  dedicate our
Annual

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [iii]

     ----------

7*1

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [iv]

     ----------

6 - r;  ~I s  _9~9~k":11~:  i-I  ii I~YI~

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [v]

     ----------

ouut Iaker  Purple, mauve, a violet haze, a splash of fine spun gold,  A
charging cloud 'cross an opal sky, like a heavenly warrior bold,  A fringe
of green in the shimmering sheen, a glare of silvered sun,  A sigh of
breeze 'mnong the sentinel trees, the work of God well done,  A mountain
rears its wonderful heights like a crown on Nature's  brow,  A towering
mountain clothed in white as pure as an angel's vow,  A circle of hills, a
stretch of land, a sweep of an inland sea  The mountain enthroned on the
roof of the world beckons  to  you and to me,  The sun beats down on its
silver crown, the waters softly creep,  There are stars, a moon, the
nights' soft croon, the world has  gone to sleep.  - Guy MANNERS.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [vi]

     ----------

.............  1w  to  INN  Ott -

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [vii]

     ----------

GEORGE WILLISTON NAkSH, B. S., -M. S., LL. D.  vu our rriartu  Mf ehI
ouinbleiii fait4 in Ilir future turlfarte of our srliol  nub Ii~r luork for
w~ipr it isi ?wiirateb will rruiain an  inrrntiur aub a rlpriolirb tuirmrij
to vrr our of us.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 8

     ----------

Vo14 1 rtnav *ur tj  of land in the most picturesque spot on Puget Sound -
on the slopes  of Sehome Hill, above the Bay, and surrounded by beautiful
mountains,  with Mt. Baker towering in the background.  The school is in
its twenty-first year of splendid achievement, and has  graduated two
thousand six hundred people. These twenty-six hundred  graduates represent
forty-nine different occupations. This manifests the  various vocations for
which one may prepare at the Normal. The greatest  number, or one thousand
four hundred sixty-two, are engaged in some  form of pedagogical work, four
hundred forty-eight are housewives, seventy-six  are doing advanced study
at colleges and universities, and fifty-nine are  clerical workers. The
number engaged in each of the other occupations  range from one to seven. 
The standards of teaching have been raised each year. From the  beginning,
those graduating from the eighth grade were  admitted. So  the requirement
remained for ten years when it became necessary for one  to complete one
year of high school before entering. The following year,  two years of high
school training were required, and in 1917, one had to be  a graduate of
high school before entering. Now the qualifications are the  same as those
for college entrance.  One-year, two-year and three-year courses are now
offered, and  this  year a four-year basis for the Normal was authorized.
Also a one-year  course is offered to university  graduates.  The courses
of study have been expanded. New features have been  Eight

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 9

     ----------

added in the various departments. The Federal Government has granted  six
thousand dollars to the Department of Hygiene. This department will  be
co-ordinated with the Department of Biological Science. With the
co-operation  of the head of this department with the School Nurse and the 
Physical Education, instructors and teachers will be better trained to
carry  on general work in personal and community hygiene.  The enlarged
manual training building provides separate rooms for  elementary woodwork,
advanced woodwork, forge work, mechanical draw-ing,  printing, and smaller
rooms for repairing and finishing work.  A great development has taken
place in the Extension Department in  the past two years, and results of
this work are becoming more and more  pronounced. This course is given to
those who wish to do part of their  Normal work while teaching, and receive
credits for their work, graduates  who wish to keep in touch with the
educational movements of the day,  graduates of other institutions who wish
to take some Normal work, and  teachers and others desiring general
culture. Sixteen of our teachers are  engaged in this field, and twenty-two
subjects are taught. These instructors  sometimes hold community meetings
where people may get in closer touch  with one another, or where they may
learn from speakers sent out from this  school. By special arrangement,
books may be secured from the Normal  Library by those taking
correspondence work.  The Student Loan Fund has proved instrumental to many
in securing  their education. Students may borrow from this fund to
complete an  entire course if they so desire. The fund increased from
$1,800 to $12,000  in two years through the assistance of 'Mr. Charles
Allen, of Seattle.  As the demand for more and better teachers is in
evidence, so this  school has  and ever will meet that situation, by itself
becoming bigger and  better each year.  Nine

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [10]

     ----------

ai  I  Q:~AC  :_: :

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 11

     ----------

SEPTEMBER  8. Monday -  "Comes the youth from farm and sea-shore,  Gathered
for the year."  The Seniors indulge in many hearty  laughs, thereby
forgetting their trou-bles  of last year.  The programming procession
proceeds.  Ladies first? Then the men will never  get there. Many sad
partings from  fond parents and beloved dollars.  9. Tuesday -  Repeat
performance. The Juniors as-sume  a sophisticated attitude.  10. Wednesday
-  First assembly. Three a week.  11. Thursday--  Everybody seems lively.
Just wait,  however, until they encounter psychol-ogy.  12. Friday--  First
club meetings.  15. Monday -  The fleet arrives. Edens Hall turns  out en
masse. In the evening we are  entertained with a display of search- lights.
 16. Tuesday--  We have a holiday this afternoon. Wyo-ming  and Arkansas
are very popular.  So are sailors.  17. Wednesday -  Some "gobs" visit
Normal.  Mrs. Douglas appointed editor of the Messenger.  18. Thursday-- 
Philo picnic, Whatcom Falls.  19. Friday -  First Students' Association
mixer. A  fine program in the auditorium, fur-nished  by the various
"houses." Then  games and refreshments in the big gym.  22. Monday--  Dr.
Nash gives a description of his ex-periences  in Seattle last week when he 
saw President Wilson review the great  fleet, and later heard the president
 speak. Miss Beardsley enthusiastically boosts  the Salvation Army drive.
About $200  is pledged.  This afternoon  Dr. L. C. Karpinsky, of  the
University of Michigan, gives a  lecture on the science of numbers and
history of arithmetic. He has some  old text-books, which some of us
ex-amine.  24. Wednesday -  A great assembly! The Faculty give  impromptu
speeches. Dr. Nash says  they are. Miss Beardsley still is boost-ing  the
Salvation Army.  Miss Wilson gives a report of the meet-ing  of the Pacific
Northwest Library  Association at Vancouver. Mr. Kibbe  tells of a
committee meeting in Olym-pia,  which he attended.  Miss Sperry tells of
her Berkeley ex-periences;  Mrs. Thatcher of her island  visit, and Mr.
Philippi protnises us  good things in moving pictures. Dr.  Herre swells
our hearts with prophecies  of a lodge on the slope of Mt. Baker.  26.
Friday -  Some visit the Whatcom County Fair  at Lynden.  Y. W. C.  A.
reception is held in the  evening.  OCTOBER  1. Wednesday -  National Grand
Concert Players. Questions: Whom was the prima don-na  looking at? How old
was Lottie  Louise Lough?  Eleven

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 12

     ----------

2. Thursday -  Aletheians initiate.  3. Friday--  Sage Brush Society
organizes.  4. Saturday -  Major Girls hike to Chuckanut.  Faculty gambol
(not gamble) in the  gymnasium. Professor Bever shows his  big league
training.  6. Monday--  Chaplain Reagor speaks of the Ameri-can  spirit. 
10. Friday --  Guy Allison,  former editor of the Mes-senger,  gives us
advice born of ex-perience.  Mr. Baughman joins the Benedicts.  11.
Saturday--  Miss Burnside entertains the Philos at  Eldridge Farm.  13.
Monday-- Kenneth Huen, formerly of Normal,  plays for us in assembl)ly. 
Gems of oratory are heard and the Students' Association election is held. 
Harold Marshall is elected to be presi-dent;  Miss Estelle Burnside,
vice-president.  Theo. Karle, well known tenor, who  originally hailed from
Seattle, sings  before us in the evening. A great day  for all Seattleites.
They were his play-mates.  15. Wednesday -  Dr. Mathes, former president of
Nor-mal  and Y. M. C. A. worker near the  front, tells of a trip he made
while in  France.  New Association officers installed.  Elwyn Bugge makes
his "farewell"  speech.  17. Friday - Mr. Hoppe speaks on " Spontaneity." 
Senior mixer in evening. Cider and pie.  You should see Mr. Bever skip
around.  18. Saturday--  The Oregonians enjoy the famous Jack  Martin
waffles.  20. Monday-- Harrison Raymond, a Normal gradu-ate,  sings before
us, accompanied by  Miss Althea Horst. Good luck, Harri-son  in your
further studies.  Miss Ida Gardner, a noted contralto,  sings before us in
comparison with her  " re-creation " on the p)honograph. We  are all "
fooled" by the similarity.  21. Tuesday -  D. A. Y. Barber Shop and
Powell's  Emporium are established.  22. Wednesday -  Normal Glee Club
sings in assembly.  New Student Council elected. Now  we feel safe. The
enterprising Juniors held a program in class meeting. We  learn that
Roosevelt was a great ad-mirer  of Harold Marshall.  23. Thursday-- 
Philomathean initiation. Pass the spa-ghetti,  please.  24. Friday -  Miss
Brown, student secretary for the  Y. W. C. A. speaks on behalf of the 
Student Volunteer movement.  The Messenger proves too interesting,  and Dr.
Nash requests that distribu-tion  be withheld until after assembly.  25.
Saturday -  A submarine visits Bellingham Bay and  some of us return the
visit.  27. Monday--  Gladys Weir, accompanied by Madame  Engberg,
entertains us with her vio-lin.  Herbert Hansen delivers a stirring 
Roosevelt address, whereby Webster  loses his reputation.  28. Tuesday-- 
The Home Economics  IV Class serves  a Hallowe'en luncheon.  29. Wednesday
-  We are entertained with " The Teeth  of the Gift Horse" by the community
 Dramatics Class. Movies afterward.  30. Thursday -  The Major Girls
banquet in the cafe-teria.  31. Friday -  " Sports," by "Luke," makes its
debut.  Sagebrush Club holds a Hallowe'en  party.  NOVEMBER  1. Saturday - 
Many of the Faculty atten dthe W. E.  A. convention at Seattle.  3.
Monday--  Junior Girls' indoor baseball team  loses to Fairhaven 44-43. 
The Evening Chorus is working on an  oratorio, " The Prodigal Son."  4.
Tuesday -  Dr. Anna Y. Reed of the Junior Divi-sion  of the Employment
Service at  Washington, D. C., begins a series of  lectures.  5. Wednesday
-  Dr. Reed speaks on the "Area of Suc-cess"-  ability, reliability,
endurance  and action.  6. Thursday -  The Normal Fire Department is being 
organized by Mr. Coughlin. We may  expect fire alarms now.  7. Friday - 
Very bright moon. Foolish thing to  mention, isn't it?  8. Saturday - 
Everett Club picnics at Lake Whatcom. 10. Monday--  Mr. and Mrs. Boucher,
of the Belling-ham  School of Music, delightfully en-tertain  us in
assembly.  Twelve

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 13

     ----------

11. Tuesday -  Armistice Day! At 11 o'clock we stand  at attention for two
minutes. Mr.  Bever speaks in special assembly. A  parade is planned but
does not ma-terialize.  First of inter-club games. Thespians defeat Rural
Life in a good game,  20-12.  12. Wednesday -  Miss Agnes Hill, first Y. W.
C. A.  secretary in India, tells us interesting  things about that land. 
13. Thursday -  Philomonic Orchestra makes its debut.  "A treat for all
music haters."  The Rural Lifers hold their cruel ini-tiations.  14. Friday
-  Tacoma Club party in the little gym.  Two boys to every girl. What's
this  school coming to, anyhow?  17. Monday -  We are urged to send
delegates to the  Student Volunteer Convention at Des  Moines. About
$300.00 is pledged.  18. Tuesday -  "Do you drink coffee?" "Naw, I  board
at Edens Hall."  Thespians defeat the Philos in the sec-ond  of inter-club
games.  19. Wednesday -  Business Girls' League meeting. Do-mestic  
Science Department holds an  Exhibit.  Herbert Hansen elected editor of the
 Messenger.  20. Thursday- -  All tonsorial activities transferred to  the
locker room.  21. Friday-  The Messenger blooms forth with much  poetry,
semni-, pseudo- and iso-poetry  from Jameson Hall.  Community Dramatic
Class gives four   plays in the afternoon.  In the evening, Mrs. Maude
Willis en-tertains  us with the " Witching Hour."  22. Saturday - 
Philomatheans tenth birthday party.  24. Monday--  Dr. Kirkpatrick and
Judge Howard  speak of the dangers of Bolshevism.  We're becoming nervous
lately.  25. Tuesday--  Philo-Rural Life basketball game ends  in a tie. In
playing this off Rural Life  wins by one basket.  26. Wednesday -  First
quarter graduation.  The graduates are not the only ones  leaving.
Excessive scattering for boats  and trains. Woe  to those that must 
remain.  27. Thursday -  Thanksgiving -- we're all home.  DECEMBER  1.
Monday-- Thanksgiving over but not gone. " Only  three weeks till Xmas,"
sighs one Ta-coma  maiden. Prof. Sedgewick of the  University of British
Columbia modest-ly  recounts his experiences in teach-ing English.  Miss
Baker speaks in behalf of Mrs.  Pankhurst.  2. Tuesday -  Courage men!
There is increased  strength in numbers.  Mrs. Emmeline Pankhurst, of
suffrage  and war service fame, speaks in Lib-erty  Hall.  3. Wednesday - 
Mrs. Pankhurst gives us her impres-sions  of France.  4. Thursday - Miss
Woodard takes the Aletheians out  on the campus and introduces them to  a
study of the stars.  15.  Monday--  Men of the school hold banquet and
ap-preciate  their own society. They come  from all parts of the globe. 
16. Tuesday--  " The New Dormitory"-- a topic for  conversation.  17.
Wednesday -  A secret  game. Normal defeats Fair-haven,  26-8.  18.
Thursday -  Santa makes an early appearance at  some of the clubs.  19.
Friday -  Training School renders a Christmas  program.  The Christmas
number of the Messen-ger  appears in special issue of maga-zine  form
dedicated to Dr. Nash.  30. Tuesday -  Normal beats Blaine in an easy game,
 26-14.  JANUARY  2. Friday--  The Normal team starts the year well  by
chastising the Mount Vernon Amer-ican  Legion, 39-8.  5. Monday--  The
Walton Brothers entertain us. One  sings, " Please Let Me Sleep," but we 
don't; we encore him.  6. Tuesday -  Calamity! No Board of Control
meet-ing.  7. Wednesday -  Men of school hold meeting to consider  forming
of association.  8. Thursday-  Messrs. Philippi and Coughlin test 
suspected liquid that the county sher-iff  sends up. Thirteen

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 14

     ----------

9. Friday -  Yell practice for the Whatcom game.  In a preliminary game the
Philos de-feat  the Rural Life girls 33-4.  Whatcom is defeated by one
point 15-  14. They, like the Arabs, silently steal  away, muttering, "Wait
'till next  time."  12. Monday--  Miss Wilson highly recommends Laz-zari, 
who sings tonight at the Ameri-can.  We had to sneak up a dark alley to 
hear Carolina, but she is worth it.  13. Tuesday --  Mr. Carver manouvers
for some post-age  stamps.  14. Wednesday -  The Misses Mead, Croxford and
Kes-ler  returned from Des Moines, tell of  their experiences and
inspirations.  15. Thursday --  The debate tryout committee gives a 
discouraging report.  Mr. Simondson suggests the formation  of a  "Mens
Auxiliary."  Tom Skeyhill, Australian poet and  soldier in Gallipoli and
France, gives  us his impressions 6f America and the  war, esp2cially his
experiences with  our "slanguage."  16. Friday -- Everett Club party at the
home of Mrs.  Hargitt.  17. Saturday -  Normal puts up a fine game, but is
defeated by the Vancouver Ex-Normal  team, 26-24. The second team defeats 
the Y. M. C. A., 29-17. Business Girls hold banquet.  19. Monday--  Dr.
Nash tells us all to be vaccinated.  Elwood Davis gets vaccinated and  then
repenting, tries to cheat nature.  20. Tuesday -  We succumb to the
inevitable. Some  steppers grow naughty and are ob-liged  to seek new
lodging.  21. Wednesday -  The Men's Association of Normal meets  and
elects officers.  Mr. Hoppe suggests that the various  societies take up 
debating.  23. Friday--  Archie Erickson and Ira Loree are  both awarded
pennants, one by Mr.  Kolstad, the other by Dr. Nash, for  inventing the
best school yell.  Normal marches down to the Whatcom  gym in a body.
Whatcom is out-yelled  and out-played. Normal girls  win 18-16. Normal boys
clinch the  city championship 18-12. A parade  through town on the way
back, too.  24. Saturday -  Y. W. C. A. Bible Institute is being  held. 
27. Tuesday -  Father O'Sullivan, missionary, gives us  a picture of Egypt,
its land  and pyra-mids.  30. Friday -  The Sing-Yell number of the
Messen-ger  appears.  Juniors hold a mixer with taffy.  31. Saturday - 
Normal defeats C. P. S., 32-8.  FEBRUARY  9. Monday--  Dr. H. E. Jackson of
 the Federal  Bureau of Education, outlines his  plans of training for
citizenship and  pleads for our support.  Boys' smokeless smoker is
announced.  10. Tuesday -  Many visit Liberty Hall and hear Walker
Whiteside in "The Master of  Ballantrae."  11. Wednesday -  Feverish
practice for the oratorio con- tinues.  12. Thursday--  VTalentine parties
are the vogue. March  Seniors banquet at the - (Pheasant)!  13.  Friday - 
The Evening Chorus, under the direc-tion  of Mrs. Thatcher, presents an
or-atorio,  " The Prodigal Son." Mrs.  Nash, Mrs. Spratley, Mr. Shaw and 
Mr. Harter, as soloists, kindly aid in  making this an excellent evening. 
17. Tuesday--  Normal debating team chosen.  Advanced Cookery Class gives a
Val-entine  luncheon.  Expression Class entertains for the  evening with
one-act plays.  18. Wednesday  -  Miss Agnes Clippenger and Mr. C. L. 
Simonson eulogize Washington and  Lincoln.  19. Thursday-- We are awakened
in phychology by  rude blasts on the hillside.  21. Saturday--  Normal team
donates to St. Martin's  College a second defeat, 40-27.  March Seniors
hold party.  MARCH  4. Thursday-- Domestic Science exhibit.  5. Friday-- 
March Senior Messenger appears.  8. Monday--  The Junior Class  presents
Mr. Guy  Johnson as "The Scarecrow," aided  nobly by the Prince of
Darkness,  Archie Erickson, and others who came  Fourteen

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 15

     ----------

most naturally to their roles. Good  work, Juniors; may the Seniors do as 
well.  9. Tuesday --  The camera at Grosart's continues to  crack.  11.
Thursday--  The hillside excavators start down for  China. 13. Saturday-- 
Myrtle Club entertains.  16. Tuesday--  Board of Control meeting. All
present.  18. Thursday--  Mrs. Kibbe demonstrates that she can  make her
own furniture. Mr. Kibbe  should have his salary lowered.  19. Friday-- 
The Normal mixed quartette presents  itself to the delighted country folk
of Lawrence.  20. Saturday--  Edens Hall girls up to Chuckanut.  A Philo
minority reaches the top minus  the  coffee pot.  Watch for " King William
at the Bat-tle  of Chuckanut."  21. Sunday--  Mr. Kolstad entertains at
Lake What-com.  Who? When?  22. Monday -  Mrs. Kelly, secretary of the
National  Consumers' League, advocates a pure  clothes act. No more "all
wool"  then.  26. Friday -  Ezra Meeker, one of the Northwest's  young men,
compares his ox team with  a modern Ford.  27. Saturday -  Men of the
school volunteer work on  the tennis court.  29. Monday -  Amateur
Pankhursts from Edens Hall  resort to mob spirit and picketing in  the
library, shouting "Votes for  Wimmin! "  Enger Hall girls give a taffy pull
 flavored  with hypnotism.  31. Wednesday -  Our pride must fall. We are
subjected  to the army mental test by Mr.  Kol-stad.  Second bump- Normal
is defeated in  baseball by Mount Vernon, 15-5.  APRIL  1. Thursday-- Wake
me not up. Home again.  5. Monday --  Dr. Nash makes the opening address 
at the Teachers' Institute. Several of  the Normal Faculty speak at
sectional  meetings.  7. Wednesday -  Mrs. Josephine C. Preston, State
Super-intendent  of Education and president  of th4 N. E. A., addresses the
institute  in  the Normal auditorium.  Dr. Chas. Francis Meserve, of Shaw 
University, Raleigh, North Carolina,  speaks  in assembly.  8. Thursday - 
MacPherson raises shrubbery.  9. Friday--  Aletheian picnic supper in the
cafe-teria.  Messenger enters politics?  10. Saturday--  Philomatheans'
annual banquet at the  Leopold. 12. Monday -  How do you get up Chuckanut?
Climb.  13. Tuesday -  Tennis rules are delivered.  14. Wednesday -  Mrs.
Mayhew argues for school spirit  and suggests the publication of a book  of
songs. 16. Friday -  Basketball letters awarded to the team.  Good work,
boys!  Student election.  Arbor Day exercises in assembly and  on the
campus. Dr. Nash reminds us  of Normal's part in the war.  Normal meets
second defeat at the  hands of Mount Vernon, 9-7.  Mr. Kibbe is hero of
hold-up and saves  thirty cents.  The Steppeite boys try their hand at 
entertaining - and go-  17. Saturday -  -- up Chuckanut. The Marathon  is
on. Who wins?  19. Monday--  Mrs. Charlotte Hammond speaks in as-sembly 
with Mrs. Firman, of Chicago.  Elwyn Bugge gives violin selections, 
accompanied by Miss Ingalls.  Ab Hennes pleads for the new "U"  Stadium. 
Normal bats Fairhaven off the map,  8-0.  20. Tuesday -  Mental test
results show the boys win  more A's in that test than the girls.  It
couldn't be helped.  After several difficulties the Seniors  are announced
winners of the Mara-thon.  21. Wednesday -  Mrs. Sacoreom, of Armenia,
pleads for  her countrymen.  Dr. Moore, chairman of the Commission  on Fine
Arts, tells us of the beauties  of Washington, D. C.  22. Thursday - 
Robert C. Craven gives an illustrated  humane lecture.   Fifteen

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 16

     ----------

23. Friday -  " The Feast of the Little Lanterns," by  the Choral Club,
assisted by many men  of the school  and children of the  Training School. 
24. Saturday --  Whatcom is humbled, 10-6.  The Flonzaley String Quartette
gives a  delightful evening of music.  APRIL  25. Sunday -  The bulb farm
offers attractions to Normalites.  26. Monday -  Governor Hart takes charge
of Normal  for the time being.  The Fisk University Jubilee Singers 
inspire us.  The Home Economics Class gives a  luncheon in honor of
Governor Hart  and  other notables.  27. Tuesday -  Last meeting of present
Board of Con-trol.  Good luck, ye new!  28. Wednesday -  We are favored by
four well-known  men: Representative Gallatly, of Che-lan  County; Mr. IL.
D. McArdle, of the  State Bureau of Inspection; Mr.  Frank Dallam, of the
Post-Intelligencer  staff, and Mr. Hartramft, Silver-Bur-dette  Company
representative and e;vi-dent  humorist.  30. Friday -  Everett- Snohomish
Club gives a Klip-sun  benefit penny party.  MAY  1. Saturday -  Noral
girls participate in the Bell-ingham  Tulip Day parade.  Philonmathean
week-end party at Mr.  Kolstad's cottage, Lake Whatcom.   3. Monda --  New
student officers installed and the  old ushered out.  The Kline Cup is
awarded to Miss Florence Baker, captain of the Junior  girls' basketball
team, and the Herald  Marathon Cup to Miss Margaret Xitco,  vice-president
of the Senior Class.  Hygiene 2 class gives a practical first-aid
demonstration.  4. Tuesday--  Cooking class field trip and picnic.  5.
Wednesday -  Dr. Herre presents a new song to the  tune of "John Brown's
Body." An-other  song is sung but the author is  unknown.  Rev. P. H.
Raymond, chaplain of the  Monroe Reformatory, gives an inspir-ing  sermon
on our place in life. Miss Evelyn Whittier wins the Mes-senger  humorous
poem contest. We  move a resolution to thank Mr. Allison  for his interest
in the school.  Seniors hold an important meeting.  6. Thursday -  The
Parent- Teachers' Association in-vades  our halls and is welcomed by Dr. 
Nash. A course in ushering is offered. 7. Friday -  Men of school discuss
Mt. Baker trip.  Signing up for tennis tournament.  Normal plays Meridian,
17-7.  10. Monday -  Senior go announced.  Tennis tournament on. Go to it! 
11. Tuesday-- Ruth Linrud sings and plays at the  Garden M. E. Church.  12.
Wednesday -  Junior Day. Junior program is pre-sented  in assembly and
enjoyed very  much, especially "The Junior Jazz Or-chestra."  Thespians
give evening of plays.  14. Friday--  Junior reception to Seniors.  15.
Saturday -  Normal plays Whatcom. 17. Monday -  Annual school excursion. 
21. Friday -  President's reception to Seniors and  Faculty at the 
Aftermath Club House.  22. Saturday -  Alumni reunion and banquet at  math
Club House.  After-  23. Sunday -  Commencement sermon at First
Pres-bhyterian  Church by Rev. H. S. Tem-pleton.  24. Monday -  William
Howard Taft honors the  Senior Class Day exercises.  25. Tuesday -  Senior
Class play, " The Saving Grace."  26. Wednesday -  Twenty-first annual
commencement ex-ercises.  Address by Dr. Ira W. Ho-warth,  of California. 
This concludes the program.  Sixteen

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [17]

     ----------

1'o  Il

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 18

     ----------

Irving E. Miller . . . . . . . . . . . ... Education  Catherine Montgomery
. . .. Asst. Supt. Training School Arthur Kolstad .. . ..... . . . . .
Education  Hope Mowbray ..... Observation and Primary Methods  Lynus Alonzo
Kibbe ............ Education  John Vincent Coughlin . ........ . .
Agriculture  Albert C. Herre. . . . . . Biological Science and Hygiene  May
Mead . ...... ... .. . School Nurse  Ida Agnes Baker . ..... . Nature Study
and Forestry  Bertha Hughes ............ . School Physician  Eighteen 
B~E~i~  I

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 19

     ----------

M. W . Heckman ......... .........  Industrial Arts, Faculty Advisor, Board
of Control  Edward Julius Klemme . . . . . . . Rural Education  Belle
Wallace . ....... Supervisor Grammar Grades  Lyman D. Bissell . .... ......
 . . . . Printing  John Rindal . . ...... ... ... Industrial Arts  Georgie
Gragg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Penmanship John F. Caskey . ......... .
Business Education  Mrs. James Gaul . . . ............ . Spanish  W. J.
Rice . .....  . . . . . . . Penmanship  Mrs. May Lovegren ...... . .
Business Education  Nineteen

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 20

     ----------

Thomas F. Hunt . . . . .......... Geography  Helen Beardsly .. . . . . . .
. French and Spanish  M. Belle Sperry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
English, Director Young Women's Christian Association  Zeta Mayhew,
English, Literary Critic Klipsun and Messenger  . .* . English, Literary
Critic Klipsun and Messenger Victor Hoppe . ........ . . . .. Oral
Expression  Marie Carey Druse . Art and Handicraft, Art Critic Klipsun
Mabel Zoe Wilson ... . . . ..... . . . Librarian  James Bever .... . . . .
. .. History and Sociology  Ruth M. Boring . ........... Art and History 
Enid Striker . ... ........ . Art and Handicraft  Twenty  ei~i~a~a~n

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 21

     ----------

Mrs. Florence Fox Thatcher . . . . School Music and Voice  Ethel Gardner
..... .......... . . Pianoforte Gertrude Longley ......... .. Home
Economics  Mildred Moffat . . . . . . . Supervisor Primary Grades  Esther 
Clark . . . .. . . . . . . Home Economics  Florence Friedenberger,
Supervisor Lower Intermediate Grades Lota M. King . . . . . . .. Supervisor
Upper Grades  Nellie Lee . .... Supervisor Lower Grades, City System  Ruth
Bell . ......... . . Supervisor Lower Grades  Mrs. Edna Samson . ... .. .
Supervisor Upper Grades Twenty-one

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 22

     ----------

Helen Tompkins ........ Pre-Primary Supervisor  Eleanor Gray . . . .
Supervisor Upper Intermediate Grades  E. Gertrude Beasley . .... Supervisor
Grammar Grades  Laura E. McDonald . Supervisor Upper Intermediate Grades 
Bertha Crawford ........ Supervisor Upper Grades  Exean Woodard.. ..
....... Dean of Women  Mme. Davenport Engherg ..... ....... Violin  Mrs.
Ina Kirkman ..... . Supervisor Geneva School Harry C. Philippi . .
.......... Physical Science  F. L. Olslager ............... Registrar 
Twenty-two

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 23

     ----------

XITCO BURNSIDE LEE  FRANK SELBY  Gly elipnn Gammitter  The Klipsun
Committee wish to thank all those who have so willingly  co-operated with
them in editing this number of the Klipsun.  The loyal five, the business
manager and editor have worked hard in  order to bring this number up to
the standard of the  school. Their hope  is that you will carry it away
with you as a reminder of those " precious  days at Normal."  Twenty-three

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 24

     ----------

B UGGE FREE MAN  Elip n 0"taff  Elwyn Bugge . . ........ ......
Editor-in-Chief  Muriel Lee .... ........ . . Associate Editor  Stanley
Freeman ......... .. Business Manager  DEPARTMENT HEADS  Carrie Whittier
... ......... .. . Literary  Ruth Claassen . .... . . . . . . . . . . . Art
 Edith Kesler . .... . ........ Entertainment Beverly Hatch . . ..........
. Organizations  Maude Elliot ......... ....... Dramatics  Olga Heggem .
........... . . Training School  Ethel Burkland . .. ......... . School
Survey  Noel Wynne . . . .......... . .. . Calendar  Stella  Lowry . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Social  Elwood Davis . ...... ..... . .
Athletics  Margaret Xitco . . . . . . . . . .  . . .. . Athletics 
Henrietta Welch . . . . . . ........ . Jokes  Kenneth Selby . .............
Snaps, Humor Twenty-four  I f/ R==L

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [25]

     ----------

BURKLAND  L OWRY  XITCO  WYNNE  DAVIS  LEE  HEGGE31  WHITTIER  WVELCHI 
SELIBY ELLIOT  KESLER  HATCH  CLAASSEN

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [26]

     ----------

VI:  Oki(  ;"FFC  ~asic.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 27

     ----------

0i) 4 lass af 19o1  OFFICERS  FIRST QUARTER  Eva Bond .................. .
. President  Muriel Young . . . . . . ..... . Vice-President  Lorraine
Winters . ..... . . . . Secretary-Treasurer  SECOND QUARTER  Ira Loree . .
............ . . . President  Paul Culver . . . . . . ........ ..
Vice-President  Muriel Young . . .............. Secretary  Arthur E.
Bowsher . ......... .. . Treasurer  THIRD QUARTER  Arthur E. Bowsher . .
.......... President  Francis Smith . . ....... . . Vice-President  Pauline
Noll .. .............. Secretary  Tom Harrison .......... . . . . .
Treasurer  JUNIOR CLASS SUMMARY  At this closing time of the year, when our
sojourn as Juniors is almost  over, it seems rather difficult to summarize
the many activities of our  class. As we look back over the path we have
trod, we think with sorrow  that our Junior days will be no more.  Many
jolly mixers, where the spirit of good-fellowship held sway,  helped us in
becoming acquainted, and in binding us together in unvidided  loyalty to
the Class of 1921. The art of the Juniors to enjoy a good time is
unsurpassed and the memory of these jollifications will be with us  always.
 Clubs and societies rejoiced to find in our midst such talent and wisdom. 
Without us their former reputations could never have  been upheld.  In
athletics we have shown our capability and willingness to play the  game,
as well as to give the " peppy" support that means so much to every  team.
Our girls showed their efficiency by their victory over the mighty  Seniors
in the Kline Cup series. The majority of the members of the  school teams,
needless to say, were chosen from the Class of 1921.  Dramatics also held a
high place among us. Our class play, "The  Scarecrow," will long be
remembered by those who saw it. The beauty  of the play and the talent of
the players made that finished production  one of our most treasured
memories. The success of the year is due to a very large extent to the
unceasing  work, and true interest of our class advisors, and to them we
are deeply  grateful.  " In closing, "when distance lends enchantment to
the view," and fond  memory brings to our minds the many helpful and joyful
things that  happened during our dear Junior days, may we show by our deeds
and  lives our appreciation for all that we have gained, and, as Tiny Tim
said,  "God bless us everyone!"  - BERNICE DAY.  Twenty-seven

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 28

     ----------

FRAYER  'p4  ~A gt;  )  VI,  V.  0le runior's 3arIell  We needs must ponder
ere we journey forth  With joyous hopes, each on his separate way,  A
little on those things we leave behind,  Which came to mean so much in our
brief stay.  The new-made friends from whom we now must part,  The hills we
climbed, the  vales we wandered through  Those things which helped enrich
and shape our lives  Are ours eternally, though we must bid old scenes
adieu.  Twenty-eight  TEFPARATIOU  PLIIMOEE ),  13

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 29

     ----------

In the early days of September a crowd of expectant looking persons 
assembled from the four corners of the earth, waited their turn patiently 
in Professor Bever's office. Some felt more at home than others, as they 
were Juniors the year before, others having done some work in other
insti-tutions,  and still others, in fact the majority, were returning
after several  years of experience in the teaching profession. This is the 
secret of the  patience shown as they waited their turn in the line,
standing first upon  one foot and then upon the other.  The following
officers were elected for the first quarter:  Pearl Nesson . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . .  . President  Helen Robertsen .. . .. ...... . Vice-President
 Ethel Burkland .. ............. . Secretary  Mary Lee.. . ............. .
Treasurer  SECOND QUARTER OFFICERS  Stella Lowry ....... ......... .
President Regina Frank . ..... ..... Vice-President  Mildred Murry
............ . . Secretary  Beverly Hatch . . ............ Treasurer  THIRD
QUARTER OFFICERS  Carl Irish ................ . President  Margaret Xitco .
............ Vice-President  Muriel Lee ................. . Secretary 
Agnes Pettigrew . . . ... .... .. . Treasurer  The opening days of school
were indeed busy ones and several social  functions did much toward making
the students happy. The first Senior  mixer was enjoyed during the last
days of October. Did we have a good time! Anyone who made their entrance
into the gymnasium by sliding  down the " chutes " and joined in all the
contests and games with zest will  say we spent an enjoyable evening.  The
Senior Class did their part toward bidding their brothers and  sisters, the
November and March graduates, a fond adieu. A delightful  banquet was given
in honor of the March graduates at the Pheasant Tea  Room and Dr. Nash most
delightfully entertained them as well.  The seventeenth of April was the
date of the famous Chuckanut  Marathon in which a large per cent of the
school participated. Competi-tion  was strong between the classes for the
winning of the prize, the  Herald cup, but the spirit in which the students
responded was whole-hearted  and joyous.  Among the whirl of events that
occupied our last days together was  the " Senior Sneak." Yes, it was a
real sneak! All cares were put aside.  Such worries that especially appear
during the " last days " were absolutely  forgotten. Eats were plenty,
spirits were high, studies were forgotten.  You know the rest!  We
sincerely appreciate the hearty co-operation of our class advisors,  Mr.
Bever and Dr. Miller, and now I suppose we must bid our dear B. S.  N. S. a
long farewell. Although it is farewell, still memory will always bring  us
back to her.  - ANAIDE MAE MYERS.  Twenty- nine

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 30

     ----------

#rnior Cass rop pry  Mildred Murray - Margaret Xitco is still in  the
profession. Now at Columbia.  ;o Hazel Peterson - Anne Adams is studying 
music in New York. She made old B. S. N. S.  a visit while on her last tour
of the West.  Edith Kesler--You ask for a list of Elwyn  Bugge's latest
plays. Here are six of them:  "Blue Roses," "Midnight at Noon," " The Flea 
Who Loved an Elephant," "The Horrible Joy,"  "The Stationary Comet" and
"Reaching Down 9 " from the Bottom."  Ethel Burklund - Could I advise you
as to  which would make the better husband, a garage  man or a floor
walker? What, not married yet?  I-/. . No,  I'm sorry. I can't.  Gertrude
Dupuis - You can get the Columbia record of Mme. Peronteau's recitation
entitled "To a Man Who Journeyed Afar."  Ann Bennett--No, Effie Mann and
Rhoda Hubbard are not jealous of each other.  Why should they be? They each
have a husband.  Harry Bartruff- -No, indeed, never let a woman have the
key to your heart; there's  more fun letting her pick the lock - at last!!!
 Russel MacPherson - Yes, Ethel Brown is teaching in South America. What's
the  matter, Mac; did your bubbles  fade and die?  Estelle Burnside - No, I
have searched the country over and not yet have I found a  man with
"parallel" eyebrows. I'm afraid, Estelle, you will have to change your
tastes.  Helen Robinson - Beverly Hatch is now making her last serial, "
Happy Though Mar-ried,"  under the direction of her director-husband, Carl
Irish.  Regina Frank - Yes, Gertrude Sears found the good-natured man at
last. Anaide Myers - Nellie Gutcher is teaching school. Guess she's still
waiting for  " Bobby."  Bessie De Graff - Surely, I can tell you where
Stella Lowry is. She and her husband,  who is a New York banker, are
spending their summer at their Long Island summer home.  Carl Sangster -
Stanley Freeman and Hilda Matson Freeman are making a movie  series with
Ruth Watrus playing heavy.  Irma Conn -You ask about Agnes Wentjar and Eva
Horback. Miss Wentjar is now  starring in "Left Alone" and "Eve" has
retired from the profession and is happily wed.  Lula Foster -It does seem
hard to believe, but it is true that Oza Myers  is now on  the faculty at
B. S. N. S.  Grace Dancer (1925) -Yes, Ellwood Davis is still a bachelor.
No use, "Gracie," only  Physical Ed. girls need apply.  Muriel Lee - Well,
I certainly can't answer such questions as, "Is Kenneth Selby  divorced? " 
Gladys Jensen- Yes, Mrs. Carpenter's life work has been and will be
illustrated lecture  courses on "Look Before You Leap."  Olga Kuehl - As to
Clyde. Bancroft's whereabouts. You remember he was wounded  three times in
the Meuse-Argonne offensive (consult your anatomy dictionary) and now he 
has joined the Bull's Eye Film Co.  Francis John- What, Francis, still an
old maid? You want to know what I believe  about equality between man and
woman. "I do not talk of equality between a cabbage and  a rose."  Grace
Green - Harold Marshall is now at Washington debating the nation-wide
anti-grape  juice question.  Lyla Robin - " Dr." Warrick is now studying :n
Vienna. His former practice has  been at Ferndale.  - M. A. P. '20. 
Thirty

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 31

     ----------

miniar Vass Witl W E, the 1920 Senior Class, the best class that ever
graduated from  the Bellingham State Normal, of the County of Whatcom, in
the  State of Washington, United States of America, being of  a firm 
understanding and disposing memory, and on the verge of leaving this 
sphere, do make and publish this, our last will and testament, thereby 
declaring null and void all wills made by us at any other time, to-wit: 
ARTICLE I.  To our Alma Mater we bequeathe our best wishes for her success
in  continuing  to do as much for others as she has done for us.  ARTICLE
II.  To our president, Dr. Nash, we bequeathe:  SEC. 1. Our deep gratitude
for the help he has given us, both directly  and indirectly.  SEC. 2. A
copyright to his invention of a convenient yet hasty method  of adjusting
eyeglasses.  ARTICLE III. To the Faculty we bequeathe:  SEC. 1. The
knowledge of the high esteem by which they are held by  all of us.  SEC. 2.
A new class of students on whom they may pass their idio-cyncrasies  as to
the management of schools, and the like.  ARTICLE IV.  To the supervisors
in the Training Department we bequeathe:  SEC. 1. The privilege of taking a
holiday now and then.  SEC. 2. Many sleepless nights to be  used in
dreaming of new con-trivances  by which they might take the joy out of the
lives of unsophisti- cated  teachers.  SEC. 3. The children of the Training
Department, hoping they know  as much now as they did before we were
amongst them.  ARTICLE V.  To the 1921 Seniors, whom we know will be
foolish enough to accept  them, we bequeathe:  SEC. 1. All our claims to
the deeper pedagogical literature. SEC. 2. Our seats in the front of the
assembly, so that they, by a  closer view of the faculty, may see
themselves as they will be seen in their  future life.  SEC. 3. The use of
room number two hundred and twenty, on the  second floor and fourth
Wednesday of every month, providing:  First--That those Seniors all present
themselves in some way or  other at the meetings.  Second--That they help
keep the school democratic by each one's  expressing himself, even if he
hasn't anything to say.  SEC. 4. Our great prestige in every branch of the
school, providing  it is not relied upon entirely, for securing a " pass "
on the credit slip.  Thirty-one

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 32

     ----------

ARTICLE VI.  To the Juniors we bequeathe:  SEc. 1. The entire course of
study, which shall at first seem annoying,  but which shall gain admiration
as the end of the school year approaches.  SEc. 2. The use of all the books
in the library for vrhich an interest  may be cultivated if absolutely
necessary.  ARTICLE VII.  Of special bequest we make the following:  SEc.
1. To Miss Earhart, a medal for her patience with practice  teachers. This
medal shall bear the names of all who did not suffer  sudden chills or
experience a feeling of "I wish I were home," on the  occasion of their
first teaching.  SEC. 2. To Mr. Bever, a machine into which blank programs
may be  inserted and returned, ready for his signature, thus freeing him
from any  conflicts.  SEC. 3. To Dr. Miller, our Marshall to be used in
child study.  SEC. 4. To Mr. Kibbe, a set of scales to be used in finding
the avoir-dupois  of prospective pedagogues, so that a record of their
weight before  and after teaching may be kept, and a good measure for
finding the exact  amount of cranial expanse of each.  SEC. 5. To the Dean
of Women, our own diaries, which shall be  printed in books to be used as
texts to guide the younger generations in  what to accept and what to
reject in their daily lives.  SEC. 6. To Mrs. Thatcher, our thanks for
having given us a chance  to sing to the Faculty on assembly mornings. 
SEC. 7. To Miss Boring, a class that is punctual at 8 o'clock in the 
morning, accustomed to yards and yards of notes, and willing to believe  in
the doctrine of " The survival of the fittest."  SEC. 8. To Miss Wilson,
twenty assistants to work in the library  during the time she is
introducing and explaining her wares to new students.  These assistants
shall portray a beaming countenance on finding encyclo-pedias  in the
periodical room or the books in general re-arranged by the studious ones. 
SEc. 9. To Miss Baker, a class to be instructed on how to bend little 
twigs.  SEC. 10. To  Miss Gragg, the push, pull movement, which shall be
used  both in and outside of penmanship class. SEc. 11. To Mr. Caskey, the
promise of a phonograph for use in  beginners' typewriting classes,
providing  the students are instructed that  its purpose is to guide only
the fingers to rhythm - the feet must remain  flat on the floor.  SEC. 12.
To the English Department, our surplus knowledge of the  English language
which shall be used as reference material when per-plexing  problems arise.
 SEC. 13. To Miss Druse, her choice between an elevator and a tele-phone 
unless the price of shoe leather takes a sudden fall. Thirty-two

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 33

     ----------

SEC. 14. To Mr. Bond, all our triangular affairs which he shall make  into
"obsolete " angles.  SEC. 15. To  Dr. Herre, all stray animals to be used
in physiology  classes for the purpose of chilling the blood of the
delicate.  SEC. 16. To Mr. Hunt, more students to be taught why the moon
was  not given to their keeping, and more globes so that they may learn
just  what makes the world go round.  SEC. 17. To Miss Beardsley, our
slanguage which shall be the basis  of a new language to be used in
emergency cases.  SEC. 18. To Mr. Hoppe, the satisfaction that we are all
eloquent  speakers.  SEC. 19. To Mr. Philippi, the pictures of our benign
physiognomies  to be shown on the screen in assemblies in a reel entitled "
The Origin of  the Comic Section."  ARTICLE VIII.  We, the Senior Class of
May, 1920, do nominate and appoint Notary  F. L. Oslager, of the Bellingham
State Normal, City of Bellingham, County of Whatcom, State of Washington,
United States of America, as sole  executor of this, our last will and
testament.  ARTICLE IX.  In witness whereof, we have hereby signed, sealed,
published, and  declared this instrument as our last will and testament, at
the Washington  State Normal School, at four o'clock, on this twenty-sixth
day of May,  nineteen hundred and twenty.  Signed and sealed.  -SENIOR
CLASS OF MAY, 1920.  ARTICLE X.  Signed and sealed, and declared to be the
last will and testament by  the testator, Class of 1920, in the presence of
me, who at their request and  in their presence, and in the presence of
each other, have hereunto set  my name as witness to the execution of their
last will and testament, on  this twenty-sixth day of May, nineteen hundred
and twenty.  Signed, F. L. OLSLAGER, Notary.  Thirty-three

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 34

     ----------

Mrs. May Wilson Aldrich  Mary Alexander . . .... . Everett  Graduate
Everett High School (1918); Snohomish  County Club.  Marie Andresen . .
Vancouver, Wash.  Graduate Vancouver High School; Philomathean;  Sage Brush
Club; Y. W. C. A.  Hannah S. Anderson ... .. Sumner  Graduate of Adelphia
College, Seattle; Rural Life  Club; Y. W. C. A.; Choral Club; "Mikado";
"The  Prodigal Son."  Mlae Anderson  Margaret Anderson  Edith May Atkins 
Philomathean.  Clyde A. Bancroft  . . Standard, Alberta   . . . . Port
Hadlock  .Bellingham  . . . . . . Seattle  Graduate of Franklin High School
(1916); Vice- President of Rural Life Club; Des Moines Delegate;  Seattle
Club; Sage Brush Club.  Harry Bartruff .. . .... Ferndale  Graduate of
Ferndale High School; entered Nor-mal  1917; Rural Life Club; Alaska Club;
Basket-ball  (Captain); Baseball.  Cecil Bolender . . . . . . . Olympia 
Graduate Olympia High School; Y. W. C. A.;  Ohivesa Literary Society. 
Thirty-four  8--I1-m~ik~  .. Bellingham

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 35

     ----------

Eunice May Bonham .... . Hoquiami  Illinois Club; Teacher in Rural Schools.
 Ellen Bergstrom . . ... . Du Pont  Graduate Lincoln High School, Tacoma;
Ohiyesa;  Tacoma Club; Choral Club; Y. W. C. A. Florence Boucher . . ...
Bellinghamn  Alkisiah; Illinois Club.  Mrs. Ethel Bridge ..... Bellingham 
Ethel Beatrice Brown . . Walla Walla  Whitman College, Walla, Walla, Wash.;
Ohiyesa;  Sage Brush; Oratorio "The Prodigal Son"; Y. W.  C. A.  Elwyn B.
Bugge . ... . . Bellinghamn  Principia Academy, St. Louis; Graduate of
Nor-mal  High School (1917); Normal Orchestra; Philo-mathean;  Junior Class
President; Editor-in-Chief of  Messenger; President of Students'
Association;  Junior Play "Mice and Men" (1919); Oratorio  "The Prodigal
Son"; Editor-in-Chief of 1920  Klipsun; Senior Play, "The Saving Grace." 
Ethel H. E. Burkland . . . Meadowdale  Graduate of Edmonds High School;
entered B.  S. N. S. September, 1915; re-entered September,  1919; Alkisiah
Reporter; Sage Brush Club; Choral  Club; Senior Secretary; Klipsun Staff;
Y. W. C.  A.  Mrs. Fay Jackson Burnett . Bellingham  Graduate of Normal
High School. Estelle Burnside . Bellingham  Vice-President Students'
Association; Messenger  Staff; Editor-in-Chief of Senior Messenger;
Busi-ness  Girls' League; Philomathean President; Chair-man  of Klipsun
Committee.  Selma Carlson . . .. . . Lake Cresent  Graduate of Port Angeles
High School; Y. W.  C. A.  'hirty-five

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 36

     ----------

Margaret Carman . ..... Nooksack  Rural Life Club.  Ruth L. Claassen .
Vancouver, Wash.  Graduate of Vancouver High School; Vice Presi-dent  of
Studio Art Club in 1919, and President in  1920; Studio Art Reporter for
Klipsun; President  of Edens Hall; Klipsun Staff.  Edna Dalziel . ... . .
Brush Prairie  Grace Dancer .... ... Bellingham  Elwood C. Davis .. . . .
Anacortes  Graduate of Anacortes High School (1914); at-tended  B. S. N. S.
1916-1917; Football (1917); Bas-ketball;  Thespian; President of Men's
Organiza- tion;  Athletic Editor of Klipsun.  Betty I. DeGraff . . . .
Alpena, Mich.  Onaway High School; Cheney State  Normal  School; Oratorio
"The Prodigal Son"; Sage Brush  Club; Aletheian; Y. W. C. A.  Gertrude
Dupuis  .. ... . Bellingham  Helen Edwards . . .... . Tacoma  Graduated
from Stadium High in 1915; attended  B. S. N. S. summer session of 1917;
re-entered in  September, 1919; Tacoma Club.  Flora Elder ........ Enumclaw
 Graduate of Skykomish High School; Alkisiah.  Anna M. Ericson . . . . . ..
. Seattle  Graduate  Ballard High School, Seattle; Messen-ger  Staff. 
Thirty-six  I~s~fljji~b~~

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 37

     ----------

Gladys L. Erickson . . Rochester, Wash.  Graduate of Centralia High School
(1915); Alki-siah.  Hazel Elizabeth Evans . .. Bellingham.  Alkisiah;
Catholic Girls' Club; Basketball Team.  Lulu Foster . . . Junction City,
Ore.  Graduate of Washburne High School; Oregon  State Normal; Oregon Club
President; Aletheian;  Sage Brush Club; Y. W. C. A.; Young Housekeep-ers' 
Club; Senior Basketball Team.  Regina  Frank . . . . . . . Bellingham 
Graduate of Whatcom High School; Philoma-thean;  President Catholic Girls'
Club; P. E. Club;  Basketball.  Mrs. Stanley P. Freeman . . Ferndale 
Graduate of Ferndale High School (1913); at-tended  U. of W. (1914);
Alkisiah; Sage Brush  Club; Business Girls' Club; Young Housekeepers' 
Club; Business Manager of Normal Cafeteria.  Stanley Prentice Freeman
Ferndale Graduate Ferndale High School (1913); Presi-dent  Rural Life Club;
Editor-in-Chief of Messenger  1917 Summer Term; Business Manager of 1920 
Klipsun; attended C. P. S. (1917).  Clara Gordon . . . . ... . Yakimna 
Graduate Chicago Training School; President of  Aletheian Club; Secretary
Illinois Club; Sage Brush Club; Y. W. C. A.; Secretary and Treasurer  March
Graduating Class.  Mina Maud Graham . Pt. Peninsula, N. Y.  Grace Geraldine
Green .. . Walla Walla  Attended B. S. N. S. 1915-1916; Choral Club,
"Messiah"; "Mikado "; re-entered 1919; Alkisiah;  Vice-President Choral
Club and Klipsun Reporter; Oratorio " The Prodigal Son"; " Feast of the
Lit-tle  Lanterns"; Sage Brush Club.  Nettie Gutcher . . . . . . . . Lyle 
Graduate Whatcom High School; Philomathean.  Thirty-seven

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 38

     ----------

Sylvia Anna Hardman . Portland, Ore.  Graduate of the Oregon Agricultural
College, B.  S.; Portland Business College; Aletheian; Oregon  Club;
Business Girls' League.  Mable Hardy . Forest  Mrs. B. M. Hartt . .... Port
Angeles  Beverly Hatch . . ... Castle Rock  Thespian Reporter; Klipsun
Staff; Senior Class  Treasurer; Lewis-Cowlitz County Club; Choral  Club; Y.
W. C. A.  Helen Hawk . ..... Portland, Ore. Lincoln High School; Oregon
Agricultural Col-lege;  Aletheian; Alkisiah; Oregon Club.  Layra B. Haynes
Bellingham  Grdauate B. S. N. S. July, 1920; Physical educa-tion  Course;
Major Girls' Club; Sage Brush Club.  Olga Heggem .. ... . . . Bothell 
Graduate Broadway High School, Seattle; Presi-dent  Sage Brush Club;
Vice-President Rural Life  Club; Y. W. C. A.; Senior Baseball Team; Klipsun
 Staff.  Evelyn Grace Henderson . .. . Seattle  Graduate of Lincoln High
School, Seattle (1917);  entered B. S. N. S. from the University of
Wash-ington  September, 1919; Alkisiah; Tacoma Club.  Helen Higley ........
Hoquiam Hoquiam High School (1916); Alkisiah.  Anna Burch Hixson ....
Skamokawa  Graduate of Astoria High School, Oregon; Lewis-  Cowlitz County
Club; Choral Club; Oratorio "The  Prodigal Son."  Thbrty-eiqht

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 39

     ----------

Alice Margaret Hoover . . Walla Walla  Aletheian Treasurer; Sage Brush
Club.  Rhoda Hubbard . . . Mount  Vernon  Graduate of La Conner High
(1917); Alkisiah  Club; Choral Club; Skagit County Club.  Dora Huelsdonk .
. . . . Spruce  Rural Life Club; Y. W. C. A.  Faith E. Huggett . ......
Olympia  Primary Course;  Ohiyesa; Choral Club; Vice-  President of Y. W.
C. A.  Carl L. Irish . . . . . . Bellingham  Graduate of Whatcomi High
School; entered B. r  S. N. S. 1915; re-entered 1919; Thespian; Sage  Brush
Club; Senior  Class President.  Gladys Lorine Jensen . .. Fargo, N. D. 
Graduate Fargo High School; Alkisiah. Frances M. Johns . .... Bellingham 
Graduate Whatcom High School; Alkisiah Club.  Ina V Johnson . . . .
Heppner, Ore.  Graduate of Heppner High School; Thespian Club  Artist;
Secretary of Oregon Club; President of  Busiess Girls' League.  Ruth
Florence Johnson . . . Poulsbo  Graduate Queen Anne High School, Seattle; 
Choral Club; Rural Life Club; "Mikado "; Ora-torio  " The Prodigal Son." 
Clara Kallander ... . . . Nooksack  Rural Life Club.  Thirty-nine

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 40

     ----------

Edith Kesler . . .. . . Edgeley, N. D.  Graduate Edgeley High School;
Northern Nor-mal,  Aberdeen, South Dakota; Alkisiah Club; Ora-torio  "The
Prodigal Son "; Klipsun Staff; Dele-gate  to Student Volunteer Convention;
Y. W. C. A.  Rosa M. Kiser ... . . . Washougal  Olga Kuehl . . . . . . . .
Seattle  Entered from Broadway High School September,  1915; attended
Summer School 1917; re-entered Sep-tember,  1919; Choral Club; Oratorio
"The Prodi-gal  Son"; Alkisiah; Seattle Club.  Gladys Lambert . . . . . .
Bellingham Graduate of Whatcom High School.  Mary Vivian Lee . ... . . .
Seattle  Graduate Franklin High School; Y. W. C. A.;  Sister's League;
Seattle Club; Ohiyesa; Treasurer  Senior Class; Student Council.  Muriel E.
Lee . . . . . .. Davenport  Davenport High School (1917); Alkisiah
Presi-dent;  Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Student Board of Con-trol;  Klipsun
Committee; Associate Editor of  Klipsun; Senior Class Secretary;
Commencement  Speaker.  Ethol I. Lewis . . . . . . . . Randle  Studio Art
Club; Choral Club; Y. W. C. A.; Lewis-Cowlitz County Club; Oratorio "The
Prodi-gal  Son."  Marion Lindell ...... Bellingham  Oakesdale, Wash., High
School; Cheney Normal;  Alkisiah; Sage Brush Club.  Leta Ann Lipp ......
.Bay View Graduate of Burlington High School; entered  Normal 1916; Choral
Club; Everett Club.  Evelyn Little . ........ Tacoma  Forty

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 41

     ----------

Stella M. Lowry ...... . Chehalis  Graduate Chehalis High School; Rural
Life  Club; Sage Brush Club; President Senior Class;  President Rural Life
Club; Klipsun Staff.  Chlora T. Lucas . . . . ... Chelan Graduate of Chelan
High School; Rural Life  Club; Sage Brush Club.  Russell Cambell Macpherson
. Denver, Col,  Colorado State Teachers' College; Basketball;  Baseball;
Track; Men's Association.  Effle Blanche Madson . Great Falls, Mont.  Y. W.
C. A.; Choral Club; Sage Brush Club;  Business Girls' League.  Marie
McCadden . . . . . Bellingham  May Ross McMillan . . . . . Seattle 
Graduate Calumet High School, Calumet, Mich.,  (1917); President of
Aletheians; Y. W. C. A.; Ora-torio  "The Prodigal Son"; Seattle Club. 
Effie Mae Mann . . . . Mount Vernon  Graduate of Mount Vernon High School
(1915);  attended B. S. N. S. 1915-1916; re-entered 1919;  Alkisiah;
Seattle Club.  Eva Lucille Main . . . . . Port Angeles  Graduate of Port
Angeles High School (1916);  entered B. S. N. S. 1917.  Louis Morgenthaler
. .  .. Bellingham  Florence Janet Morrison .. Bellingham  Forty-one

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 42

     ----------

Anaide Mae Myers . . . . . . Hillyard  Graduate Hillyard High School;
Thespian Club;  Sage Brush Club; Senior Basketball Team; Choral  Club;
attended Cheney Normal one year.  Loda Helen Mullen . . . . . Tacoma 
President Tacoma Club; Vice President Choral  Club; Oratorio "The Prodigal
Son"; Catholic Girls'  Club.  Mildred Murray . . Sandpoint, Idaho  Graduate
of Sandpoint High School (1917); at-tended Lewiston State Normal School one
year;  P. E. Girls' Club; Sage Brush Club; Ohiyesa Presi-dent; Secretary of
Senior Class.  Oza B. Myers ..... Prineville, Ore.  Graduate of Crook
County High School; Presi-dent  of Alkisiah Club; Secretary of Choral Club;
 Student Council.  Esther M. Nelson . . . . . . Custer  Graduate of
Ferndale High School; Y. W. C. A.;  Rural Life Club; Des Moines Delegate;
Students'   Volunteer Band; Choral Club; Oratorio "The  Prodigal Son." 
Myrta Noon . . . . . .  Ruth E. Nyberg . . . . .   Sage Brush Club. 
Roswell Oliver  Philomathean President.  Mavie Olson  Hoquiam High School
(1914);  W. Ella Pallas .  Bellingham  . . . Camas  Bellingham  Hoquiam 
Alkisiah.  .M.ukilteo  Ohiyesa; Choral Club; President of Everett Club; 
Oratorio " The Prodigal Son."  Forty-two

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 43

     ----------

Sarah M. Parr . ... . . Laurel, Ore.  Choral Club; Oregon Club; Y. W. C. A.
Cabinet.  Hazel Peronteau ......  Bellingham  Graduate of Assumption
School; Aletheian Club;  Catholic Girls' Club; Choral Club.  Hazel L. 
Peterson . . . . . Wenatchee  Aletheian Treasurer; Y. W. C. A.; Sage Brush 
Club.  Margaret Agnes Pettigrew . Silver Lake  Graduate of Castle Rock High
School; Alkisiah;  Lewis-Cowlitz County Club; Choral Club; Senior  Class
Prophecy.  Corrine Maude Ranford . . . Ridgefield  Graduate of Vancouver,
Wash., High School; Ale-theian;  Sage Brush Club; Y. W. C. A.; Young 
Housekeepers' Club.  Lulu F. Rau . ... .. ... Seattle  Rural Life Club; Y.
W. C. A.  Lyla J. Robin ....... Bellingham  Graduate Whatcom High School
(1918); Lewis-  Cowlitz County Club; Oregon Club; Vice-President  Rural
Life Club; Senior Basketball Team.  Helen Robertson . . .. . . Grandview 
Graduate Grandview High School; Thespian; Sage Brush Club; Vice-President
Senior Class.  Mae Isabel Robinson ... . . . Yelmn  Attended Yelm High 
School two years; Seattle  Seminary (1913-1914); Charter Member of
Alethe-ian  Society; Choral Club (1915); Y. W. C. A.;  Oratorios " The
Messiah " and " The Prodigal Son."  Frankie L. Roe . . . . Koshkonong, Mo. 
Graduate Koshkonong High School; Rural Life  Club; Y. WV. C. A.;
Association News and Klipsun  Reporter; Business Girls' League; Young
House-keepers'  Club.  FVorty-t ree

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 44

     ----------

Ruth L. Rostedt . . . . Tacoma  Graduate of Lincoln High School, Tacoma;
Choral  Club; Secretary and Treasurer of Ohiyesa; Society  Editor of Senior
Messenger.  Sophia L. Ruzicka . . Vancouver, Wash. Graduate of Vancouver
High School; entered  B. S. N. S. 1916; re-entered 1919; Y. W. C. A.  Helen
A. Sargent . ... . . Cle Elum  Graduate Cle Elum High School; President
Stu-dio  Art Club; Sage Brush Club.   Floetta Schmitt . .... . Blanchard 
Graduate Edison Union High School; Y. W. C.  A.; Aletheian.  Alta Vista
Sears . ..... Arthur, Ill.  Graduate of Arthur High School; Ohiyesa;
Illi-nois  Club; Lewis-Cowlitz County Club; Oratorio  "The Prodigal Son." 
Gertrude Sears .. ... . Danville, Ill.  Graduate of Arthur, Ill., High
School; one Sum-mer  Term at University of California; Aletheian  Reporter;
President Lewis-Cowlitz County Club;  President Illinois Club; Chairman of
March Gradu-ating  Class; Choral Club; Oratorio " The Prodigal  Son." 
Kenneth E. Selby ... . . Bellingham  Normal Training School; Graduate of
Normal  High School; President of Junior Class; Junior  Play "Mice and Men"
(1919); Philomathean;  Alaska Club; Men's Organization; Business Manager 
Weekly Messenger; Klipsun Staff; Klipsun Com-mittee;  Senior Play "The
Saving Grace"; Com-mencement  Speaker.  Lela B. Senska ... . .. BellinghamI
 Margaret J. Shannon . . . . Anacortes  Graduate of Anacortes High School
(1918); en-tered  B. S. N. S. September, 1918; Ohiyesa; Y. W.  C. A.
Cabinet Member.  Lola Eve Shepherd . . . . . . Seattle  Graduate of
Franklin High School (1919); Sec-retary  of Alkisiah Club.  Forty-four

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 45

     ----------

Alice Sherwood ........ Everett  Graduate of Everett High School; Rural
Life  Club.  Lottie Smith . . . . . . . . Newport  Graduate of Newport High
School; Sage Brush  Club.  Mary M. Soper ..... . . Arlington Graduate of
Arlington High School; Rural Life  Club; Everett Club; Sage Brush Club; Y.
W. C.  A.; Senior Basketball Team.  Barbara Steele ... . . Sedro-Woolley 
Ohiyesa Literary Society.  Florence E. Townsend  .. . . Olympia  Graduate
of Olympia High School (1917); Ale-theian;  Vice-President Senior Class;
Vice- Presi-dent  Y. W. C. A.; Secretary of Aletheians.  Virginia J.
Vandermast . . Ridgefield  Business Girls' Club.  Hilda Van Liew ......
Bellingham  Graduate of Normal High School (1917); Choral  Club; Senior
Play.  Ruth Watrous . ....... Tacoma  Graduate of Stadium High School;
Rural Life;  Choral Club; Treasurer of Tacoma Club; Business  Girls'
League.  Grace Waite ... . . . Bellingham  Graduate of Whatcom High School;
Sage Brush  Club.  Henrietta M. Welch . ... . . Bothell  Graduate of
Pacific Academy, Newberg, Oregon;  Philomathean; Choral Club; Klipsun
Staff; Young  Housekeepers.  Forty-five

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 46

     ----------

Carrie Whittier . . . . . . . Seattle  Queen Anne High School, Seattle;
Philomathean  Literary Society; Klipsun Staff.  Evelyn Whittier ..... ..
Seattle  Broadway High School, Seattle; Critic Philoma-thean Literary
Society; Seattle Club.  Elsie Wilsted . .... . Bryn Mawr  Graduate of
Franklin High School, Seattle  (1916);  entered B. S. N. S. September,
1916; re-entered  December 1, 1919; Secretary of Rural Life Club;  Normal
Basketball Team; Choral Club; Oratorio  " The Prodigal Son."  Vera A.
Winchester . Everett   Graduate of Everett High School; entered B. S.  N.
S. 1917; re-entered April, 1919; President of  Everett Club; Rural Life
Club; Senior Indoor  Baseball Team; Basketball.  Noel Hugh Wynne ......
Ferndale Graduate of Ferndale High School; Philoma-thean;  Junior Play
"Mice and Men" (1919); Stu-dent  Council;  Board of Control; Klipsun Staff.
 Margaret C. Xitco .. .. . Bellingham  Graduate of Fairhaven High School
(1918); Philo-mathean;  Tacoma Club; Catholic Girls' Club; Klip-sun 
Committee; Klipsun Staff; Manager of Junior  Basketball Team; Captain of
Senior Basketball  Team.  Lillian Bourke. . . . . . . . . Bellingham
Thespian; Oratorio "The Prodigal Son."  Frieda Norma Brett . . . . . . . .
. Auburn  Graduate of Appleton High School, Appleton, Wisconsin; Graduate
of  American College of Physical Education, Chicago, Illinois; Member of Y.
 W. C. A.  Maude Elliott . ........ . Seattle  Graduate of Lincoln High
School; Intermediate Course; Klipsun Staff.  Namanee Sherwood . . . . . . .
. . Everett  Graduate of Everett High School; Chicago Evangelistic
Institute, one  year; Everett Club; Illinois Club; Business Girls' League;
Student Volun-teers;  President of Y. W. C. A.  Aleta Swayne . . . . . . .
. . . . Chehalis  Rural Life Club; Y. W. C. A.  Forty-six

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 47

     ----------

Ruth Thurman . . . . . . . . . Burlington  Graduate of Burlington High
School (1917); Ohiyesa; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet Member.  Loucygne Wilcutt .  Y.
W. C. A. Cabinet.  Helen Mary Wilson . . . . . . . . . Ferndale Serina
Anderson . . . . . . . . Emmons, Minn.  Eva Mae Baltuff . . . . . . . . . .
Seattle  Anne Bergstrom . . . . . . . . . Bellingham  Lillian Bourke . . .
. . . . . . Bellingham  Frieda Brett . . . . . . . Auburn  Mrs. Bess
Carpenter . . . . . . . . Bellingham  Mrs. Ruth Craw . . . . . . .
Vancouver  Olah Cresap . . . . . . . . . . Potlatch  Mrs. Clara Christensen
. . . . . . . . Dewey  Irma Coon . . . . . . . . . . Portland, Ore.  Anna
Davis .  . . . . . . . . Lake Burien  Mrs. Rose McVay Davis . . . . .
Williams, Minn.  Geraldine Drake . . . . . . . . Wenatchee  Maude Elliot .
. . . . . . . . Seattle  Laura Flood . . . . . . . . Walla Walla  Mary
Fullerton . . . . .  . . . Coupeville  Margaret Hannah . . . . . . .. . .
Renton  Catherine Harris . . . . . . . . Everett  Margaret Jones . . . . .
. . . . . Seattle  Matilda Kahout . . . . . . . . Goldendale  Elvey
Lovegren . . . . . . . . . Centerville  Bess McGuire . . . . . . . A
berdeen  Carrie Morrow . . . . . . . Bellingham  Elizabeth Owens (Mrs.) . .
. . . . B. ellingham  Elizabeth Quillen . . . . . . . Greenville, S. C. 
Gladys Roach . . . . . . . . . . Bay Center  Namanee Sherwood . . . . . . .
. . Everett  Frances Spotts . . . . . . . . . . Langley  Vera Stolts
Prescott  Beth Stuart . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle  Aleta Swayne . . . . .
. . . . . Chehalis  Mrs. Thompson . . . .  . . . . . Port Orchard  Mrs.
Janet Thompson  Ruth Thurman . . . . . . . . . . . Bow  Lewis Tromp . . . .
. . . . .  . . Lynden  Virginia Vandermast . . . . . . . . Ridgefield 
Agnes Wentjar . . . . . . . . . Astoria, Ore.  Bernice  Whitaker.
Bellingham  Frances Willard Sedro-Woolley  Ermine Wagner . . . . . . . . .
. St. John  Dora West . . . . . . . Friday Harbor  Loucygne Wilcutt . . . .
. . . . . . Blaine  Forty-seven

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 48

     ----------

I narb of (Eontrol  Harold Marshall . .............. President  Estelle
Burnside . .......... . Vice-President  Eva Bond ... ... . . . . ... . . .
Secretary  Muriel Lee .. . ...... . Student Representative  Noel Wynne . .
. . .... . . . Student Representative  Every Tuesday at 12:30 the Board of
Control convened to direct student activities. This took much time and
patience, but we have enjoyed our  work to the fullest extent.  To the
board of next year we can say that they have both pleasant  and unpleasant
experiences before them and  we leave for their use this  motto:  " Never
explain. Your friends don't need it and your enemies will not believe it." 
Forty-eight  VON

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 49

     ----------

V1!7 1N,  The Normal Book Store, owned and controlled by the Students'
Asso-ciation  and appropriately designated "The Students' Co-op," is rated
as  one of the finest and best equipped stores in the country. The store
has been in existence since 1908 and, until four years ago,  was operated
by student help. Then Mr. C. C. Baughman, a former student  of this school,
took full charge and under his capable and efficient manage-ment  its
resources have steadily increased until now its capital outlay is 
practically four  times what it was at the time he assumed the management. 
During the past year Miss Ruth Sanford, a graduate of Whatcom High  School,
of this city, has ably served as the store assistant, and her pleasant
manner and charming personality have won her the friendship of all the 
students.  The " Co-op " aims not only to supply students with the proper
equip-ment  for school and recreative life at moderate cost, but it stands
for  efficiency in its management, prompt service and courtesy to its
patrons.  Forty-nine

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 50

     ----------

HERBERT HANSEN, Editor KENNETH SELBY, Business Manager  ;4r Wekly Mnssngr 
State Normal School in 1899 and was issued only once each quarter.  It did
not at that time bear the name under which  it is now published,  "The
Weekly Messenger." In 1903 the size of the paper was slightly  increased,
and  it was then published monthly and remained a monthly  publication
until 1916 when it became a weekly publication, although its  size had
again been increased both in size of sheet and in number of pages. The
paper was very successful and has continued since that time as  " The
Weekly Messenger." During the present school year the paper has  been
published in the regular sized eight-page form with the exception of  a few
issues during the second quarter when it was temporarily reduced  to meet
the extra expense incurred by the publication of a very beautiful  magazine
issued at the Christmas season giving a  history of the institution  and
appropriate cuts of the buildings and grounds and a handsome full-page
photograph of the president of the school to whom the special issue  was
dedicated.  The Weekly Messenger is published by the Students' Association
of  the Bellingham State Normal School. A business manager is appointed  by
the Board of Control at the beginning of each year, and is paid a salary. 
The editor is appointed quarterly through the advice and recommendation  of
the censor of the paper and the endorsement of the Board of Control.  He
receives credit in English. A faculty advisor is appointed by the 
president of the school and does the work of censorship of the contributed 
material as well as the general makeup of the paper. Training in journalism
 is required for eligibility to the office of editor or staff-membership. 
Fifty

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [51]

     ----------

The Weekly Messenger  Devoted to the Interests of the Student Body,
Washington State Normal School BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, MAY 7, 1920 
OUR DEBATERS on the subject?" "Why,  on a bright day, does an  From the
very begin- iscuyn nylo okd ispnoosti tiorenf lewcti th-a  ning, this year
has been sunny disposition with-one  of the most extra- The visiting
debaters  ordinary alonn g ddeebbaatitnigg The asvtiosuitnindged deabt
atethrse  lines. In such a large were astounded at the assembly of students
great opposition that  from all over the state, was theirs, and declared 
one generally finds many that they had never be-ofore  met with ones so 
who are not interested fore met with ones so  in debates. Such is not
skilled in oratory.  the case in our school, The second debate of however,
for everyone especial importance was  zealously sought a place with the
University de-on  the team. When the haters from Hawaii. On  nn eoo tt ii
ce e ffoorr prospective occasion of the arrival prospective of the boat
from Hono-debaters  was posted on of the boat from Hono-the  bulletin
board, some luiu, school wur eariers-students  stood in line missed an hour
earlier  for more than an hour, than usual. Again the  awaiting their t u r
n t o Student Body went to  sign up. The judges on greet the outside
debat-t  he try-out committee, ers. The Normal uku-not  anticipating such a
lele orchestra headed the vast number, were forced procession. The
Hawaii-to  call the literary so- ans expressed great sur-cieties to their
aid in prise when they found  selecting debaters for our musicians could
pre-the  team. After muc h sent sweeter music than  thought an d delibera-
that heard on the islands  tion, and many repeti- in the Pacific. A
bar-tions  of the speeches, the becue was held on the  debaters were
finally campus in their honor.  chosen. The strength of Four beeves were
roast-the  team was exceptional ed, and along with other  - three being
married refreshments arranged  ladies with much ex - for by the refreshment
 perience  in argumenta- committee, a perfect  tion, and the other three
meal was given the hun-are  members of educa- gry multitude. Potatoes  tion
classes where opin- were scratched off the  ions clash regularly, menu, but
a large hand-painted  likeness of one The first debate was was displayed
near the  with the Normal of Can- tables erected for th e  dle, Alaska, the
best occasion.  normal north of Belling- The crowd  gathered In  ham.
Before the boat the auditorium to hear arrived from Alaska, a t h e debate
" Resolved, rally was held in assem- that the beach at Wai-bly.  All
students were kiki is more famous than  filled w i t  h enthusiasm
Squalicum Beach." Here  and cheered vehemently again the negative side  as
one of our speakers upheld by our team, won.  informed them that there The
last debate of the  w a s no question b u t season was international,  what
we'd win. All the and held at London. Six  peppy school songs were
aeroplanes carried o u r  sung as the students people acros sthe water. 
marched ten abreast They left here midst  through the streets of shouts and
cheers, early Bellingham, to the dock. Friday morning, and sent  The
subject for debate a cablegram b a c k to  was " Resolved, that it
Bellingham a t e Satur-is  the Sun which causes day.  the Aurora Borealis,
by Being so near the its reflections on the grounds where their hus-snow 
and ice." There bands sent back the  w e r e h o t discussions Boche, the
lady debat- throughout.  The listen- ers set sail for France  ers sat tense
with per-spiration  rolling f r o m  their foreheads. The de- FOR SALE OR
TRADE  bate might have b e e n  lost had it not been for A 1912 Ford by a 
t w o decisive questions Lady with an  asked by the negative de- Extra Tire
 haters: "If the sun causes such a great ar- We Make the Interest of  ray
by shining on the Our Depositors Our  ice, why doesn't a little Interest 
sunshine on a cold re- THE BUST'EM  quirement cast through THE BUST'EM
reflection, a little light N A T I O N A L  from England. On first ODDS AND
ENDS  arriving there, they be- gan  searching for the T h e easiest way t o
 girls who had been seen make enemies is to hire  with their husbands in
friends.  some of the pictures Beauty is only skin  they brought back from
deep, but that is enough  over there, and tried to satisfy any reasonable 
some of their elocution man.  on them. O u r faculty Marrying t h e wrong 
members who accom - girl is the one mistake  panied the team, feared you've
got to live with  that our debaters would all your life.  strain their
voices, thus Education will broad- rendering  them incap- en any mind, but
there's  able of doing their best no cure for the big head.  on their
return to Eng- Tact is the knack of  land, but our ladies soon keePing
still at the right  ceased arguing with the time.  French girls on account
When you make a mis-of  the unsatisfactory take, do not make the  answers
received. second one--keeping it  The debate at England to yourself.  took
place on Monday A man's first duty is  night. Thousands of to mind his own
busi-people  came from all ness.  over the British Isles to A man who does
big  hear these notorious de- things never has time to  haters. T h e
question, talk about them.  Resolved, that the Eng- Today is your
oppor-lish  language is more tunity, tomorrow, some-difficult  to speak
than one's else.  the slanguage," was A woman's heart is  skilfully handled
by like a stock ticker--it  both sides. Our debat- never beats over any-ers
 who were the affirm- thing except money.  ative speakers, at first  seemed
to lose ground, GENERAL SCHOOL  but as they pointed out, NEWS  the much
greater number  of people who spoke the Mr. lwood Davis  A m e r i c a n
language, a spent last Friday even-combination  of English ing paying
visits to the  and slang, headway was occupants of variious  gained. The
debate was chairs in the library. A  ours, even before the last very good
time was had  rebuttal was made. To by all but the librarian.  say the
least, the victory Mr. Kolstad very in-was  very bitterly fought
dustriously spen the  for by evveerryy,f r ssppeeaakkeerr.. l:st Saturday
in his gar-  After visiting in Eng- den, laborio-sly turning  land for a
few days, our over his beans, so that winners arrived ho me, t e sprouts
would b e  The whole town cele- erot l b  brated in their h o n o r.
uppermost. T h e t i n y  The papers all over the stelies rly
aaptpterenctiioatne. his fa- nti are publishing night the Nor- tshpeeeirc
hepsi,c tures and their al the - speeches. real students of the Bell-
ingham Normal had a  These people are daily delightful entertainment 
receiving requests f o r i th big gym. They aaututoirag raphedh e ppicit uc
tures, dini d tnhoet tbriyg tog ydma.n ce,T hbeuyt  and movpiinetgr e co
they stepped, jazzed and  panis an d Chautauqlua shimmied to their heart's 
leaders are seeking cn- content.  tracts with them. Other Stanley Freeman a
n d  opportunities st i I1 are Carl Irish spent the 10 being offered them,
but o'clock hour Tuesday at  they desire to stay with a very enjoyable game
of  the work of their choice tennis. Stolen s w e e ts - school
teaching-for are always best.  which we admire them Sam Carver tramped 
still more. a 1 of Friday morning  searching t h e building  LOST-By Erwin
Black, for a stray, loose, or un-his  power to " vamp" occupied man to
indulge  the girls. Big reward in a hearty game of  offered. checkers.  For
the Sweet Girl Graduates  DIAMOND RINGS  LINK'EMUP JEWELRY CO.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 52

     ----------

ATHLETIC SUMMARY  large school. During the past year our Normal School has 
made a very satisfactory record in that line; although one branch  of
sports did not "function" in our school this year. The  second quarter of
school found abundant material for a foot-ball  squad worthy of
representing the average college. However, it was  the second quarter
instead of the first when this material could have been  used.  In 1916,
Coach Carver was given credit for turning out the strongest  non-conference
football team in the West. With the return of many of  the men now in
school, together with the coming of others who are suit-able,  it is hoped
that he may be able next fall not only to turn out a team  able to make a
good showing with the non-conference teams, but also  that his team can be
scheduled with conference representatives.  BASEBALL SCHEDULE  Mount Vernon
. March 31, There  Mount Vernon . April 16, Here  Fairhaven .... April 20,
Here  Whatcom ..... April 24, Here  Burlington ..... May 1, There 
Bremerton .  . . . May 7, There  Whatcom ..... May 14, Here  Bremerton ....
May 21, Here  Arlington .... May 22, There   The work in girls' athletics
this year has  heen rather limited, due to the "flu" and  other unavoidable
causes. The sports par-ticipated  in have been basketball, baseball, 
tennis and swimming. We are planning to  have the hockey field fixed and
play the clos-ing  weeks of school. Although we have in- dulged  in only a
few games, credit is due to  Miss Moffat and Mr. Carver for the splendid 
spirit of co- operation and sportsmanship which  has been developed.  The
girls who have taken an active part in athletics have received the joy that
comes from  one of the best activities of school life. Every  girl should
share the opportunity offered them. CARVER  p  MOFFAT  Fifty-two

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 53

     ----------

BASKETBALL  FAIRHAVEN H. S. 8 - NORMAL 26  The basketball season opened
after two weeks of practice in our  " gymette " with a game with Fairhaven
High School. The game was very  greatly enjoyed by the spectators, for
seldom does one see a game in which  both teams pass and shoot so wildly.
The game demonstrated to us a  great need of team work and basket shooting.
 BLAINE H. S. 14 - NORMAL 26  MOUNT VERNON 8 - NORMAL 39  During the
Christmas holidays the team assembled several times  for  practice; they
also played two games during that time.  The first was a contest with
Blaine High School at Blaine and was a  victory for the Normal.  The second
game was played with the Mount Vernon American Legion  at Mount Vernon.
Here the first signs of hope for a basketball team were  raised, as great
improvement was shown, both in passing and in basket  shooting.  WHATCOM 14
- NORMAL 15 We have no alibi for not running up a larger score on the
loopers from  Whatcom. A failure " to get started " seems the only excuse,
although the  game was a spirited game and was played before a large crowd.
VANCOUVER Ex-NORMAL 26 - NORMAL 24  The fast Canadian group looped two free
throws too many.  They won  a fair game and proved themselves true
sportsmen.  WHATCOM H. S. 12- NORMAL 18  In the  second game played with
Whatcom the Normal team was beaten  according to soothsayers and prophets
even before the game was staged  or the first whistle blown. The large gym
was a handicap to our men,  after their practice on the smaller floor on
the hill. However, we secured  eight field goals to Whatcom's two and the
final score stood in favor of  the Normal.  C. P. S. 8 - NORMAL 32  The
quintet from Tacoma came up to play us in our own gym, but we  failed " to
get properly wound up." Our visitors demonstrated very good  football
tactics but they failed to loop the ball a single time during the  entire
game. They did manage to make eight out of seventeen free throws. 
VANCOUVER Ex-NORMAL 25 - NORMAL 15  Our little trip to the Canadian
metropolis proved conclusively that a  group playing together for several
years has a very great advantage over  the " one-year team." The Ex-Normal
team again defeated us by out-playing  and out-shooting us.  ST. MARTIN'S
COLLEGE 24 - NORMAL 33  St. Martin's College, of Lacy, spent a very
enjoyable evening with us,  leaving with the little end of the score. We
found these fellows clean sports,  and feel it a pleasure to have relations
with them.  Fifty-three

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [54]

     ----------

BARTRUFF (CAPT.), G.  YORKSTOW, F. JENKINs, F.  MONROE,' C. (SVIr) 
MACPHERsoN, F. 15LACK, U.  DAvis, G.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 55

     ----------

C. P. S. 19 - NORMAL 17  On our trip down the Sound little did we expect to
meet defeat from  the Tacoma quintet after having whipped them so soundly a
few weeks  previous. However, our team fought well and gave their opponents
a hard  battle.  ST. MARTIN'S COLLEGE 27 - NORMAL 40  At our return game
with St. Martin's at Lacy we again won by a com-fortable  margin.  STARTUP
23 - NORMAL 36 We started on our east-of-the-mountains trip, but the " flu
" prevented  our going farther than Startup where we played and won the
last game  of the season.  BAKETBALL LINEUP - FIRST TEAM  Harry Bartruff
(captain), Guard  Elwood Davis . . . . . Guard  Erwin Black . .. . . Center
 Herbert Yorkston . . Forward  Max Jenkens .  Russel MacPherson  Carl
Sangster . . .  George Monroe .  Forward  Forward  . Center  Center 
Fifty-five

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 56

     ----------

BASKETBALL LINEUP - SECOND TEAM  William Elder . . . . Center Arthur
Bowsher . . . Forward  Guy Stickney . . . . Forward Paul Culver . . . . .
Guard  Ira Loree . ..... Forward Archie Erickson . . . Guard Guy Johnson .
.... Guard  The success of the first team was greatly enhanced by the
strong, per-sistent resistance of the second team. There is no doubt that
some of these  second team men will be strong candidates for positions on
the first squad  this coming year.  BASEBALL LINEUP  Elmer Karlson (Capt.) 
. . C. F.  Raymond Prevost ....... P.  William Elder . ....... P.  Russell
MacPherson . . . . C. F.  Elwood Davis . . . . . ... 1B  Carl Sangster
........ . 2B  Harry Bartruff . ...... 3B  Herbert Yorkston ..... S. S. 
Paul Culver ........ R. F.  Guy Stickney . ...... L. F.  Stanley Freeman
..... Utility  George Monroe . .... Utility Fifty-six  s~a~a;~i~~

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 57

     ----------

MOUNT VERNON 15- NORMAL 5  Our baseball season started out rather
discouragingly when we played   with Mount Vernon High School at Mount
Vernon. Our defeat was due  mostly to wild pitching and wilder  base
throwing.  MOUNT VERNON 9- NORMAL 7  Mount Vernon came up here two weeks
later only to defeat us in the  last inning. The Blue and White had
gradually forged ahead until the  eighth inning which found us two scores
to the good. But our opponents,  rallying, scored four times in the ninth
and secured the victory.  FAIRHAVEN 0 -NORMAL 8  The game with Fairhaven
High School was encouraging, as well as  providing excellent practice for
the game with Whatcom which followed.  WHATCOM 6- NORMAL 10 Again we found
these prophets of sports rather dazed and uncertain  when we defeated
Whatcom High School. The team from the " School  on the hill " started out
rather raggedly in the first two innings and the  boys and girls from
Whatcom were delirious. But Coach Carver's men  caught the spirit of the
old fight and kept climbing until the close of  the game.  Fifty-seven 
p-p~-~Eib~B~i~h~L~

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 58

     ----------

Upper Row - FOSTER, XITCO, FRANK, MISS MOFFAT (Coach) Standing.  Lower Row
-EVANS, NooN, WILSTED, MYERS.  GIRLS' BASKETBALL  Basketball, the most
important and popular of girls' athletics,  is inspir-ing  much pep and
enthusiasm in the basketball lovers. Both Juniors and  Seniors hoped to
receive the Kline Cup, but the Juniors were the pronounced  all-star
champions. Every year the two classes compete for the Kline Cup.  PHILOS 33
-- RURAL LIFE 5  The Philos and Rural Life played a preliminary game before
the clash  of our boys with Whatcom. The game was a fast exhibition of
girls' basket-ball.  The fast and skillful guarding of Regina Frank and
Hilda Woodburn  prevented the Rural Life forwards from building up a high
score. Only one  field basket was secured by the Rural Life forwards, the
other three points  being made on free throws.  PHILOS RURAL LIFE  Agee
........ F........ Wilstead Xitco. ........ ......... Foye  Weir ........
C.......... Baker  Wilson. .. S.C. . . . . . . Winchester  Woodburn . . . .
...... G. ...... . . Eacrett  Frank ......... G.......... Robin 
Fifty-eight

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 59

     ----------

Standing - CoNx, BRO II EY, CARV ER (Coach), AGEwE, WEIR.  Kneeling -
EACRETT, BORST'EI1N, BAKER, STROMI FORD.  NORMAL 18 - WHATCOM 16  On
January 23, under Miss Moffat's coaching, our fast sextette defeated  the
hitherto supposedly invincible Whatcom girls' team in a closely con-tested 
game. Whatcom failed to come up to the Normal score during the  first half,
but during the second half they tied the score by securing a  free throw,
and two more field baskets made things seem pretty dark for  the Normal
team. The Normal team set to work in grim earnest and soon  had the score
in their favor and so it remained until the end of playing time.  The
lineup: Forwards, Agee, Wilstead, Evans; centers, Baker, Born-stein; 
guards, Frank, Stromford.  JUNIORS 32- SENIORS 9  On Wednesday afternoon,
February 11, occurred the first Junior-  Senior game. The Juniors outranked
their opponents from the start.  The  Seniors worked hard and played a
clean game.  JUNIORS SENIORS  Agee . ...... . .......... Wilstead  
Bromley, Hartley ..... F. ..... . . Xitco  Baker, Weir . . . . . C. Frank 
Bornstein . . . . . ... S.C. . . . . . . . . Evans  Stromford . . . . . . .
G. . . Myers  Conn . . . . . . . . . G. . . . . . . Foster, Noon 
Fifty-nine

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 60

     ----------

GIRLS' INDOOR BASEBALL  Last fall the Seniors and Juniors organized
baseball teams and selected  a school team with Mr. Carver and Miss Moffat
as coaches.  The games were close and exciting, displaying  the good
sportsmanship  of the girls.  SCHEDULE  November 3, Juniors 43 .. ...
Fairhaven High School 44  November 4, Seniors 22 ..... Whatcom High School
54  November 10, Juniors 51 .......... Seniors 48 November 12, Normal 21 .
. . . Whatcom High School 24  November 20, Normal 32 . . Fairhaven High
School 18  Senior lineup: Soper, c.; Xitco, p.; Frank, lb; Winchester, 2b;
Berg-strom,  3b; Pallas, lss.; Lowry, rss.; Anderson, If.; Heggem, cf.; Mc-
 Guire, rf.  Junior lineup: Bornstein, c.; Baker, p.; Bromley, Ib; Hartley,
2b;  Rust, 3b.; Eacrett, lss.; Natterlund, rss.; Weir, If.; Xitco, cf.;
Simpson, rf.  Normal lineup: Bornstein, c.; Baker, p.; Frank, lb; Rust, 2b;
Weir,  3b.; Xitco, lss.; Eacrett, rss.; Foye, If.; Lowry, cf.; Bromley,
rf.; Xitco,  substitute 3b.  Sixty

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [61]

     ----------

ones one 1111~11~ all a  06.: . a1 I1 ag 0o'o or 11 a a I 1F1 ,p II wII e
II  LF NDRS

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 62

     ----------

VOLUME I MAY 3, 1920 EXTRA  Published by the Philomathean Literary Society 
Edited by NOEL WYNNE  This issue is for deliverance into the hands of
strangers, foes as they  may be, and consequently cannot display the
treasure of confidences, poetry  and wit that has graced its pages
throughout the year. The Philo-Sopher  was published first in October,
1919, to us falling the honor of being its  editor. It immediately became
the journal of the Philos and has fulfilled  the duty of unifying the
society. Who could forget the " Ode Initiatione "  by Miss Whittier or the
Forecast Number, edited by Miss Sutherland?  The Junior coupe at the first
of the year placed Roswell Oliver in the  president's chair and two other
of that class in offices. Miss Estella Burn-side,  vice-president of the
Student's Association and chairman of the Klip-sun  Committee, was our next
president. Elwyn Bugge, editor of the Klipsun, succeeded her in the third
quarter.  sixty-two

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 63

     ----------

The Philos boast of two Si's - " Sci " Philippi and " Psy " Kolstad.  The
Philo initiation proved a source of joy to the older members but of  misery
and fright to the " noveaux Philo." Spaghetti was the characteristic  dish
on the menu.  Look into the records of responsible positions of the school
and into the   literary and other rewards. The Abou Ben Adhems' names are
there.  The Philos, as a society, were ten years of age on the
twenty-second  day of November. Then they celebrated in the true old Philo
way at the  home of Professor Philippi, with program, balloon races,
birthday cake  'n everything. Dr. Nash, our oldest Philo, was present and
gave us some  advice as club members.  The pinnacle of enjoyment was
reached when we spent our annual  week end at Mr. Kolstad's cottage by Lake
Whatcom. The experience was  varied, from sleeping in bath tubs and row
boats to playing baseball on  Sunday. Verily, we will go again, if invited.
 The annual banquet was held at the Leopold on April 10th. There our 
desires, physical and intellectual, were amply fulfilled, to the
accompani-ment  of music, readings and most witty toasts.  That the Philos
are appreciative of music was proved when we were  entertained by the
Philomonic Orchestra, which played from the works of  Ivan Offulitch, the
great Russian composer. When the orchestra had fin-ished  we applauded
loudly.  Although the boys were defeated in basketball, the Philo girls
obtained  revenge by an unmentionable score.  Santa Claus visited us three
days before Christmas and applied for  admission into the society.  What
does the word " Philomathean " mean? As Mr. Philippi explains,  it may mean
either " Lovers of Learning " or " Learners of Loving," perhaps.  "That's
why, that's why, a Philo feels that way.  For once a Philo, always a Philo,
forever and a day."  Sixty-three

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 64

     ----------

0l# Alktiatal (tub  Yes, we are the Alkisiah Club,  Whom Fortune bestowed
with a smile  Upon the Bellingham Normal School,  There to reign for a
long, long while.  - GLADYS JENSEN.  We are nearing the close of our
fourteenth year. With each successive  year we have added new friends and
new ideals. The Alkisiah Club was  formed in 1906 under the sponsorship of
Miss Baker, who has continued in  that capacity ever since. We hold the
distinction of being the oldest club  in the school and also of belonging
to the National Federation of Women's  Clubs. Throughout the years we have
striven to keep always before us  the ideals and the work of this great
organization.  Our first meeting this year was held at the home of Miss
Baker, where  although few in number we planned the work for the first
quarter.  One of the first social events of the year was the children's
Hallowe'en  party at Miss Baker's. Here all of the members came in pinafore
and  pgi-tail, to frolic before the fireplace and listen to stories. The
success  of a party, however, is always determined by the refreshments, so
just  mentioning pumpkin pie and stick candy will explain why everyone
pro-claimed  it " the nicest party " she had ever attended.  Sixty-four  p-
pa~idk;3~j~i~~PY8~~S2-

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 65

     ----------

The next event of importance was the initiation of new members.  After
finding their way from the third floor  to the gymna,ium blindfolded,  they
were put through various stunts, even to riding the " goat."  On February
14th, according to custom, we met at the Hotel Leopold  for our annual
banquet. There we were delighted to meet several of our  former friends and
clubmates.  Now nineteen-twenty is a year  That holds  for girls a ray of
cheer.  So accordingly the Alkisiahs gave the first leap year party. 
Varying our custom of a Christmas bulb sale, we decided to postpone  it
until Easter time. Just before Easter about fifty blossoming bulbs were 
sold, from which we derived the double benefit of learning something of 
bulb culture as well as the financial aid.  Hikes and outings comprised the
social program for the spring months,  our annual house party at Miss
Baker's cottage on Lummi Island being  the crowning event. Throughout the
year we have had reports from the " Woman Citizen "  in our meetings; in
this way keeping in touch with the great work of  the Federation. Last fall
we received an inspiring report from the Federa-tion  convention held in
Centralia, Washington, to which Avis Dodge was  our representative. We hope
that again this year we may be represented.  OFFICERS  FIRST SEMESTER 
Muriel Lee ... ... .......... President  Oza Myers . .. .... .. . . . . .
Vice-President  Lola Shepherd .... . . . . . . . . Secretary Frances Johns
. ........... . Treasurer  SECOND SEMESTER  Oza Myers . . . . . . . . .. .
. . . . .. President  Victoria Huston . . . . . . . .. . Vice-President 
Bernice Webster ............... Secretary  Gladys Jensen ............ . .
Treasurer  Sixty-five

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 66

     ----------

1 11  @hyKe . iterary oriety  " Alain one-nine-three-O.  " Hello, this you,
Margaret? Yes--. Do you realize that it is just ten  years since we were at
Normal together? Well, you know my niece was  just packing her trunk and
getting ready to leave - yes, she is going to  Bellingham, too. She leaves
tomorrow. I was just telling her about the  different clubs and
organizations. Of course since I've told her about ours,  the Ohiyesa, she
says she wouldn't belong to any other.  " Do you remember our year together
- 1920, wasn't  it? Yes, indeed  - and that taffy pull, the first meeting
of the year, wasn't it? Oh yes, and  the initiation. I can just feel the
pain I had in my joints now when I  think of it. Oh, and can't you just see
those old members doing the 'lame  duck ' down the hall after they had
initiated us? We certainly surprised  them when we turned the tables.  " I
surely do remember our Thanksgiving party at the Bever House, the Christmas
party at Jenkins Apartments. The interesting programs and  plays were
always attractive to me. Oh! and our stunt at the Country Fair  Sixty-six

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 67

     ----------

-' a photograph gallery' of the faculty, wasn't it? We made some money, 
didn't we?  " -- Yes. I'm baking bread today. It's in the oven now - almost
 done by now, I think. Say, we had a joint meeting with the Alkisiahs, 
too, wasn't it a fine meeting!  "

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 68

     ----------

Okanogan, Wash., April 31, 1921.  MY DEAR DOROTHY:  As I sit at my desk-
the children gone for the day - memories of last  year's student life flash
before me.  Just one year ago today, I remember, the Thespians were so busy
 getting out posters for the four plays, " Weeping Wives," " Dust of the 
Road," " Open Gates " and " The Bishop's Candlesticks."  Mr. Hoppe was so
wonderfully patient with us and without him our  success would have been
impossible.  How I wish you could drop in on us some evening and see our
dear  little birds' nest of a cottage. We're very careful to see that there
is  enough fuel in for the evening, curtains are drawn after sunset, and
never  answer the door after dark. Not afraid to stay alone or afraid in
the  dark--you understand--but we are of a too convivial nature to enjoy 
the songs of the night birds and tree toads. Both of us are strong
believers  in dreams - and such horrid ones are generally the result.  O,
that makes me think of the play " Unsuppressed Desires " we gave  last
year. Mae Andersen, Will Beardsley and Loraine Winters were the  cast, were
they not?  Sixty-eight

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 69

     ----------

Glancing to the back of the room, my eyes fall on some Pilgrim posters  the
children made in November. They remind me of the dainty little
en-tertainment  the November graduates presented us with. What a
picturesque  little group - every member in the Puritan costumes, sitting
very prim, en-joying  the Swedish  reading, " Courtship of Miles Standish "
by Pearl Nesson,  and the quaint little songs by the quartette. Then they
led us to the  cafeteria to that real Thanksgiving dinner - as near like
the original as  could have been arranged.  Remember the night we clashed
victoriously with the Philos in debate?  But after that animated little
farce starring Helen Robertson, Tromp and  Roe, we were friends all over
again.  Helen just came and wants me to go home so I will finish " The 
Thespian Biography " this evening.  8 P. M., SAME DAY  This is my evening
to keep the old fireplace glowing. Between firing-up  times perhaps I can
talk to you.  Did the Normal have a Country Fair this year? Wasn't our
booth pretty  last year? Those days we spent making wisteria and cherry
blossoms--  makes me tired yet. Such a long debate we participated in over
a booth  and finally decided on a Japanese tea garden. The unique costumed
little  maidens toddling here and there serving the kneeling guests to tea;
tinkling  Japanese music, and the heavy odor of incense added to its
bizarre-like  atmosphere.  Will you ever forget the night we entertained
the two basketball teams  the night we played the C. P. S.? How
dexteriously Archie Erickson ex-changed  Dr. Nash's and Sam Carver's dish
of jello when it was discovered  that Gretchen had accidentally added salt
to some of the whipped cream  in place of sugar.  Our worries were few
compared to our good times and accomplish-ments.  It is growing late and
our fuel is low, so I must bring these dreams to  a close. I think it's all
right to dream if we don't make dreams our master,  don't you?  Always
yours,  - BEVERLY  P. S. - Give all Thespians my best greetings. Once a
Thespian, always  a Thespian.  OFFICERS  FIRST QUARTER SECOND QUARTER  Will
Beardsley .... President Erwin Black ...... President  Mae Andersen  .
Vice-President Paul Culver . . . Vice-President  Nell Henry . .... .
Secretary Loraine Winters . . Secretary  Pauline Bornstein . Treasurer
Gertrude Dupuis .. . Treasurer  THIRD QUARTER  Irene Stewart . .......... .
.... President  Paul Culver ........ . . . . . . Vice-President  Anne
Hillier ............ . . . Secretary Carl Irish ................ Treasurer 
HONORARY MEMBERS  Maude Williams Gertrude Beasley  Mr. Hoppe,  Sponzsor
Sixty-nin

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 70

     ----------

tubia Art (flub  SONG  (SMILES A LA AT)  Oh! it's art that makes us happy; 
Oh, it's art that makes us glad;  Oh, it's art that keeps the whole world
going  And it's art that's going to be the fad.  All the world is filled
with charm and beauty  That the eyes of art alone can see,  And the club
that knows about this beauty  Is the Studio Art Club - We!  " Why, hello
Amy! Where in the wide world have you been keeping yourself this past year?
How is Harold and the baby? Yes, I graduated  last year, too. I couldn't
get a man, so I got a teacher's diploma.  " Things have been in such a
whirl lately. I have been on the go con- stantly.  But the most weird thing
of all happened last Saturday night  when a bunch of us girls went over to
that old woman who tells fortunes  by crystal gazing. You remember her,
don't you? She lives out near  Elizabeth Park. Well, anyhow she picked out
Julia, Ethol and me and  then she just let out a regular blizzard.  Seventy
 ~E~

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 71

     ----------

 She began by saying that we all had a great deal in common. She  said that
she saw a many-colored band around us. Of course none of us  believes it,
but it did make us think of our club days. She sort of waved  her hands in
the air and made me, at least, think that she was painting a  picture.  
This queer woman then said in her sepulchral voice, 'Spirits of you  who
sit in this circle, I see in the past that you have worked out in black 
and white that which will bring to you fame and admiration. You have  taken
pure carbon and upon white parchment you have made much  beauty of line.
You have each worked out your own life's thoroughfare.  One shall travel on
country roads, another shall choose the smooth lake, while another shall
journey forth upon a wild sea of dark surroundings.'  " I didn't tell her,
Amy, but you know those charcoal sketches that we  made in Art Club last
year, each represented something that she men-tioned.  I don't believe that
she knew what she was talking about, but isn't  it queer?  " Then she went
on to say that beauty was an expression of the spirit.  Ours had proved
itself by delighting an audience of country folks, prize  babies and even
the renowned Jesse James at a country fair. That must have been the one the
school gave for the Klipsun fund. You remember  how we worked for hours at
a time making hearts, cupids, baskets and  everything else.  " Yes, Amy,
and that's what capped the climax! She told about the  movie that we
attended, and then she told how Helen had gone east of the mountains and
had married that good looking man of hers, even though  she had been
offered the position  of art instructor under Miss Druse.  " Now, I really
don't see how that woman knew so much and I really don't believe a word of
it, it is so uncanny, but - ah, there's your car now!  Do give my love to
your mother. Good-bye! "  OFFICERS  FIRST QUARTER  Ruth Claassen .
............... President  Ethol Lewis . . ............ Vice-President 
Namanee Sherwood . ............ Treasurer  Hermina Haveman ..............
Secretary  SECOND QUARTER  Helen Sargent ......... ...... President  Julia
Whitmore . ........... Vice- President  Ruth Robbins . ...............
Secretary  Lauretta Mulhern . ............ Treasurer  THIRD QUARTER   Helen
Sargent ............ . . . President  Ethol Lewis . . ...........
Vice-President  Ida Greibrock . .............. . Secretary  Amy Peterson .
.... .... ...... Treasurer  YELL  Zipti miny gazully ga zum,  Ti ally ally,
hoo! hoo. Art!  Seventy-one

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 72

     ----------

Alrlthia  FIRST OFFICERS  May Ross McMillan ............. . President 
Elsie Davies . . . . . . . . . . . Vice- President  Lulu Foster .. ....
...... . . . . . . Secretary  Hazel Peterson.. ........ . . . . . Treasurer
 SECOND OFFICERS  Clara Gordon ................. President  Mrs. Bertha
Hart . ... . . ...... . Vice-President  Florence  Townsend ...... ... . . .
. Secretary  Alice Hoover .......... . . . . . . . . . Treasurer  Aletheia
was formed in 1915 by " the seekers after truth and wisdom."  Miss Crawford
and Miss Woodard have been the sponsors for the last two  years, and the
club has prospered. There are thirty member now enrolled. During the winter
the program consisted of studies of various nations.  The people, their
language and costumes, their literature and music were  discussed. In
addition there was a study of astronomy. Several  charts  were made of the
most important constellations and the girls spent some  Seventy-two

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 73

     ----------

very interesting evenings " star-gazing." They studied the position of the 
stars and learned the legends connected with the names of the stars.  The
club enjoyed a Christmas party just before the vacation. A large  number
were present and took part in the merry-making. Several new  members were
initiated. Dainty refreshments concluded the party. Every-one  agreed that
there was not a dull moment during the affair.  On February 19 the club
held a Colonial party. George and Martha  Washington, impersonated by Miss
Sears and Miss Peronteau, received the  guests. Nathaniel Green, Lafayette,
Stark, Benjamin Franklin and many  other famous Revolutionary gentlemen
attended, each with his wife. Old  time games and dances occupied the
evening. Refreshments, in which  cherries predominated, were served in the
cafeteria.  Just before Arbor Day the girls hiked to Flat Rock. They
toasted  marshmallows and practiced songs and yells until darkness forced
them  to take the home trail.  Aletheia spent an evening at Dead Man's
Point. There around the fire  the girls told Indian legends and discussed
Indian music. Although marsh-mallows  were never an article of Indian diet,
the girls did not fail io  appreciate them. At the following meeting the
girls played a number of  Indian records on the Victrola.  On Arbor Day the
Aletheian colors were conspicuous. The grey and  rose streamers floated in
the air, carried by white clad girls. In addition  to the rose bush already
flourishing, the girls planted an ivy vine on the  western side of the
Training School. The little plant seemed to imbibe the  spirit of the songs
and yells of that day, for it is  growing vigorously.  The year has been a
fine one for the club, unsurpassed by any in the  past. The future seems
bright with promises of success for Aletheia.  Seventy-three

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 74

     ----------

Rural Eif (lul b  OFFICERS  FIRST QUARTER  Harry Bartruff . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . President  Olga Heggem . . . . . . . . . .. . . .
Vice-President  Mary Soper ........ ...... . . Secretary  Archie Erickson .
............. . Treasurer  Clyde Bancroft . ......... . Sergeant-at-Arms 
SECOND QUARTER  Stella Lowry . ............. . President  Clyde Bancroft .
..... ....... . Vice-President  Elsie W ilsted . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . Secretary  Frankie Roe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Treasurer  Tom
Harrison ... . . .... . Sergeant-at-Arms THIRD QUARTER  Stanley Freeman .
.............. President  Frances Smith . ............ Vice-President Olga
Heggem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Secretary  Tom Harrison . .
............. Treasurer  William Elder .......... . Sergeant-at-Arms 
Seventy-four

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 75

     ----------

Not long after taking up my duties as a rural school supervisor, I  arrived
one afternoon about four o'clock at a dear little school house tucked  in
the hollow of the side of a hill. Late flowers bloomed in the garden and 
an air of peace and quiet seemed to pervade the place. A recitation was in 
progress and the other children were so busily engaged at their desks that 
it was possible for me to enter unnoticed and remain an undiscovered but 
greatly interested visitor. This simple but pleasant school room was a 
delightful place in which to linger.  It was an industrious and happy
school, made so by a teacher with  the true rural spirit, who after
dismissing her school gave me a most cordial  welcome, expressing regret
that she had not found me out sooner. Her  eyes lighted with joy when I
mentioned B. S. N. S.  " Oh, you are an old Bellingham student! Then of
course you know  Mr. Heckmann and Mr. Coughlin, our Rural Life Club
sponsors. I am  very much indebted to them for the ideas which you have
approved so  highly in my work this afternoon. We have a very active P.-T.
A. Its  members have been no end of help to me, and it is the ideal P.-T.
A. which  Mr. Heckmann so enthusiastically advocated."  Then in a
reminiscent mood I told her of some of the good times I  had with the Rural
Lifers back in 1920: "At a Valentine party Mr. Coughlin   told us of a
vision he had of an ideal community. I have not seen all of  your
community, but if it corresponds to your school his dream is realized." 
She modestly acknowledged my praise by saying, "A  true product of the 
rural course of dear old B. S. N. S. could not do less, but infinitely
more."  We chatted for some time, recalling many delightful experiences in 
the Rural Life Club. I related the events of our first meeting at Whatcom 
Falls: the " ripping" game of baseball, the appetizing eats, the cheerful
chat of our sponsors and last but not least the toasting of marshmallows 
over a big bonfire while we roused the timid woodfolk with our hearty 
singing.  " You enjoyed the Rural Life conferences?" I continued, " So did
I.  I think the Rural Lifers appreciated the situation presented by Mrs.
Preston  more keenly than others because our hearts were in it. Vividly she
re-called  to mind various sojourns in the country schools and the needs
which  existed then as they do now - needs of community centers and more
intelli-gent  living upon the farm. After her address we gathered in the
big gym  and romped hilariously like little children."  Reluctantly I bade
the little teacher farewell and went on my way  rejoicing at her success
and hoping the other Rural Lifers were duplicating  her spirit and as
successfully realizing the hopes of their Alma Mater.  - ETHEL MCCLELLAN 
Seventy-five

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [76]

     ----------

0  0  cu

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 77

     ----------

Gloyral IGlub  OFFICERS  FIRST QUARTER  Pearl Ingalls ................
President  Loda Mullen ... . . . . . . . . . . . Vice-President  Elizabeth
Umbarger . . . . . . . . . Secretary-Treasurer  SECOND QUARTER Victoria
Huston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . President  Grace Green . . . . . .. .
. . ..... Vice-President  Oza Myers . . . .. . . . . . . .
Secretary-Treasurer  THIRD QUARTER  Victoria Huston . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . President  Grace Green . . . . . .. . . . . . . . Vice-President  Oza
Myers . . . Secretary-Treasurer  Ann Newman . . . . . . . . . . Reporter 
There is no part or group in the Student Body of Bellingham State Normal
School so small, so remote or far removed from the activities of the 
school but what has come in contact with the Choral Club. This club is  the
melting pot of all the other social and literary organizations of the 
school. Students have long recognized the potential value of the club, as 
is proved by our list of seventy active members.  The club is one of the
oldest in school. It was started about 1904 by  a few lovers of music, for
the sole purpose of enjoying an hour of community  singing. It has now
become a regular part of the school program, meeting  at the 1 o'clock hour
every Tuesday.  Since music (as one author states) is one of the four
fundamental  elements of life -the purpose of the club is to learn to
appreciate and  reproduce the better type of music suited to a girls'
chorus in any com-munity.  The early efforts of the club this year resulted
in rendering several  selections for the student assembly. The latter part
of the year was  spent in preparing an operetta, " The Feast of the Little
Lanterns," which  was given in April. This proved to be the debut of our
most talented  members.  Sometimes our individual precepts have been rather
indefinite, our  interest has sometimes shifted to other scenes. But
through the persistent  labors of our director, Mrs. Thatcher, we have in
the end reached our goal.  But as a whole, our  climb has been so
interesting that few members have  dropped out prematurely.  But this club
is not all work. We have enjoyed many social evenings  and look forward to
many more next year. Wise is she who  joins.  - GRACE G. GREEN 
Seventy-seven

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 78

     ----------

. E. Mar (lub  At the beginning of the first quarter (1919) eight had
entered the  newly organized course in physical education. These eight met
one day  in the gymnasium and decided informally to organize a club,
planning our  first good time-a hike to Chuckanut. This was followed by an
early  morning breakfast up Sunset Trail.  Some weeks later a strictly
gymnastic dinner was cooked and served  in the Domestic Science rooms. It
was Hallowe'en Eve as I remember, and  the only goblins were those
partaking in the delicious eats.  Just before Christmas we were good as we
could be and were rewarded  with a mock track meet given by Misses Moffat
and Williams. " Pep"  and skill were not lacking. The elephant's miraculous
stunts at the circus  will long be remembered with jovial laughter. 
Another breakfast! This time  at Initial Rock. Here as before the  coffee
deserves honorable mention. It was just like mother used to make  before
she learned how to cook.  Hurrah! twelve more have realized the great value
and need of physi-cal  education and have entered the course with us. We
hope to see many  more take up the work with the realization that health is
necessary for  the attainment of every worthy ambition and achievement. 
May they go  forth to teach this, the first work of the school, with
whole-hearted interest  and enthusiasm.  Seventy-eight

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 79

     ----------

~ee~x0  Few groups without regular officers or time of meeting have so
per-sistently  pursued their purpose as have the Young Housekeepers.  The
dean, Miss Woodard, has for the past few years interested herself  in the
welfare of the many girls who do their own housekeeping, and at  intervals
has called them together for discussion, consultation and mutual  help.
During this year there were not many gatherings, but reports of  those few
were scattered broadcast. Among the items in a certain news-paper were some
quite unbelievable stories about what the Normal girls  were doing to the
H. C. of L.  After musical selections, the main points of interest at the
meetings  were definite study of the food value in calories of our most
common foods;  balanced rations from the standpoint of the main elements in
them; their  cost, and labor-saving devices. Different houses tried to see
which would  excel in offering the best menu for a reasonable price.  These
gatherings were very profitable, and if the Young Housekeepers  did not
serve refreshments at their meetings they at least had much " food  for
thought."  Seventy-nine

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 80

     ----------

,uNsines 6irl E1ague  The Business Girls' League, an organization of
approximately seventy  members, was founded by Miss Exean Woodard, Dean of
Women, for the  purpose of co-operating with the working girls and meeting
the difficulties  arising in their several lines of employment.  The one
big social feature of  the year was the Business Girls' banquet,  which was
given in the Normal Cafeteria. The hall was artistically hung  with
clinging ivy and draperies in the league colors of blue and white.  Miss
Estelle Burnside acted as toastmistress, while the toasts were given  by
the following honorable members: Mrs. Samuel Gompers (Estelle Burn-side), 
Mrs. Herbert Hoover (Hilda M. Freeman) Julia Lathrop, Chief, (Oceola
Thomason), Miss Woolworth (Grace Thatcher), Mrs. Ignace Pad-erewski  (Donna
Klinker), Miss Carnegie (Margaret Zurbrick), Mrs. John  Mitchell (Sarah
Mowad), Mrs. John L. Lewis (Frankie Roe), Miss  D. W.  Griffith (Muriel
Young), Mrs. Wm. F. Bigelow (Alice Neander).  With many a heavy, weary
heart, Defeat they'll ne'er confess;  Bravely striving toward the goal 
Which means naught but - success!  Eighty - CAROIYNE HOWELL, Reporter. 
-~e~v;ans~

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 81

     ----------

4'age Vrus (flub  OFFICERS  J. V. Coughlin, Sponsor  FIRST QUARTER  Marie
Andresen . .............. President  Bernice Webster ......... Secretary
and Treasurer  SECOND QUARTER  Olga Heggem . ....... ....... .President 
Mildred Murray ........ ..Secretary and Treasurer  THIRD QUARTER  Ethel
Burkland .. ............ President  Ethel McClellan ....... . Secretary and
Treasurer  CLUB YELL  Sagebrush and fields of  grain,  Bumper crops without
a rain,  A jolly bunch full of fun,  All from Eastern Washington!  The
Sagebrush Club is composed of fifty of the jolliest livewires of  the
school. Although we were only previleged to several social functions  the
first two quarters, the quaint hard time party and the second social  party
may well be remembered as paramount favors of the term.  Eighty-one

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 82

     ----------

@e Everett u(f lub  The Everett Club is composed of students from Snohomish
County.  Many social events were held during the past year which will live
in the  memory of all our members.  The most important affair of the year
was a " kid" party held on  De

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 83

     ----------

@reign (flub  Rita Olson . ........... . . ... President  Ina Johnson
....... ... . . Secretary-Treasiurer  Myrtle Mathiesen ... . .... .......
.Reporter  Early in the fall the old Oregonians, together with several new
mem- bers,  met to organize and to di

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 84

     ----------

Saroma (!lub  Early in the first quarter the Tacoma Club members met and
or-ganized.  The officers chosen were as follows:  Loda Mullen.
............. ... President  Margaret Xitco .. ........... . Vice-President
Julia Whitmore .......... Secretary-Treasurer  Miss Boring, Sponsor  The
object of the club was: " To present suitable entertainments and  to
counteract the effects of our study and brain fag." That the results  were 
entirely satisfactory no one would doubt had they gone on the hike to Lake 
Whatcom and eaten beefsteak, broiled over a bon-fire, or sat around 
another bon-fire at Lake Geneva and consumed " eggs on  the half shell." 
Such primitive amusements, however, were not the only means employed  to
make life agreeable. In the second and third quarters two mixers were  held
and were enjoyed by the entire club and the boys of the school.  - FLORENCE
BAKER, Reporter.  Eighty-four

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 85

     ----------

Alaiska Cub  If you habitually have the blues, ask an Alaska Club member
what to  do. He will tell you to make a trip to Alaska so you may become an
 Alaska Club member, and will add that should you do so, you will never 
regret it. Not a happier group could be imagined than those who answered 
the call issued at the beginning of the second quarter.  Upon being
organized the club planned its first event. It might prop-erly  be called a
rush down to Camp Perfection. No one could make any  of the members who
were there admit that they did not have the time of  their lives, though it
is rumored that the bill of fare was limited to catsup,  cookies, buns and
pickles.  The club's second affair of the quarter was a banquet and theater
 party. Everyone who was there declared that they had a good time.  During
the early part of the third quarter, the club enjoyed an outing  at Mr.
Kolstad's cabin on Lake Whatcom. Memories of ham and eggs  still linger. 
Eighty-five  I  Yl/////, AM

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 86

     ----------

ieis aub Qowlitz Tounty Qlu b  OFFICERS  Ethol Lewis, Vance . . ..........
President  Alta Sears, Kelso . ... . ..... . Secretary-Treasurer  Impi
Saari, Vader . ............. Reporter  Hail! from Southwestern Washington.
The thirty students from the  border counties, Lewis and Cowlitz, organized
a social club early last fall.  Late in October the club went to Flat Rock,
where an ideal breakfast  was enjoyed by all around the crackling fire. 
Our numbers joined with the Seattle Club and celebrated with a party  in
the big  gym. The numerous stunts and games provided enjoyment until  the
refreshments were announced.  Mr. Bond is the faculty club member.  Our
motto is "A good bunch and good time."  Eighty-six  --. Memo

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 87

     ----------

attffle (lub  FIRST OFFICERS  Gretchen Weide . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
President  Mrs. Nye ...... ... ... . . . Vice-President  Inez Clark
............... . . . . . . Treasurer  Helen Thayer . . . . . . . . .. . .
. Secretary SECOND OFFICERS  Ruth Robbins ................ President  Clyde
Bancroft . . . . . . . . . . . . Vice- President  Dorothy Robbins . . . . .
. .. . . . . . . Treasurer  Pauline Noll ... . . . . . . . Secretary and
Reporter  Our club was organized the latter part of the first quarter, and
although  we were late in starting, the true Seattle spirit soon asserted
itself.  Among the many social functions enjoyed by the club was a "Kid 
Party," held in the big gymnasium, where we united with the members of  the
Lewis and Cowlitz Club. The next event was a hike to Squalicum  Beach
accompanied by the members of the Everett Club. Since then we  enjoyed a
breakfast on the top of Sehome Hill.  Eighty-seven

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 88

     ----------

Eb+r Ialt  OFFICERS  Elsie W ilsted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
President  Julia Whitmore ........... Secretary- Treasurer  Betty De Graff
........ ... . .. Fire Captain  Corinne Castle . . . . . ... . . . . . . .
Reporter  OUR "SCHOOL HOME "  If we dare say it, and who has a better
right, the last bunch of the old  " dorm " has been the best bunch a house
could wish!  Our many distinguished members include our worthy officers,
musi-cians  (even some who could actually run the phonograph!), artists,
vocalists  (some voices " sound like thunder," others merely " shriek "!),
but we truly  have some excellent singers, aesthetic dancers, readers
(famous as " story  tellers "!), and - but we can't begin to enumerate our
talents!  Among our fondest memories we count our spreads, hikes, slumber 
parties, dancing parties (including second-floor events!), " others," and 
theater parties. The " Red Kimona," too, is now a memory and we have
serpentined our welcome to Miss Mead, who has come to us replacing Miss 
Woodard.  The dearest memory of all will be of our house mother, Mrs.
Powell.  We hope that the inhabitants of the new Edens Hall will have her
with  them to brighten their days. This is the biggest and best we can wish
for  them. Eighty-eight - AGATHA FOLEY

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 89

     ----------

Gatyalir Girls Tlub  OFFICERS  Regina Frank ... . . . . . . . . .... . .
President  Nell Henry ...... ...... Secretary-Treasurer  Miss Nabstein,
Sponsor  The Catholic girls of the Normal School have, for a number of
years,  organized as a purely social club. This year we have had many
opportuni-ties  for social gatherings, the most prominent one being our
Hallowe'en  party held at the Assumption School with the Juniors and
Seniors of that  institution.  Each one of us appreciates the privilege of
being brought closer together  in a social way and we are sorry that the
end of the term brings an end  to our good times.  - AGATHA M . FOLEY. 
Eighty-nine  ~L-s~l~~

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 90

     ----------

p~B~JNA  Namanee Sherwoo  Faith Hugget . .  Frances Jennings  Margaret
Scott  Muriel Lee  Frankie Roe  Hilda Freeman  Eva Bond  CABINET OFFICERS 
OFFICERS  d . . . . . . . . . . . .. President  . . . . . .  . . . . . .
Vice-President  COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN  Loucygne Wilcutt  Esther Nelson  Ruth
Thurman  S. .  . Secretary  . . . . Treasurer  Vivienne Croxford  Margaret
Shannon  Ruth Ostle  Miss M. Belle Sperry, Faculty Sponsor  The activities
of the Y. W. C. A. began with the meeting of trains to  welcome new girls. 
 On Thursday afternoon, September 11, the first " get together " meet-ing 
was held in the Y. W. C. A. room.  The first devotional meeting was held
the following Sunday afternoon.  Miss Sperry, who had returned from a
year's vacation, brought the message.  The social events of the year began
with the annual Y. W. reception  to the whole school Fri-day evening,
September 26. Many acquaintances  Ninety

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 91

     ----------

DES MOINES DELEGAIES  were formed which have ripened into friendships
during the year. Punch  and wafers were served.  After the organization of
the cabinet the work moved along rapidly.  The chairman of the Bible Study
Committee soon had classes organized  in the largest rooming houses on the
hill. About two hundred fifty have  been enrolled in these classes.  The Y.
W. C. A. has been serving the school in a very practical way  through their
management of the cafeteria.  Miss Brown, the Northwest Field Secretary,
visited in early November  to interest us in the great Student Volunteer
Convention held in Des Moines,  Iowa, during the Christmas vacation. We are
proud to think that our  Student Body, Faculty and Alumni with the
assistance of the Y. W. made  it possible to send our full quota of six
delegates to this convention.  The annual Bible Institute was held January
15 to 18. Mrs. Campbell,  of Seattle, came again  to be our speaker. This,
as in other years, was a  time of great inspiration.  The Association has
been especially blessed by the visits of mission-aries  this year. First,
Rev. and Mrs. M. C. Clark brought us a message of  opportunity from India.
Next, Rev. Stanley Soltau made us feel the heroism  and the wonderful faith
of the Koreans. Miss Cable and the Misses French  brought us greetings from
two of our own students, Lydia Berthold and  Nina Gemmell, in China. These
glimpses into the foreign field broadened  our vision of Christian service.
 Ninety-one

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 92

     ----------

14titu lahattatt  At the suggestion of Dr. Miller there was formed at the
beginning of  the school year an organization termed by outsiders as " The
Men's Auxil-iary."  Its membership included all of the men of the school,
both faculty  and student, and its aim was to promote clean, wholesome
fellowship among the men students and to otherwise foster a spirit of
friendliness and co-operation  among its members. Several genuine " stag "
socials were held during the year, which were  judged by all concerned to
be the greatest gloom chasers in history.  0519 ooIterr  After Christmas
some of the young men who had been prominent in  student activities met and
formed " The Boosters." Though social in nature,  this club was formed
along an entirely different line from any then existing  in the Normal
School.  The object of the club  is to foster good spirit among the
students as  a whole and between the organizations of the school. It aims
to promote  an interest in the Normal among the high school students, many
of whom  do not understand the work of this school either because it has
not been  brought to their attention, or because they are indifferent. 
Hail to B. S. N. S.! May the future bring in greater quantities what  the
past has not been generous with - men.  Ninety-two  S~g~I

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 93

     ----------

irainin g r! ol  HE physical and chemical  laboratories are in the north 
wing of the building; but in  the south wing the Normal has a  different
sort of a laboratory, one  where the pedagogy and psychology  of the
Seniors are tested out. Test  tubes and retorts of chemical lab-oratories 
give no account of experi- ments  carried on in them; but the  children of
the Training School  bear a permanent impression and  can  give an account
of the experi-ments  which the Seniors have been  conducting with them for
subjects. 'With this in mind, late in  April, the children of the Training 
School were asked to write what  things they had done during the  year,
which they considered the  GERTRUDE Supt. most interesting with a reason
for  EARInT Tr. Dept. the answer. The answers of these  questions are a
measure of the success of the experiments, which have been  performed in
the Training School this year.  The first grade children cover a  greater
diversity of impressions in their  reports than any other class. They tell
about work for various holidays  beginning with Hallowe'en. They like to
play stories because they are so  " inter-sting." They go to the library to
see the pictures and read the  Peter Rabbit books. They make a wigwam and
Indian life groups on the  sand-table, an Eskimo scene and a cotton field
with negro workers. They  also mention nearly every activity of their
school day, including moving  pictures, lunch room, " where we learn to act
nice," and "'Semblies."  In the second grade we get the first idea of
studying a thing because  "It's good for me." The children are interested
in the May-pole dance  they are learning, in the sand table and in their 
songs.  The third grade worked out several projects in history which remain
 in their memories, among them the Viking Boat, an Egyptian House and a 
Pioneer Wagon.  The fourth class tell of their history projects as making a
Greek  temple; their excursoin as when they studied a bay; their garden
project and number work which grew out of that. They also tell about the
costume  designing in drawing.  The fifth  and sixth grades enjoy
particularly their various dramatiza-tions.  They mention some history
dramatization and explain how this  makes their work more interesting. They
tell how the dramatization in  English makes them more careful in
punctuation, capitalization and also  Ninety-three

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 94

     ----------

that it helps them " to speak better." Much interest is shown in their 
Book of Myths of Bellingham, and the magazines for the hospitals.  The
reasons given by the Junior High School pupils for their work are more
clearly defined. Many of them speak of some project in English and  say
that they gained a greater appreciation for literature and sometimes  the
moral is mentioned. The benefits gained in punctuation, in the use  of
verbs, in the mechanics of writing and in general information are all 
given as reasons why they  approve English project.  The children see the
advantage of the superiority of the Senior plans  as well as  the Senior,
herself. One teacher devised the scheme for three of  the class to act as
judges to decide whether tolics were satisfactorily  handled. The 7-A pupil
who reports this says, " This made us study our  lessons more thoroughly."
Manual training has interested the boys because  of the articles of
furniture they were able to make for their homes. One  class measured and
calculated the cost of the excavation for the new dormi-tory.  The pupils
also tell what they gained from excursions made early in  the year when
studying types of industry.  These reports from the children prove that the
Seniors have put their pedagogy and psychology into practice; and have show
themselves able to  handle the very latest frills in education in such a
way as to be both inter-esting  and beneficial to the children.  TRAINING
SCHOOL ATHLETICS  The boys' basketball was not as successful this year as
in the past. This was largely  due to  insufficient practice, as the boys
were deprived of practice periods to a large extent.  Nevertheless they
worked hard and faithfully, practicing whenever they could. Out of a  total
of eight games three were won. The games won were against Ferndale, Scout
Troop 4  and Roeder. A good showing was made against the large heavy team
from Lowell and in  the last game with Franklin the score was only 12 to 13
at the close of the game. The boys  were coached by Arthur E. Bowsher.  On
April 2bth the boys were presented their letters. Those earning letters
were Lester  White, Vance Radvaney, forwards; Claude Snitzler, center;
Arnold Wastrom, Montford  Alsop, guards; Weston Hayes and Elmer Peterson,
substitutes.  The girls' team won two games out of three played. These were
from Franklin. The  game lost was with Lowell. After this game the Training
School girls served refreshments  to the two teams which were enjoyed by
all.  Ninety-four

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 95

     ----------

THE FEAST OF THE LITTLE LANTERNS  Entertainments  THE PRODIGAL SON  The
Oratorio Chorus, under the direction of Mrs. Thatcher, gave the  oratorio "
The Prodigal Son" at the Normal auditorium, Friday evening,  February 13th.
At Liberty Hall Sunday evening the oratorio was repeated  to a very large
and appreciative audience.  There were several very beautiful solos, duets
and quartets given by  Mrs. G. W. Nash, soprano; Mrs. H. W. Spratley,
contralto; Mr. Oscar Shaw,  tenor, and Mr. C. B. Harter, bass. The
accompanists were Miss Maud  Williams and Miss Edith Kesler.  The whole
oratorio was beautifully rendered and reflected much credit  on the
director.  THE FEAST OF THE LITTLE LANTERNS  Under the direction of Mrs.
Thatcher, the Choral Club gave one of the  most artistically beautiful
programs of the whole year when they presented  " The Feast of the Little
Lanterns," a Chinese operetta by Paul Bliss, Friday  evening, April 23. 
The stage was artistically decorated with colored lanterns and bright 
flowers. The chorus and cast, dressed in their gayly colored costumes, 
gave us many beautiful songs and dances. The Oriental atmosphere of  the
operetta carried the entire audience to the distant land of China where 
they all spent a most delightful evening.  The soloists were Dora Agee,
Irene Stewart, Anaide Myers, Ethel Burk-land,  Helen Jones, solo dancer;
Elwood Davis, Ira Loree and Archie Erick-son.  THE NORMAL QUARTET  The
mixed quartet, consisting of Pearl Ingalls, soprano; Grace  Thatcher, alto;
Elwyn Bugge, tenor, and Mr. M. B. Thatcher, bass, who  substituted for Guy
Stickney during his absence, have given some pleasing  entertainments
during the year. They went to Lawrence and other places  near here, giving
an evening's program in each place.  Their program consisted of quartet
numbers, duets, solos and violin  music by Mr. Bugge. Victoria Huston went
with them as reader and Edith Kesler as piano soloist.  The quartet was
organized and directed by Mrs. Thatcher, whose efforts helped to make. the
organization a distinct success.  Ninety-five

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [96]

     ----------

.  .:;

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 97

     ----------

Gl4 ernior lay  " THE SAVING GRACE"  CAST  Mr. Blinn Corbett . . ..... ..
.. Elwyn Bugge  Mr. William Hobbs, his man servant . ... . . Carl Irish 
Mr. Ripley Guildford . . . . . . . . . Kenneth Selby  Mrs. Corbett, Blinn's
wife .. . . . . . . Anaide Myers  Susan Blaine, Mrs. Corbett's niece .
..... . . Marian Moore  Mrs. Guildford, Ripley's mother ..... Agnes
Clippenger  Ada Parsons, Mrs. Corbett's maid . .... Hilda Van Liew The
curtain rises and Hobbs and Parsons, the help of the Corbett home,  discuss
their present situation and financial embarrassment due to the  financial
difficulties in the home. A boy delivers a duck which must be  paid for and
Susan, Mrs. Corbett's niece, meets the difficulty. Mr. Guild-ford,  a
suitor of Susan, is expected for dinner, thus the added delicacy.  The
dinner proves to be a success and Susan and Guildford steal quietly  away
and return blushing and happy, as they have become engaged. But  in the
midst of the rejoicing Mrs. Guildford, a very cold and dignified per-son, 
is ushered in and upsets the happy plans because she insinuates that  Susan
is already the third girl to whom Ripley had been engaged.  Mrs. Corbett
remains a staunch friend to Ripley Guildford through all  the trouble and
tries to make Susan see her mistake in dismissing Ripley.  Mr. Corbett, who
has won considerable fame in his brave deeds in South  Africa, tries to
enlist in the present war, but at first is refused because of  his age, but
finally he is accepted. Hobbs also enlists and is likewise  accepted. 
Ripley and Susan's love affair is mended, due to the Ripley's assertion 
that the girl in question is happily married. And thus the difficulty is 
solved. Financial straits are likewise improved and all the characters are 
left in a contented frame of mind.  ?Eurning of @Cnr-Art $jalla  The
members of Mr. Hoppe's expression class put on a series of four one-act
plays, on the evening of February 24th. The funds received were  turned
into the fund for financing the Klipsun. Beginning with "A Little  Fowl
Play " and continuing through " Come Michaelmas," "Indian Sum-mer  " to the
last, " The Violin Maker," the appreciative audience enjoyed  every minute.
 Ninety- seven

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 98

     ----------

UP unutor lay  CAST OF CHARACTERS  Blacksmith Bess .......... .. Donna
Klinker  Dickon . ........ .......  Archie Erickson  Rachael . ...........
. . . Pearl Stoughton  Richard .. ...... .......... Ira Loree  Justice
Merton .......... . . . Ray Buswell  Lord Ravenshane (Scarecrow) .. .....
Guy Johnson  Mistress Merton . .. .. .... Gretchen Weide  Micah, servant
........ . .. Howard Griggs  Captain Bugby .. .... . .... . Arthur Bowsher 
Minister Dodge ........... .. Charles Powell  Mistress Dodge .......... .
Lorraine Winters  Sir Charles Reddington ... ........ Erwin Black  Mistress
and Amelia Reddington, daughters ......  .......... . Pauline Bornstein and
Gladys Jacobs  "The Scarecrow," a comedy by Percy Mackaye, was presented by
 the  members of the Junior Class. The scene is laid in Massachusetts at
the  time when witchcraft flourished. Of course magic runs through the
entire  play from the introduction of the " Mirror of Truth " to the moment
wheri  the pipe was broken and the " Scarecrow " drew his last breath.  The
talent displayed was worthy of all of the praise and admiration  which the
large audience so graciously extended. The school has Mr.  Hoppe to thank,
for it was his splendid coaching which paved the way for  the success of
the production.  lNinety-eight

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [99]

     ----------

A

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 100

     ----------

00  0,  EXTRACTS FROM THE BELLINGHAM HERALD  BELLINGHAM, WASH., SEPT. 20,
1919. - The Normal students of the  Bellingham Normal were very
delightfully entertained at the Association  Mixer on September 19, at the
Normal on the hill.  The first part of the evening was spent in the
auditorium with  " stunts" pulled off by the various occupants of the
different houses on  the hill.  After the stunts they very quietly
adjourned down the banisters to the  big gymnasium, where they all joined
in games and contests which lasted  until someone called " Eats! "  With a
great amount of hesitation they rushed to the " eats "  booth  where ice
cream and wafers were dealt out without even the asking. After  this cool
reception they  all went home, well pleased with " Normal society." 
BELLINGHAM, WASH., DEC. 16, 1919. - Last evening the " minority"  of the
Bellingham Normal banqueted and enjoyed their own society to the utmost.
Along with their other ingredients they swallowed speeches,  impromptu and
otherwise, toasts, songs and yells - until all wished for  more elasticity
to the membrane of some parts of their anatomy. BELLINGHAM, WASH., FEB. 7,
1920. - Last night at the Normal occurred  one of the most interesting
events in the history of Bellingham. This was  a genuine Country Fair,
staged by the students of the school.  After an intensely interesting
comedy and vocal solos in the auditorium,  the entrance to the grounds were
thrown open - only to be filled by the  rush of Bellingham's population.
Here they were entertained with events  ranging from grand opera to dog
show. Some of the special features were vaudeville, fortune telling, stock
shows, rogues' gallery, baby contest and  eats. Never in the life of the
big gym has the moon witnessed such an  evening of co-operated pep and
whole-hearted enjoyment as that of last  night.  BELLINGHAM, WASH., MARCH
6, 1920.- Friday evening, March 5, the  men of the Normal  enjoyed
themselves at a smoker held in the small gym.  Numerous forms of
entertainment were indulged in, such as boxing,  wrestling, racing and
horizontal and parallel bar exhibitions. Following  this violent exercise
they were refreshed with cider and doughnuts.  BELLINGHAM, WASH., APRIL 17,
1920.-- One of the events of the year  at the Bellingham Normal that
depends upon the weather-cock is the annual Chuckanut Marathon which was
celebrated by the students on Saturday,  April 17, 1920.  One Hundred

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [101]

     ----------

:v IN

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 102

     ----------

Among (Our Thtiters  THEO. KARLE  Theo. Karle, the great American tenor,
gave us one of the treats of the  season when he appeared at the Normal,
October 13. His mastery of vocal  technique, diction and musicianship give
him equipment enabling him to  present artistically the widest range of
song literature. His voice mastery  was admirably displayed in the
Beethoven aria, " My Heart Is Sore." But  the beauty and tenderness
displayed in the shorter, simpler songs won  the sincerest applause. 
CAROLINA LAZZARI  Of all the musical programs which we were privileged to
attend none  was more enjoyed than the concert given by Carolina Lazzari,
contralto.  Her wide range, rich full tones and charming personality help
make her  one of the few great artists of today.  MRS. MAUD E. WILLIS  Mrs.
Willis gave us an interesting program of plays in our auditorium  November
28. She is called "an interpreter of plays" and justified the  title in her
interpretation of " The Witching Hour," the play of Augustus  Thomas. Mrs.
Willis is a woman of charming presence and a clear, pleasant  voice, which
won much applause from her audience.  DR. ANNA REED  Dr. Anna Reed, who
came to us from Washington, D. C., where she  is director of the junior
division of Employment Service. She gave us a  series of very interesting
lectures. Dr.  Reed showed herself to be a woman  of rare personality, a
very forceful as well as entertaining lecturer. TOM SKEYHILL  Tom Skeyhill,
an Australian war poet, speaker and soldier, appeared  as the third number
of our lecture course. As a speaker too much can  not be said of his
ability and after one has become used to the " English "  in his voice, one
sits spellbound or rocks with laughter as the case might   be. He gave a
lecture on "The Poetry of the War."  LORADO TAFT  On Monday evening, March
15, Lorado Taft, a prominent American  sculptor, appeared at the Normal as
the sixth number of our lecture course.  He gave an illustrated lecture on
" Rambles With the Boys in Burgundy."  Many beautiful slides were shown,
bringing out the art work on old cathe-drals,  churches and monuments. Mr.
Taft's lecture was very entertaining,  and it was punctuated with bits of
humor.  FLONZALEY QUARTET  The Flonzaley Quartet, often spoken of as the
finest stringed quartet  in existence, appeared here April 24 as the last
number of our Lyceum  Course. Their perfection of technic, remarkable
blending of tone and  musical attainments rank them first in artistic merit
as an organization.  One Hundred Two

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 103

     ----------

FIRST PRIZE STORY  GEORGE STEPHENS  IPSY stood in the middle of the road
holding his broad straw hat  in his hand, watching a horse and buggy
disappear in a cloud  of dust in the distance. Then he turned and climbed
to the top  of a high gate under the oaks by the roadside. Alone with his 
thoughts he sat with his freckled face buried in his hands,  thinking of
the work his guardian, Mr. Ross, had told him to   do the next (cd  The
next day was the Fourth of July, and Mr. and Mrs.  Ross had gone to town to
stay a couple of days, leaving Gipsy in charge  of the farm. He sat for
some time listening to the hogs cracking  acorns  under the oaks, with now
and then a satisfied grunt coming from them.  The soft breeze blew his long
red hair about his face. When the sun  sank lower long shadows crept across
the road and out in the  meadow  a lark sang its last song of the evening.
Finally he was aware that tears  were trickling down his  face. Wiping them
on the sleeve of his shirt he  slipped hurriedly to the ground and followed
a path to the grove by the  spring. His homespun breeches dangled half way
between his knees and  bare feet as he walked along. He whistled to keep up
his courage.  When he came to the barnyard he was greeted by a friendly
whinny  from an old white mare that stood under a sagging cow shed. Gipsy
had  traded a bushel of small Irish potatoes and a gallon of molasses to a
band  of gypsies who had been passing through the country the fall before,
for  that old white mare. He was known as Gipsy ever since by the
neighbor-hood boys. For the first time he lead the mare into the barn, for
Mr. Ross  had forbidden him to bring her there. He was to keep her under
the cow  shed and feed her on fodder. The protruding hip bones of the mare
showed  conclusively that fodder was not a very substantial food. Johnny
Lucey,  a neighbor boy, said " She looked more like a hat rack than a
horse," and  so saying he walked up and hung his hat on her hip bone where
it hung  until Gipsy, red with anger, grabbed it and threw it over the
fence into  the corn field. Gipsy led the mare right into a box stall, then
brought a heaping bucket  of oats and dumped them into the feed box. The
mare stuck her nose into  the oats, and lifting her head she looked at him
thoughtfully. Then the  boy climbed into the hay loft and filled the manger
with hay. Jumping  One Hundred Three

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 104

     ----------

down he went to the house and after glancing hastily around to see that 
everything was all right, he returned to the barn, patted the mare gently 
on the nose and climbed to the hay loft for the night. He lay awake for 
some time on the new mown hay and watched the full yellow moon climb  into
the sky. It reminded him of another night a long, long time ago when  he
lay awake on a little white bed near a window, while his mother walked  the
floor nervously. Finally three gun shots echoed in quick succession  down
the mountain side and a few minutes later his father plunged into  the
room, holding his hand to his  bleeding heart. Next day he died and a  few
weeks later his mother died of a broken heart. The day had come for  him to
leave the mountains. When he was going around the last bend  down the road
he looked back at the large tree which he knew sheltered  the graves of his
mother and father. Now as he lay on the hay watching  the moon he saw two
little stars close together, twinkling. " One is  mother and one is
father," he whispered and dozed off to sleep.  He arose early next morning
and going to the smoke house he ate a  hastily prepared breakfast of cold
corn bread and milk. He looked wist-fully  at the house where he knew there
were lots of honey and good things  to eat, but Mrs. Ross had taken what
she wanted him to eat to the smoke  house near the spring and had told him
not to enter the house. After  milking the cow  he turned the mare into the
large pasture among the  blue grass and clover, took his hoe and started
for the corn field on the hot  hillside back of the house where 'Mr. Ross
had told him to work. He  hacked away at the tall weeds along a row of corn
down to the other end  of the field, then back. The sun was boiling hot and
he felt the sweat  trickling down his back. He sat down in the shade of a
mulberry tree and   watched a large chicken hawk go sailing lazily by
toward the wood where  it lighted on a dead snag. Finally the boy heard his
name called. Getting upon a stump he saw  Johnny Lucey and Skinny Fuller
coming up the hill; each boy carried a  fishing pole over his shoulder. "
Whoope Oh, Gipsy," came the cry. Gipsy's  laziness instantly disappeared
and he ran down the hill to meet them.  " Come on Gipsy," said Johnny. "
Let's go fishing."  " Oh, I reckon I can't nohow," drawled Gipsy.  " Oh,
yes ye can. Jest ye come ahead, an me an Skinny will hep ye  all hoe corn
tomorrow, an old man Ross won't know it nohow."   After fifteen or twenty
minutes' argument the boys persuaded Gipsy  to go with them. Arriving at
the turnpike Gipsy discovered he had no  fish-hook.  " Oh, take a pin,"
suggested Skinny.  They searched their clothing but could not find a pin. 
" Oh, gee! I ain't goin' if I can't fish," exclaimed Gipsy.  Suddenly a
horse and buggy and two girls appeared from a bend down  the road. "I have
a scheme," said Johnny, tossing his fish pole to Gipsy,  " jest ye watch
your Uncle Jake," and he proceeded down the road walking  lamely.  Soon the
horse and buggy drew up and the elder girl inquired why the  boy was
limping.  One Hundred Four

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 105

     ----------

Oh, I jest stuck a splinter in the bottom of my foot and I ain't got  airy
a pin to pick it out.  The girl searched in her waist for a pin, then
climbed to the ground  with a sympathetic look. She handed the pin to
Skinny who passed it to  Johnny; she motioned for the boy to come nearer so
she might help him. Suddenly the boys darted away down the road kicking up
a cloud of dust  as they went. The girls looked after th'em in surprise.
The boys climbed  a rail fence and struck out across a field toward the
creek.  " Oh, let's go wadin'! " said Skinny, " maybe we can find some
soft-shell  turtles over by the sand bar."  " Let's do! " exclaimed Johnny.
 Gipsy followed willingly as they ran splashing down the shallow stream. 
At  last they came to a deep hole by the cliff, sheltered by the dense
foliage  of the trees. Skinny ran out in the field and dug some worms with
a  stick. Then he and Johnny divided their lines with Gipsy, who tied the 
pin, which he had bent in the shape of a hook, to the string.  After
several hours of fishing, which netted Skinny one perch, Johnny  two and
Gipsy one sucker, they showed signs of discontent. Gipsy yawned  and
stretched then " accidently," on purpose, knocked the can of bait into  the
water. Skinny jumped to his feet and threw his perch after the can.  " Go
to thunder, bait and fish; come on, fellers, let's go down to old  Mr.
Brown's place and steal some muskmelons."  " It ain't right to steal,"
returned Gipsy, quietly.  " Oh, who's askin' ye to steal," demanded Johnny,
" Jest ye watch your  Uncle Jake."  The boys crept cautiously down the
creek toward the Brown farm,  taking the lines from their poles as they
went. Climbing the picket fence to the garden they sneaked along behind 
some blroom corn toward the muskmelon patch, whose vines they could see 
stretched over the ground with the much coveted fruit on them. As Skinny 
got hold of a big yellow one ready to snap it from the vine, they heard a 
voice nearby:  "  Well, well! boys, so you have come to call on an old
man."  Glancing around they saw an old man walking with a cane, emerge 
from the broom corn patch, his soft blue eyes smiling with friendliness. 
"I am so glad you have come," continued the old man, " very few  people
call on us now days and you must  come right along over to the  house. I
know Mrs. Brown will be just as glad to see you as I am."  Johnny looked at
Skinny with almost a lump in his throat.  "Just ye wait, Mr. Skin," he
threatened in a loud whisper, "just ye  wait. I'll fix ye, getting us to
come here and get caught."  " Let's run," advised Skinny. The old man had
started for the house, chuckling to himself. He  motioned for the boys to
follow. Gipsy started after him, whispering back,  " Come on, fellers,
don't be afraid of an old man. Come ahead, Johnny,  and tell him about your
Uncle Jake."  .Johnny and Skinny followed shyly. They found that Mrs. Brown
was  a little bundle of good nature who smiled and looked over her
spectacles  One Hundred Five

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 106

     ----------

at them. She seemed to take special interest in Gipsy and eyed his long 
baggy breeches with sympathy. She invited the boys to the front porch 
which was shaded by low spreading branches of a locust tree. Old Glory 
waved from an old flag pole and cast its shadow on the steps of the porch. 
They sat in some home made rockers with deep cushions in them. Mr.  Brown
sat opposite Gipsy and began telling them a story of his boyhood  days.
They could hear Mrs. Brown humming a hymn as she walked quietly  about her
work in the kitchen.  After an interval she appeared at the door and
announced dinner. The boys looked at each other sheepishly as they followed
the two kind  old people into the house. The table was spread with a snowy
white cover  and set for five. Gipsy was to sit between Mr. and Mrs. Brown 
and Johnny  and Skinny on the opposite side. First Mrs. Brown brought out a
large  platter of fried chicken; then mashed potatoes, green peas, green
onions,  radishes and last of all muskmelons. The boys looked at each other
 shyly and as Johnny said afterwards, they thought the dreaded moment  had
arrived, but Mr. Brown's look was as indifferent as his voice and not  a
word was said or hinted at about stealing muskmelons.  After dinner Mr.
Brown took the boys through the lower part of the  garden where he had
planted some watermelons and gourds. Some of  the gourds had vined up a big
oak tree and hung  down as if they had  been placed there with care. Skinny
was sent to the barn after a sack  which Mr. Brown filled with muskmelons
and small watermelons.  Finally the boys departed for home, promising to
call again soon.  They lugged the sack up Clover Hill. Then they sat down
to rest in the  shade of a sycamore tree. For some time they remained
silent, then  Johnny began to cry. Skinny said nothing but swallowed
several times  and looked away at the blue mountains. A flock of noisy
little birds flew  by. Gipsy got to his feet and stammered out:  " Oh,
shoot, fellers, 'taint goin' to do no good nohow! "  After talking over
what they should do, they hid the melons in a  fence corner among some
goldenrod. Gipsy said good-bye to the boys and  walked up the hill toward
home. Johnny and Skinny went by a short  cut through the woods. When Gipsy
came to a moss covered log he sat  down and soon he began to cry. He
finally lay down among the tall  grass and drifted leaves, looked up
through the branches of the tall trees at the white drifting clouds and
murmuring several times, "Oh, if she  was only my mother! "  Taking up his
way again he came to the top of a hill where he could  look down upon the
Ross farm in the valley. The hush of the summer's  evening settled down
upon the valley. He could see several white chickens walking slowly toward
the hencoop to roost, the tinkle of a cowbell echoed  from the clover field
and the rattle of a wagon came from down the turn-pike.  He loped down the
hill at an easy gait, and after milking the cow  went to the clover field,
climbed to the top of the rail fence and called to  his old white mare. He
whistled several times, then he got down and  walked along the fence to a
clump of blackberry bushes. He called again.  After an interval a full moon
appeared from behind old Thunder Mountain,  One Hundred Six

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 107

     ----------

flashing its clear rays out over the valley, revealing a white object
stretched  out on the ground at a little distance from him. Gipsy smiled
and whis-pered,  " Sleeping."  He crept slowly up but the mare did not move
as he approached. In  surprise he caught her mane and lifted her head, but
it fell back heavily  and a  pair of white glassy eyes stared up toward the
sky.  An hour later when Mr. Brown and Judge Fields came to the Ross  farm
looking for Gipsy they found him sitting on a fence corner crying.  When
Gipsy saw them coming he howled louder than ever and pointed  out to the
mare and mumbled out between sobs, " She's dead, she's dead."  The two men
walked over to the mare. Gipsy heard them say that  she had eaten too much.
Mr. Brown walked back to Gipsy, picked him up  and carried him to the road
where he and the Judge had left the horse  and buggy.  That night in a
little room with white walls and blue ceiling Gipsy  lay awake listening to
Mr. Brown and Judge Fields talking out in the  sitting room. Finally he
heard them make arrangements for him to stay  with Mr. Brown. Gipsy cried -
then he got out of bed and walked to the  window and gazed out into the
moonlit night. Way up toward the moon  two tiny stars twinkled brightly, "
Mother and father are happy, too," he  whispered as he tiptoed back to bed.
 3 wlatd   AN INCIDENT  THE GEORGE STEPHENS weeks had grown into months and
the months into twenty years  since the ill-fated ship ran on a sunken reef
near the South Sea  Islands. The only survivor, a tall, handsome
Englishman, a perfect  specimen of manhood, had at first looked upon his
isolated life with indif-ference.  Taking advantage of the wreckage, he
built a rude but comfortable  hut in a grove of tall palm trees at one end
of the largest islands near where  he had been washed ashore the day of the
disaster.  His health wore slowly away with the years and at the end of the
 nineteenth year he could no longer concentrate his mind upon his flock  of
tame tropical birds nor could he hunt cocoanuts and dates for any  length
of time without a sudden wild dash along the white, sandy beach  in the
boiling surf murmuring and screeching to himself. Occasionally a  ship
appeared far away on the horizon. The days came and went much  the same.
Now and then the solitude was broken by the shrill cry of a  large parrot, 
or the deep, heavy breathing of the sea, or the wind as it  moaned sadly
through the palms to remind the man that he was alone.  One night, the
full, yellow moon rose lazily above the quiet blue sea.  The man, with
wild, hollow eyes sat on a little grassy knoll watching the  approach of a
large steamer. Now and then a faint yellow light gleamed  from the ship.
The man arose suddenly and followed a dim path down One Hundred Seven

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 108

     ----------

the cliffs to the beach. He walked slowly along until he came to a large 
flat rock. He knelt and examined the rock carefully. He ran his long  bony
fingers through his matted hair. The name " Ellen " was carved on  the
rock, but was badly worn by the waves. He arose, his half-starved  body
shaking with hunger, and whispering to himself he stretched his long  bony
arms toward the moon. A big red and green parrot flew to his  shoulder and
cried out shrilly, " Ellen, Ellen, Ellen." The man slowly  regained his
mind. His whole past life flashed before him. He made a  few wild leaps up
the cliff to his hut. Grabbing some coals of fire, he ran  to the edge of
the cliff and with the aid of the tall, dry grass soon had a  small blaze
started. The ship was now passing nearby and faint sounds of  music drifted
in with the hot sea breeze. The man's mind left him as  suddenly as it had
returned and when the fire took a sudden leap upward,  he jumped upon it
and trampled it out with his bare feet. Then he dashed  wildly down the dim
trail, along the beach in the wake of the boiling surf,  screeching and
waving his arms above him. His flock of tame parrots answered from the palm
grove.  Enu in 1920  SECOND PRIZE STORY  PEARL STOUGHTON WELL, it's leap
year," announced Ted Carewe.  " Un," grunted Jeremiah Pettigrew from the
depths of a huge  volume  on " Organic Acids." To Jeremiah nothing was of
any im-portance  that did not pertain to chemistry.  " Say, Jerry, aren't
you afraid for your scalp? " flung in Jack Wells.  On occasions the boys
undertook to teach Jeremiah a few of the experiences  of Normal college
life but in vain. He clung obstinately to his ferrocynides  and
bicarbonates until the attempts of his friends had descended to mere 
joking.  " What say?" he asked, now looking up suddenly through his round 
tortoise-shell glasses.  " Why, it's leap year,  man," cried Ted.  " Leap
year? " asked Jeremiah regarding a diagram interestedly.  " You bloomin'
blockhead! Don't you know that during leap year  the ladies may propose to
the gents? You must beware!  " chortled Phil  Hardy.  " Ladies propose! "
ejaculated Jerry with a scandalized look.  " Sure," said Phil, winking at
Ted. " You want to look out. I heard  Bess Holden say just recently that
you had such a romantic nose, she  thought she'd try for you."  Jeremiah
recalled the dashing, brilliant Bess and shuddered. During  all his
studious life he had above all things avoided girls, but now -  " They -
they don't really. You're just guying me - " he wavered.  " Indeed not,"
Jack assured him solemnly. " It's gospel truth.  You  One Hundred Eight

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 109

     ----------

see you've never gone after the girls so they're going after you. I noticed
 Blanche Wilson watching you in class this morning. Now she's not a bad 
sort -"  "Say, clear out of here. I've got to get this formula straight,
right  now! " he shouted in desperation.  Contrary to all precedent the
trio withdrew meekly. However, had  Jeremiah's hearing been keen he might
have heard the low murmuring that  proceeded from  Jack's room across the
hall.  "- - scare him stiff - girls'll never know - some joke on the old 
boy! I'll bet he'll beat it worse than ever! "  " I say, let's get little
Ann Mayo in ---- " came Phil's voice.  " Nix," ordered Ted.  The lecture
next evening offered an opportunity for their nefarious  scheme to be put
in operation.  " Say, Jerry, old man, will you do me a favor?" begged Phil
in an  undertone.  " Um," grunted Jeremiah, not pausing in his note taking.
 " Harriet Franklin's here with her chum Blanche Wilson. Now you  just see
Blanche over to the hall -- come along with us you know, and I'll  be your
Aunt Isaac," coaxed the mischief maker.  " Oh - I - - " began Jeremiah.  "
Thanks, old man. Awfully kind. I'll do something for you some  day," broke
in the rogue.  "I say - I - " began Jerry again.  " Sh - you're disturbing
the speaker," whispered Ted as he admin-istered  a sharp dig in his
roommate's ribs.  Jeremiah subsided, but his eyes,  fixed on the speaker
were terror-filled.  Phil saw that Jeremiah had no chance for a private
word before they  joined the girls. Then he whispered, " Now with a little
tact, you know,  she can be kept from " Jeremiah strode along in silence
beside the vivacious young lady.  " Oh, Mr. Pettigrew, a penny for your
thoughts," came Miss Wilson's  insinuating tones.  Jeremiah realized with a
start that he was entirely alone with her. The  others had dropped back. He
stammered dismally.  " I'll bet you were thinking about me," announced the
young lady  suddenly.  What he said Jeremiah never knew. At all events it
was entirely  inadequate to the situation.  " Isn't the moonlight romantic,
Mr. Pettigrew? " she persisted.  Jerry murmured something about never
having noticed,  " Doesn't the soft glow just make your heart quiver - " At
this point Jeremiah lengthened his stride. He had noticed what  had escaped
his companion - the proximity of the hall steps.  " Why, Mr. Pettigrew, how
you walk! " she gasped.  " Oh, yes- here we are - good night," he burst
forth and with a  nervous twitch of his hat he vanished, leaving Blanche
overcome with  One Hundred Nine

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 110

     ----------

silent mirth. She was joined almost immediately by her co-conspirators  and
all three rocked with laughter.  Poor Jeremiah did not rest well that
night. His cheeks burned and  quivers were running up and down his spine.
What if he should meet  her again? WVhat if -but here he fell asleep to
dream of being pursued  by a disheveled creature breathing smoke and flame.
 By afternoon of the next day he could think of other things for a half 
hour at a time. At last he betook himself to his beloved laboratory. Before
long he was deep in an experiment - so deep that he did not observe the 
entrance of a small, thin, young lady who occupied the place next him.  He
was aroused by a quiet, persistent voice.  "I beg your pardon, Mr.
Pettigrew, but could you reach that bottle?  Some one put it up high." 
Jeremiah started and turned a deep crimson.  " Excuse me, Miss Smith," he
murmured as he handed her the bottle.  Julia Smith was a plain little woman
devoted to organic chemistry  and utterly guiltless of coquetry, but to
Jeremiah she appeared to be a  siren. He drew as far away from her as
possible and stared blindly at his  dish of bubbling grease.  At length he
gained control of himself sufficiently to reach for a tube  of yellow stuff
from the rack.  " Mr. Pettigrew, will you "  But she was interrupted by a
loud sizzling and a cloud of smoke. Jeremiah's start had overturned a
beaker into his dish of grease.  Miss Smith's scream brought several people
to the spot but Jeremiah  had recovered his presence of mind and was wiping
up the mess with a dilapidated towel. This procedure brought his right hand
into view.  " Oh! " cried Mliss Smith, " It's burned! "  It was certainly
burned and in spite of his protestations Jeremiah was  sent to a doctor. 
The doctor pronounced the burn not serious and Jeremiah with an 
interesting bandage caught the car for home. Unable to write because of his
burned hand Jeremiah found peace  and quiet in his room. Just as life was
becoming quite normal again Ted  rushed in with the announcement that they
both must attend a party at  Morris Hall. In vain Jeremiah pleaded and
rebelled; his roommate was  obdurate and in the end he submitted.  If ever
there was a miserable man that man was Jeremiah Pettigrew  as he entered
the cosy living room at Morris Hall. Ted immediately found  his way into
the midst of a merry group and Jerry was left to his own  devices. He found
a quiet nook watching the young people before him and  marveling at their
fearlessness.  At last his glance rested on a slim little miss in a fluffy
white dress.  She was standing not far from him watching the others with
bright grey  eyes and rosy parted lips. Jeremiah's gaze, however, was
riveted on her  hair. He had never seen anyone's hair so coppery in color
and so curly.  He felt a desire to catch one of the little rings that
clustered around her face.  As he watched, Ted approached the girl and with
a laughing remark  One Hundred Ten

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 111

     ----------

drew her into the group before the fire. Jerry longed to join them but 
dared not.  Some time later he was so near Ted and the red-haired miss that
his  roommate introduced him.  "Ann Mayo, the name fits her," he thought. 
" Not half homely when he smiles," was Ann's mental comment.  Jeremiah did
not say much. That would have been impossible, but  his eyes followed Ann
wherever her bright head could be seen.  It was a thoughtful Jerry that
left Morris Hall that evening. He  decided that after all leap year might
not be such a bad affair.  The next day as Jeremiah came down the library
steps, reading as he  walked, he became aware of someone just ahead of him.
It was Ann Mayo.  Flushing with embarrassment, he fell in step beside her,
choking out a  feeble " Good morning." Then he waited wondering what would
she say.   " crisp weather is the nicest for picnics."  Jeremiah made an
attempt to reply and drew a deep breath. Ann chatted with him from the
library to the door of Morris Hall.  When he left her Jeremiah felt that he
had done a bold and hazardous  deed. In this pleasing frame of mind he
returned: home.  When Ted came, he was overflowing with joy. There was to
be a big  concert in town tomorrow. Everyone would be going. He thought
he'd  ask - maybe Blanche Wilson - or, well - Ann Mayo.  Suddenly a thought
flashed into Jeremiah's mind. For a second he  was too dazed by the idea to
speak. Then with a burst of confidence he  rushed to the telephone, leaving
the exuberant Ted open-mouthed. Still  boldly he gave the  number of Morris
Hall. While he waited for the answer  all the terrors of his venture burst
upon him, appalling him. He had just  decided to hang up the receiver and
flee when someone answered. Breath- lessly  he asked for Ann Mayo.  " Hello
- hello - is this Miss Mayo? Yes - this is - well - yes - I  am - that is
-- I'm Jeremiah Pettigrew speaking. I - I heard - that is  Ted - I mean I
heard about the concert and I thought -- I wish - that  is -- I hoped --
oh, well - will you go with me? Thanks - eight, then.  All right. Good-
bye."  Trembling at his own audacity Jeremiah returned to his room. For 
the rest of the day he turned a deaf ear to the sallies of Ted and .Jack. 
Every time he thought of it he experienced a sinking sensation. He was  so
absorbed that he paid no heed when Ted came in growling because  "Ann Mayo
had other arrangements."  He spent an unprecedented time getting ready the
next evening and  yet he never felt so awkward and unprepared as he did
when he pre-sented  himself at Morris Hall.  Ann did not keep him waiting,
and with an almost enjoyable excite-ment  he strode along beside her. His
face burned and his heart pounded.  Ann chatted gaily on a hundred and one
topics but one person cannot  make a conversation. Ann found it so and
after a time she, too, grew  silent. To Jeremiah the silence was awful and
he made one or two valiant  attempts to entertain her. By the time they
reached the theater Jeremiah  One Hundred Eleven

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 112

     ----------

was watching one loose red curl and wondering how it would feel to be so 
short. Ann was stealing side glances at her companion, noting the firm 
mold of his chin and the dreamy light in the eyes behind the round glasses.
 The concert may have been a success, but neither Ann nor Jeremiah  heard
much of it. Each was considering the long silent walk home. It  was as bad
as they had feared. Ann walked along in silence and Jeremiah  had not the
courage to utter a word.  The girls at Morris Hall looked very mysterious
when Ann entered,  but her preoccupied air gave them no excuse to unburden
themselves. Jeremiah undertook to devote himself to his chemistry, but the
beloved  subject had lost its charm. He found himself seeing Ann's face on
the  page before him; the silvery ring of one bottle against another
suggested  her laugh; the glowing fluid in his test tube was just the color
of her hair;  the eddy and whirl of  the ascending gases was like the wave
of her hair.  He even noticed little Miss Smith was just Ann's height.  At
last he went to the telephone and called her. With a vast amount  of
embarrassment he managed to make her understand that he would  like to
call. Could he have seen the half amused, half tender light in her  grey
eyes as she listened to his halting words!  With great nervousness he
dressed and fled from Ted's questions.  As he neared Morris Hall his feet
lagged. Once he paused and almost turned, but he overcame the impulse and
ascended the hall steps.  He rang the bell and was ushered into  the hall
by a wise looking little  person who went after Ann. Jeremiah suffered
tourtures before the girl appeared. Perhaps something of it was in his face
- certainly Ann saw  something there that made her very kind to the
frightened young man.  Jeremiah was, as ever, tongue-tied. He was quite
content to sit and  watch the curl of Ann's hair, the sparkle of her eyes.
He felt no need of  words. The girl fidgetted at his silence until the
humor of it struck her,  flashing a dimple into view in one cheek.  " Do it
again," he said involuntarily.  " What?" she cried in amazement.  " Oh - no
- nothing," he stammered, a deep crimson flaming in his  cheek. " I -- I
must be going.  He arose abruptly and departed forthwith, leaving Ann to
laugh softly  as she ascended the stairs.  " Oh, Ann," cried Blanche
Wilson, with a teasing inflection.  " Oh, Ann," echoed several others, with
much laughter.  " What is it? " she asked quickly.  " Oh - Ann - did - did
you - oh - I shall die - " choked Blanche  doubling with mirth.  " Have you
anything to say? If so, get it out of your system quickly,"  advised the
girl coolly.  The other girls joined in the laughter  until weak and
wet-eyed they  leaned against the wall.  " Did - did you propose to dear
Professor Jeremiah? " giggled Blanche  at last.  " Not that I know of -
why?"  One Hundred Twelve

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 113

     ----------

 Dear me! I must tell you the joke. You know Ted Carewe - he told  me. The
boys stuffed Mr. Pettigrew with a big tale about girls proposing  and leap
year until Jeremiah was scared stiff! Oh - I shall die - when I think of
it! He's expecting the girls to propose. You should do your  duty when he
gives you the chance. "I think you and Ted Carewe have been in big
business. I think  Mr. Pettigrew is the truest gentleman here  - and Ted,
the silliest puppy.  You might both of you spend a little time learning
common decency from him," cried Ann with blazing eyes.  With this she flung
herself into her room and slammed the door  upon a group of very surprised
young ladies.  The sudden spell of cold weather that fell on the little
town in no wise cooled Jeremiah's heated brain. He grew more absent-minded
than  ever. He nearly blinded himself in the laboratory and generally
disgraced  himself. Whatever ailed him he could not tell. In the midst of a
most  absorbing lecture he would be staring straight before him, his pencil
twirl-ing  uselessly in his fingers. Ann he did not see. Whatever she was 
doing she succeeded in keeping out of his sight.  About a  week after his
call upon Ann he came home to find Ted in a  great state of excitement. He
was getting up  a skating party for the next  afternoon and Jerry must go.
Jeremiah pleaded a headache and every  other excuse, but in vain.  The next
afternoon saw him well and warmly clothed plodding along  in the rear of a
party of students bound for Lake Mary. Quite despond-ently  he trudged
along, dangling his skates, until he heard above the clatter  and laughter
a voice that sent a thrill through him. With startled intent-ness, like one
frightened out of a sound sleep, he straightened and surveyed  his
companions. He saw her far in  the lead, a small conspicuous figure  in her
brown suit. From that moment he began to notice what was hap-pening  around
him.  When Ann's partner left her for a moment at the edge of the lake 
Jeremiah awkwardly stepped up and offered to put on her skates.  Ann
consented with faintly flushed cheeks, conscious of the impish  glance of
Blanche Wilson.  With a great deal of fumbling and awkwardness he finally
strapped  them on and, rising, held out his hands. Ann accepted silently
and the  pair swung out onto the lake quite unmindful of the wrathful
amazement  of Ted and the amusement of Blanche. Jeremiah was a good skater
and Ann loved the sport. No happier  couple swung across the ice that
chilly afternoon, although there was many  a noisier pair. As they glided
he observed how the wind drove the rich red  to her cheeks and loosened
sundry glowing curls. Ann was noticing the  easy, tireless stride, the 
quiet mastery with which he guided her. So  absorbed was each that they did
not see the little inlet which they were  approaching until it yawned
before them.  " Oh! " she screamed - but too late.  There was a great
splash! a sudden cold shock - and Jeremiah found  himself in the icy water.
He made a motion to swim when he fel tsomething  One Hundred Thirteen

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 114

     ----------

beneath. He straightened and stood upright on the bottom of the creek.  He
reached for the bit of brown and caught Ann's dress. He slid his arm  about
her and held her for a second.  " Stand up - the bottom is just down
there," he said.  But the water reached to his shoulder and Ann was shorter
than that.  She could not touch the sand and clung to him pitifully. Then
Jeremiah  proved that he was a man as well as a  genius. He gathered her
into his  arms and waded shoreward.  " Let me down now," she begged, as
they  drew in closer.  Jeremiah's answer was not in words, but it was very
plain to Ann.  Several couples had heard Ann's scream and had seen the
accident  from a distance, but so quickly had it all occurred that they
arrived at  the spot just in time to behold the bedraggled young man openly
clasp the  dripping young  woman in his arms and express himself in several
moist  smacks.  " Heaven help us! " ejaculated Ted, pulling off his coat to
wrap Ann.  What - what's happened! "  Half an hour later in the big kitchen
of a nearby farmhouse Ann, clad  in a dress far too large for her, came
shyly forth to greet Jeremiah, arrayed in garments several sizes too small
for him.  " Come on, Blanche. We're not needed," cried Ted, shoving the
other  occupants out of the room.  Some time later Jeremiah ventured a
gentle observation:  " We - we  - we're engaged, aren't we? "  One Hundred
Fourteen

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 115

     ----------

yi Mountain 0tream  FIRST PRIZE POEM  ANNA ERICKSON  Are you fleeing from
unknown danger  Or rushing to new delights,  My mountain stream, rushing,
rushing,  Through the days and through the nights?  Is it joy that sets you
bounding  In all your windings far;  Or do the stones that fill your way 
Hurt you and bruise and mar?  Is it mirth and the long glad hours  That
cause you to dance and leap;  Or the hidden pain of memory,  That will not
let you sleep?  Mountain stream, turbulent, merry,  Kin of my woes and
delights,  I would go rushing with you,  Through the days and the nights. 
Rushing, just rushing with you,  New ways, new scenes where we pass;  The
rough, brave strength of the mountains,  The tender voice of the grass. 
And rushing, perhaps we'll discover,  Far out where the bright sunlight
glows,  An expanse of deep, soothing stillness  My mountain stream - peace
and repose.  One Hundred Fifteen

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 116

     ----------

FIRST PRIZE ESSAY  LETHA S. DuCOMMUN I XVAS lost. I gazed helplessly
around, but no one came. In front of me  were ridges of hills, trees and
thick underbrush. Night was fast falling,  the sky became blacker and small
drops of rain pattered down on the  ground beside me. I called out once,
then again, but  all I heard was the  echo.  In my heart, I knew I must
find the answer to that echo, and it was  not to be solved by gazing at the
already black sky, or wondering if some-one  would come. I must go ahead.
So half walking, and half stumbling,  I made my way over the first hill.
The briars cut me but still I went on. By this time, the rain came in
torrents and I stumbled and fell, but at last  all out of breath, I reached
the next hill.  What was that? A light! I knew that light was the answer to
my  echo, but that answer could be obtained only in one way, by continued 
effort and hard work.  My face was dirty, and my clothes were torn by the
cruel briars, when  at last I reached the gate of the farm house, the light
of which had guided and helped me on. But to my dismay, I was met by a
large dog which  growled, broke the slender rope which bound him, and
jumped at me.  Imagine if you can my relief when a pleasant voice said, "
Down, Rover,  down," and then, " Come in, stranger, and make yourself at
home." The  warmth of the fireplace and the kindly atmosphere of home were
like a  healing benediction to my wounded and bedraggled spirits. Truly it
was  the answer to my echo.  How many have stood alone, lost on the hills
of knowledge, and calling  out have received the echo, but have not, as
yet, secured its answer? The  answer is there, but each one must find it
for himself.  We are all receiving echoes every day. When the war came we
waited  for a long time calling out, receiving the echo but letting its
answer wait.  It was not until we sent our boys ahead with effort and hard
work that  the answer came.  Today, you and I are standing not on a hill,
but on the mountain of  knowledge. The children who need us have given the
echo, for there is  such a  dearth in the ranks that we must find that
answer although it does  mean hard work and low salaries.  At first we do
not wish to face it - we call out -we hear just the  echo; somehow,
somewhere ahead is the light, the answer to our echo.  For our country and
for the future citizens, you and I must find that  answer  and count not
the cost.  One Hundred Sixteen

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 117

     ----------

What of omorrno?  SECOND PRIZE ESSAY  HERBERT HANSEN  HE everlasting
question, "What of tomorrow? " is one that through-out  all ages has been
puzzling mankind and to which many have essayed an answer. One thing is
certain, mortal man is not endowed  with the power of prophecy, but it is 
equally certain that coming events  cast their shadows before them, so that
mankind, through a careful and  candid consideration of the past and
present can to a large extent answer  the time-old question and  foretell
what the future has in store for them.  America today is at the dawn of a
great tomorrow. The most gigantic  struggle in the annals of time has just
ceased and the world has not yet  recovered from the shock thereof.
Reconstruction is progressing slowly  and meanwhile millions impatiently
are peering ahead and wondering what  tomorrow holds in store for them.
Will it be a day of honor and glorious splendor, or will it prove a
disappointment - a blot to mar our national  history? Momentous times are
there, and great, indeed, are the problems  which face our leaders. 
Foremost in our mind arises the question, what has America gained  from the
war? What have we to show in return for the billions of dollars  we spent,
and the thousands of lives that were sacrificed? What were  the benefits of
the war and what do they tell of tomorrow?  Before the war Germany
dominated the field of chemistry. Undis-puted her scientists reigned in
their laboratories, concocting all manner  of infernal devices - also their
far-famed dyes. Every novelty or souvenir  we purchased must bear the
unescapable mark of Germany. But the war  has changed all this. No longer
is America dependent upon Germany, for  no sooner had the war shut off our
supply of dyestuffs, than American  chemists turned their dyes upon the
market. Not works of beauty,  to be  sure, but the war did start us in this
line of manufacture which is a  benefit for which we should be devoutly
thankful.  Commercially, a great tomorrow awaits America. Considering our 
geographical position, it is but logical to assume that the bulk of South 
American trade should be in our hands. Before the war, through our 
neglect, we allowed the enterprising German salesmen to snatch this from 
beneath our very eyes. Now that the war is over Germany is already
pre-paring  for the commercial battle. Shall we  of America sit idly by and
 allow this fruit of victory to be snatched from our hands? What does 
tomorrow  hold in store for us? Shall we arise and maintain our commer-cial
 supremacy, or sink into oblivion? Assuredly the promise of tomorrow  is a
bright one if we but grasp it.  But South America is not the only field
that beckons for American  products. India, China and Japan are joining the
ranks of civilized nations  and crying for manufactured articles. But at
that Japan is not so much a  field for trade as a commercial rival. While
Europe has been devastated  by war and the industries of the United States
turned into martial activities,  One Hundred Seventeen

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 118

     ----------

Japan has not been idle. While the nations of the world that previously 
led in mercantile activities have remained stationary, Japan has
progressed,  and now the dawn of her tomorrow is a rosy one. Whether the
so-called  "yellow peril" constitutes a serious menace or not, is another
and a  lengthy question, but at this time it is a self-evident fact that if
America  does not beware, Japan will sweep down with her now powerful
merchant  marine and lick up the cream of the trade with other awakening
Oriental  countries. Press dispatches from all sources at this time
indicate that  Japan's expansion in foreign trade is regarded as general.
At present  Japan has the advantage due to the slow progress of
reconstruction, but  whether she shall permanently retain it or not is a
vital question upon  which depends much of the glory of our tomorrow. 
Another of the fields of trade mentioned above was India. Most of  India's
315,000,000 obtain their living through agriculture. Primitize  methods
were employed until recently but now the demands for American  manufactured
products is unsatisfied and the possibility for trade with  India is
limited only by our initiative. It is unnecessary to say more con-cerning 
the trade prospects of America for the future. The dawn betokens  a bright
tomorrow for commercial America.  There are, however, other vital questions
demanding solution. Para-mount  among these is the peace treaty and the
League of Nations.  Undeniably the ideals of those advocating the League of
Nations are high  and noble. War is always detrimental and any means that
would abolish  it should be worthy of consideration. Whether the prophecies
of League  advocates come true and war is forever Wiped from the face of
the earth  remains to be seen, but as was said before, no man is a prophet,
and the  lessons of yesterday and today do not speak well for the peace
league of  tomorrow. The experiences of the immediate past do not indicate
that  human agencies as yet can remove war from the world. If the linking 
of the United States with the nations of Europe would promise well for  our
tomorrow is one of the questions over which our statesmen are pon-dering 
today.  As yet the opening question, " What of tomorrow?" remains
un-answered,  but as a glorious sunset foretells a glorious dawn, so does
today  foretell a bright tomorrow.  One Hundred Eighteen

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 119

     ----------

mwilig4t on te We3natrre  SECOND PRIZE POEM  NAMANEE SHERWOOD  Under the
cottonwoods, gay with gold  Stolen from Autumn's store;  Quietly resting
upon the rocks  Belting the lonely shore;  I sit and gaze,  While purple
haze  Shuts off the valley's door.  The river is flowing to meet her mate 
A thousand leagues away.  She hums and whispers a low, sweet song  From
dawn till close of day.  And on the shore  Forevermore,  The wavelets run
and play.  The sun is bidding the world good-night,  And rosily tints the
skies;  The pines, on the everlasting hills,  Grow black, and daylight
dies.  In peaceful rest  On Nature's breast,  The world in silence lies. 
One Hundred Nineteen

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 120

     ----------

THINGS WE WOULD LIKE TO KNOW  Why it is necessary to take roll in as-sembly
 ?  If the Canadian B. B. guard with mus-tache  is married?  Why M.
Anderson hasn't time to attend  club meetings?  How Mr. Hoppe became such a
talented  violinist in "The Violin Maker"?  Why Tromp doesn't visit the
Cedars any  more ?  If Nettie G. is afraid of the (K)night?  If Pinkney and
Nichols have a lease on  Sunset Trail? Why Loree needs a Gard?  Where E.
Burklund got the sparkler?  Why Green favors a "Chevrolet."  WANT  ADS 
WANTED--A girl like the other fellows  have. Monroe.  WANTED--A lounging
couch and dress-ing table for Association room. L. Mar-shall.  WANTED-A
position in a baby show.  Harrison.  WANTED - More young men. Normal 
Girls.  POSITION WANTED in noodle house.  Call Bowsher and Wynne. Green 
2323.  WANTED - Some of the Senior dignity.  Juniors.  WANTED-A rolling
pin. Mr. Freeman.  LOST AND FOUND  LOST--One Day. N. Wynne.  LOST--Several
hours sleep. R. Knight.  LOST - One girl. Tromp.  IOST -One assembly
period. Oliver.  LOST - One trophy cup. Juniors and  Faculty.  FOUND--A
trophy cup. Seniors.  FOUND - M. Hardy locked in the library.  The
janitress.  FOUND - A baseball game from What-com.  Normal Team.  FOR SALE
ADS  FOR SALE - Valuable note books of  every description  at the " Senior
Second  Hand Store."  FOR SALE - Children's toys at low prices.  Wynne
Factory.  FOR SALE--Good Ford machine; will  take a Bond in exchange.
Kenneth  Selby.  FOR SALE--A Hope chest with the  "Hope" included. Mr.
Harrison.  FOR SALE - Cretonne sun hats. Art De-partment.  FOR SALE -
Worries of graduation.  Seniors.  FOR SALE - A pair of gym socks. Oliver. 
I WONDER WHAT WOULD HAPPEN  " IF "-  Nobody talked in assembly?  The Senior
Class had some pep?  Nobody had the "flu"? Bugge and Marshall couldn't
scrap?  " Herby " Yorkston had a bass voice?  E. Bond didn't drive her
Ford?   Mr. Hunt couldn't read his newspaper?  E. Burklund couldn't go to
church on  Sundav?  All the Seniors were at a class meeting?  We "arose" to
suit Mrs. Thatcher?  We were childish "enuf" for Miss Mow- bray?  We
separated Nettie and "Bobby"?  We were psychological enough for Mr. 
Kolstad?  Dr. Herre believed all that his Hygiene  Classes told him?  Mr.
Coughlin ceased to smile?  The Chemistry Class could continue to  make
alcohol?  Mr. Bever ceased to say, "Please rise so  that we can see you? " 
The Seniors received condition slips?  Mr. Bond forgot to attend Junior
Class  meeting?  It wasn't for the Class  of '20?  One Hundred Twenty

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 121

     ----------

WHO SAID THIS?  "That's the dead line, come up here."  "Absolutely not." 
"This should be a socialized class."  "How often should a baby be fed?"  "
Now, I don't know."  "Get into your character.'  " It's the custom of the
clubs -  "Rise and explain."  "My uncle's grandfather said-"  "I doubt
that, I doubt that." "Appoint yourself a committee of one -"  "You big
boot, you! "  A. Neander: "What does your father  do for  a living?"  E.
Simpson: " Why, he takes up the  collection in church."  G. Weir: "I gave
Herbert the thirty- second  degree last night."  B. Day: "Are you a Mason?"
 G. Weir: "No, but that's the freezing  point, isn't  it?"  Miss Boring:
"When did the revival of  learning take place?"  Junior: "Just before the
quarterly  test."  From a newspaper: "Man dies as re-sult  of hard drink.
He choked on a piece  of ice."  Senior: " Have you ever heard the story  of
the two holes in the back yard?"  Junior: "No."  Senior: " Well, well!" 
Mrs. Sangster: "Ta-ta, dearie; I shall  write before the end of the week." 
Mr. Sangster: "Good gracious; you must make that check last longer than 
that."  Innocent Junior: "I've heard of a Good  Friday and an Ash
Wednesday, but what  in thunder is a nut sundae?"  Laugh and the teacher
laughs with you.  Laugh again  and you laugh alone.  Teacher: "A fool can
ask more ques-tions  than a wise man can answer."  Student:  "No wonder so
many of us  flunk in our exams."  Herbert Warrick (in Physics VI): " How 
long is a short circuit? "  THE MARATHON  The shades of night were dark
o'ercast  As up Mt. Chuckanut there passed Some youths who bore with manner
nice  A banner with that strange device -  "Seniors will win!"  Their brows
were set, their eyes so deep  Looked very much bereft of sleep.  And ever
they were heard to sing On their way up the same old thing,  " Seniors will
win!"  And later there was seen to pass  A Junior and a  pretty lass. 
Above the Senior's fires shone  And from his lips escaped a groan,  "
Juniors will win!"  Try not the pass the Seniors said,  But still straight
up the hill he lead  The lass who walked on by his side, And loud and saucy
he replied,  " Juniors will win! "  At break of day was seen to be  A
member of the faculty  Climbing furiously and fast,  And Seniors saw his
sign at last,  " Instructors win!"  " 0, stop! " the students cried - " and
rest."  But their intent the traveler guessed.  A twinkle flashed from his
blue eye, And he was heard to make reply,  "No, we must win!"  And all (lay
long by twos and more  Their banners up the hill they bore,  Pausing to eat
hot buns and dogs,  But sat not long upon the logs -  For each would win. 
One man helped twenty maids or more  Surmount the hill to boost the score. 
A modest man lie was in truth,  But brave, oh brave, must be the youth  At
Normal School!  Travelers by the way were found  Exhausted - lying on the
ground,  Still grasping in each grimy hand  A banner which revealed their
band -  " Juniors will win! "  And many days they figured up  To find who
won the silver cup,  Until at last there came the day  When in Assembly
Luke did say,  "The Seniors won!"  Irish: "I haven't slept for days?" 
Black: "What's the matter, sick?"  Irish: " No, I sleep at nights."  Howard
Griggs: " Barber, how long will  I have to wait for a shave? "  Barber
(looking him over carefully):  "Oh, about two years." Teacher: "Johnny,
tell me what you  know about the Caucasian Race."  Johnny: "I wasn't there.
I went to the baseball game."  One Hundred Twenty-one

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 122

     ----------

A MODEL B. S. N. S. STUDENT  Hair like ..... . Pauline Bornstein 
Complexion like . . Herby Yorkston Blushes like . .. ... Beverly Hatch 
Eyes like . .... . . Helen Robinson  Teeth like . . ...... Effie Mann 
Laugh  like . ..... Arthur Bowsher  Brains like . . Carl Irish  Voice like
......... Elsie Davies  Hands like . .... Betty De Graff  Good nature like
...... Iyla Robin  Fun like . . . . . . . Regina Frank  Spirit like . .....
. Ethel Burklund  Modesty like . ..... Ethel Brown  Temper like ... . . .
Elwyn Bugge  Neatness like ... . . Gladys Jensen  Daintiness like ......
Irma Coon  Persistence like . . . . Clyde Bancroft  Dignity like . . . .
... Oza Myres  Feet like ........... .Muriel Young  Popularity like . . . .
Archie Erickson  "Pep" like ...... Harold Marshall  Cleverness like . .
Stanley Freeman  Warm-hearted like ..... Miss Mead  Athletic like ...
...... Elwood Davis  Sensible like ....... Muriel Lee  Independent like . .
. . . Stella Lowry  Grace like ....... Helen  Higley  Talent like . . ..
... Edith Kesler  A STUDENT'S TEN COMMANDMENTS  1-Thou shalt not skip
assembly.  2- Thou shalt honor thy team with all  thy songs and with all
thy cheers.  3- Thou shalt love thy faculty with all  thy heart that thy
A's may be numerous.  4- Thou shalt not loiter in the halls lest  thou  be
reported in the office.  5-Thou shalt not sit in the wrong seat  in
assembly let thou be marked absent. 6 - Thou shalt love thy brothers, for
they  are few in numbers.  7-Thou shalt not hide thy ears from  view,
neither shalt thou dress in unseemly  clothes.  8-Thou shalt not study
diligently lest  thy eyes be taken from, thee.  9 - Thou shalt not covet
thy room-mate's  supervisor lest thou get a worse one.  10 - Thou shalt
write school songs and  poems by the volumes that thy name may  be honored
and future students may be  saved the trouble.  Kenneth Selby (in Senior
play practice):  " How do you tremble with love? " Mr. Hoppe (in Exp. III):
"Bring your  Foundations to class with you."  One Hundred Twenty-two  Reta
Olson: "Why, Olga, you out in  this rain without an umbrella or hat? Your 
hair will rust."  Miss Price (dictating a short story about  the lost
kitten): " Miss Erickson, will you  please repeat the kitten's third
speech?"  HEARD Ix DEBATE  Mickey (excitedly): " Who runs  foreign born
steamship lines?"  these Powell: "I can go with any girl I  please." 
Davis: "Yes, but do you please any?"  McPherson (referring to basketball):
"I  expect that Davis will soon be our best  man.9  E. Brown: "Oh! This is
so sudden."  H. Hansen: "I think I shall revise the  alphabet."  G. Weir:
"Why?"  H. Hansen: "Well, so U and I will be closer together."  Miss 
Class):  also the  Bugge.  Wilson (in Library Instruction  "Use your own
judgment and  books I put on the shelf with Mr.  Student Teacher: " What
are you learn-ing  back there, Johnie?" Johnie: " Nothing; I'm listening to
you."  REMEMBER?  Do you remember the time when -  The Student Association
room wasn't oc-cupied?  Bugge forgot to make an announcement  about the
Klipsun?  Helen May wasn't using the typewriter?  Hansen wasn't talking to
Mrs. Mayhew?  Marshall failed to use the word "pep "?  Dr. Nash forgot to
take off his glasses?  Mr. Kolstad forgot to spring a test?  Nichols and
Pinkey weren't strolling on  the campus or Mac and Ethol were going  home? 
The Seniors won the Marathon?  Someone wasn't collecting fees on the  first
landing?  We kept off the grass or didn't run over the knoll?  Eva and
Archie ran for president?  The library was open before 8:02 A. M.  or 6:32
P. M.? Movies weren't given on Wednesday?  Room 119 wasn't occupied by
social clubs?  When Black wasn't cutting hair?

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [123]

     ----------

i -  ;-  :I  1'  :i  ;.t  I  i  i  P r- ::  a- :-1  :~:~:

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [124]

     ----------

A'  i  c  Cil d ~l~t~ C  I:1  '1  .

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [125]

     ----------

47

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [126]

     ----------

N4iii  IP  1#1 lo

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [127]

     ----------

-- 4  i il iiiil !

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [128]

     ----------

own  . . . . . . . . .  ......

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [129]

     ----------

will  IKI  4wb  .............. ...  ..................  .

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [130]

     ----------

wll  -t77,

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [131]

     ----------

7w ; E~"i  Lar "'  B1-

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [132]

     ----------

--A- -j4-P  ~,ve,-J  lior,--ne/  /01.4  .5 /4fc/y o* ~oL  A, M L-dao7 Hall
Jb  a lcvly

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [133]

     ----------

Pich,,-. oib'A/r ma!  - uo  g - la*ri7q a ____/  Y04, .3/y ale/ -TOO~y 
Yoe, *Ohea /,/f/e da'..0dy /2 ,dgef Yaa 4*tlh.- Jay,7eyiv  %Yi-ea / 47, y0
, a,7-7 /VOWu/  7h'n4 ha71 47 lzV*oC'-*,C 0  CV1e -1 , a2 j -- 7 Dall

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 134

     ----------

n jartiung  HE work on this number of the Klipsun has,  as with all
previous ones, been very interest-ing to those who have been actively
engaged  in its production. Now that the work is finished,  the staff
members will feel amply rewarded if the  book to which they devoted so much
of their time  serves as a pleasant and comprehensive review of  the past
school year.  Much credit is due to various students in the  Art Department
for the admirable etchings that  appear throughout the book. Especial
mention should be given to Miss Ruth Claassen, who sub-mitted  the Klipsun
cover design, and to Miss Ethol Lewis, who designed the running head. The 
Senior Class poem, which appears below the  Senior etching, was written by
Misses Carrie and  Evelyn Whittier.  To the many others who have helped in
pro- during  the 1920 Klipsun, we gratefully say, " We  thank you."  -
ELWYN BUGGE, Editor.  One Hundred Thirty-four

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 135

     ----------

This is of  Special Importance to  Graduates  The policy of this school is
to always keep in touch  with its graduates and former students so as to be
of  assistance to them whenever needed.  The Co-Op., being a  part of this
instittution, also  desires to keepl) in touch with its patrons and has
this  proposition to make:   To those of you who will be located in places
where  it will be impossible for you to get many of the things  needed in
teaching, we will agree to fill any order sent  us provided we have the
goods in, stock and providing  cash is sent to cover. You are all more or
less familiar  with our prices, so in making your remittances please  send
enough to cover the articles, together with the  postage. If there is
anything left we will return the  balance to your or give you credit for
same.  -i Those of you who are located handy to regular deal-ers,  we
advise that vou buy of them. It is not our desire  to secure business that
rightfully belongs to them.  The Co-Op  C. C. BAUGHMAN, Maiiager  ;:;: ::;:
;; : : :;;; ...:.
:.....:.:..:.....:...::..:........:....:........;........:.:...:..;::.:.:..:....:.....:..:..;....:..:....;.........;.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 136

     ----------

The  Pheasant  REFRESHMENTS  Ice Cream  Music Dancing  Puget  Sound 
Navigation  Company Freeman  Transfer  PIANOS, FURNITURE  AND BAGGAGE 
PHONE 648  1310 COMMERCIAL ST. Empire Meat    Grocery Co., Inc. 
"Everything  to Eat"  PHONES 986-987  ...............
ql.....................................I

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 137

     ----------

Wr1 " .o...o-o-o.  The  or. NORTHWESTERN  6 o S STATE BANK  "Better OF
BELLINGHAM  Pictures" at  QuaityWork:Quick i orSOUTH BELLINGHAM  When You
Leave School TWASHINGTON  We would greatly appreciate hav-ing  you look up
our dealer in  your home town. In case we are  not represented in your
locality,  please mail your Kodak work  direct to us.  J. H. BILOEDEL,
President J. J. DONOVAN, Vice-President C. L. FLYNx, Supt.  Iluebel
Inonouan ?umber iillsi  Retail Department  Telephone 433 Bellingham Retail
Yard, 1615 Elk Street - - Phone 433  Lynden Retail Yard, Near B.   N. Depot
- - Phone  46  Ferndale Retail Yard, Near Condensery - - - Phone 66 
Everson Retail Yard, South of Postoffice - - Phone 18  _mlllmlllnlnllllunll
ll lllllll l lll rininfl nlmlllllali lul liri in inn ll lIIIII innln l  The
Normal Instructor Primary Plans  FOR ALL GRADES  Fully three times the
circulation of any other  educational magazine.  == _=_F 
?IlnlHIIIIIIIIIIIIIlnln1111111111111114 " "lilll liiiii llilllll ll""lnll
lllli l i" iiili.....i ....... ........................

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 138

     ----------

MAKERS OF  PERFECT PINIGPLATES  HALF TONES and ZINC ETCHINGS  By the Acid
Blast Process  1 /  the modern way of etching today.  i !M"a"inn   PHON80E
i  . . .- .  188  kHM  13in80 IZ

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 139

     ----------

Compliments of  The  American Theatre  Bellingham's  Biggest and Best 
Photoplay  House  Music to Fit the Picture on  Our Wonderful Robert  Morton
Organ  :7I1 1l llllllllllll1ll lllI1iiiiiIIIIIIIII
IIIIIIIIIiIIIIIIiIiIiIiIiIIIIIIIiI IIII1l 11 1iinn l1l llll ii iI I llll l
IiiIIi ii1i iin ll llllllllll lll llll lll llll llllllllll lll iiiii
iiiil1llllllllll llllllliii  FORD CREAMERY COMPANY  1329 DOCK ST.  Plain
and Fancy  Brick Ice Cream  Butter, Cream  and Milk  "Buy Where Values
Tell"  Clothing and  Furnishings  FOR  Men, Young  Men and  Boys  122 EAST
HOLLY STREET These Trademarks  Are Guarantees  of Quality  " KEEN KUTTER" 
Cutlery and Tools  " QUICK MEAL" Ranges  "CRYSTAL"  Electric Washer 
"SIMMONS "  Sewing Machines  " KEEN KUTTER"  Garden Tools  "UNIVERSAL" 
Aluminum Ware  "ARMSTRONG "  Linoleum  See Any of Them at  Jenkins-Boys Co.
 E~~1
1I1I1II1I1I1I1I1I1I111I1II1I1I1I1I1I111111111111111111111111111111111111111111

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 140

     ----------

The  HOME STORE  A. LAWSON  1312-1314 BAY STREET  Dry Goods, Men's and 
Women's Furnishings  Boots and Shoes  At Prices You Can Afford  to Pay  We
Solicit Yoiur  Account NORTHWESTERN  NATIONAL BANK  WE THANK YOU  For your
patronage  Good luck to each  and every one  of you.  Normal Grocery  P. G.
GULBRANSEN, Prop.  431 INDIAN STREET  Battersby's ALWAYS RELIABLE  FOR YOUR
GRADUATION  Adler Gloves  Best Silk Hosiery  Fine Footwear  For Party and
Recep-tion,  Athletic and  School Wear  KABO CORSETS  Exquisite Laces Have
Spread  the Fame of the Bat-tersby  Store  1II1i I 1iI iiIilIillIi~llI l
llll ~ll l lllllIlIlIlIl~llll lllllllilIlIl lI lIlIlI1l 1l1
.II...n.l.IIF...In....

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 141

     ----------

For the Young Business Man  Some day the young business man will be a big
business  man.  Right now, perhaps, there isn't any money profit in
car-rying  his checking account. But some day, as that account  grows, and
as the owner grows with it, the bank will be repaid  for having counseled
the young man, and co-operated with  him in his business success.  So, this
bank invites the young business man or woman  who wishes to grow. We have
seen many a small account  grow into a large one, and have earned the
thanks for help-ful  service cheerfully rendered at all times.  We want
your account. But, what is more, we want  you as a growing business man or
woman to associate your-self  with this bank.  The First National Bank 
BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON  Total Resources Over Four Million Dollars  llmuni
Jl lnnl lnlrll lmiluiii l r lnininulnnnuulllllinlnlulallllllilnlimluil
numinglnmll nuinn  This Space Purchased by BELLINGHAM NATIONAL BANK 
BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON  _1 111111111111111111 + - -  ==~i b ==ucI~rcasd  =
= =  ==LNGAV BN ==TOAL  -- IIAHSrO ==LrTHn, __=-_  = ==  = = =  == """ =="1
== 1 111111 ==11111111111

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 142

     ----------

Introducing Fashions  Most Favored Fancies  Never was the leading
merchandising es-tablishment  of Bellinghamn in so happy  a position to
show fashion's most favored  fancies in everything from dainty garments to
charming chapeaux.  You find here your heart's desire at  prices you will
be glad to pay. Sixteen Big Departments Arranged for  Your Convenience  The
largest stock of Silks, Woolens and Cottons in the Northwest for you  to
select from.  Montague   McHugh  When on Your Vacation Send Us  Your Mail
Orders - 10 Per  Cent Discount Allowed Normal Students and Faculty  142

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 143

     ----------

QUALITY, QUANTITY, VARIETY  AND VALUE  Is what you get when  you trade with
us.  KEMPHAUS   CO.  DRY GOODS - READY-TO-WEAR  A Better Position  That is
what every good teacher  wants. If you are a teacher, a  principal or a
superintendent, and  want to change your position, we  can locate you. 
Superintendents, principals and  school officers are constantly look-ing 
to us more and more for their  supply of teachers.  Get your name on our
list now  if you are going to be available,  either now or in  the future. 
C. C. BRAS, Editor and Manager  of the Northwest Journal of  Education,
Manager  The Bras Teachers' Agency  3140 ARCADE BLDG.  SEATTLE, WASH. 
==il.l.llll Ilil,I IBIIIHNN III II1lIIIIII II l1lllIlIlII III 1il lllnl ill
l l lill lllill l lllilill_ l_- '.r ............  Pacific Teachers'  Agency
 This agency has been do-ing business in Washing-ton,  Oregon, Idaho,
Mon-tana,  Alaska and Hawaii  for twenty-one years. Its  record  for fair
dealing is  open to your inquiry.  We handle many of the  best teachers and
teachers'  positions in  our territory,  and we can help you. Let  us try
and we can convince  you.  Write for Year Book and application blank. They
are  free.  F. H. HUNTWORTH, Mgr.  535 NEW YORK BLOCK  SEATTLE  == n-I 
8111_1 1 1_ 1111 __---111
~~~il1ll1ll1ll1l1li1ll1ll1ll1l1l111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 144

     ----------

Designed for Appearance, Built for  Endurance, Priced for Economy  PHILLIPS
SHOE STORE  " Where Quality Is Higher than Price "  113 WEST HOLLY  -,-l-l-
lili i iii iiiii1I1I1II 1I IIII IlIl I lIII IIIIIIIII IIIIII II IIIII II
IIII IIIIIlIIlIIlI IIIIIIIIlII .  .'litililili iiiiiiii1inii1
illlllllllllllllililililililili i1lilnnll ll
l1lllllllllllllliii1iiiIllllllnlllllllllll  CARSTEN'S PACKING CO. 
(Wholesale and Retail)  Meats  Butter  Eggs  Cheese  Poultry  Delicatessen 
Phone 98 117 WEST HOLLY  Ireland    Pancoast  EVERYTHING  GOOD TO EAT 
Service and Quality  Free Delivery  1321 COMMERCIAL ST.  Phone 2473 
NOTHING OVER 15 CENTS  F. W. WOOLWORTH STORE  5-10-15c Store  122 W. HOLLY
STREET, BELLINGHAM  .. .................  ..,,,,,,,,,,,
8JI1llllll1ll11ll,11l1l11l1l11l1l11l1n11l1111l1l11l1l1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111:1
1111111111 
-~illlllnlllllllllllllllllllllllllllrlIlll1ll1ll1ll1ll1l1ll1li1ll1l1ll111:111111
I  milllll --------- -----

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 145

     ----------

(trn3 art"  'tubt  OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER FOR  THE KLIPSUN FOR  1919-20 
1309 DOCK STREET BELLINGHAM  PHONE 2144 
1111111111111111111111111111111111111111  "flllllllllllIlI iiiiI1lllIlIl ll
I'nl T1{ n I I I IU|n l IlU{III1III hI-: _
III1lllllllillllllllllllllllllillllillll  i i i

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 146

     ----------

Headquarters for everything in School Sup-plies,  including the well known
line of  Milton Bradley Kindergarten Materials  Mail Orders Promptly Filled
at the  Lowest Market Price  Griggs Stationery and Printing Co.  212 E.
HOLLY, BELLINGHAM, WASH.  .....................................-  Which Do
You Like Best -  Good SERVICE or Good EATS?  You Get BOTH Here.  Cafe
Richelieu  W. S. ARMSTRONG, Proprietor  1311 DOCK STREET  -
~6l1ll1la1I1U1I1I1II1I1II1I1I111111111111111111(1111)11111111111111111111111

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 147

     ----------

Utz   Dunn's Style Shoe of Quality for  Women - Co-Operative Shoe for Men 
You Will Find Them Excellent Shoes  KRAMER'S  Quality Shoe Shop  214 E.
HOLLY ST.  ENGBERG DRUG COMPANY KODAKS  Our developing, printing and
enlarging department  is always at your disposal for information,
instruc-tion  and general assistance. Our prescription de-partment  is the
best in the city.  CORNER ELK AND HOLLY STREETS  WHY ADOPT  The Rice System
of Business Penmanship  1. It is no experiment. The results excel others. 
2. The system in both movements and characters is better classified than
any  other.  3. The system, without doubt, has more teaching devices and
aids for teachers  than ever before presented in any work on writing.  4.
The author's personal work in Bellingham State Normal and in city and 
county institutes is a most vital consideration.  For further particulars
address  W. J. RICE, 227 MASON BLDG., BELLINGHAM  The Ideal Place to Room
and Board  While attending the Normal is Mr. and  Mrs. L. Johnson's home at
 630 High Street  References Required - PHONE 3448 - Reasonable Rates 
-=-1111  11111111111111  gljlil iilli ilili lll 1lllilillliil
Di11ii11ii1iii11[i(1i1iii1i iii11i1i1t¢  1iiD  "

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 148

     ----------

A Pleasant Rendezvous  Visitors to Seattle find at the FREDERICK    NELSON
Store so many conveniences that it  is the natural thing for them to adopt
this store  as shopping headquarters during their stay,  and as a pleasant
rendezvous at which to meet  their friends.  Among the service conveniences
a r e  the Tea and Grill  Rooms (5th floor);  the Hairdressing  an d
Manicuring  Rooms (5th Floor);  I E the Rest and Writ-ing  Rooms (5th 
Floor); the Parcel  Checking Bureau  S(1st Floor) ; the Ask  Mr. Foster
Travel  77777 J 'Office (1st Floor).  FIFTH AVENUE AND PINE STREET  inll--
==lll11111111111  a l ll l l  _ll  ll l1__-1-11 111 1

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 149

     ----------

We desire to be of utmost service to Normal Students.  Make our store your
headquarters -- leave your grips and packages here, use our telephones,
etc.,  etc. THANK YOU.  OWL PHARMACY  TO THE STUDENTS AND FACULTY  Of the
Washington State Normal School  WE WISH SUCCESS  SEARS, ROEBUCK AND COMPANY
 Seattle, Washington  Oldest Book Store in Northwest Washington  E. T.
Mathes Book Co.  Headquarters for School Supplies - Mail  Orders Filled
Promptly - Mail Us  Your Magazine Subscriptions.  BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 150

     ----------

For Oxfords and Shoes  that fit and wear, styles  , that are supreme and
ex-elusive,  prices that are  fair -  WALKOVER  - BOOT SHOP  = = -
-lllllll11111111111  . ... 1(1 11(1 111111 11111  For Better Things in
Confectionery  The Pallas  The Home of  DE LUXE  Chocolates  Lunches Ice
Cream  GUN S AND AMMUNITION  FISHING  TACKLE  AND  BASEBALL  S U PP L IES 
NORTHWEST  HARDWARE COMPANY  We Sell Beaver Board  HIGHLAND  CLARK ELECTRIC
C E A M E R Y  H. A. LYLE, Prop. CO PANY ICE CREAM  1322 Commercial Street
CONFECTIONERY, ETC  Phone 182 629 High St. +................
*~1~1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111)11111111111111111111111111
 1 ;1111111111, 111111111111111111:F

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 151

     ----------

......l.l........  :;;..;;;;.;;.;; ;;;;;.............mn m n . . . ......
.... -  GIFTS FOR ALL  OCCASIONS  AT  Muller   Asplund  Jewelers  Manufactu
rers of  Normal School  Class and Club Pins  and Rings  ..- 111 11 1 111 1 
1 11 1 _ _111  -- ,,,,,1111111 ==,,,,,i  IT'S QUALITY  THAT COUNTS  IN THIS
WORLD  Candies (aljd Ice  Cream  Stand for that  119 EAST HOLLY  ..........
.1111111)1111111111111111111)11111111111,11111111111111111111111111111111111111
Exclusively Women's, Misses', Children's, and Infants'  Ready-to-Wear
Apparel and Accessories Characteristic Originality  Combined with  Correct
Style and Good Taste  Comprehensive Displays of Seasonable Apparel  Always
Featured  - at -  BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON  ........11.1.1 111111 111 11

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 152

     ----------

NEW SPRING SHOES-We  have a full line of new spring shoes  and oxfords for
men and women, all the new styles at prices you can afford to pay.  Famous
Shoe House  126 E. HOLLY, BELLINGHAM, WASH.   ;i 1i i i:i:i
iii::ii:i1:ii1:ii1 tl llllillllllllillllillillill. lillliilllllllll 
Watches  Diamonds  Fine Jewelry  We Make Everything Run  that Has Wheels 
G. E. Ludwig  Watch Expert  ALASKA BUILDING  BELLINGHAM, - WASH.  Fishing
Tackle  Tennis Rackets  Baseball  Supplies  Kelly Springfield  Tires for
More  Mileage Morse  Hardware Co.  Distributors  Established 1884  1025 ELK
STREET  PHONE 422  TABOR   CRUIKSHANK  Wholesale and Retail  Tires and
Automotive Supplies  GOODRICH SOLID TRUCK TIRES  1327 DOCK STREET
BELLINGHAM

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 153

     ----------

GEO. F. RAYMOND  Dependable Footwear  Phone 3491  110 EAST HOLLY STREET 
BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON  Headquarters for  GROCERIES, FRESH FRUIT AND 
VEGETABLES  Home Baking Cakes of All Kinds for Special Occasions  We
appreciate the liberal patronage extended to us in  the past  by the Normal
students, and we shall try to  give our best attention to all business in
the future.  M. J. O'CONNOR  Successor to SWEET GROCERY CO.  1021 ELK
STREET  An Office With a Reputation for  " SE R V I C E"  BRISBIN, SMITH  
LIVESEY  REAL ESTATE - INSURANCE  Phones 411 and 412 312 DOCK STREET  in
ll:rl r l l n u mi i r l n l l l n i m u r n n n n n m m n I n l n  u n n i
m i n l m ml in m l  n n nn n n n um u m nu n m n i in i r l i n n

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 154

     ----------

THE U1NIVERSAL CAR  Out of the more than 3,000,000 Ford cars  now in use,
about sixty percent have been sold  to farmers. Probably no other one thing
has  brought to the farm so much of comfort and  profit  as has the Ford
car. It has enlarged  the social life, doubled the facilities for
market-ing,  brought the town next door to the farm,  multiplied for the
farmer the pleasures of living.  A family car without an equal in low cost
of  operation and maintenance. We solicit your  rder for one now because
the demand is large  and continually increasing.  Diehl   Simpson Co. 
LBELLINGHAM'S  Established 1889  cHARLES ERHOLM, Prop. FAVORITE  "He
Profits Most FOR  Who Serves  Best" st." FIFTEEN  PROMPT - RELIABLE YEARS 
Up-to-date and Sanitary  in Every Respect  We Are at Your Service R YAL 
Phones 126 and 127 ICE CREAM  1728-1738 ELLIS STREET  Gi-- --  toPrb+byn
ohroe hna ----.  -__ -t+  bruh fr o ....uhofcmor n  == == nlre ==  . n i~
ii l fit n i  i i  ,-111111111111111ii1l1ln1l lllllllllllllllll
llllllllllllll l IIeI IIIIIIIIII11111111111 11fa1 1 illlllllllllll l llll i
| | ikn

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 155

     ----------

Cook With _ -  PUGET SOUND TRACTION  PUGET SOUND TRACTION  LIGHT   POWER
CO.  A RESTAURANT  to ever suit must change its bill of  fare, and must
have special con-coctions  to appease the jaded ap-petite.  We have a habit
of spring-ing  something new every week.  Fish, roasts, steaks, chops,
oysters  and all table delicacies to order,  = Come and visit the hoe-lik
res-taurant  and make yourself at home.  Leopold Hotel  -- ==  -- 5  For
Eight Years  THE CAVE  Has Stood for Pure,  Clean, Wholesome  CANDY AND 
ICE CREAM  '?L~1
"1l"1l1ll1ll1ll1l1ll1l1111111111111111111111111111111(11111111111111111  I
I IIIIII IIIIIIIII IIII JI II111111 1[11 1 11 1 11 IIIJ ilI I II

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 156

     ----------

We wish each member  of the  Class of Nineteen Twenty  a successful
life----one  that will be a credit  to themselves and to  the school they 
represent.  UNION PRINTING,  BINDING   STATIONERY CO.  The House of
Printing Products 
:~(:I~IIlIlRlllIlIlIlIlIlrIIrInIlIlIlIIII1II1I1IL11lU11II1II1I1II1I1II1I1I111111
~P:::::::::::l:II::I1::::::::::11111111:

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 157

     ----------

The Following Firms Have Helped to Make  It Possible to Place This Klipsun 
in Your Hands  ADAMS STYLE SHOP  The Store for Men  HOLLY AT ELK  B. B.
FURNITURE CO.  BAY AND PROSPECT STS.   BELLINGHAM BAY IMPROVE-MENT  CO. 
COR. ELK AND HOLLY STS.  BERG SHOE REPAIR SHOP  DOCK STREET  COLLINS   CO. 
Cut Rate Drug Store  208 EAST HOLLY ST.  COUNTRYMAN, L. C.  Dry Goods  1316
BAY STREET  FAIR DEPARTMENT STORE  GRAND AND CHAMPION FLORAL EXCHANGE  102
WEST HOLLY  GAGE-DODSON CO.  Clothes for Men  203 WEST HOLLY GIBBS, WILBUR 
Manufacturing Optician and Jeweler  115 EAST HOLLY  MACKLIN, EDGAR  Dry
Goods  1320 BAY STREET  NEWTON'S, INC.  Women's Apparel of Quality  200
WEST HOLLY  WOLL, J. P.  Optometrist and Optician  205 WEST HOLLY  SETH
ATWOOD  Pictures, Art and Gift Shop  212 West Holly  157

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 158

     ----------

, ituxgrutI1

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page 159

     ----------

Autfograpya  __

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [160]

     ----------

,  ',,  i

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [3] of cover

     ----------

I ~~ __ I 1 1111 1 IId II 11 1111 111I1I I ~ IIII  u ~--~-~~~~~ :;1:~~;~
~1~~~~~4:-;::::::-~;i~~-~~r-- ~~II :_ ;

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1920 - Page [4] of cover

     ----------

PPPPP