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1923

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Klipsun, 1923


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     Klipsun, 1923 - Cover


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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page [2] of cover


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I I  THE ANNUAL SENIOR  PUBLICATION  Volume XI  Published at  WASHINGTON
STATE NORMAL SCHOOL  Bellingham, Washington  Three  __ __

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Dot Island Copyright Clyde Banks

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Five  I I

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Seven  I- - - r-1 c_ -~ ---"C IIIILIII~CIIIII

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Eight

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Nine

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a r ks  : r  r I'  .ii  I' ~ "CtJll I

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FOREWORD  Whatever the faults or merits of the I923 Klip-sun,  it is my
hope that it will, to a degree, stand as  a record of those things most
interesting and worth  while that have been representative of our Normal 
School life of the past year.  In our school life we have been imbued with
a  spirit of co-operation and labor for those things  which we have come to
recognize to be for our own  best interest and welfare. Further, we have
gained  that social point of view which induces us to work  for the common
good of all. That is why we are  interested in the welfare of our school.
For that  which we have been given-these few years of free  education-we
have come to recognize our relative  responsibility; and that it is our
duty to be  boosters;  to work in a constructive way for things that will 
soon put this school in the lead of the other Normal  schools of our
nation. Let us not forget this obli-g'ation.  Because of this year's
successes, we have rea-son  to be proud of our Alma Mater. Our
represen-tatives  in athletics, debate, and other student enter-prises, 
have, by their marked ability and achieve-ment,  and through victory after
victory, given to our Normal School a distinction and standing in  our
commonwealth of which we may be justly  proud. In very deed and truth, this
has been a glor-ious  year.  It is my hope that in after years this Klipsun
 will be a reminder of those (lays that were so dear  to us, and that those
who come after us may find  in it something worthy of emulation.  -Eggert
A. Burns.  Eleven

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IN APPRECIATION  With the completion of work on the 1923 Klip-sun,  there
comes a realization of the splendid co-operation  and services of those who
contributed to  its success.  We sincerely appreciate the encouraging
attitude  of Mrs. Vaughan, literary critic, who in times of  difficulty has
been ever willing to  help; and the  splendid contributions of Robert
Caulkins in the  way of many of the finer ideas incorporated into the 
Klipsun. It was with sincere regret that I learned  of his inability to
continue his work  as associate  editor, due to failing health. The breach
left by  M'r. Caulkins was, however, satisfactorily filled  when the
services of Miss Anna Lind were secured.  Her very efficient, though
unassuming manner has  made working with her a distinct pleasure.  Among
others of the Normal to whom we are  especially indebted, we wish to
mention Miss Marie  Druse, art critic; Miss Catherine Smith, art editor; 
Miss Marjory Downes, literary editor; Miss Floris  Clarke, debate editor
and editor of the Alaska sec-tion;  as well as the many contributors to the
lit-erary  section and art work.  W e are also greatly indebted to the Art
Engrav-ing  Company, the Jukes Studio, and the Irish Print-ing  Company for
the efficient services rendered at  all times during our work with them. 
In all truth, it may be said that any merits  which this Klipsun may
contain are dcue to the con-certed  effort of the Sophomore class and
associated  student body.  -THE EDIrOR  Twelve

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TABLE OF CONTENTS  The Normal School Page  Normal School and Northwest
Scenes ............................................... 4  Officers of
Administration .................... ....... ... I188.......................
 History of School .......... .. ........ .. ........ 21  D epartm ents of
School ..... .... . ................. ............3.3.2.......
.....................  Alumni Association .........
................................... ..... 42  Students' Association
.................. ...................... ..... ........ 46  Students'
Co-op. ............................ ............... ... ...........
......... 48  Classes  Seniors ..... ....................................
49  Juniors ................................................... 105  Senior
College -............................................ 8  Debate
...........................-..
...................................................................... IIO 
A thletics  Men's Athletics ....... .................. ......... ...
........... I 5  W om en's Athletics ....................
.................................... ......... ... ... .... 127 
Publications  Klipsun ......... .................................
.................. .........1.3 2 Weekly Messenger ......
.................................. 137  Literary  Stories .............. .
..................................... 40  Poetry .......
.................... .... ................ .... 148  Leaves From An Alaskan
Calendar ......................................... .1.6.o.  Mount Baker
Excursion .......................................... .............
............. ...... 173  Hannegan Pass Hike .............................
........................... .. 177  Organizations ..............
.......................... .... 11881..............  Drama ... .
................. ................................. 22..1...9.......  Music
.. .... 22I  Calendar ..............................
............................. ----- 227  Bunk, Snaps and' Advertisemenlts
........................... 235  Thirteen

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That man only, is worthy to be called educated who is able to do at least
one useful thing well;  who has a sympathy that is universal, and who is in
the line of evolution.  Fourteen

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DE)ICATED  TO  JOHN F. CASKEY  Department of Business Education  Because as
an instauctor he shows us  bigger phases of our studies by being able to go
 yond the limits of an text-book;  Because as a mann he stands up for his
convic-tions;  Because as a friend and advisor he inspires us  to be of
service  to our fellows.  Fifteen  the  be-

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IN MEMORIAM  JOHN VINCENT COUGHLIN  Departmelnt of Science  CLARA MARIE
BURTON Sophomore  Sixteen  C~i~

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A TRIBUTE  Just for today, (lear God, give us the faith  To banish sorrow
that has crept among  Infesting all and piercing hearts that once  Were
teeming full with laughter, joy, and song.  Let us again, as only
yesterday,  Slip hand in hand with every face a friend,  Knowing his motto
whence he lived and loved  And  learn of life John Coughlin's plan and way.
 Let us forget earth's tears, its gloss, and sham,  The mummery of those
who give to take;  Let us forget the pretense and the show,  And of our
lives, a model, like his, make.  Dear God, O let this plea, our prayer,
wing high above;  Gve us new hopes, new days, glad, undefiled,  Show how we
here, bereaved and left behind,  May learn his goodness, gentle, kind, and
mild.  -TINY LA RouCHE.  Seventeen

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PRESIDENT DWIGHT BRYANT WALDO  Eighteen  I , ~ _ _I _- _I~_ ~_~Lr~ ~

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To President Waldo, who has Zwalked among  us for a twelveinonth;
diagnosing with far-seeing  eye; adding here and readjusting there; always 
building, reconstructing, with expert knowledge of  future needs and
present opportunities: sincerely,  gratefully, and sorrowfully, we give
greeting-an,'  f arewell. Nineteen

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Miss EXEAN WOODARD SANFORD E. CARVER  Dean of Women Dean of Men  Miss
Woodard may, at  any time, he caught in  the act of doing a kindness to
others. She is the con-siderate  friend who tirelessly devotes herself to
the  welfare of her girls for whom she covets the best  possible in life. 
Mr. Carver is a real friend to the men of B.  S. N. S. Efficient, sincere,
and self-effacing, he  speaks little, but means what he says.  Twenty  1

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HISTORY OF BELLINGHAM  STATE NORMAL SCHOOL  Our present Normal School,
considered the sixth largest in the United  States, had its beginning as a
private school in the little city of Lynden. That institution, however, was
refused state aid; hence a movement was started for  the establishment of a
state normal school in this locality.  A law was passed creating a
commission to select a site in Whatcom  County, and the present location,
occupying sixty-eight acres of land on the  slope of Sehome Hill, was
chosen. This tract of land was at that time midway  between the two cities,
Fairhaven and Whatcom, now united and known as  the city of Bellingham. The
Bellingham Bay Improvement Company,  the  Fairhaven Land Company, and the
heirs of the Lysle estate donated the land.  The governor vetoed the first
appropriation for the erection of a building.  In 1895, however, the
legislature appropriated $40,000 for the erection of the  original
building. On the first board of trustees were Major Eli Wilkins, of 
Fairhaven;  Hon. R. C. Higginson, and Hon. J. J. Edens, of Whatcom. A 
third appropriation in 1897 was also vetoed,  and the building was
unoccupied  for two years. The legislature of 1899 appropriated $33,000 for
equipment  and maintenance of school. The campus was cleared and fenced,
sidewalks  built, the building furnished, laboratories fitted up, the
library opened with  one thousand volumes, and many other necessary items
furnished.  The first faculty of six members began their work on September
6, 1899, with Dr. Edward T. Mathes as principal. There was an enrollment of
16o  students on the first (lay of school, but at the end of the first
month, the  number had increased to 230, necessitating the addition of
three more faculty  members, among them being Miss Catherine Montgomery,
who is still doing excellent work for the school. Eight young ladies
graduated the first year,  and sixteen received elementary certificates.
The spirit of the school in those  early days, exemplified by their school
yell, "Za! Za!! Zeer! ! ! We're right  here! 19oo Pioneer !" has been
rekindled with every succeeding year.  The Normal School has rapidly grown
from its struggling beginning  into a school that ranks very high among the
educational institutions of this  state. We now have a president, a faculty
corps of fifty members, and an  enrollment of over a thousand students,
representing every state in the Union,  as well as other countries.  In
addition to the original structure, eight other buildings have been 
erected-the training school  building in 90oI, the gymnasium in Ig9o, old 
Edens Hall in 1905, which accommodated sixty-three students, the science 
annex in 1907, the manual training shop, and a large annex to the training 
school in 1913, a central heating plant in 1917, the Emergency Hospital in 
1921, and the new Edens Hall in 1922, accommodating 116 students. The 
Twenty-One

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library now has 27,000 books in the main library, 3,000 in the juvenile
library,  and over 300 magazines and newsp apers in the periodical room.
The school  each year provides a lecture course free to the students, which
gives them an  opportunity to hear the leading artists of the world. Third
and fourth year courses are now offered to the students, and they are
looking forward to the  time when they may receive a degree.  The growth of
the school can best be realized from the fact that the  enrollment has
increased to such an extent that certain departments of the  school are
entirely inadequate. The library and gymnasiums, built to accom-modate  the
students of two decades ago, are examples of this.  The first issue of the
"Messenger," the schocl paper, appeared in De-cember,  1899, being a paper
five by ten inches, printed once a month. It is  now known as the "Weekly
Messenger," is eleven by fourteen inches,  con-taining  ten pages of school
news.  A recent addition of importance to the school's development was the 
purchase in 1922 of the eighty-acre tract, Normalstad, the school's
recreational  park, on Lake Whatcom. The dock has just been completed, land
is the largest  on the lake. Plans are being made for a  boathouse, with
quarters for a row-ing  crew. The twenty different clubs of the school are
busy at p r esent locat-ing  the sites for their future lodges.  FIRST
BUILDING B. S. N. S., 1896  Twenty-Two

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Twenty-Three

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:fir \  rr  i~  r=r  x. ',r  f  a-  I :.

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GERTRUDE EARHART Superintendent Training School  Teachers' College,
Columbia University, B. S.; and graduate work; graduate four-year course
State  Normal School, St. Cloud, Minnesota; student University of Michigan 
NORA B. CUMMINS Associate in History and Sociology  Columbia University, M.
A.; and graduate work; Minnesota University, B. A.; graduate Northern 
Normal and Industrial School, Aberdeen, S. D.  GERTRUDE LONGLEY Home
Economics  Teachers' College, Columbia University, B. S.; Chicago
University  IRVING ELGAR MILLER Education  University of Chicago, M. A.,
Ph. D.; University of Rochester, B. A.; Author of "Psychology of
Think-ing,"  "Education for the Needs of Life," and "American Spirit."  MAY
G. LONG Physical Education  Special work in Minnesota University; Columbia
University; University of California; University of  Utah; holder of an
Iowa State Physical Training Certificate.  EDWARD JULIUS KLEMME Director of
Extension  Northwestern University, M. A.; Central Normal College, Indiana,
B. A.; graduate student in Education,  Ewing College and Northwestern
University.  MARGARET G. BLACK Supervisor, City System  University of
Michigan, B. A.; graduate Western Illinois State Normal; graduate work
University of  Wisconsin  LYNUS ALONZO KIBBE Associate in Education 
Columbia University, M. A.; University of Washington, B. A., M. A.;
McMinnville College, B. S.;  graduate State Normal School, Bellingham;
advanced study Columbia University and University of  Washington  DELIA L.
KEELER Extension Supervisor  Columbia University, M. A., and graduate work;
Salina Normal University, B. S.; State College of  Washington, B. A.  HARRY
C. PHILIPPI  Physical Sciences  University of Missouri, B. S., in Ed., M.
A.; State Normal School, Warrensburg, Missouri, M. Ped.; B. Ped., graduate
work University of Missouri and University of Washington CATHERINE
MONTGOMERY Assistant Superintendent Training School  University of
Washington, B. A.;  Kindergarten Course, School of Education; State Normal
School, San  Francisco, California; State Normal School, Emporia, Kansas 
JOHN F. CASKEY Business Education  National Penmanship and Commercial
College, Delaware, Ohio; student Wesleyan University of  West Virginia  MAY
MEAD School  Nurse  Graduate Northwestern Sanitarium, Port Townsend,
Washington; University of Washington. LYDIA E. JACOBS Supervisor Lower
Intermediate Grades  Teachers' College, Columbia University, B. S.,  and
graduate work; University of Chicago; Teachers'  College, Normal, Illinois 
LILLIAN GEORGE Cataloguer and Library Assistant  Rhode Island State
College, B. S.; University of Illinois, A. B.; New York State Library
School, B. L. S.  Twenty-Five

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Twenty-Six

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EXEAN WOODARD Dean of Women  University of Chicago, M. A.; Ohio Wesleyan
University, B. A. MRS. ANNETTE H. VAUGHAN English  Bellingham Normal;
Eugene Bible University; University of Oregon, B. A.  JOHN RINDAL Assistant
Industrial Arts  Carpenter, builder and cabinet maker for six years  S. E.
CARVER Physical Education for Men  Bellingham State Normal School; State
University, Berkeley, California  THOMAS F. HUNT Geography  University of
Minnesota, B. S.; graduate work University of Wisconsin, University of
Chicago and  University of California.  MRS. BERTHA FROST HUGHES School
Physician  University of Minnesota, M. D.; Hamline University, Minnesota;
State Normal  School, Bellingham  JESSIE AMES BELTON fMusic  University of
Washington; Urbana University; Thomas Normal Training School.  LINDA
COUNTRYMAN Home Economics  Milwaukee-Downer College, B. S.  MIRS. MAY
LOVEGREN Assistant in Business Educaltion  Graduate Vashon College;
Washington State College  HORACE G. RAHSKOPF Assistant in Expression 
Willamette University, B. A.; School of Expression, Boston, Massachusetts;
Public Speakers' Diploma.  JAMES BEVER History and Sociology  Drake
University, B. Ped., B. A., M. A.; graduate work, University of Washington,
and University of  Chicago.  ANNA ULLIN Foreign Languages  University of
Washington, A. B.; Columbia University.  BELLE WALLACE Supervisor Granmmar
Grades  University of Washington, M. A., and holder  of University Life
Diploma; Whitman College, B. A.;  Author of "The Problem-project Method in
Operation."  LAURA E. MCDONALD Supervisor Upper Intermediate Grades  Iowa
State Teachers' College, A. B.; University of Chicago, Ph. B.; graduate
work University of Chicago.  M. W. HECKMAN Industrial Arts  University of
Wisconsin, B. A.; graduate State Normal School, Oshkosh, Wisconsin;
graduate Stout  Institute, Menomonie, Wisconsin; student Armour Institute,
Chicago, Illinois; student Bradley Poly-technic,  Peoria, Illinois. 
Twenty-Seven

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.M ~ Ny'= }+ 1 yf w 'sy= .r~ .rF 1".;". rk ,v , . :, t  ".. ' r ' ~is f, '
1  lt;  "a  Olel  a a  4 r3'

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BERTHA CRAWFORD Supervisor Upper Grades  State Normal School, Bellingham;
University of Washington  MARGUERITE LANDIS Assistant in Art  Pratt
Institute; advanced work at Columbia University; three years of outdoor
sketching with  Edgar Forkner.  LYMAN D. BISSELL Printing  United
Tyjlotl:etae of America, M. P.  ALMA G. MADDEN English  Earlham College;
Marden School of Elocution; University of Illinois, B. A.  F. L. OLSLAGER
Registrar  BLANCHE LOUDEN Assistant Superintendent Training School 
Teachers' College, Columbia University, B. S.; State Normal School,
Moorhead, Minnesota; University  of Chicago and Universty of California 
LOLA I. MCMEEN Supervisor Intermediate Grades  Bellingham Normal;
University of Washington; Columbia University, B. S., and Diploma for
Primary  Critic teacher.  RUTH BUCHHOLz Secretary to the President'  JEAN
R. FRANK Assistant in Physical Education  Bellingham Normal; American
College of Physical Education, Chicago, B. P. E.  MABEL ZOE WILSON
Librarian  Ohio University, B. A.; New York Library School, B. L. S.
GEORGIA I'OWELL GRAGG Penmanship  State Normal School, Bellingham;
supervisory course A. An. Palmer School of Penmanship.  MRS. IWEY A. GAUL
Foreign Languages  W. J. RICE Assistant in Penmanship  Central Normal
College, Danville, Indiana, B. A.; University of Washington; Gregg School,
Chicago.  CECELIA KNAPSTEIN Secretary Appointment Committee  MILDRED V.
MOFFATT Supervisor Primary Grades  Secondary Education, Chicago University;
holder of Iowa State Life Diploma.  Twenty- Nine

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Thirty

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JENNIE LYNN RICE Office Secretary  MRS. ELIZABETII MCDANII. KlRural School
Assistant  Graduate State Normal School, Bellingham, Washington  ELIAS A.
BOND Mathematics  Pacific University, B. A.; graduate work University of
Washington and University of Chicago  VICTOR H. HOPPE Oral Expression
Denison University, B. A.; graduate work University cf Washington and
University of Chicago.  EDNA SWANSON Recorder  M'ARJORIE JOHNSTON Assistant
in Art  Academy of Fine Arts, Chicago, Illinois; University of Washington. 
MARGARET ZURBRICK Assistant Librarian  MARGARET MACKINNON Accountant  MABEL
SHUEY Social Director, Edens Hall  MARIE CAREY DRUSE Art and Handcraft
Boston School of Drawing; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Eric Pape Life
School, Boston; pupil of  Edwin Burrill, Amelie De Combes, Geer; Harvard
Summer School.  MRS. LAURA LEE TARTE Recorder  F. W. BROCKMAN Agriculture 
Washington State College; Cheney Normal; University of Washington, B. S.
HAZEL M. BREAKEY Assistant in Art  MARY ELLEN RINGER Library Assistant 
MRS. PEARL LANSING Secretary Hygiene Department  Thirty-One

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ART DEPARTMENT  Miodern education has a double trend: one is toward
democracy; the other  toward the practical side of living. As we approach
these tendencies from  many sides, we find that they are often  coincident.
 The Art department has felt the strong current setting in toward what  is
practical and of value in industry. We are forced to consider the question 
of art for life's sake. This means, first of all the taking of art out of
the  hands of a few exceptional people and putting it into the hands of
everyone  who wants it and needs it. There is scarcely an hour of the day
when the  question of art does not come up in some form or other. It is
this universal  application of art principles that makes us lay such stress
on art teaching. It  has forced us to revolutionize our art courses both as
to their content and  their method. Another reason why the Art department
lays such stress on art  teaching is the constantly increasing demands of
the best schools for teachers E  who can teach practical art.  An annual
exhibit offers a splendid opportunity for one to stop and sum-marize  the
year's achievements. More than that, it furnishes  a standard  of
comparison and an index of progress that is of inestimable value to those 
interested in general, and to the department in particular. The annual 
exhibit of art and handicraft which was held May 17-18, under the direction
 of Miss Druse, Miss Landis, Miss Johnston and Miss Breakey summarized the
work of the department in a remarkable way. The aim of the department  is
four-fold: I. the development of technical skill; 2. correlation between 
subjets; 3. use of industrial material and processes; 4. appreciation. It 
was most interesting to follow the systematic working out of these aims as 
 shown in the results exhibited on walls and tables in the department rooms
 and corridors. Correlation has become the keyword in modern education and 
no subject offers more opportunity for correlation than does Art. Work was 
especially correlated wth civics, literature, history, geography and other
sub-jects. The use of industrial materials and processes have been
strikingly il-lustrated.  The development of appreciation is a harder thing
to measure because,  after all, appreciation is a thing of the spirit and
so cannot come under any  yard stick rule yet one could get some
satisfactory evidences of the existence of appreciation in the comments of
students as they went about from section  to section.  In summing up the
exhibit as a whole we would call your attetnion once  more to its aims and
the aims of the department  back of it. The reason for  the existence of an
Art department is first of all to train in appreciation of  what is
right-second, to teach how to apply this knowledge and give others  the
same appreciation, and finally, to make of this knowledge some practical 
use in industry in the home life and in the personal equipment of the
indi-vidual.  Thirty-Two

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BUSINESS EDUCATION  With J. F. Caskey as head of the department, 'ably
assisted by Mrs. May  G. Lovegren, the Department of Business Education has
functioned in the  school, the community and the state in a way to cause
the business men and  school boards to seek those who have received
instruction in this department.  The greatest contributing factor in the
success of the students of this department lies in the fact that the
instructors, believe in taking the student  with whatever of natural power,
initiative and ability he may possess, and by  developing these to the
highest point of efficiency attainable in the time given  for the work, and
then, this accomplished, send him forth with spirit unafraid, to do and
dare in his chosen line of work. As teachers, the instructors of this 
department encourage and help their students in ways that bring out the 
best that is in them.  Students of the Department of Business Education
have felt and do feel  that the scople of the work should be broadened so
as to include those subjects  that naturally fall within its line of work.
Commercial Geography, Business Arithmetic, History of Commerce, and
Penmanship suited to the needs of  the commercial teacher, surely  come
within the province of this department.  Mr. Caskey has endeared himself to
each and every student through his  never failing help, advice, comfort,
and sympathy that is available to all who  go to him with their troubles. A
former student, writing to Mr. Caskey, said  this of Mrs. Lovegren: "She is
all gold." What higher tribute need any  woman ask? Mrs. L'ovegren's cheery
words and smile, together with her  fund 'of knowledge, helps many 'a
student along his weary way.  EDUCATION  Dr. Irving E. Miller, the 
well-known author of the "Psychology of  Thinking," and "Education for the
Needs of Life," is at the head of this  department. Associated with him are
L. A. Kibbe, Miss Delia Keeler, and  Arthur Kolstad, all able and efficient
instructors. In addition to the work  of these regular instructors, Miss
Margaret Roberts teaches one class a quarter  in Observation, and Miss
C'atherine Montgomery one class in Primary Methods. Both of these teachers
are highly trained for their special lines of  work. Mrs. Clara K. Jones
serves as a reader on half time, and Miss Minnie  Swanson gives fourteen
hours to clerical work.  The Department of Education covers the following
fields: Psychology,  Child Study, Observation and Methods,  Rural
Education, School Law and  School Mianagement, Principles and History of
Education, Educational  Measurements, Intelligence Tests, and School
Administration. In these var-ious  lines, about  thirty different courses a
year are given, distributed through  four years of the college course.
During the four Quarters something like  four thousand students 'are
enrolled in all the classes of the Department. Thirty-Three

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The ideals of the Department call for highly trained teachers,
speciali-zation  of instruction, and a sharp focusing of all the work upon
the problems  of teacher training. The Department expects to have
additional  teachers  next year. It will then be possible to emphasize
still more the advanced  courses for third and fourth year students.  -0- 
ENGLISH  No subject in the curriculum contributes so much to culture and to
breadth of vision as does English literature. Many students, realizing that
 this is true, have chosen to specialize in this subject, and as many as
714  students have taken elective courses in English this year.  The field
from.  which to choose is large, covering, as it does, 25 courses in
li'terature and  composition. The growing demand for such work has
necessitated the em-ployment  of two new teachers.  fMiss Sperry, the head
of the department, needs no recommendation as all  those who have 'een in
her classes know what an inspiration she is. Mrs.  Vaughan, 'too, is ever
the students' friend, and her untiring zeal in work for  the Messenger has
been much appreciated. Mrs. Hussey, a graduate of the  University of
Washington, came to us from Washington, D. C., last fall.  She is
specializing in the teaching of composition and is a popular member of  the
faculty. Miss Dillon taught only till Christmas when unfortunately she  was
obliged to resign on account of illness. She was succeeded by Miss  Madden,
a graduate of the University of Iowa, and for four years head of  the
department of Public Speaking at Penn College, Iowa.  Next fall we shall
welcome the return of Miss Edens, now on leave of  absence. Miss Edens
studied at the University of London last summer and  has been at Columbia
University this year. With this addition to the staff Miss Sperry is
anticipating further de-velopment  in her department next year, and will
offer special courses to third  and fourth year students.  ORAL EXPRESSION 
Oral Expression, which is included with the English, is named by Victor  H.
Hoppe and Horace G. Rahskopf, who are excellently fitted by previous 
training for this special work.  Twelve different courses are offered in 
oral expression ranging from  practical speaking to community dramatics.
The department constitutes a vital part of the school, not only from the
professional and the academic  standpoints, but also as a basis for such
vital student activities as school  dramatics and debate, both of which
have flourished during the present year  and which have before them a
future of great promise.  The Bellingham State Normal is of greater
assistance in an educational  way to teachers in service and to the public
in general, by having an  Exten-sion  department organized for extension
service.  Thirty-Four

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EXTENSION  The Extension department, with E. J. Klemme as director, serves
the  state at large in various ways. Through extension service, classes are
or-ganized  at different points and conducted by Normal instructors. These
may  be credit or non-credit courses. The correspondence courses, offered
by the  several departments, make it possible for teachers who are unable
to be in  residence to do work that  will count toward graduation, after
thirty-six weeks  of residence as required by law. At the request of a
superintendent or prin-cipal,  an instructor is sent to a school to give
educational tests in spelling, reading, arithmetic, writing, and any other
subject taught. They point out  the best method of adopting the material of
instruction to the needs of the  individual. A number of small towns and
communities within easy reach of  the Normal School, profit by the talent
centered in this institution. Readings,  compiled by Mr. Hoppe, of a very
high standard are in constant demand. Upon  request, the Extension
department also furnishes judges for debates, and  speakers for P. T. A.,
Women's Clubs, and other civic organizations.  Mr. Klemme has served the
school in the capacity of director of the  Extension department for several
years and has given excellent service. He  is in constant demand throughout
the state, both as an adviser for higher edu-cation,  and as a speaker. 
Mrs. Pearl Lansing is the secretary of the department and has served  the
Normal School four years. The department is entirely in her charge during
Mr. Klemme's absence in the field. Mrs. Lansing has full charge of  the
correspondence work and is able to advise students regar(ling courses that 
would apply on their major.  There are twenty-one instructors offering work
in correspondence and  150 students .entrolled at the present time. These
enrollments represent the  four states, Washington, Idaho, Oregon, Montana
and the territory of  Alaska. The department has enrollement from 23
counties out of the 39 in  this state.  FOREIGN LANGUAGE The foreign
language department is headed by Miss Helen Beardsley,  who received her
training at the University of Colorado, with graduate study  at the
Sorbonne and at the University of Leipzig. Owing to ill health, Miss 
Beardsley has been on leave of absence this year, but is scheduled to teach
dur-ing  the summer session.  The department is, however, fortunate in
having as instructors Miss  Anne Ullin and Mrs James Gaul. Both have come
to the institution this year,  and are particularly well fitted for work in
this special line. They have  worked earnestly for the interests of the
school at large, as well as of this de- partment.  Thirty-Five

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French and Spanish are the foreign languages offered in this year's
cur-riculum.  Elementary courses in these subjects are given each quarter,
and  the opportunity is then given the students to take advanced work,
including  studies of literature and composition. Each year the enrollment
in both the  elementary and advanced courses is large.  For the future, the
instructors of this department plan to have their  work so organized that
they will be able to have their classes produce French  and Spanish plays,
along with their advanced work.  HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE  This
department is under the direction of James  Bever, who has been  connected
with the institution since 1909. Associated wilth Mr. Bever in this
department is Miss Nora B. Cummings, with this institution since 1915, and 
T. F. Hunt, also since 1915.  All members of the 'tealching staff have done
research work along their  special lines in some of the best universities
of the country, and consequently  are especially fitted to teach the
courses offered.  The department covers in the history courses, all phases
of European and  American history, including the world war period. Courses
in history meth-ods  are offered each quarter covering some phase of
presenting the subject.  In social science, courses are offered in the
principles of sociology, rural sociology, social problems, economics,
'community civics, comparative govern-ment,  commercial and political
geography.  The plan of instruction followed by the department is that all
subjects  should be taught in relation to their bearing upon the present
time and  problems, thereby giving 'the student a better  back ground for
his work as a  teacher.  The department expects to, have additional
instructors in the near future,  thereby enabling them to further emphasize
the advanced courses for third  and fourth year students.  HOME ECONOMICS 
The Home Economics Department, although located in the basement  of  the
Science annex, does not hold an inferior place in the life of the school. 
Miss Gertrude Longley is head of the department, and associated with  her
is Miss Linda Countryman. Thirteen courses are offered,  none of which  are
requirements for everyone, but eight are required for those forty or fifty 
girls who are specializing in Home Economics teaching. However, we had  an
average of 149 students each quarter this past year, with 273 last summer, 
while many more wished for time for one of these electives. The main object
 of our work is to train future teachers, and because of this much time is
given  to method, as  well as subject matter. H. E. I Fundamental Foods  
Cookery,  and H. E. 9 Elementary Clothing lay particular emphasis on Home
Economics  work in the grades, and so are of value, not only to girls
specializing in Home  Economics, but to any girl preparing to teach
children. The other courses *  offered,  especially IAdvanced Cookery  
Table Service, and Dressmaking are  valuable for a girl's own use, whether
she plans to teach or not.  Thirty-Six

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Practice teaching is done by girls majoring in the department, in the 
training school, in the fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, and ninth grades.
Here  practice under supervision gives added incentive to study.  The
department has charge of the Normal cafeteria, which has served 
attractive, reasonable lunches to from 150 to 200 people a day. A
well-trained  cook is in charge, but much of the work is done by students
desirous of earn-ing  part of their way.  Equipment for teas, club parties,
and schcol mixers is kept in our custody  and given out on a requisition
from the registrar. Our aim is service to the  school in every way
possible.  "Work thou for pleasure; paint or sing or carve  The things thou
lovest, though the body starve. Who works for glory misses oft the goal; 
Who works for money coins his very soul;  Work for the Twork's  sake then
and it may be  That these things shall be added unto thee."  -Kenyon Cox. 
INDUSTRIAL ARTS  M. W. Heckman, who has had many years of training and
teaching ex-perience  along the industrial lines, is head of this
department. Associated  with him is John Rindal, a practical cabinet maker,
who has been an instructor  in the department for a number of years.  The
Department of Industrial  Arts covers the following subjects: Ele-mentary 
Woodwork, Advanced, Woodwork and Cabinet Making, Wood  Turning, Wood
Finishing, Organization and Administration of Industrial  Education,
Advanced Mechanical Drawing, Architectural Drawing, Freehand  Perspective,
and Practice Teaching in the Training School.  The emphasis of the work of
this department is laid upon the develop-ment  of a high degree of
technical skill in both woodwork and drawing which  is an essential factor
in teacher-training in 'the Industrial Arts. An intensive  study is also
made of courses and equipments to be used in grade and high  schools for
the best advancement of industrial work in these schools.  Thirty-Seven

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THE LIBRARY  The library of the Bellingham Normal school is a very young
one, as  it has been in existence but little more than a score of years,
and yet it has  attained much of that prestige which is given to a rare
collection of profes-sional  material. It is already rated as one of the
very best in the North- west.  During all of its existence the ideal has
been to make this library wholly  adequate to meet the needs, aims, and
interests of a great teacher-training  institution. However, believing that
teachers must have other knowledge and  interests which are equal to their
professional ones, the library has devoted a very large part of its
twenty-eight thousand volumes and five thousand pamph-lets  to history,
literature, art, science, sociology and other subjects. The  material on
history, literature, and art is particularly broad  and adequate.  In the
periodical room are to be found one hundred fifty different magazines  for
which the library is a regular subscriber. These cover many subjects and 
keep the students in close touch with contemporary thought and action.  The
juvenile library is in reality a huge "project" as it exists primarily as 
a  laboratory for student teachers and consists of some three thousand
volumes  of extremely well chosen literature for boys and girls. It has a
large pat-ronage  from the training school pupils, who keep the student
librarian busy.  After the collection of books a librarian's aim is to get
the material to  the reading public. Therefore the whole administration has
been based on  getting the student to read. Throughout its history the
library has been run  entirely on the honor system and its success is quite
unique. There is also  no limit to the number of books a students may take
out at any one time.  Library instruction has been given during most of the
history of the school.  The real success of the Library, says Miss Wilson,
has been made pos-sible  by the long procession of students, who thru a
score of years, have done  their part in sensing and appreciating the
ideals of the Library. They have  read far above the average of student
bodies and have shown an exceptional  appreciation of the care of books.
Miss Wilson  maintains that in all points  the students have met with
enthusiasm the library's efforts to serve them. Thirty-Eight

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MATH EMATICS-PEN MANSH I P  Mr. A. E. Bond, a man of recognized standing
among mathematicians,  is head of this department. The chief feature of the
department of Mathe-matics  is its teacher-training course for teachers in
the elementary schools  and junior high schools. In addition to the above,
teacher-training course.  there is given each year a quarter's work in each
of the following: College  Mathematical subjects: Trigonometry, Analytical
Geometry, College Algebra  and Differential Calculus. The standard
university text books are used as  the basis of all work in these subjects.
In addition to the foregoing work in  Mathematics, Miss Georgia Gragg,
teacher of Palmer Penmanship, and Mr.  W. J. Rice, teacher of his own
system, are doing very efficient work in the  training of teachers for this
work in Elementary and Rural schools.  The aim of the department is to do
as efficient work in the things undertaken as can be done anywhere. We are
expecting more help in the  department next year and feel sure that the
work will be even better than  it has been.  MUSIC  Jessie Ames Belton came
to the Normal  this year as the new head of the  Music Department. Miss
Belton is well known in the public school music  work of our state as well
as in that of other states. For the past two, years  she has served in an
advisory capacity to the National Association of Music  Supervisors and is
now completing her third year as the Secretary-Treasurer  of the Washington
State Music Teachers' Association.  The Department offers courses in the
methods of public school music,  and as prerequisites to these subjects,
sight singing and fundamentals of music  are given, the latter courses
being ably handled by Mrs. Emma Whipple and  Miss Dlgmar Christy.  Students
have also been able to take elective courses in History of Music,  Harmony,
Conducting, and Appreciation.  Miss Ethel Gardner cares for all students of
piano, as do Mr. Harrison  Raymond for students of voice, and Mr. John Roy
Williams for students of  violin. Each one of these instructors is well
known, and is prominent in  musical circles of the Northwest.  Beside the
music that is taught in all grades in the Training School, the  Girls' Glee
Club of the Training School has been organized and is well under  way. Both
Normal and Training School orchestras, under the capable leader-ship  of
Mr. John Roy Williams, have proved successful and are great fav-orites  at
the assemblies.   Among the musical activities are the Normal Chorus,
consisting of all  men and women of the school who wish to join; the Clef
Club, which has  for its membership twenty-four selected women's voices;
the Men's Glee Club,  also of selected membership; a Normal Quartette
composed of women's voices,  and a  Male Quartet.  Thirty-Nine

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SCIENCE-PHYSICAL EDUATION  These two departments, usually considered quite
separate, are, strictly  speaking, one, with H. C. Philippi as head of the
department.  SCIENCE DEPARTMENT.  Mr. Philippi has had charge of the
Science department for several years,  in which capacity he has given
excellent service. He teaches the physical  sciences and hygiene.
Associated with him are Bertha F. Hughes, school  physician and instructor
in hygiene; May Mead, school nurse; and F. W.  Brockman, instructor in
biology, agriculture, and nature study.  The Science Department has four
well-equipped laboratories affording  excellent facilities for the teaching
of Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Physiol-ogy, Hygiene, Nature Study, and
Agriculture. It also has a three and one-half  inch astronomical telescope,
which is used in the courses in Introduction  to Science and Nature Study.
A new radio receiving set, having a radius  of hundreds of miles for
broadcasted concerts, speeches, etc., has been ordered  for use in the
department.  The department aims to give direct preparation for the
teaching of  Hygiene, Agriculture, Nature Study, and Elementary General
Science in the  elementary schools and junior high schools of the state and
to give indirect  preparation for the better teaching of other subjects by
supplying the proper  scientific background. College courses are being
developed as rapidly as the  demands justify and the size of the teaching
staff permit.  All students are given health examinations upon entrance and
are given  the advantage of the services of the school physician and the
school nurse.  THE PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT  In the Department of
Physical Education, S. E. Carver has charge of physical education for men,
and Miss May G. Long of physical education  for women. Both instructors
have had wide experience in physical education  and have done excellent
work at the Normal for several years. Miss Regina  Frank, as an assistant
of Miss Long, has special charge of the aesthetic and  folk dancing
classes.  The Physical Education Department offers courses in gymnastic
train-ing,  school room  methods, aesthetic and folk dancing, athletic
coaching, and  practice teaching.  The work of the department is designed
to give students an understand-ing  of the purpose, means, and method of
physical education in the school-room  and in athletic coaching, as well as
to give students physical training  through class gymnastics and athletics.
 Closely connected with the physical education department, we have the 
boys' "WV" club, an athletic organization of the school, and the Women's
Ath- letic  Association, a national organization.  Forty

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TRAINING SCHOOL  Much has been said as to the real purpose of the Training
School. Some  think it merely a place for training student teachers. It is
this, but it is also  a place for training citizens. The individuals to be
trained for citizenship, for  their future work, for life itself with all
its wealth of possibilities,  are both  the grade students and the Normal
students. The welfare of every student,  younger or older, who enters the
Training School, is always the chief concern  of the superintendent and
supervisors. The principle that a real teacher is  also always a learner,
helping others and being helped, is well worked out  here. The work done in
the fTraining School has always been equal to that  done by the city
schools, as the records show. Student teachers here have the  opportunity
to work out and develop, under the helpful criticism of more ex-perienced 
teachers who are always studying their needs, those theories they  have
learned and the Education courses of the Normal School. They have the 
opportunity to learn whether they are suited to the profession and how to 
improve their practice.  The theory of teaching by projects is one of those
tried out in practice  by student teachers when they are in the training
school.. A "whole- hearted  puposeful activity" that engaged the entire
training school, pupils, student  teachers, and supervisors was the
"Harvest Festival," given in November for  the parents of the children in
the school. The Dramatic Club of the Junior  High School, with Miss
Wallace's help, worked out the play, in which each  department had a part
in song, dance, or dialogue. The Art department  co-operated in working out
color schemes, stage settings, and scenery; the  Home Economics teachers
helped the children plan and make their costumes;  the Industrial Arts
department assisted, Miss Long and Miss Frank taught the children the
dances, Miss Belton had charge of the songs, and Mr. Will-iams  directed
the children's orchestra in the program of music that preceded  the play.
Each person connected with the Training School in any way  helped work out
some phase of the whole. Children and student teachers  learned anew
lessons of co-operation, planning in detail, perfecting prepara-tion  for a
creditable presentation, and of fitting parts together to make a  unified
whole. The children are more responsible and the student teach- ers  are
more competent leaders for their experiences in assisting to bring the 
play to successful presentation. The synopsis and cast follow :  The
Seasons are in dispute as to which shall rule the coming year. Time  is to
decide, and he calls upon the Years to help him. Each Season presents  his
claim to the throne, except Autumn, who is too busy with her harvest to 
think of ruling. Because of her rich gifts, given in the spirit of service,
she  is chosen queen. All rejoice in her honor.  An attractive program of
music accompanied the play. Three of the  numbers, "Flag of Truce,"
"Dancing Dolls," and "United Liberty" were given  by the Training School
Orchestra. Katherine Bettman played a piano solo, Lange's "Meditation." 
Forty-One

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AN OPEN LETTER TO THE ALUMNI  How may the Alumni Association of the
Bellingham Normal School be  of more service to the institution and to its
graduates?  Twenty-three years ago, eight young people went forth from the
then  new teacher-training institution on Sehome Hill, to represent the
institution  as teachers in the public schools of the state. They told the
young people in  their communities of the wonderful location of the new
institution, with its  marvelous view of the mountains and the sea, its
matchless sunsets, of the  fine type of students, of the fine opportunities
for training and development, and, most of all, they imbued those with whom
they associated with the spirit  of service, co-operation, and loyalty for
which the institution has ever been  famous, and which was destined to make
it one of the very greatest and most  useful teacher-training institutions
in the United States. Yes, and that same spirit which predominated the
institution twenty-three years ago, still per-meates  every room and
corridor of the now large and famous Normal over-looking  Bellingham Bay.
It is that spirit which has made the institution great,  and it is that
spirit which crowds the buildings to the very limit of their ca-pacity,
whenever a new quarter opens. It is that same spirit which has been 
carried to almost .every school in the Northwest, from the smallest and 
humblest log schoolhouse of Washington, Alaska, Oregon, and other states. 
to the finest and most modern school buildings of the largest cities of the
 country.  Instead of eight per year, graduates are now going forth from
the  Normal-by-the-Sea by the hundreds. Already the  school has sent forth 
about four thousand graduates from the- two, three, and four year courses. 
Nearly four hundred young people go forth each year imbued with the same 
spirit and with the same ideals of service that characterized the first
class.  One of the November graduates recently wrote that she had persuaded
six  members of the high school graduating class in the little town in
which she  is teachine, to  attend the Bellingham Normal next quarter, in
spite of the  fact that four other Normal schools are nearer their homes. 
But what is being done to keep alive the ties that bind us to our Alma 
Mater? An Alumni Alssociation was formed many years ago, and this
or-ganization  holds an annual reunion and banquet at Bellingham each year,
 which is attended by two hundred or more graduates from the institution, 
nearly half of whom are members of the graduating class for the current
year.  An alumni gathering is also usually held at the annual meeting of
the W. E. A.  Forty-Two

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But is this enough? Should the Alumni Association reach only five  per cent
of its members? What more can the organization do to keep our  alumni in
touch with their Alma Mater and with old friends and classmates?  First, an
effort should be made by the alumni to keep a constantly re-vised  list of
the names and addresses of all alumni. The association should  co-operate
with the President's office in securing constantly revised data  along this
line. Without this co-operation, communication with graduates  of former
years is decidedly uncertain and unsatisfactory.  We should have a real
home- coming at the end of each school year, one  that would last for two
or three days, perhaps, and would be attended by from  five hundred to a
thousand of our members. We should have a celebration  that would make it
worth while for our graduates to come for hundreds of  miles. This is
impossible at the present time, because the Normal School  closes its
spring term two weeks before most of the common schools of the  state
close. It is hoped that a readjustment may be made in the near future  that
will obviate this difficulty. One of the things that keeps many people 
away from our alumni gatherings is the fact that when they do attend, they 
find so few of their old friends. By concerted effort, this can be
overcome,  and each class can be represented by many of its members.  At
present there is no method of communication with the alumni, except  as the
annual letter announcing the banquet and reunion is sent out, through  the
courtesy of the President's office, and at the expense of the Normal
School.  An alumni bulletin, published twice a year, would be a great help.
Perhaps  two issues of the Exchange, now published by the Extension
Department,  could be secured for this 'purpose. One number could be
published at mid-year,  and could be devoted largely to the outstanding
activities, improvements  made and contemplated, the needs of the school,
changes in faculty for the  current year, and all important alumni news.
The President of the institu-tion  would undoubtedly be glad to co-operate
in securing data for such a  bulletin. Another similar bulletin could be
published in April, and could  contain the announcement of Commencement
week, the alumni banquet, etc.,  and could replace the annual letter, which
the president of the Alumni Associa-tion  now sends out each spring, prior
to the annual reunion and banquet.  These bulletins would be a great help
to the Normal and to the alumni. If  the alumni were kept posted as to the
needs and progress of the institution,  the members could assist greatly in
presenting these needs to the people and  to the legislatures, from time to
time. If every alumnus of the Bellingham  Normal School had realized the
great need of a new library and a new gym-nasium,  also of authority to
grant degrees from the four-year course, and the  pressing need of funds
with 'which to employ additional instructors, and pre-vent  the serious
congestion due to overcrowded classes, the four thousand  alumni of our own
school could have done something to prevent the absolute  neglect of the
institution at the hands of the recent legislature. There are  many strong
friends of the institution in each session of the legislature, but  these
legislators need the co-operation and support of every alumnus and former
student.  Forty-Three

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The Allison cup, which was given by Guy S. Allison, of the class of 1907, 
has done much to stimulate interest in debate at the Normal, and it has
done  much to show the interest of the alumni of the earlier days in the
activities  and progress of the school at the present time. Wouldn't it be
worth while  for the alumni to offer a prize of fifty dollars, or more, in
oratory or declama-tion,  to be given to the winner in a contest in the
school each year? This  would be an additional incentive to intensive work
along this line, on the part  of the students each year. In this way the
alumni would feel a real interest  in the present activities of the school.
One of the things most needed, is some-thing  that will keep alive in the
minds of the alumni the present activities  of the institution. Each
alumnus should feel that he is still a part of the institution and that its
successes are his successes. We, as alumni, have every  reason to feel
proud of the institution which we learned to love, and which  we call our
Alma Mater. It has continued to grow in usefulness and in the  esteem of
the people of the Northwest, until it is not only the largest and  best
known Normal school in the Northwest, but it is one of the very largest 
and best known teacher-training institutions in the United States.  The
Bellingham Normal needs the interest and support of every alumnus,  and we,
as alumni, will enjoy keeping alive the school spirit, enthusiastic
sup-port,  and co- operative interest of former clays.  L. A. Kibbe,
President.  Forty-Four

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HELEN GOKE ARTHUR KOLSTAD HELEN HIGHTOWER  MISS DELIA KEELER ALBERTINA
PEARSON  OLIVER INGERSOLL ARCHIE THOMAS LELAND RANKIN  BOARD OF CONTROL
Unexpected and rapid have been. the changes in the personnel of  the Board
of Control the past year. Archie Thomas, Helen Goke, Albertina  Pearson,
Helen Hightower, and Oliver Ingersoll were elected last spring for 
president, vice-president, and student representatives, respectively.
Arthur  Kolstad and M. W. Heckman were elected for faculty representatives;
Archie  Thomas, Helen Goke, and Helen Hightower were not present during the
 summer and their places were occupied by Oliver Ingersoll as president,
and  Pearl Bailey, Robert Tunstall, 'and Gertrude Sennes as student
representatives.  At the end of the summer term, Mr. Heckman resigned and
Miss Keeler was  elected faculty representative. Because of his numerous
activities, Mr. Thom-as,  after a few weeks as president during the fall
term, resigned, and Oliver  Ingersoll was elected [president by an
overwhelming majority. Leland Rankin  was selected to fill the vacancy left
on the Board. About the middle of the  Forty-Five

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winter term, Oliver Ingersoll resigned to become business manager of the 
Klipsun, and Vice-President Helen Goke took his place. At the beginning  of
the spring term, Rebecca Arnell was elected to fill the vacancy caused by 
Miss Pearson, who left school.  A school picnic, a school trip. to
Victoria, quarterly school mixers, a  Christmas tree program, basketball
banquets, a debate team entertainment, and  the Chuckanut Marathon are a
few of the various events arranged for during  the year by the Board of
Control.  The Board has made regular payments on Normalstad, at Lake
Whatcom,  and has started a scheme of improvement. A dock has already been
built, and  preparations are beginning to, be made for the building of
school lodges, the  clearing of an athletic field, and many other
improvements.  One must mention the spirit of good fellowship, which
existed in the  "family group" as it assembled around the table in the
Students' Association  room. There were differences at times, but they were
soon forgotten. This  spirit showed itself most clearly in the quarterly
Board dinners, a custom  inaugurated by last year's members, and carried
over in the second annual  Two-Board dinner, when the retiring members
entertained the Board-elect.  Where 'tviy o vere4 r?  Forty-Six

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I I6  EDITH HEATON, Assistant  MR. C. C. BAUGHMAN, Manager  RUTH LUND,
Assistlant  STUDENTS'  CO-OP.  Service and the Students' Co-op. have become
synonymous terms. Start-ing  back in 19o8 in a very modest way, the
Students' Co-op. has enjoyed a  steady growth until it is now considered to
be the equal of any college sore,  regardless of the size of the student
body, in its service to its patrons, and, in its reasonable prices.  Mr.
Baughman, the manager, has been with the Co-op. almost from its  beginning
and it has been through his earnest and untiring efforts that the  store
has reached its present high standard. He has further increased the 
service of the Co-op. this year by establishing a postoffice sub- station. 
Students and teachers are beginning to realize more and more generally 
that Mr. Baughman and his assistants, Miss Heaton, Miss Lund, and Mr. 
Mercer are ever on the alert to give efficient service,  reasonable prices
and  courteous treatment.  Forty-Seven

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CLASS ADVISORS  The Sophomore class has been safely piloted through the
difficulties of  the past year by two capable, far-seeing, and sincere
advisers, Mr. Bever and  Dr. Miller. With the best interests of  the class
always at heart, they have  bridged many difficulties with their helpful
suggestions and advice. At all  times the two advisers have kept foremost
in their minds the necessity of  giving students the chance to develop
leadership; both have emphasized and  observed this important phase of
class organization.  Mr. Bever is one of the hardest working members of the
faculty and  yet, strange to say, one of the kindest and most patient. Who
has not been  grateful at one time or another for the relieved feeling that
a talk with Mr.  Bever has given when everything seemed to point to a
delayed graduation. Through the rushed programming, tedious checking and
the many details  attending graduation, Mr. Bever  has remained the patient
and optimistic  adviser upon whom we could safely depend.  Dr. Miller, in
his unobtrusive, quiet manner, has also been willing to give  his valuable
time to anything connected with the Sophomore class. With the  same spirit
that he has built up the Education Department, he has entered into our
class problems. New ideas gathered in his travels over the state,  his
educational research work, his hopes for improvement along educational 
lines-all have helped to broaden and prepare the students now ready to go 
out into the field of educational service.  'Tis true that we have not
pierhaps fully realized,  during the year, how  much Mr. Bever and Dr.
Miller have helped us. With graduation and depar-ture, however, comes a
fuller realization of what their assistance has meant.  We leave with a
determination to prove worthy of their trust and to fulfill  their hopes
for our future success as teachers.  Forty-Eight

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 49

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CLASS OFFICERS  FIRST QUARTER  EGGERT A. BURNS ... --------
...........--.--. ...P.r.e--s-id..e.n..t... GERTRUDE MORGANTHALER
............. . .. .....V.i cce. .P..r.e.s.i~d.c nt  Lou FOWLER
............ . ................ ...........S.e.c.r etar(y  HERBERT
CEDERBERG ........-.-.--- --------...............T. e..a.s ur HELEN HIGHTO
WER- ----------......................- ....-.Re..e.p.o.r.t.e.r...... . 
SECOND QUARTER GERTRUDE MORGANTHALER
--------------...............-.-------.P-.r.e..s .i.d.e.n.l.t..........  M
RS. SANFORD CARVER .............................V.i..c..e. ..P...r.e..s
i.d.en. t............  ROBERT CAULKINS ..........................
..............------------------------------- - Secretary  HELEN HIGHTOWER
.................----------- .-.-.-.-.-..........R..e...p...o..r .t.e.r.'
.........  HERBERT CEDERBERG
---------......-----....................-.-.-T.-.r-. - . .s re  THIRD
QUARTER  LELAND RANKIN ............-.-.-.-.-
--------------.-.-..........-..--..--.. .P...r..e..s..i. d.e.n.t...  MRS.
SANFORD CARVER . -------------............................-V..-.i- c-e-
--P-r-e-.s.i.d.e.n..t. EDWIN OPSTAD ...........-.-.-.-
----------------------------.....S.e.c.r..e.t.a.r.............---...................
 JOHN O'ROURKE .............-------------.........................----..
Treasurer  HELEN HIGHTOWER
.....................................R.e-o-rt-e-r---------------------------..
 CLASS HISTORY.  It was the year 5678 A. D. Father Time, the old gentleman
who walks  around with -a dull scythe over his shoulder, had applied his
bare foot to the  accelerator, and had sped the world along a few centuries
 But, lo! the accumulation of years was not the only change which had 
taken place! Mt. Baker, our far-famed peak to the east, had become so
dis-satisfied  with looking at the Bellingham State Normal School without a
 special Library building, that in its wrath it burst out in flame,
spreading lava  and ash over the surrounding countryside, covering it to a
great depth. And  thus our beautiful city of Bellingham was laid to
lestruction.  But the leaves have taken their floating journey to Mother
Earth from  the tree tops, and Spring has come and gone again many times,
as the poet  says.  Let us turn again to the site of our fair hamlet.
Congress has at last  apprbpriated funds for removing the city's ashen
bed-clothes, and men are at  work restoring the Normal School.  What is all
this excitement? Workmen come rushing forth with a bat-tered  and dented
box, recovered from the ruins. A great crowd gathers around  them, waiting
for the appearance of the Superintendent to open the box and  divulge its
secrets. At last he comes, and orders the box to be broken open.  Crash!
Crash! The box, not being able to withstand the blows laid upon  it, falls
apart, and there, among its ruins, the crowd beholds a bound volume! 
Forty-Nine

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 50

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The Superintendent of Excavation picked up the book, and brushing the 
(lust from the cover, he read aloud,  "History of the Sophomore Class of
1923, of the Bellingham State Nor-mal  School."  Excitedly he  fingered the
document, and exclaimed, "This is indeed the  most worthy relic we have as
yet discovered."   The crowd surged forward in its eagerness to view the
wonderful book,  and was kept hack with great difficulty.  "Read it! Read
it! What does it say?" shouted the crowd.  The Superintendent quickly
opened the hook to the first page and read  aloud,-  "October 17 was the
(late of the first class meeting, in which the following  capable and
efficient officers were elected:  EGGERT BURNS
.............................................. President  GERTRUDE
MORGANTHALER .............................................. ice President 
Lou FOWLER ....................--.................-----------------
................. Sccretary  HERBERT CEDERBERG
.................................. ------------ . TreasurerC DOROTHY
SCHAFER ........................................... Reporter  "On Friday
evening, November 3, 1922, the Sophomore Class of the  Bellingham State
Normal School held its Pumpkin Party at Edens Hall. The  party was a great
success and will long be remembered by all those who at-tended."  "Ah,
those were the happy days," sighed one of the listeners. "Tha't  class
surely must have had lots of pep."  Again the reader raised his voice so
that all might hear  "At a class meeting held Tuesday, October 31, students
were nominated  'to serve on the Klipsun Staff."  "All was not pleasure
with that class. They had business  to be (lone, , 4  too."  "Read more.
Let us hear what else they (lid," shouted the multitude, and  the
Superintendent did as they desired.--  "A special meeting of the Sophomore
class was held on Monday, No-vember  6, in which a great deal of business
was very satisfactorily accomp-lished.  The following students were elected
to serve on the Klipsun Board :  Sam Ford, Helen Goke, Lou Fowler, Violet
Mitcham, and Helen Hightower."  The reading was interrupted by a little fat
boy who excitedly shouted, "Samuel Ford was an ancestor of mine. We've got
his pitcher home in the  album."  "Hush !"  "Be quiet!" "We must hear !" 
"On November 16, the Klipsun Board displayed its good judgment by 
selecting Eggert Burns as edi'tor, and Oliver Ingersoll as business manager
of  the 1923 Klipsun.  Fifty

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 51

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Wednesday, November 29, was 'the last day of the first quarter. But it 
meant more than that to forty-nine Sophomores, who, overpowering their 
joyous emotions, received their diplomas with all the dignity befitting
such a  solemn occasion.  Forty-four Sophomores entered at the beginning of
the second quarter   to keep the ranks of the Sophomore class well filled."
 Here the Superintendent paused for breath, and exclaimed loudly, "They 
were lucky to be in such a wonderful class. I wish I had lived in those
days. Then he read on, without further loss of time:  "Witth the beginning
of the second quarter, the following class officers  were elected at the
peppy meeting:  GERTRUDE M ORGANTHALER
..................................... ... ................. President  M
RS. SANFORD CARVER
.........................................-------------------------------
Vice President  ROBERT CAULKINS ........-----.....
.................------------.-.-..-.-.-.-.-.-- ------ ---- Secretary 
HERBERT CEDERBERG .........--------.....
...............-------------------------.................. Treasurer  HELEN
HIGHTOWER .......... --------------------
...............----------------.................... --- Reporter  "These
officers carried out their duties in an admirable manner, worthy  of much
praise. Another graduation came and went, and more Sophomores  passed out
into the world to startle it with brilliancy.  "The following members of
the Sophomore class were elected to  take the  place of the retiring
officers of the preceding quarter:  LELAND RANKIN
..................................------------------........................--------
Pesident  MRS. SANFORD CARVER
........................................................--------V---i-c--e--
-P---r--e--s--i-d--e- nt  EDWIN OPSTAD
.......................................................-------------------------------------
------- Secretary  JJHN O'ROURKE
...........................................................-------------------------
------- Treasurer  HELEN HIGHTOW ER
..................................................-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.- . R
eporter  "These officers lead the class through a memorable quarter of
Sophomore  achievement, making the class remembered, beloved, and respected
by all.  Thus ends the history of the Sophomore class, of 1923, of the
Bellingham  State Normal School."  The crowd broke out in joyful shouts. 
"A record to be proud of!"  "Marvelous !"  "Superb !"  The Superintendent
of Excavation gently wrapped the worn document in  his coat, and, carrying
it as a sleepy parent carries a nervous baby after suc-ceeding  in putting
it to sleep for the fourth time, he said, proudly:  "How lucky we have been
to recover this precious record! I will deliver  this personally tomorrow
to the Jonesonian Institute."  And to this very day a visitor at the
Institute can see'the History of the  Sophomore  Class of 1923 of the
Bellingham State Normal School, closely  guarded, in the place of honor
among relics.  GLENN M. BREAKEY.  Fifty-One

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 52

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AU REVOIR  We, the Sophomores of I923, feel that we must record the
sentiments  that surge through us as we leave to carry out our life's work.
We are going  into a new environment. The change from school  life to the
life of appli-cation  will be gradual. As we have worked 'at the shrine of
Education so  shall we work at tle feet of Experience. We have hopes that
in our future  work we shall be able to inspire those with ,whom we labor
and to create in  them a desire for the better things of life. We hope that
we shall lbe a credit  to our school, its faculty, our fathers and mothers,
and our country.  We leave behind us two short years of life. How long they
seemed when  we entered the Normal School, but now, as we look back, in
reality: how  short! Those two years were filled with opportunities. Of
thiese opportuni-ties  we have availed ourselves of those that we thought
were best suited to  our needs. In this way we have become what we are
today. May the classes  that come after us profit by our mistakes and
errors.  To the. faculty of our Alma Mater we express our deepest
gratitude, for,  through them, we have been taught the meaning of the word
"service."  Their versatility has been an inspiration to us. In them we see
personified the  saying that "'A little each day is enough, if each day
accomplishes that little."  To them we extend your most sincere thanks four
showing us that education  consists in forging the mind.  Now, we are
looking forward. Some of us see a life of service in the  teaching
profession; others, in other callings. All of us shall go forth domi-nated 
by the spirit of our Alma Mater.  May success attend us! LELAND A. RANKIN
.........................................................--------------------------------------.
President EDWIN R. OPSTAD ...................------------........
......-.------------- ------S--e---c--r ctary  -ROBERT O. CAULKINS.  -b 
Fifty-Two

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 53

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c UW"  Fifty-Three

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 54

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ALLA ROSS, CASHMERE  "Serene and pure, like gushing joy of  light"  Delphos
High, Kansas; Leowyrhta Club;  Sagebrush Club; Entered from North-west 
University, Chicago, Ill.  JULIA ANNE CASPER, Edmonds  "She is noble in
every thought and deed"  Edmonds High; Studio Art Club  MARIAN CURTIS
(Molly),  Granite Falls  "Smiling in the morning, smiling all the /  day, 
Smiling always in her own sweet way"  Granite Falls High; Philo Club Sec.; 
Y. W. C. A.; Class Basketball '22-'23,  Captain '22 GEORGIA BELLE FETTIS,
Oakville  "The great idea baffles wit,  Language falters under it" 
Oakville Union  High; Home Economics  Major  SELMA NIXON, Yallsville,
Missouri  "She speaks, behaves, and acts just as  she ought to." a 
Marysville High, Mo.  1EVA NEIL, Bose, Ida.  "A light heart lives long" 
Boise High  IJULIA SEMPLE, Brittin, S. D.  "There is something very winning
in her  way"  Britton High; Business Girls' League;  Prize in Short Story
Contest  lFifty-Four

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 55

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MRS. LUCILLE BARNHOUSE, Olympia  "Nothing is impossible for a willing
heart"  Olympia High; C. P. S.; Y. W. C. A.  ALICE McKEE, Tacoma  "We love
her pleasant smile"  Stadium High; C. P. S. KATHERINE TONNING, Waitsburg 
"Happy is the maiden who is always sat-isfied"  Waitsburg High SELMA RHODE,
Cornelius, Ore.  "Her ways are ways of pleasantness and  all her paths are
peace." Castle Rock High; Ellensburg Normal;  Lewis-Cowlitz County Club;
Choral  Club; Oratoria "The Prodigal Son";  Glee Club, Operetta, "The Feast
of the  Little Lanterns"; W. S. C.  ALICE NELSON, Seattle  "A sweet and
happy girl,  With step as light as summer air"  Broadway High; Seattle Club
 EVELYN V. SPINNER, Tacoma  "Modest, retiring, dainty and neat,  A perfect
student and clasmate sweet" Vancouver High, Washington  GRACE WAGONER,
Waterville  "Consistent and persistent in all things" Waterville High;
Sagebrush Club; Hikers  Club.  Fifty-Five

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 56

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LUCILLE ECKER, Lynden  "The original bunch of sweetness tied  with a golden
cord"  Lynden High ANNA KEATING, Auburn  "A calm and gracious element" 
Alburn High; Rural Life Club; Tacoma  Club BLANCHE LOWTRY, Sedalia, Mo. 
"True as the dial to the sun"  LENA JEFFRIES, Pe Eli  "She hath a sweet and
merry voice"  Pe Ell High  OLIVE WOLF, Seattle  "Shy an( sweet and winsome
in her  ways" HAZEL ECKER, Lynden  "Things well done and with care,  Exempt
themselves from fear"  Lynden High; W. M. Club; Young  Housekeepers' Club 
LILLIAN COLEMAN, Mossy Rock  "She seeketh diligently after knowledge" 
Mossy Rock High; Rural Life Club  Fifty-Six

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 57

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DAPHNE HAUGEN, Everett  "Her presence drives away dull care"  Everett High 
FLORENCE WING, Oswego, Ore.  "E'en her feelings leaned to virtues side" 
Central High, Spokane; Rural Life Club;  Sec. Y. W. C. A.  EDITH KENNY,
!)eming  "Nothing endures but personal qualities"  Mt. Baker High; Rural
Life Club Pres.  SYLVIA BAIRRET, Everett  "Modesty is the color of virtue" 
Everett High; Aletheia Club; Everett  Club Pres. '20; Mt. Baker Hiking
Club;  Choral Club, "Prodigal Son" '20  FRANCE'S JOIRI)AN, Dalles, Ore. 
"If happy I, and wretched he,  Perhaps the king would change with me' 
Dalles Iligh; Y. W. C. A.; Glee Club  Pres.; Alkisiah Pres, '22; Social
Commit-tee  Y. W. C. A. '22.  AIAYE 1AAM\SLEY, Spokane  "We'll keep a  for
her"  Aletheia Club;  A.  cozy corner in our hearts  Sagebrush Club; Y. W.
C.  ANITA REESE, Kirkland  "Thy voice is like a fountain,  Leaping in
sunshine bright"  Union "A" High; Alkisiah, Vice-Pres.  Fifty-Seven

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 58

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EDNA PAULSON, Marysville  "The hand that made you fair, hath made  you
good"  Marysville High; Ohiyesa Club; Everett  Club; Chorus  MAE PHINNEY,
Moses Lake  "Small of measure but of quality super-fine"  Stillwater High,
Minn.; Alkisiah; Sage-brush;  Y. W. C. A.; Vice-Pres. Business  Girls;
Pres. Edens Hall; Y. W. C. A.  Social Committee  RUTH GETCHELL, Everett 
"Constancy is the foundation of the vir-tues"  Everett High; Aletheia  MYRA
HEACOCK, Arlington  "She was both good and fair"  Chelan High; Sagebrush
Club; Alkisiah  (lub; Pres. Edens Hall '22  TILLIE ONSETT, Enumelaw  "For
she was not  forward, but modest as  a dove" -  Enumnclaw Iligh  ELIN
JOHNSON, Seattle  "A good heart is indeed a credit"  Broadway High;
Ohiyesa, Vice-Pres.  TNEZ CLARK, Seattle  "Achievement is my mark"  Lincoln
High; Alkisiah, Sec.-Treas.  I,  Fifty-Eight

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 59

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MRS. B. P. DORSEY, Sedro-Woolley  "Nothing is impossible to industry" 
Girls' Latin School, Baltimore, Md.  EDITH E. SMITH, Kirkland  "Sober,
steadfast and demure"  Crook County High, Princeville,  Ohiyesa  Sec. and
Treas.  Ore.;  GEORGIA .JOHNSON, Bellingham  "Studious and quiet"  Cottey
College Boarding School, Nevada,  Mo.; Valley City Normal, N. D.; Cheney 
Normal; Alkisiah; Pres. Sage Brush Club.  ROXY HAIGHT, Chelan  "Nothing is
impossible to a willing heart"  Chelan High; Choral Club; Sage Brush  Club.
 AGATHA F()LEY, Vancouver  "She has commnon sense in a way that is 
uncommon' Providence Academy; Pres. Ohiyesa Club;  Sec.-Treas. Ohiyesa
Club; Newinan Club.  HELEN JOHNSON, Ilwaeo  "Whence came that ray of
sunshine?"  Ilwaco High; Business Girls' League; Y.  W. C. A.  REBECCA
ARNELL, Auburn  "Like most small parcels, she is precious"  Auburn High;
Ellensburg Nomral 1 year;  Vice-Pres. Aletheia; Y. W. C. A. Social 
chairman; Vice-Pres. Edens Hall; Vice-  Pres. Debate; Board of Control. 
Fifty-Nine

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 60

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SIGNE MARIE FLINN, Adna  "She is earnestly intent on all that she  does" 
Adna High; Aletheia President; Lewis  County Club, Vice-Pres.  HANNAH MARY
FISHER,  Richmond Highlands  "She is a friend to everyone"  West Liberty
High, Iowa; Leowyrhta  Club; Iowa State Teachers' College, Ce-dar Falls,
Iowa; Post Graduate West  Liberty High.  ANNA McGAVER MURA, Van Zandt  "I
find a joy in living  and laughing"  Whatcom High; Newman Club, Pres.; 
Thespian Club; Business Girls' League. FRANCES KERNAN, Snohomish  "And her
voice it murmurs lowly,  As a silver stream may run" Snohomish High  ERMA
F. DUTTNLAP, La Conner  "She is good natured and a friend to all"  La
Conner fligh; Aletheia Club.  JOSEPHINE HAWLEY, Bellingham  "Modesty is the
grace of the soul"  Whatcom High; Philo, Vice-Pres.; Vice-  Pres. Junior
Class  CECELIA HUNTINGTON, Hoquiam  "A sweet voice that-you scarce could
bet-ter  that"  Hoquiam High; Sec. and Pres. Aletheia  Club  Sixty

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IDA SUNQUIST, Mt. Venon  "Things well done and with a care exempt 
themselves from fear"  Mt. Vernon  High; Rural Life Club  GRACE WATSON
ALBERT, Olympia  "A good heart is indeed a credit"  Winlock Miller High;
Aletheia Club Re-porter  MARARET E. LAMBERT, Raymond  "She knows the value
of a smile"  Raymond High; Y. W. C. A.; Oregon  Club; Messenger Staff 
VIOLA WHITNEY, Olympia  "Her manner gracious, kind and true."  Olympia
High; Aletheia Club; Y. W. C. A.  Membership Committee LOUISE A. YOUNG,
Portland, Ore.  "A quiet worker always on the job"  Jefferson High; Treas.
and Pres. Studio  Art; Sec. and Treas. Newman Club.  WILMA MAE DUBUQUE,
Index  "Speech is silver, but silence is golden"  Index High, Newman Club. 
BESSIE YOST, Edmonds  "Like all musical people, she is  happy"  Edmonds
High; Edens Hall Sec. and  Treas.; Alkisiah Treas.  Sixty-One

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OLIVE MARY PEAlRSON, Mt. Vernon  "O look of deep knowledge shines forth 
from her eyes"  Mt. Vernon Union High; Ohiyesa Club.  Reporter, Skagit
County Club  CLARA DYVEN  "Shallow brooks murmur most;  Deep brooks silent,
glide away"  Whatcom High  D)O1:O'IIHY SMITH, Oregon City "Everyone excels
in something in which  another fails"  Oregon City High; Alkisiah and
Oregon  Club FRANCES PIERCE, Kalama  "Despise not trifles, there are no
trifles  in this world"  Kalama High School;  Y. W. C. A.  CHRISTINE EDIN,
Kalanla  "A girl of much esteem and truly a  worthy friend"  Kalama High; 
Studio Art Club; Oregon  gt;  Club; Young Housekeepers' Club  MARGARET
BENNET, Vancouver  "Her heart is as far from fraud as heaven  is from
earth"  WIY\ MA A. RANDAL, Maxwell, Iowa  "Nothing great was ever achieved
with-out  enthusiasm"  Cogswell High, North Dakota  a.  Sixty-Two

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IHAZEL H ARRIS, P'rineville, Ore.  "She has the truest, kindliest heart" 
BLANCHE FULTON, Anacortes "Her disposition is as sweet as her voice" 
Anacortes High; Alkisiah Club; Entered  from W. S. C.  B RTHA VIG'USSEN,
Seattle  "I'm sure care's an enemy to life."  Ballard High; Studio Art
Club, Seattle Club  GENEVIEVE EVON, Gladstone, Ore.  "Well done is better
than well said"  Oregon City High; Business Girls; Sec.  and Treas.
Alkisiah Club; Vice-Pres.  Oregon Club, Pres. and Reporter;  Climbed Mt.
Baker, Mt. Constitution and  Hannegan Pass  HELEN SINN, Carnation, Wash. 
"A good heart never changes but keeps  its course truly"  Duvall High; Y.
W. C. A. Sec.  GRACE KENYON, Bellingham  "To be merry best becomes her" 
Everett High; Choral Club; Everett Club;  Story Telling Club.  VERGIE
CLARKE, Lynden  "Her lively looks, a sprightly mind dis.  closes"  Aletheia
Club, Vice-Pres.  Sixty-Three

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LEN()IRE RAI)EMIACHER, Bellingham  "Light headed only to her tresses" 
Whatcom High  RUTH FRANCES PEDERSON,  Skagit River Project  "Praise is the
debt owed to the virtues of  others"  Auburn High; Alkisiah; Sourdough
Cl:ub;  Y. W. C. A. Pres.; Chairman Social  Committee  E. FRANCES
CALLECIIER, La(Conner  "For what I will, I will and there's an  end"  La
Conner High; Skagit County Club; Ru-ral  Life Club.  DOR)IS WHITMORE,
Buckley  "Enterprise and energy know no failures"  Buckley High  BLANCHE
PITMAN, Bellingham.  "Her winning smile and laughing voice  like a beam of
sunshine fell" Whatcom High  MILLICENT DE HAVEN, Bellingham  "'Tis good to
be merry and wise"  Whatcom High RUTH AUSTIN C()(OK, Bremerton  "What she
undertook to do she did"  Union High; Alkisiah Club  r Sixty-Four

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 65

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DEIA IA WESTI', Winlock  "Would that there were more like her"  Winlock
High School; Ohiyesa LOLETA BEIRG, Nooksack  "Full of life, joy and fun" 
Nooksack High; Rural Life Club; Y. W.  C. A.; Chorus  PAUIlINE SCIIAUBLE,
;Kalana  "God gives all things to industry"  Kalama High; Rural Life Club;
Newman  Club  WENDELLA G RAY, Grand Rapids, Mini.  "In virtues nothing
could surpass her"  Grand Rapids High School; entered from  U. of W. 
ESTHER AILEEN SALTER,  Port Blakely  "She's little, but Oh my!"  Everett
High; Thespian Club  NELLIE McKINNEY, Yakima  "A laugh is worth a hundred
groans in  any market"  Council Member, Edens Hall; Pres. Edens  Hall. 
MILDRED COPE  "No day without a deed to crown it."  Wooster College,
Wooster, O. Kent State  Normal, Ohio; St. Clairsville Normal,  Ohio;
Western Reserve U., Cleveland,  O.; Metropolitan Business College, 
Cleveland, O.; Cass Technical Continua-tion  School, Detroit, Mich.;
College of  Puget Sound, Tacoma.  Sixty-Five

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MARIE IE. MAU.IRMAN, Dryad £  "A heart uns1 otted is not easily
daunted"  Doty High; O. A. C.; Oregon Club  ESTHER MARGARET SKRONDAL, 
Everett  "Sort that wrinkled care derides and  lautghter  holding both its
sides"  Everett High; Alkisiah Club, Pres., Sec.;  Good English Week
Committee LUCILE SARGENT, Tonasket  "There was a soft and pensive grace,  A
cast of thought across her face" FLORIS CLARK, Skagway, Alaska  "Steady
work turns genius to a loom"  Skagway High; Ohiyesa, Pres. and Vice- 
Pres., Sourdough; Pres. Y. W. C. A.;  Messenger Staff  RUTH WALBOM, Seattle
"Truth sparkles in her eyes and like a  diamond beams"  Y. W. C. A.;
Aletheia Club; Young House- kepers'  Club.  MARG;URITE MOON, Bellingham 
"With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles  come" Whatcom High; Studio Art
Club.  VIOLET MITCHAM, Bellingham  "I fill this cup to one made up  Of
loveliness alone"  Whatcom High; Thespian Club Sec.; P. E.  Major; Women's
Athletic Association; Klipsun Board; Klipsun Staff; Class  Basketball '22,
Captain '23; Normal  Drama Club; Messenger Staff,  s   Sixty Six

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 67

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GERTRUIT1) EG( BEIRT, Bellingham  "Beauty needs no letters of introduction"
 Fairhaven High; Thespian  Club Trcas. '23;  Women's Athletic Association 
GRACE IIUSETHI, Great Falls, Mont.  "Laughing cheerfulness throws sunlight 
on life"  Elementary Science Dept. of State Col-lege  of Washington;
Ohiyesa Club;  Sagebrush Club.  OLIVE FAY OLIVER, Seattle  "A sweet
disposition is the very soul of success"  Broadway High; Chorus.  KATHERINE
AUGUSTA SMITH,  Bellingham.  "Man delights me not (?)"  Whatcom High;
Studio Art Club, vice-  Pres.  GERTRUDE MORGANTHALER,  Bellingham  "For
nature made her what she is and  never made another"  Whatcom High;
Thespian Club, Sec.; Nor-mal Drama Club, Vice-Pres.; Vice-Pres.  and Pres.
Sophomore Class.  BLANCHE PENNICK, Montesano "She'll whistle her way into
your heart"  Montesano High; W. A. A.: Ohiyesa,  Vice-Pres., Sec. and
Treas, Sergeant-at-  Arms.  VIVIENNE ALLEGRA CROCKSFORD,  Snohomish  "In
thy heart the dew of youth,  On thy lips the smile of truth"  Snohomish
High; Aletheia; Chorus; Y. W.  C. A. Pres.; Delegate to  International
Stu-dent  Volunteer Concention at Des  Moines, Iowa, 1920  Sixty-Seven

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]EMMA J. KII(1lAN, I'ortland, O)re.  "Nothing succeeds like success" 
Newberg High; Y. W. C. A.; Finance  Chairman on the Cabinet  IMRS. MNIABIl
W\. JO! INSON, Tacoman  "Laboring untiringly, ignoring applause" 
Burlington High  NITA NWVI((,INS, Brusl Prairie  "Laughing cheerfulness
throws sunlight  on life"  Vancouver High  MAIRIT'FE LAYTITAM, Blaine  "Oft
do I marvel whether her eyes are eyes  Or else two radiant stars that
shine"  Monroe Union High  EVELYN MOUSO, Bellingham  "Where none admire
'tis useless to excel,  When none are beaux 'tis useless to be a j  belle."
 Whatcom High; Alkisiah Club  BERTHA HACKETT, Seattle  "The glory of the
woman is her hair."  Clarkson High; Vice- Pres. of Seattle  Club; Sagebrush
Club; Choral Club.  ZETTA LUELLA SQUIRE, Bellinglam  "Those who live on the
mountain have a  longer day than those who live in the  valley."  Blaine
High; Philo Club; Clef Club; Nor-mal  School Orchestra  s  Sixty-Eight

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DOROTHY E. CLARK, Bellingham  "Pecious pearls dwell in silent natures" 
Whatcom High; Philo Club Critic  LOUISE NORDAL, East Stanwood  "Many words
don't fill a bushel"  Business Girls' Club; Young Housekeep-ers'  Club. 
ELSA THORSTEINSO()N, Point Roberts  "Modesty is the grace of the soul!"
Whatcomn High; Messenger Staff  MI 1DRED (GILBERT, Bellingham  "Hail to
thee, blythe spirit" Whatcom High.  AMY A. FARLEY, Anacortes  "There is
water in 'Death Valley'-if you  dig for it" Anacortes High  IDO(ROTHY E.
WARD, Centralia  "Herself alone, none other she resembles"  Centralia High;
Ohiyesa Club, Treas. and  Choirister  NELLIE LTNDBLAD  "Don't open the door
of your heart to everybody"  Ellensburg Normal; Sage Brush Club  Sixty
-Nine

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ELIZABETH McGIRR. Ontario, Ore.  "There is little of melancholy in her" 
THELM.' DOCK, Stanwood "Comon sense is not a common thing"  Stanwood High;
Philo Club; Normal  Drama Club; Oratorio "Ruth" '22  ELSIE O'NEIL, Vale,
Ore.  "Each morning a smiling face"  Vale High; Newman Club; Oregon Club;
Home Economics Club; Entered from  O. A. C.  FRANCES FOWLER, Snohomish 
"Why aren't they all contented like me?"  Snohomish High; Business Girls'
Club  Club  ELLEN (iUST'AFSON, Lans, Penn. "Has ambitions as high as her
stature"  Bethel Academy, St. Paul, Minn.  GRACE EYRE, Mt. Vernon "So
quiet, so calm, yet eloquent"  Mt. Vernon High; Aletheia Club  HAZEL BRING,
Ferndale  "Endurance is the crowning quality"  Seventy

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ELLEN PETERSON, East Stanwood  "It is easy to hustle from morn 'til night, 
But it's hard to do anything  and do it  right."  Stanwood High School;
Business Girls'  Club; Young Housekeepers' Club.  POLLY MOCKT, Bellingham 
"Where words are scarce they are sel-dom  spent in vain'  Whatcom High;
Philomathean Sec. and  Treas.  NINA LM. VELDEE, Bremerton  "One good deed
is a stepping stone to an-other"  Union High; U. of W. 1 year  EUNTCE
GATES, Union, Ore.  "One today is worth two tomorrows"  I)(Ro)TY'HY FRASER
BARR()N, Seattle  "Laugh whenever you can'  Broadway High; Alkisiah  Club;
Newman  Club  MRS. VIOLA WEST, St. John  "She was a scholar and a ripe good
one"  St. John High; Clef Club  VIOLET HELEN FRASER,  Havre, Mont.  "A
woman who is never spoken of is  praised the most"  Havre High; Leowyrtha
Club  Seventy -One

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ELIZAETH ANN McDONNELL,  Lewistown, Mont.  "Nothing so strong as
gentleness'  Great Falls High, Mont.; Newman Club  ADDA WILSON, Waterville 
"I do believe you think what now you  speak" Waterville High; Ohiyesa Club;
Normal  Drama Club; "Miss Lulu Bett"  IBE MENZE, Ferndale  "To be honest,
as this world goes, is to  be one picked out of ten thousand"  Fe-ndale
High; Rural Life Club; Choral  Club  KATHERINE C. SMTTH, Mt. Vernon  "The
silence often of pure innocence  Persuades when  speaking fails"  Mt.
Vernon High; Studio Art Club  JANI.CE 11ROO()KS, DIngeness 0  "Virtue and
modesty are near kin"  Sequim Iligh ; Ohiyesa, .Pres.  ALEDA RTIESE,
I)uvall  "She is as constant as the Northern Star"  Duvall High  JLUDELLA
EATON, Oakville  "A laugh, a smile, some quiet fun"  Oakville High;
Business Girls' League '19  Seventy-Two

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 73

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LA VERNE STUBER, Bellingham  "Quips and cranks and wanton wiles"  Whatcom
High; Studio Art Club,  Sec.;  Attended Principia College, St. Louis,  Mo.,
1922  MARY J. RICHARDSON, Laurel  "She likes fun and jokes as well as most 
folks"  Meridian High; Choral Club  ({R ETCHEN JUNE W1EI'DE, Seattle  "Ah, 
why should life all labor be?"  Broadway High; Seattle Club, Pres. '19; 
Thespian Club; Normal Drama Club;  Junior Play '20, "Glass of Truth"; The 
Bishop's Candlesticks"  EMMALINE D)ORO()THY TONY, Seattle  "Luck is all
right but hustling beats it"  Franklin High; Seattle Club; Business  Girls;
Social Committee, Edens Hall  ])(DOOTHY LOB()IE,L, Monroe  "A light heart
lives long"  Monroe Union Iligh ESTHER BENSON, Edison  "Impulsive, earnest,
quick to act"  Edison High; Rural Life Club, Sec.; Y.  W.  C. A. Cabinet 
BESSIE E. SWEITZER, Oakville  "Duty, faith, love are roots and ever  green"
 Ohiyesa Club; Choral Club; Y. W. C. A.  Seventy-Three

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BLANCHE SHANAHAN, Monroe  "A good example is the best sermon"  Snohomish
High School ELIZAETH O'NEAL, Bellingham  "I infer 'twas her thinking of
others  made you think of her"  Whatcom High; Clef Club; Sagebrush  Club 
GLADYS HUGHES, Seattle  "Man is nature's sole mistake"  Broadway  High;
Aletheia Club, Vice-Pres.  MABEL STEPHENS, Everett  "She is armed without,
that is innocent within"  Exerett High  MRS. MABIEL I. JOHNSON, lellingham 
"Virtue alone can ennoble"  Oregon Club; Skagit County Club; Young 
housekeepers' Club; Messenger Staff  EDNA LINDSTROM, Chinook  "A good
countenance is a letter of recom-mendation"  Ilwaco High; Clef Club; Choral
 MADGE MacISAAC, Kirkland  "Studious and quiet"  Kirkland High; Ohiyesa; 
chestra  Normal Or-  Seventy-Fou r

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MARTHA E. THOMPSON  "A gentle hand may lead the elephant  with a hair" 
North Central High, Spokane; Studio Art  Club, Vice-Pres.; Edens Hall
Executive  Council.  IRENE LAPP  "To be of use in the world is the only 
way to be happy"  GRETCHEN HARMS  "Nothing will bring you more honor than 
to  do what. right you may"  Goldendale High; Philo Club; Sagebrush  Club. 
LEONA SMITH  "All must respect those who respect them-selves"  Marysville
High; Entered from U. of W.  MARGARET "PEG Y" PENNIN(ITON,  Tacoma  "They
met, they gazed, lie saw and sighed"  Stadium High; Cantata, "Ruth" '22
ALEMEDA L. BOMAN, Lynden  "In truth is right and might"  Lynden High;
Aletheia Club; Choral  Club; Chorus.  IMPTIE I. SAARIT, Winlock  "The only
way to have a friend is to be  one"  Winlock High School; Ohiyesa, Pres. 
Seventy-Five

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TYNE SAARINEN, Winlock a  "A day for toil, an hour for sport,  But for a
friend, life's too short"  Winlock High; Ohiyesa  MINNTIE SWVANSON,
Marysville  "Dreams of doing good for good-for-noth,  ing people"
Marysville High; Business Girls" League;  Stenographer for Dr. Miller. 
FLORENCE THOPE, Trinidad "Constancy is the foundation of virtues"  Cheney
High; Sagebrush Clul; YV. W. C.  A.  SONORA HESS, Yarima  "A truthful heart
is ever happy"  Yakirma 1High; Sagebrush Club  E1)NA MATI) ClARNINE,
Iloquiam  "From a little spark may burst a mighty  flame"  Iloquiam High
School; Aletheia, Treasur-er, Reporter and President 4  G ENEVIEVE KEOIGIH,
Spokane  "Skill is better than strength"  North Central Hligh; Leowyrhta,
Treas.  MYRTLE MULLER, Montesno  "Brave actions never want a trumpet"
Montesano High; Y. W. C. A.  :j A  Seventy-Six

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FLOY SOUTIARD, Olympia  "Life is what we make it"  Granite Falls High
School; Y. W. C. A.;  Alkisiah ANNA lIE(CINA LIND, Burlington  "Hlonest
labor bears a lovely place"  Burlington IIigh; Rural Life Club; Mes-senger 
and Klipsun Assitant Editor.  JULIA WH ITMORI E, Tacoma  "With a manner
calm and a heart sincere,  Faithful to friend and full of cheer"  Lincoln
High; Studio Art Club, Pres.;  Debate Team.  T. SIVIE IHERBERG, Holstad,
Minn.  "Her ready smile, a true friend's warmth  expresses"  Holstad High,
Minn.; Entered from Teach-ers'  College, N. D.  JOHANNA SCHUYLEMAN, Lynden 
"Whatever is worth doing is worth doing  well"  Lynden High  ESTHER
MIDGARDEN, Seattle  "A true friend is a treasure" Ballard High; Alkisiah
Club  JESSIE M. CLARKEN, Kosmos  "Be silent and pass for a philosopher"
Lincoln High, Tacoma; Studio Art Club,  Treas. and Vice-Pres.; Y. W. C. A. 
Seventy-Seven

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GERTRUDI!)E NIKDH)EItliE, Arlington a  "A happy hearted maiden"  Arlington
High; Y. W. C. A.  ANNA MARGARET LYNN, Bellinghanm  "A true friend is a
treasure"  Whatcom High; Choral Club  MELVIN II. FRACK, Ferndale  "Our
character is our will, for what we  will we are"  Ferndale High  REBA DORIS
MIDDLESTATE, Edison  "How soon a smile can change the world"  Edison High;
Sec. Ohiyesa Club; Skagit  County Club  DORIS REBECCA GOULD, Portland 
"Heard melodies are sweet but those un- heard  are sweeter"  Hood River
High; Studio Art Club; Ore-gon  Club; Messenger Staff; Choral Club EGGERT
BURNS, Point Roberts  "The noblest mind he carries that ever  governed man
"  May he live long in fortunes"  Whatcom High; Thespian, Pres.; Editor  of
Klipsun; Pres. of Sophomore Class  NORINE  NELSON, Mt. Vernon  "Modest as a
dainty flower"  Mt. Vernon High; Normal Drama Club;  Skagit County Club 
Seventy-Eight

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JESSIE iM. N()IRMAN, Redmond  "Care and diligence bring luck"  Broadway
High, Seattle; Rural Life Club  CHARLOTTE IRENE SQUIER, Seattle  "As
unpretentious as a wild rose"  Seattle Pacific College; Leowyrhta Club; 
Seattle Club  I ILA II. FOLTZ, Parkland  "She hath a sweet and merry voice"
 Lincoln High, Tacoma; Alkisiah Club.  IANA ANDERSON, Port Blakeley  "A
calmin and gracious element" Winslow High School; Y. W. C. A.  LA PEARL
MOORE, Boise, Idaho  "Favors to none, to all she smiles ex-tends"  Boise
High; Rural Life Club; Sagebrush  Club; Vice-Pres., Edens Hall; Y. W. C. 
A.; Albion Normal, Idaho.  DOROTHY S. SCHAFER, Anacortes  "She's all my
fancy painted her, she's  lovely, she's  divine"  James John High,
Portland; Philo Club;  Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A.; Senior Class  Reporter; Clef
Club, Sec. and Treas.  HEL1EN IRENE GO()KE, Seattle  "She excells each
mortal thing upon this  dull earth dwelling."  Queen Anne High; Thespian
Club; Se-attle  Club; Normal Dramatic Club;  Chorus and Choral Clubs;
Vice-Pres. and  Pres. Students' Association; "Little  Women"; Klipsun
Board; Messenger Staff  Seventy-Nine

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 80

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PEARL RIt. WVIIITI'MORE, Tacoma  "I laugh, for hope has happy place with 
me"  Lincoln High; Pres. Alkisiah Club; As-sistant  Secretary W. A. A.;
Basketball  '21; Class Basketball '23  FERN AG(EE, Blaine  "A still and
quiet conscience"  Blaine High; Studio Art Club; Choral  Club; Ladies'
Quartet '21-'22 E. PEARTL EVANS, Haver  "I will be brief"  Haver High
School; Sagebrush Club  HE LEN MAXSIN "When comes there such another?" 
ROSA ADING TON, Ajlune  "I do betray myself with blushing" GLADYS LUCILLE
SHAHAN,  Wenatchee  "I Will"  High School Dept. Spokane University; 
Aletheia Club; Sagebrush Club.  GLADYS GAIL KUHUS, Bellingham  "Men,
monkeys, lapdogs, parrots, perish all"  Whatcom High School; Studio Art
Club.  Eighty

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 81

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HERBERT R. CEDI)ERIERG, Bellinghamn  "He has a head to contrive, a tongue
to  persuade and a hand to execute any  business"  Whatcom High School;
Philo Club, Pres.;  Boys' Glee Club; Sophomore Class Treas.  two quarters 
NEVA DENSFORD, Crothersville, Ind.  "Good taste depends on sound judgment" 
Crothersville High School  MARJORY SHEPARI), Seattle  "She winks with one
eye and laughs with  the other"  Queen Anne High; Philo Club; entered  from
U. of W.  BEULAH A. JOHNSON, Frankfort, Mich.  "A handful of comnlon sense
is worth a  bushel of learning"  Frakfort High  HELEN E. SUNDEEN, Anacortes
 "Our faces like mirrors reflect ourselves"  Anacortes High; Studio Art
Club, Chair- man  Entertainment Committee; Y. W.  C. A.  JAY H. GRIGGS,
Yakima  "I may die to slow music but I will live  to ragtime"  Yakima High;
Thespian; Tennis "W";  Junior Play, "The Scarecrow"  MABLE E. MORLAN,
Bellingham  "Nature's above Art in this respect"  Whatcom High  Eighty-One

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BLANCHE HJERTOOS, Tolt A  "A good action is never lost"  EVELYN MYERS,
Seattle  "One must have  strength of character  to be really amiable" 
Queen Anne High; Seattle Club  FRANK D. HENDERSON, Bellingham  "The noblest
motive is the public good"  Roosevelt High, Kansas 'State Normal; 4 
Football; Debate  DACAMAR CHRISTY  "I do but sing because I must and pipe 
but as the linnets sing"  Broadway  High; Ohiyesa Club; Clef  Club, Pres.;
Ladies Quartette '23; As-sistant  Teacher in Music  £  EB1A
NATT'I'ERIIJND, Mt. Vernon  "It is the quiet people who are becoming"  Mt.
Vernon High; Aletheia Club; Skagit  County Club  HIAROLD W. WALLING  "Every
man must play his part."  Bickleton High; Ellensburg Normal;  Track  EDNA
B. FRANTZ, Outlook  "We are never as happy or unhappy as  we think we are" 
Alkisiah Club; Sagebrush Club; Y. W. C.  A.  Sr  Eighty-Two

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 83

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HELEN F. PIFER, Portland, Ore.  "I would rather be, than seem to be"  Hood
River High; Oregon Normal; Bus-iness  Girls' League; Oregon Club; House 
President, Maynard Hall  DOROTHEA ISABELLE BANGLE,  Nooksack  "Promises are
measured by hope"  Nooksack High  VIOLET GORRIE, Bellingham  "Of manner
gentle and effections mild"  Whatcom High; Rural Life Club  HERMING
HAVEMAN, Lynden "Good taste depends on sound judgment"  Lynden High School;
Studio Art Club  RUTTH ELLEN MA(N ER,  Richmond Beach  "Merit procures us
the esteem of the up-right"  Richmond Beach High; Ohiyesa Club; Se-attle 
Club; Debate Team; Clef Club  MARTHA PETERSON  "Let my actions speak" 
Elbow Lake High; Minnesota U.; Y. W.  C. A.  HELEN RIESE, Duvall  "Charms.
strike the sight  lights the soul"  Dvall High; Seattle Club;  Club  but
merit  Rural Life  Eighty-Three

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 84

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WINIFRED F. STEARNS, hlarmony  "Thinking is but an idle waste of thought" 
Raymond High  MRS. FIAIORENCE IMES, El (Centro, Cal.  "I strove with none,
but none was worth  my strife"  Stadium High, Tacoma; Y. W. C. A. 
MARI(-ARII' MAD ELNE 11AY WARD),  Bellinghamn  "The sweetest thing that
ever  grew be-side  an open door"  Whatcom High  MERLE M. WELLS, Vancouver 
"When she can't laugh at the jokes of  the age she laughs at the age of the
jokes"  Vancouver High; 1 year O. A. C.; Oregon  Club ALICE PERONTEAU,
Bellingham a  "Make it thy business to know thyself,  which is the most
difficul lesson in the  world"  Assnupmtion High; Newman Club.  NELLIE
WALLACE, Sumner  "Think of ease but  work on"  Puyallup High  MILDRED
ANDERSON, Bellingham  "We love to hear her debate"  Meridian High; Debate
Team '23; Entered  from W. S. C.  41,  Eighty-Four

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 85

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NELLIE M. HENTON, Sunnyside  "To bear is to conquer our fate"  Walla Walla
Academy; Young House- keepers'  Club.  MRS. MARY NORVELL  "She is a very
capable person"  Entered from Linfield College; Alkisiah  Reporter; Oregon
Club; Young House-keepers'  Club  DOROTHY AME JONES, Portland, Ore. "Hence
loathed meloncholy"  James-John High; Ohiyesa, Reporter; De-bate  ELVA
STUMP, Edison "Ready always for a joke"  Edison High; Skagit County Club 
DAISY ROOP, Seattle  "No legacy is so rich as honesty"  Kiona-Benton High;
Y. W. C. A.  GRACE M. VAN HOUTEN, Bellingham  "Of all girls, she is one of
the most stu-dious"  Whatcom High; Rural Life; Excuse Com-mittee  MYRTLE
LINDBLAD, Everett  "She does her duty without hesitation"  Everett High;
Rural Life Club  Eighty-Five

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 86

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BERTI IA M DlHORO (RST, Wilson Creek  "The silence that is in the starry
sky"  Wilson Creek High; Sagebrush Club,  Pres.; Alkisiah Club; 1 year W.
S. C.  DOROTHIY CAVE, Winslow  "Wisdom is ofttimes nearer when we stool 
than when we soar"  Winslow High; Leowyrhta Club  WIILIAM 1'. BEINS()N,
Everson  "A noticeable man with large grey eyes"  Nooksack High; Thespian
Club, Vice  Pres.   ALMA J. REID, Toledo  "Type of the wise who soar, but
never  roam,  True to the kindred points of heaven and home"  Toledo High;
Newman Club; Choral Club  IRENE M. ALEXANDER, Tacona  "Fair as the day and
always gay"  Lincoln High; Clef Club  ERNEST P. STOWELL, Ferndale  "Who
does his task from day to day  And meets whatever comes his way"  Ferndale
High; Philomathean Club; De  bating Club; Football; Baseball; 2nd  team
Basketball  MARTHA ANDERSON  "A quiet miss and mild in action"  Lincoln
High, Aletheia Club  Eighty-Six

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AUDREY AIICE ORR," Bellingham  "She is fair to see and sweet,  Dainty from
her head to feet" Whatcom High  RUTH OGREN, Du Pont  "In thy face I see a
map of honor, truth,  and loyalty"  JOHN J. THIENNES, Covan  "If he's happy
you see him smile,  If sad, the same"  Philo Club  MARJORIE CARLANDER,
Bellingham  "Her blue eyes sought the west afar,  For lovers love the
western star" Fairhaven High; Choral Club, Sec.  ERCELL CERVIN, Wanmic,
Ore.  "A heart, the fountain of sweet tears,  And love and thought and joy"
 Connell High; Y. W. C. A.; Entered from  Cheney Normal  EDGAR J. HANNAH,
Friday Harbor  "He works with all the strength he can"  Nooksack High  MARY
A. CUTTTNG, liwaco  "I am not the rose, but I have lived near  the rose" 
Ilwaco High; Ohiyesa Club  Eighty- Seven

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 88

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LILLIAN J. MANERG, Centralia  "And if I laugh at any mortal thing,  'Tis
that I may not weep"  Centralia High; Studio Art Club; Sour-dough  Club  G
LADYS MOTTER, Kennewick  "What strange thing is man, And what a stranger is
woman"  Kennick High; Sagebrush Club; Business  Girls' League; Home
Economics Major.  FREEMAN J. MERCER, Prosser  "Man is but a reed, the
weakest in nature,  but he is a thinking reed"  Prosser High; Rural Life
Club  VERSA BAUGUESS, Arlington  "Modest, as her blushing shows;  Happy, as
her smiles disclose"  Arlington High; Studio Art Club  EMMA E. LARSEN,
Tacoma  "She had a gentle smile,  And a kindly word to say"  Shelton High;
Aletheia, Reporter; Y. W.  C.  A.  MARGARET SMITH, Seattle  "Modest as the
day is long"  Marysville High; Entered from U. of W. SAM S. FORD  "What a
piece of work is man!  How noble in reason!  How infinte in faculty!" 
Ellensburg High; Thespian, Treas. and  Chairman Program Committee; Treas. 
Freshman Class; Chairman Klipsun Board; Business Mgr. of Messenger; 
Football '23  Eighty-Eight

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 89

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MELBA V. HINDS, Bellingham  "Such a blue inner light from her eye-lids 
outbroke  You looked at her silence and fancied  she spoke"  Whatcom High;
Thespian Club; Hiker's  Club; Business Girls' League; Commun-ity  Players;
Choral Club; "Rosemary"  '21; "The Little Princess" '21; "As You  Like It"
'21; "Overtones" '21; "Mer-chant  of Venice" '22  RUTH ECCLES, Seattle 
"Yet in herself she liveth not" Franklin High; Entered from U. of W.  E.
VANCE URNESS, Colfax  "Truth is the highest  may keep" Antigo High, Antigo,
 from W. S. C.  thing that man  Wis.; Entered  IRENE C. STEWART, Anacortes
"She doeth little kindnesses,  Which most leave undone, or dispise"  Port
Townsend High; Thespian Club,   Pres.; Clef Club; Seattle Club  NELLIE
(ILBER.T, White Salmon  "Blessings she is:  Vancouver FHigh God made her
so"  JOHN AUBREY W CRIGITSTu, mas  "Thy Foes shall bite the dust"  Sumas
High ALICE MIRIAM LARSON, Bellingham  "Great feelings bath she of her own" 
Whateom High; Sagebrush Club  Eighty-Nine

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 90

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CATHERINE M. DEEMER, Bellinglhamn  "The gods approve the depth and not  the
tumult of the soul" Aquinas Academy, Tacoma; Newman Club 2  ESTHER F.
CARLSON  "Shalt show us how divine a thing a  woman may be made"  Matsqui
High, B. C.; entered from Pro-vincial  Normal School, Vancouver, B. C.  
LOTS TIMMEN,Ilwaeo  "Distinct as the billows, yet one as the  sea"  Ilwaco
Hich; Sec. Alkisiah Club: Sec.-  Treas. Edens Hall: Oratorio "Ruth";  Class
Basketball '22  GLADYS W. SCRIMSHIER, Harmony "A mind rejoicing in the
light"  Harmony High  ESTHER REDDICK, Bellinghani a  "A beautiful and happy
girl  With step as light as summer air"  Philo Vice-Pres.: Class Basketball
'23  MABEL ESTHER NYQUIST,  Funlock, Cal.  "And she sits and gazes at me 
With those deep and tender eyes"  Funlock High; Young Housekeepers' Club 
ELSIE WRIElHlT, Kirkland  "So buxom, blythe and debonair" Broadway High,
Seattle; Alkisiah Club;  W. A. A. Minstrel Show Manager  z  N mety

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 91

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EDNA FLORENCE ANDERSON  "There was always something sweet and  refreshing
in her face" Meridian High; Clef Club; Librarian;  Ladies' Quartette '23;
W. A. A. Min-strel;  Extension Programs; U. of W.;  Wilson Business College
 MURILL ARRUNDALE, Tacoma  "Who once has had a friend, has found the link
'twixt mortal and divine"  Lincoln High; Alkisiah  ROBERT O. CAULKINS,
Bellingham  "How a man can have a quiet and  cheerful mind under a great
burden and  load of genius I know not"  Santa Monica High; Thespian
Dramatic  Club, Pres. '23; Normal Drama Club,  Pres. '23; "Little Women";
Boys' Glee  Club; Associate Editor Klipsun  AMANDA McCORKLE, Bellinghamn 
"The rose is fairest when 'tis budding  new"  Whatcom High; Choral Club 
NELLIE BROWN, Bellingham  "Her eyes as stars of twilight fair;  Like
twilight too, her dusky hair"  Lynden High; Philo Club; Class Basket-ball 
'22-'23; "All Gummed Up"  LORRAINE WINTERS, Olympia  "And all the lads they
smile at me when  coming thru the rye" Stanwood High; Thespian Club, Sec.; 
Thespian Debate Team; Junior Play '20;  Treas. Junior Class '19; "Prodigal
Son"  '19; "Merchant of Venice" '22  JESSIE BERYL WILSON, Bellingham  "Her
air had a meaning, her movement a  grace,  You turned from the fairest to
gaze on  her face"  Whatcom High; Thespian Club; Normal  Drama Club;
"Little Women"; "The  Merchant of Venice"; "Miss Lulu Bett"  Skagit  County
Club.  Ninety-One

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L-:7ir~  BERNICE STOLTS, Colville  "When the sunshineth, make hay." 
Colville High; Studio Art Club; Sage  brush Club  JOHN O'ROURKE, Bellingham
 "He speaks reservedly, but he speaks  with force, nor can one word be
changed  but for worse"  St. Patrick's School, Liverpool, Eng.; De-bate 
Team '23 RACHEL K. M1\P. ALO, Tacoma  "Nothing so strong as gentleness" 
Lincoln High; Alkisiah Club; Home Eco-nomics  Major  EDWIN R. OPSTAD,
Blaine  "Quite forgetful of self and full of the  praise of his rival"
Blaine High; Philo Club, Pres.; Sec.  Sophomore ('lass  RITT11 I'AITCETT,
Stanfield, O.re.  "Airs and manners are miiore expressive  than words" 
Stanficldi Iigh; Oregon Club, Sec.  INEZ CROMER  "A smiling face  Edmonds
High  makes a blooming visage"  KATHERINE N. ROBERTS, Seattle  "Gracious
and sweet, the better way she  shows"  Entered from San Francisco Normal; 
Sourdough Club; Oratorio '17; "H. M.  S. Pinafore"; "Mikado" '17 
Ninety-Two  *

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MARY H. STEMKIEI, Seattle  "Smooth success be strewed before her  feet" 
Aletheia Club; Business Girls' League  VIVIAN I1AZE;l I IAVENS, Everett 
"Her value is her worth, not in her size"  Everett High; W. A. A.; Everett
Club,  Sec.  IVA M. McK I NN()N, Jellingham  "Quiet, studious, determined" 
Whatcom High; Studio Art Club  BESSIE CASSMIAN, Shoshone, Wyo.  "A maiden
never bold of spirit, still and quiet"  HELEN I)OR(I)TIIY BOYD, Everett 
"Her face makes sunshine in shady  places"  Everett High FLORENCE JENNE,
Coupeville  "There are so many funny things I don't  have time to laugh" 
ALPHA L. SAMZELIUS, Novelty  "Modesty is a priceless gem"  Lincoln High,
Seattle; Sec. Seattle Club  Ninety- Three

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GRACE WHITEHEAD, Roy  "Never known to say an unkind word"  Roy High; Y. W.
C. A.  RUTHI WHItTEI]EAD, Roy  "She lives most who thinks most"  Roy High 
LLOYD STILL, Bellingham  "The secret of success lies in constancy  of
purpose"  Whatcom High  DIOROTHY BULLOCK  "She has learned the luxury 
good"  of doing  PEG(GY EMILY PADDI)EN.  "It is nice to be natural  are
naturally nice" Snohomish High; Alkisiah  Seattle  when you are  Club 
ESTHER A. ANDERSON, Langley  "What sweet delight a quiet life affords" 
Langley High  ANNA CLOOR  "She who makes new friends as she ad-vances  thru
life and who keeps her old  ones as well, will never be left alone. 
Ninety-Four

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HULDA MARIE STONEBERG,  Portland, Ore.  "She doeth all things well" 
Lincoln High; Oregon Club MRS. CLARA LA BOUNTY,  North Bellingham  "An ear
to no folly or mischief inclined"  Meridian High; Philo Club; Home
Eco-nomics  Minor  G LADYS E. PARR, Bellingham  "She is all youth and all
charms"  Whatcom High; Leowryhta Club  ARCHIE THOMAS,  "He that gained a
hundred fights"  Union High, Sedro-Woolley; Philo Club;  Vice-Pres., "W"
Club; Pres. of Student  Body '23; Football and Baseball LO(UTSE H. PALLAS,
fMukilteo.  "She speaks seldom iut Sages listen when  she does"  Everett
High; Ohiyesa Club, Vice-Pres.  INGEBORC HALL, Stanwood  "She walks in
beauty, like the night,  Of cloudless chimes and starry skies"  Stanwood
High  CATHERINE WHITCOMB, Bellingham  "A jolly girl without care or
troubles  Whose voice with laughter always bub-bles"  Whatcom High; Philo
Club: Women's  Athletic Association; P. E. Major's Club  Ninety-Five

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MA(,(IE V. COULD, Everett  "In seeking wisdom, thou art wise"  Chillicothe
Business College, Mo. ESTELL E T HORSEN  "Truth and goodness in her heart
find  place"  CHRISTINE PI)ET'I EISON  "It is gobd to lengthen to the last
a  sunny mood"  GENEVIEVE MOORE  "Care will kill a cat so therefore, let's 
 be merry"  GLENN M. BREAIKEY, Bellingham  "Not eminence only, but worth" 
Whatcom High HELVIE H. SILVER, Astoria, Ore.  "How brilliant and mirthful
the light in  her eyes"  Astoria High; Alkisiah  Club  GLADYS PRICE,
Bellingham  "Her life is earnest work, not play"  Meridian High 
Ninety-Six

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B. B. ROBINSON, Republic  "A quiet smile played 'round his lips"  Republic
High; Rural Life Club  EDYTH  YOUNG COTTEREIL,  Clear Lake  "She starts,
she stops and thinks again,  then speaks"  Union High, Sedro-Woolley; Y. W.
C. A.;  Home Economics Major  ALBERT HALVORSON, Custer  "We grant that
though he has many words  he. is very shy of using them"  Ferndale High;
Rural Life, Vice-Pres.; Football.  MILDRED CARMEN SWEITZER,  Oakville  "Men
may come and men may go but I  go on forever"  Oakville High School;
Ohiyesa.  VIVIAN M. JONES, Hood River, Ore.  "With a tact and cleverness
she manages  affairs"  Hood River High School; Alkisiah Club  IDA
AHLSTRAND, Mineral  "An  honest conscience is the best pass-port"  Stadium
High, Tacoma; Aletheia Club;  Y. W. C. A. MARJORY DOWNES, Topeka, Kan. 
"Always merry and bright"  Clapham High, London, Eng.; Vice- Pres. 
Leowyrhta Club; Literary Editor, Klip-sun  Ninety-Seven

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ELIZAETH BRANSTAD, Mt. Vernon  "And in her mind dwells knowledge"  Mt.
Vernon High; Aletheia Club; Skagit  County Club  HAZEL DOROTHY (KENNEY,
Deming  "A look of deep knowledge shines forth  from her eyes"  Mt. Baker
High; Leowyrhta Club  GLADYS I. NIMS, Sumas  "A sweet disposition is the 
success"  Sumas High; Rural Life Club,  soul of  Reporter.  ALICE
SCHONHARD, Centralia  "A pleasant body of happiness"  Centralia High 
MILDRED BAY, Lyndtn  "Thou art a master of diffiiculties" Lynden High;
Philo Club; Class Basket-ball  '23  THELMA PAUL, Seattle  "Ah, truest soul
of womanhood"   SIGNA MOONEY, Roslvn  "Speech is great, but silence is
greater"  Hoquiam High; Business Girls' League;  Sagebrush Club; Choral
Club; Y. W.  C. A.; "Feast of the Little Lanterns"  Ninety-Eight  p I

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AFFIE REITAN  "Life means something to the capable"  MARY A. (GERE,
Bellingham  "Peaceful, studious, and quiet"  Fairhaven High; Newman Club 
MERLE O. ANNIS, Sultan  "Look into her eyes and you see a little  angel, 
Look a little longer and you see a little  imp"  Sultan High; W. A. A.;
Business Girls'  League; Clef Club  GRIACE McGINNIS, Filer, Ida.  "Wit she
hath, without desire to make  known how much she hath"  Filer High; Albion
State Normal, Idaho;  Idaho Technical Institution, Pocatello BYRON PAYNE,
Snohomish  "His strong determination will bring  success"  Snohomish High;
Philo Club; Glee Club;  Mixed Chorus; Normal Dramatic Club  MYRTLE D.
PYNOR, Bellingham  "She laughs and the world laughs with  her"  Meridian
High; Rural Life Club  PAUL J. RAIRD)ON, Anacortes  "I have kept one secret
in the course of  my life-I am a bashful man"  Anacortes High; "W" Club;
Rural Life  Club, Pres.; Football, '22, '23.  Ninety-Nine

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HAZEL C. BIRCHARD, Vancouver  "A mind at peace with all below,  A heart
whose love is innocent" Vancouver High; Ohiyesa Club; Choral  Club; Chorus 
FERN JUNE ONSTINE, Ferndale  "And all that's best of dark and bright,  Meet
in her aspect and her eyes"  Ferndale High  ALV IN GtEOI11O, 1Fr'endale
"The mildest manners with the bravest  mind"  Ferndale High; Rural Life
Club e.  RUBY MEEKS, Thayer, Mo.  "If my heart were na' happy I would die" 
Thayer High; Young Housekeepers' Club  ETTA PITMAN, Sedro-Woolley  "All who
joy would win,  Must share it,-happines was born a  twin"  Sedro-Woolley
High; Alkisiah, Vice-  Pres.; Pres. and Hostess, Skagit County  Club 
SLOANE SQUIRE, Seattle  "All her free, impulsive acting  Is so charming, so
distracting"  Lincoln High; Entered from U. of W.;  Thespian Reporter; 
Normal Drama Club;  "Miss Lulu Bett"; "Rider's to the Sea";  W. A. A.
Minstrel; "W" Vaudeville;  Seattle Club  "PEGGY" MARGARET STOVEL,  Seattle 
"You have deserved high commendation,  true applause,  and love"  Broadway
High; Thespian Club, Treas.;  Normal Drama Club; Seattle Club;  "Rider's to
the Sea"; W. A. A. Minstrel;  "W" Vaudeville; Entered from U. of W.  One
Hundred  I _ _ _

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WILLIAM R. RUE, Bellingham  "I don't smile-it hurts my face"  :t. Fairhaven
High; Baseball '22, '23  "W" Club  CARROLL M. HAESKE, Bellingham  "Yours
received. We are out of halos in  your size.-St. Peter."  c pWhatcom High;
Third year course; Vice-  Pres. Student Body '21, President '21-  '22;
Orchestra '21- '22-'23; Men's Glee  Club; Philo Club; Normal Drama Club; 
Yell King '22-'23; Messenger Staff;  "Passing of the Third Floor Back"; 
"Merchant of Venice"; Tennis "W"  OSCAR LINST'EDT, Bellingham  "A pleasant 
giant, but modest withal"  Fairhaven HIigh; Second Team Basketball 
'22-'23; Football '23; Baseball '22- '23; "W"  Club  ANNE F'LAKOY, Buckley 
"When 1 have anything to do, I go and  do it"  Buckley High; Y.  W. C. A. 
IAWRIENCE IKEPIING(4ER, Bellingham  "All great men are dying,  I don't feel
well myself" Whatcom High; Football '21-'22; Basket-ball  '22-'23; Baseball
'23  HAZEL J. JOHNSON, Ilwaco  "Tho I'm always in haste,  I'm never in a
hurry"  Ilwaco High; Leowyrhta Club; Business  Girl's League; Young
Housekeepers'  Club  RUTH MEEKS, Thayer, Mo.  :. . "What's in a name?" 
Thayer High; Young Housekeepers  One Hundred C::!

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J. W. FULLER, Granite Falls  "There is no genius in  energy and activity" 
Lincoln High, Seattle;  Pres. and Sec.  MARY MONOCLE  "Time to her work, 
friends"  life like genius of  Sourdough Club,  her words,  her  ROSE McVAY
DAVIS, St. Paul, Minn.  "She bore a mind that envy could  call fair" 
Willman High, Minn.; Sourdough  Sec. and Treas.; Reporter for  and Fourth
Year Classes  not but  Club,  Third  OLGA KELLER  HELEN HIGHTOWER,
Bellingham  "A unique combination of sense and  nonsense"  Whatcom High;
Philo Club; Editor, Mes-senger;  Klipsun Board; Klipsun Staff;  Student
Representative; Secretary and  Treasurer, Board of Control; "W" Club 
Vaudeville; W. A. A.; P. E. Major; Bus-iness  Girls' League; Class
Basketball  '23-'23  OLIVER R. INGERSOLL, Nooksack  "The world must have
great minds even as great spheres, suns"  Nooksack High; Philo, President;
Debate  Team, '22; Editor of Messenger; Presi-dent,  Board of Control;
Manager, Klip-sun  '23  LOU M. FOWLER, Bellingham  "Men can live without
knowledge,  Men can live without books,  But where is the man  Who can live
without cooks?" Fairhaven High; Philo, Secretary and  Treasurer; Home
Economics Major;  Class Basketball '22; Tennis Tourna-ment,  summer '22;
Secretary, Sophomore  Class, '23  One Htundred Two

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ALBERTINA PEARSON, Bellingham  "Her sunny disposition is rivaled only  by
her hair"  Whatcom High; Thespian Club; "Little  Women"; Class Basketball
'22; Board of  Control '22 and '23, Secretary '23; P. E. Major.  ROBERT A.
TUNSTALL, Kalama  "A big man in many ways,  Knows the trifle from the
great" Kalama High; Philo Club; Normal Drama  club; Board of Control;
Debate Team  '23  MERCY GAVE BROMLEY, Kent  "Keen in studies, gentle in
manners,  refined in all her actions"  Red Wing High, Minn.; Winona State 
Normal: New England Conservatory of  Music, Boston; Sourdough Club.  One
I-hlndred Three

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M ARIE BERGERSON ......... ........................... Everett  VIRGINIA M.
BLAKESLIE ............. M..eridia............Meridian  RAY M. GATES
.......................................... Deming  MRS. PEARI, JOHANSEN
.Belnga................................. Bellingham  M RS. M ARIAN M
CCLASKEY ................................- ........-..... .... . Seattle 
KATHRYN DUNHAM MARTIN .............................. - Woodland  MARY ELLEN
PRENDERGAST ........................... BBe..-..l-.l -i-n--g ham  DOROTHY
MAY ANDERSON .a........ ................................ ga, Montana 
JEANETTE NELSON .......... ........................ ....... Seattle 
EVYRELL RICE .................................. Bellingham  M RS. M ARGARET
\1VEIDERT .. ...................-. .-.....-.. .. Saniss/i , AT. D .  s  1 7
I ' r 17 1 n  17 1 Il I 11 0 17 n  7  7- THE VA ULT  One Hundred Four

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One Hundred Five  'NMIN  D...................

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One Hundred Six

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JUNIOR CLASS HISTORY  Place: B. S. N. S.  Time: September, 1923. AcT I. 
Scene: Upper hall, near auditorium.  Dignified Soph to spirited Fresh:
"What was all the mad rush to assem-bly  for yesterday at eleven o'clock ?"
 Fresh: "Freshman class meeting! Some meeting, too."  Soph: "I 'admire your
Freshman  pep. Who'd you elect for president?"  Fresh: "Guy Bond's
president. Guess we know a good man when we  see him."  Soph: "You bet you
do. Who're the other officers?"  Fresh: "Vice-president, Desmond Fulp;
secretary, Blanche Cloetta, and  treasurer, Angue Bowmer. You couldn't find
a better lot of class officers  anywhere."  Soph (departing) : "Good luck
to you, but your pep'll soon die."  Fresh (looking daggers at departing
Soph) : "Just you wait!"  ACT II.  Scene: Big gym. A Freshman class mixer
of girls whose names begin  with the letters f to m, and all the boys of
the school.  Fresh to dignified Soph: "Hello, there! Some mixer, don't you
think ?"  Soph : "I'll have to admit this is the best Freshman mixer I ever
attended."  Fresh: "Sure, it's good. Did you hear about the play we gave at
our  last class meeting?"  Soph : "Yes, I heard about it. Wish we'd do
something like that; but,  say, what was the idea of all the blue and white
tags on everybody in your  gang ?"  Fresh: "Oh, those were 'I've paid my
dues' tags. Everybody paid his  dues, too, you bet."  Soph (feeling need of
refreshments) : "Seems to be time for the eats."  Fresh: "Yea, let's join
the procession to the cafeteria."  ACT III.  Scene: Waiting bench on the
tennis courts.  Dignified Soph: "Heard you had a class meeting yesterday." 
Fresh: "You bet. Bill McNeal's president; Kathryn Schupp, vice-presi-dent; 
Madeline Temple's secretary, and Beatrice Thomas's treasurer."  Soph: "Our
class meeting beat yours."  Fresh: "They do not! Do you ever give programs?
We gave two  excellent ones, but I've never heard of your class giving
any."  Soph (beginning to get ruffled) : "Maybe we don't give programs, 
but we have Sophs in all the school activities."  Fresh: "Well, so do we,
and a lot more. The best people on the debate,  basketball, football, and
baseball teams are Freshmen. We boast of a tulip  queen from our class-Miss
Mabel Hickson."  Soph (losing dignity) : "You win."  Fresh: "I tell you our
class is the best one that ever entered this insti-tution."  (Curtain)  One
Hundred Seven

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SENIOR COLLEGE CLASS  For the first time in the history of the B. S. N. S.
a Senior and a Junior class, based on a four and a three-year course,
respectively, take their places  among the organizations of the school.  In
1917, through an act of the Legislature, the three-year course was
in-troduced;  a four- year course was also planned for, but was not to go
into  effect until 1920. In checking over the list of 'r7 graduates, twelve
were  found to be eligible to graduation in May. Since then ninety-nine
students  have received third-year dillomas, and two have completed a
one-year college  course.  In March, 1922, Mrs. Verna McGinis took the
first four-year diploma.  Since then Bessmarie Alexander, Chas. A. Buddy,
Mary B. Egbert, and  Frederick Roby Palmer have completed the course. To
this list will be added  the names of the present Seniors, Dale Pfaff and
Rose M. Davis.  One Hundred Eight  ________e ~~j~~s~ai~e~

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Tuesday, March 27, was the "birthday" of the Senior-Junior class. The 
following officers were elected: FRANK HE NDERSON .............
.................... President  DIALE PAFF
.................................................. Secretary  MARJORY
DOWNES ...........--.-.--.---.---.--.---.---.- .--. ...-.-.-
-.--..T.rc.a.s.u.r.e.r.  ROSE M . DAVIS
..........................................- .--------R---e--p..-.o.
-r-t-e-r---------------- ---  DPR. M 'ILL R-.--.-.--.-.--.-.--.-.--.--.-.-
................--.-.--.-.--.-.- . ----------- Faculty Adviser  ROSE M.
DAVIS, SIELMA NIXON, PIARL JO.HANS I"N Social Commrmittee  Class Colors:
Green and Gold. Class Flower: The Rose.  Class Motto: "Ambition, Couragc,
Trtuth;" with the first letter of each  word taken to form the watchword,
"ACT."  Committees are working on the constitution, class pin, and
invitations.  The business of organization did not cause the class to
forget its social  life. On March 31, the two classes, combined for mutual
benefit at the first  meeting, had a picnic at State Park. Though the skies
frowned, the picnickers  (lodged between the drops and found their way to a
huge over-hanging boulder  on the water's edge. There laughter, jokes,
smoke, and good eats mingled  as they boiled coffee,  roasted steak, and
made merry in general.  Three other "events" are cutlined for this quarter.
A class "frolic" will  be held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Frank
H.enderson, Saturday, April 21,  where a five-act tragedy entitled, "The
Prince and Why For," will be a fea-ture.  An excursion to the head of Lake
Whatcom, and a track meet while  there, will take place Saturday, April 28.
May II, a banquet will be given at  the Leopold. The class will, class
prophecy, and toasts will help make the  evening a success. The class plans
to run independently in the Marathon, Saturday, April  14, making the
fourth contestant. The enrollment is as follows:  JUNIORS  Killen,
Nellie--Bellingham. Anderson, Edna-Ferndale.  Lind, Anna-Mount Vernon.
Densford, Neva-Crothersville.  Motter, Gladys-Kennewick. Downes,
Marjory-Topeka, Kans.  Nixcn, Selma-Hallsville, Mo. Hackett,
Bertha-Seattle.  O'Neill, Elsie-Vale. Haeske, Carroll- Bellingham.  Frack,
Melvin-Ferndale. Henderson, Frank-Bellingham.  Truchel, Ben-Bellingham.
Hume, Chester-Bellingham.  Vermeulen, Grace-Bellingham. Ingersoll,
Oliver-Everson.  Young, Pearl-Bellingham. James, Clair-Bellingham.  Davis,
Rose McVay-St. Paul, M Johansen, Pearl-Bellingham.  SENIORS Davis, Rose
McVay--St. Paul, Minn. Pfaff, Dale-Seattle.  One Hundred Nine

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HoRACE RAHSILOPF, Coach  Too much credit cannot be given Mr. Rahskopf for
the progress made in debate during the past two years. The debaters have
worked hard, but it  is because of his able coaching that they have
succeeded so well.  When the schedule of the past year is contrasted with
that of three years a!go, the progress is amazing. Not only has the school
won the  inter-normal triangular contest for the Allison Cup, after two
successive years  of defeat: it has also, in meeting the two colleges in
Oregon, extended its  schedule and stimulated its interest in forensic
activities. The record of the  past year shows  debate to be firmly
established in Bellingham Normal.  It is expected that next year the
schedule will be enlarged still more to  include, besides the contests with
the colleges in Oregon and the inter-normal affair, a tour of the Pacific
Coast as far as Southern California. The increased  interest in debating
and the assurance that several of this year's team will  return next year
make prospects for the future more than encouraging.  One Hundred Ten

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Dorothy Jones, Charles Simunson, Christian Pederson, Lulu Whitmore, Rebecca
Arnell, Robert  Tunstall, John O'Rourke, Frank Henderson, Mildred Stout,
Ruth Magner, Mildred Anderson,  Lewis Arnold. One Hundred Eleven

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DEBATE  Resolved, that the United States should establish a national
industrial  court and regional industrial courts for the settlement of all
disputes between  emplloyer and employee in essential industries.  LINFIELD
DUAL DEBATE.  ]Bellingham, Affirmative, I Linfield, 2  Bellingham,
Negative, o Linfield, 3  At the morning assembly hour onl Wednesday, March
14, a negative  team of two men representing Linfield College of
McMinnville, Oregon, met  the Normal's affirmative team on the home floor. 
Our speakers were Robert  Tunstall and Tohn O'Rourke. In logic, in
clear-cut clash of argument, and in delivery this debate is conceded to be
one of the best and hardest-fought de-bates  ever heard here. The negative
won by contending that it could not be  shown that an industrial court
could operate efficiently. On the evening of the same day a team of women
upholding the negative  of the same utiestion met Linfield's affirmative
team of two women at Mc-  Minnville. This debate also was a splendid
example of logical thinking and  effective trt( rv. The nevative case
argued that a system of courts could not  handle efficiently and justly all
the intricate labor problems arising in essential ,  industries. The
Normal's team was made up of Ruth Magner and Julia '  Whitmore.  PACIFIC
DEBATE  Bellingham, Negative, I Pacific, 2   The group which took the trip
to Oregon was made up of three speakers.  Besides 'debating Linfield
College, they also met Pacific University at Forest  Grove, Oregon, on the
evening of Tuesday, March 13, upholding the negative  of the same question.
The Normal's team in this debate was made up of  Dorothy Jones and Julia
Whitmore.  Speaking of the trip to Oregon and of the debates of this series
with  Linfield and Pacific, Mr. Rahskopf said: "I don't feel at all
disappointed. The  team did a fine piece of work and I am well pleased. We
found the people in *  both colleges to be good sports and we were royally
entertained by them.  I am happy over the result of the whole thing."  One
Hundred Twelve

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DEBATE  Resolved, That the United States should adopt a system of
responsible  cabinet government similar in principle to that in force in
Great Britain.  BELLINGHAM-BA.DGER DEBATE.  Bellingham, Negative 2 Badger
Club, _i  In the contest with the Badger Debate Club of the University of
Wash-ington, which was held on Wednesday morning, February 14, at the
Normal,  Mr. Henderson and Mr. Simonson upheld the negative. They based
their  argument on the grounds that the affirmative team had shown no way
of  transplanting the cabinet system without bringing with it certain
inherent  defects which had proved to be serious handicaps in England. The
affirmative  team failed to meet their objection satisfactorily. 
INTER-NORMAL TRIANGULAR DEBATE.  Bellingham, Affirmative, 3 Ellensburg
Normal o Bellingham, Negative, 2 Cheney Normal, I  In the contest between
the three normal schools of the state, the negative  team of each school
debated away from home. Bellingham's team went to  Cheney, Cheney's to
Ellensburg, and Ellensburg's to Bellingham. All three  debates were held on
the evening of March I.  On the home floor Miss Peterson, Miss Anderson,
and Mr. Airnold,  ,upholding the affirmative, proved far superior in both
logic and delivery to  the team representing Ellensburg. Their argument
showed  the inefficiency  in our government arising from frequent deadlocks
between the executive and  legislative branches, the attempts to secure
efficient functioning thru unity  between these two branches, and the
failure of that unity because of our  basic theory of separation of powers
in government. These things, they  con-tended,  showed the necessity for
the fusion of executive and legislative powers  by adopting the principle
of the cabinet system. The closing rebuttal  speech clinched the case by
showing that the negative had in substance agreed  with the affirmative
throughout the debate.  One Hundred Thirteen

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The decision gave Bellingham five cut of nine judges' decisions in s  the
three debates, and thus secured to us possession of the Allison Cup for the
 coming year.  The Allison Cup is a beautiful trophy, given by Mr. Guy S.
Allison to  stimulate interest in debating among the normal schools of this
state. Mr.  Allison is a graduate of Bellingham Normal, and is now engaged
in business  in San Francisco and Portland. Under the terms of the
inter-normal debate  agreement the school winning the cup for three years
in succession is entitled  to hold it permanently. It is probable that
during the next few years the  rivalry for its possession will wax even
keener than in the past.  Miss Arnell, Mr. Henderson, and Mr. Simonson
traveled to Cheney to  debate there against Cheney's affirmative. They
based their argument on two contentions: ( ) That the cabinet system would
be undesirable because, if  brought to this country it would  create faults
similar to those now existing in  England. (2) That principles of
government, being the result of develop-ment,  cannot be transplanted from
one country to another with success. Since  the Cheney team had built their
case on the assumption that the opposition  would defend our present
principle of government, they were unable to meet  the negative argument. 
a  One Hundred Fourteen

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WAr WP~5WUEU U .'t l  One Hundred Fifteen

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SANFORD E. CARVER, Coach  Mr. Carver is recognized as one of the foremost
factors in the advertising   of the Bellingham Normal school. The many
teams developed under his guid-ance  during the year radiate wherever they
play, the high ideals in athletics  and manhood for which Mr. Carver and
the Bellingham Normal stand.  Mr. Carver is the "right man" in the "right
place."  One Hundred Sixteen  L I ___ ____I

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1922 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE  October 14-There-Normal, 14; College of Puget
Sound, 7.  Otober I9-Here- -Normal, o; University of Washington Frosh., 9. 
October 29-Here-Normal, 7; St. Martins College, 7. November 4-There-Normal,
o; Ellensburg, 19.  At Tacoma, on October 14, the Normal squad defeated the
College of  Puget Sound in the first official game of the season. Although
this was the  first game of this year for the Normal team, they fought like
veterans from  whistle to whistle. The College of Puget Sound had
determined to make up  for the defeat which they had received at the hands
of the Normal squad in 1921, a defeat of 17 to 6, but the Normal had
decided that there should be two  klefeats in a row.  In the first three
minutes of the play, the Normal backfield tore a hole  through left tackle
and sent a man through for a touchdown, carrying the ball  two-thirds the
length of the field, for the first touchdown of the game. After  a
successful try for gcal, the score stood 7 to o in favor of the Normal. 
The fight was new on in earnest, the C. P. S. team determined to regain 
the lost ground and the Blue and White warriors determined to hold the lead
 already ga'ned.  During the last half, the heavy C. P. S. team forced the
ball across the  Normal goal line for their only touchdown during the game.
 The Normal team rallied, and by a  series of line bucks and forward 
passes, again crossed the C. P. S. goal line for another 6 points. After a
suc-cessful  try for goal the Normal possessed 14 points.  The story of the
last few minutes of the play is one in which the C. P. S.  fought hard to
even the score, but the Normal was successful in stopping the   onslaught
of her heavy opponents. VWhen the final whistle blew, the score  stood 14
to 7 in favor of the Normal.  The Normal line-up : Keplinger, Bond, Clark,
Rairdon, Knowlton, Frank,  Lindstedt, Ford, Gaasland, Staggs, Miller, and
Thomas.  Substitutes: Dawson for Bond; W. Thomas for Miller; Miller for
Gaas-land.  On October 19 the Normal team met the University of Washington 
Frosh on the Bellingham field, and, according to all "dope," the teams were
 evenly matched. The Normal team was particularly anxious to win because 
of the defeat which they had received at the hands of the visitors in 1921,
the score at that time being 14 to o in favor of the Frosh.  The lines of
both teams were evenly matched but the Normal line could  not withstand the
charges of the Fresh's heavy backfield. The Normal realized early in the
game the futility of bucking the Frosh line, and relied upon a  series of
forward passes for gaining yardage.  Twice (luring the game the Normal
worked the ball dlown the field to  the 20-yard line, and each t'me a
forward pass was intercepted, thereby losing  the ball to the Frosh.  The
visitors depended on the charges of their heavy backfield for gain-ing 
yardage and thus secured the points necessary to win the contest.  One
IurInred Seventeen

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When the final whistle blew, the score stood 9 to o in favor of the Frosh. 
The players of both teams will always remember this game as a hard-fought 
battle.  Normal line-up: Keplinger, Dawson, Rairdon, Knowlton, Frank,
Lind-stedt,  Staggs, Thomas, Clark, Vanderford and Ford.  Substitutes:
Gaasland for Vanderford; W. Thomas for Staggs; Bowman  for Ford.  On
October 27, the Normal squad met the team from St. Martins Col-lege,  on
the Bellingham field. The teams, as far as weight was concerned,  were
evenly matched, but the Normal's main standby, the forward pass, was 
rendeied useless on account of the muddy field and the uncertainty of
passing  a slippery ball.  The story of the game is one of line plunges and
attempted end-runs,  both sides often losing the ball on fumbles. g  The
St. Martins squad put up a hard fight in their attempt to make up  for the
defeat which they received from the Normal in 1921,  a defeat of 6  to o. 
When the timekeeper signaled the close of the game, the score stood 7  to
7, each team having made one touchdown and then kicked goal.  Normal
line-up: Lindstedt, Dawson, Keplinger, Frank, Rairdon, Ford,  Knowlton,
Staggs, Gaasland, Thomas and Tryggvi.  Substitutes: Bond for Dawson;  W.
Thomas for Gaasland; and Bowman  for Ford.  At Ellensburg, November 4, the
Bellingham Normal squad met the strong  Ellensburg Normal team, the team
which had defeated the Cheney Normal  team earlier in the season.  On the
outcome of this game rested the football championship of the  Normal
Schools of the state, and, consequently, was a hard fought battle 
throughout. S  The Bellingham line was  in the pink of condition for the
fight, but the  backfield was the wea'kest that it had been at any time
during the season. The  weakness of the backfield was due to the fact that
one of the regular players  had  left school, and furthermore, two of the
halfbacks had, in previous games.  received injuries from which they had
not totally recovered.  The Bellingham team tore holes through their
opponents' line, but the backfield men were not in condition to deliver the
follow-up necessary to gain  yardage.  The final score of 19 to o in favor
of Ellensburg, secured for Ellensburg  the Normal football championship for
1922.  Normal line-up: Dawson, Frank, Knowlton, Lindstedt, Rairdon, Ford, 
Keplinger, Staggs, Gaasland, Miller and Thomas.  Substitutes: Hillier for
Staggs; W. Thomas for A. Thomas; Tryggvi  for Miiller; Bond for Keplinger;
Bowman for Lindstedt.  Football men earning letters: Keplinger, Bond,
Dawson, Rairdon, ". Knowlton, Frank, Lindstedt, Bowman, Gaasland, Staggs,
Miller, A. Thomas,  Vanderford and Ford.  One Hundred Eighteen

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RALPH WEILLER1,;R  Halfback  Ile runs low and hits hard.  WALTER VANDERFORD
 Halfback  He runs  away from them all.  SAM FORD  Tackle  ANTONE FRANK, 
Tack/c  LAURENCE KEPLINGER  End When they see him coming they give  him
room.  BOYD STAGCS  tHalfback  When he has the hall they give him  room. 
One Hundred Nineteen

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OSCAR LINDSTEDT  Center  Always in his opponent's way.  ARCHIE THOMAS 
Fullback  The reason for  many touchdowns.  HAROLD GAASLAND  Halfback  Many
times oown, but never out.  DEWEY BOWMAN  Tackle  A good reason why  ish
the play.  PAUL RAIRDON  Guard  He always made  their plans.  they did not
fin  the enemy change  RUEL KNOWLTON  Guard  Always center's left hand man.
RANDOLPH DAWSON  End,  A man they had to watch.  One Hundred Twenty

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GuY BoND  End  Give him the hall and watch him go.  1923 BASKETBALL
SCHEDULE  FIRST TEAM. W. S. N., 59; Edison, 15.  W. S. N., 48; Y. M. C. A.,
23.  W. S. N., 74; Ferndale High, 12.  W. S. N., 35;  Fairhaven High, 22. 
W. S. N., 44; Blaine High, 25.  W. S. N., 34; Fairhaven High, 17.  W. S.
N., 40; Y. M. C. A., 24.  W. S. N., 25; Ellensburg Normal, 16.  W. S. N.,
32; Ellensburg Normal, 18.  W. S. N., 20; Cheney Normal, 16.  W. S. N., 29;
St. Martins College, 22.  W. S. N., 24; St. Martins College, 21.  W. S. 
N., 26; Ellensburg Normal, 22.  W. S. N., 27; Ellensburg Normal, 33.  W. S.
N., 33; Cheney Normal, 29.  W. S. N., 17; Spokane College, 39.  W. S. N.,
25; Spokane College, 24.  One Hundred Twenty-One

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The basketball season opened with a large turnout for practice, and after 
two weeks' training it was found necessary to limit the squad to sixteen
men,  due to cramped training facilities.  Practically all of the men 
chosen had had experience on high school  teams, and as a consequence the
season started off with red hot enthusiasm on  the part of all concerned. A
real contest developed for the first team positions, and the players were
chosen from the way they showed up in the series of  games played with
Edison, Fairhaven H. S., Ferndale H. S., Blaine H. S.,and  the Y. M. C. A.
In each of these games Coach Carver used his entire squad  in order that he
might follow the actual performance of each player in some  of the games. 
The story of the playing of the Blue and White hoopsters is told by the 
fact that out ,of the 17 games played, the Normal won 15 and lost 2. The 
total points scored by the Normal (luring the games being 592, while their
op-ponents  made 378.  One of the features of the basketball season was the
winning of the  championship of the Washington Normals and also of the
minor colleges by  the Bellingham school.  The Bellingham Normal wen three
out of the four games played with  Ellensburg, and both games played with
Cheney.  The basketball season throughout was considered by Coach Carver
and   the entire school as being highly successful from all angles.  A
record has thus been established that will be recorded in the history  of
the school, thereby establishing a precedent for the teams that are to
follow,  in the years to come.  Men earning letters in basketball were:
Randolph Dawson, Laurence Keplinger, Carl Hoggatt, Leland Rankin, Walter
Vanderford, Maurice  Thomas, Orville Hoggatt, Guy Bond.  SECOND TEAM. 
Normal, 40; Presbyterians, 33.  Normal, 23; Presbyterians, 13.  Normal, 26;
Blaine H. S., 27.  Normal, 15.; Nooksack H. S., 16.  Normal, 21I ;
Nooksaick H. S., 27.  Normal, 44; Ferndale H. S., 28.  The Sparkplugs'
schedule consisted of six games, three of which were  won and three lost.
The three games were lost by a total of only eight points.  The Normal
scored (luring the six games a total of 169 points against their  opponents
144.  The team played a fast, clean game and gave a good account of 
them-selves  in upholding the honor of the school. °  The team
consisted of: Frank Hatley, Gordon Broadbent, Edwin Baily,  George Abbey,
Roy Swenson and Dewey Bowman.  One Hundred Twenty-Two

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RANDOLPH DAWSON  Guard  Always with his opponent.  WALTER VANDERFORD 
Forward  The long shot is his favorite basket  getter.  MAURICE THOMAS 
Folr-ward  When the score is in doubt, he does his job well.  LELAND RANKIN
 Center  A short man-but my, what a reach.  CARL HOGGATT  Foward He reaches
up and drops it in.  LAURENCE KEPLINGER  Guard  Plays hard-never complains.
 ORVILLE HOGGATT  Center  Built especially for the job.  GuY BOND  Guard 
Small enough to travel fast, but. al- ways  in his opponent's way.  One
Hundred Twenty-Three

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I I  .From left to right, upper: Archie Thomas, Alvin Gregor, Oscar
Linstedt, Sanford E. Carver, Gus  Van Sinderen, Roy Swensen, Hollie
Atterbury.  From left to right, lower: Leland Rankin, William Rue, Desmond
Fulp, Dewey Bowman. Byron Payne  BASEBALL  The opening of the baseball
season was marked by a large turnout for  the initial practice. Included in
the group were five of last year's letter men, these forming the nucleus
around which Coach Carver built his team.  The large turn-out developed
cinsiderable rivalry for the various posi-tions,  thereby giving the
followers of the Blue and White teams assurance  that the schedule of games
yet to be played would result in a large percentage  of victories for  the
Normal.  The Normal line-up : *Letter men.  Pitcher-Rankin*  Pitcher-Bowman
 Pitcher-Fulp  Catcher- Keplinger*  Catcher-A. Thomas  I Base-Lindsted*
Outfield--Atterberry  I Base-Vander Sinder Outfield- Gregor  2 Base-Swensen
 3 Base-Payne  Short Stop-Rue*  one I1mdred Twenty-Four  Outfield-Bowman
Outfield-Fulp

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From left to right, upper: Randolph Dawson, Dewey Bowman, Carl Hoggatt,
Sanford E. Carver, Ed  Bailey,  Thomas A. Frank. From left to right, lower:
George Abbey, Edwin Hannah, Dubois Rhine,  Harold Walling, Clifford West. 
1923 TRACK  The first event in which the Normal's followers of the cinder
path will   compete, will be a triangular meet between Fairhaven H. S.,
Whatcom H. S.,  and the B. S. N. S., to be held on Battersby field, May 4. 
The second event will be the University of Washington relay carnival,  to
be held at Seattle, April 28. The Normal will be represented in this event 
by the following men:  i oo-Yard- Vanderford. 440-Yard-Hoggatt. 
22o-Yard-Hannah. 88o-Yard-Dawson.  1320-Yard-Abbey.  The third event will
be a dual meet with the U. of W. Frosh at Seattle,  May 12. The men who
will represent the Normal are:  M. Thomas Dawson  Bowman Walling  Ryan
Hannah  Vanderford* Frank  West Hoggatt  Bailey Abbey*  *Letter men. 
Although the Normal has only two of last year's lettermen among this 
year's group,  Coach Carver is very optimistic, as the new material is
showing  up well. He feels that he has selected men who will win the
necessary points.  One Hundred Twenty-Five

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EF L:  ~s~ i  y  ; (ON   lt;t  e ' "= t yr , _   lt;z s :del  pv' x y
lt;EniJ w 4i .ra* ~ .F f "  lt; k '

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n)ej Iuiidred Twenty-Seven

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GIRLS' ATHLETICS  Girls' athletics have been a wonderful success throughout
the entire year. Basketball, baseball, hockey, tennis, and track have been
a source of pleasure  to a great many girls of this school. The successful
outcome of these activities  is largely due to Miiss Frank, the coach. She
has  worked untiringly through-out  the whole year, and has had her hands
full managing and coaching the teams. Never before have so many different
branches of athletics been open  to the girls, nor such a feeling of good
fellowship and sportsmanship developed  as during the past season. Their
motto has been,  "Sport for spoirt's sake."  BASKETBALL.  As in previous
years, basketball played the greater part in the girl's ath-letics.  The
season opened in December with verve, and found a score of girls  keenly
interestedl  in basketball. For the first two months, our coach, Miss 
Frank, gave all the practice to passing and to the study of rules and  the
etiquette of ,good. clean plavin. From early in December until February, 
on every afternoon of the week, 'the girls turned out faithfully and
regularly  for practice. In February, teams were chosen to represent the
two classes,  with the Kline Cup as the prize. This is the prize awarded to
the team  scoring the greater number of points in the series of three
games. Violet  Mitcham, the reliable forward, was. chosen captain by the
Sophomores; Carla  La Vigne, the speedy center, was the Freshman  choice. 
The first game was one of great excitement and one long to, be remem-bered 
by both teams. As the Sophomores had 'won 'the Kline Cup the past  year,
the Freshmen entered the game with a strong  determination to capture  the
prize: trophy, while the Sophomores were just as determined to keep, it; so
the battle was on. From the first toss-up each knew that whoever won a 
would have to put up a hard fight. At the end of the first half, the
Sophomores  were ahead with a score of 16-14. During the intermission the
Freshmen  became imbued with a determination to win, and the last half of
the game was a hard fight for supremacy. The Sophomores did some remarkable
 team-work, but the Freshman seemed to have a charm over the ball and some 
notable plays were made. When the whistle blew, the Freshmen had won by  a
score of 29-25.  The second game was full of suspense and excitement, the
score being  tied at the end of the first half. Again the Freshmen were
victorious with the  game ending in a score 28-17, thus giving them a lead
of 13 points.  With much spirit and enthusiasm, everyone looked forward to
the third  and final game that was to decide the winners of the cherished
Kline Cup.  Through the halls and around the gym, just before the game,
small groups  were to be found seriouly discussing some apparently weighty
subjects. Com-ing  closer, one might chance to hear some stray remark such
as: "Now, who  do you think will win ?" followed by individual opinions.
Or, they might have  been discussing the deciding game, for that was the
subject uppermost in  One Hundred Twenty-Eight

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everyone's mind. Tuesday night the game was played and every member of 
each team had the light of battle in her eye. Long before 4 o'clock the
small  gym was packed. As the two teams came on the floor, a deafening
cheer  went up from both sides, and the "Rah ! Rah ! Rah! Freshman !" could
hardly  be distingushed from the "Hip! Hip! Hooray! Sophomores!" The
whistle  sounded, the game was on hard and fast, each team determined to
win.  Skilled teamwork was apparent on both sides. The first half ended in
a tie,  Io-Io. As the girls came back for the second half the loyal
supporters of both  teams were tense with suspense. The Sophs were hoping
for only 7 baskets  more than their opponents. After fifteen minutes of
quick, decisive playing  and excellent team work on the part of both teams,
the enthusiastic shouts of  the Freshmen told that fcr the next year the
Kline Cup was theirs, as the  final score for the series of games was
79-59, in their favor.  BASKETBALL LINE-UP  SOPHOMORES Position FRESHMEN  M
itchem , V iolet --................. F ............ ........... .....T.u.rn
er, Doris  Curtis, M arian .......................... .. .F. ..........
..............T.w. e.i-t,- A- -g-ne-s------------..................  F
................... .................. Barber, Alice  B row n, N ellie
................... .... ...J.C. ................L. a. .V. i.gn.e.,.
C..ar.la.....................  Judson, B ernice
...........................S..C. .. .... ... ...................T..h ..o..m
. a.s., .B.e.at.r.ic.e...  Carver, Jessie, Mrs.
...............G....................................P .i.n.ck.n.e.y.,
.A.l.ic.e....... Bay, M ildred ................................ .G. ......
................................ .... Gill,Ruth  Substitutes- Sophomores:
Helen Hightower, Lou Fowler, Pearl Whit-more.  Freshmen: Marjorie Morrison,
Florence Bowman.  THIRD QUARTER  The third quarter of Girls' Athletics
consisted of classes of organized games and sports. The first six weeks
meetings of the classes were devoted  entirely to instructions in volley
ball rules and methods of playing the game.  The next three weeks were
filled with much enthusiasm and spirit, as the girls  of each class chose
their captains and formed teams. As much enthusiasm  was aroused in the
games which were played as had been shown in the  preceding quarter's
athletic contests, but neither class seemed to gain prece-dence  over the
other and each game was lost and won in the spirit of "sports  for sports'
sake."  The last six weeks were given entirely to indoor baseball and
tennis.  Many girls who, heretofore, had never shown athletic ability rose
to the height  of fame in the games which were played between the two
classes.  Several games of tennis were played between the Freshman and
Sopho-more  classes, but the contestants were so equally matched that
neither could  stand out as being victor.  One Hundred Twenty-Nine

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CARLA LAVIGNE  Jumping Center  Captain Carla, Captain of our squad,  Loud
her teamwork we applaud.   BEE THOMAS  Side Center  First she's here and
then she's there,  (lets the ball with time to spare. ALICE BARBER 
JumIping Center, Forward  She got the ball from anywhere  At her feet, or
in the air. FILORENCE BOWMAN  Side Center  Blocking passes was her aim 
Disaster for opponent's game. DORIS TURNER  Forward  Dose at lone shots
reigned supreme  Swift and accurate, was her theme. AGNES TWEIT  Forward 
Aggie cracks a little grin  Grabs the ball and drops it in.  RUTH GILL 
Guard Ruth, with the  She throws it  quick.  ball can turn the trick  right
and throws it  ALICE PINCKNEY  Guard  We can depend upon her reach  To get
the ball. She's a peach.  One Hundred Thirty

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VIOLET MITCHAM  Forward  Vi, Our Captain.  W e can always depend upon Vi 
She's unexcelled in speed and ac-curacy.  MARIAN CURTIS  "Molly" Forward 
For Molly's superb games of Basket-ball  Long  and loud her praise we'll
call.  NELLIE BROWN  "Brownie" Jumping Center  Brownie's smile, her speed,
her  spring,  As center, was our feature thing.  BERNICE JUDSON  "Bee" Side
Center  Bee's teamwork, her speed, her aim  Was incomparable in every game.
 JESSIE CARVER  Guard  "Carver" so speedy and  so sure  Got the ball if
good or poor.  HELEN HIGHTOWER  "Hightower" Guard  "Hightower" never met
her equal in  guards, short or tall,  We relied upon Helen to give us the 
ball.  MILDRED BAY  "Billie" Guard  "Billie," light, and swift and tall 
Just reaches up and grabs the ball.  One Hundred Thirty-One

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Ip I  MARIE C. DRUSE MRS. ANNETTE HI. VAUGIAN  Art Critic Literary Critic 
Good sincere and constructive criticism is an  essential to high
attainment. In the production  of this Klipsun the sincere work of our
critics,  Miss Druse and Mrs. Vaughan, cannot be over-estimated.  We, the
members of the student body  and of the Senior class who had the good
fortune  of taking part in the organization and preparation  of this book,
feel deeply indebted to our critics  who, by their unasuming way, have lead
us through to the completion of our work on the  Klipsun.  One Hundred
Thirty-Two

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One Hundred Thirty-Three

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sty.  r,  fo  1r '

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ASSISTANT EDITORS  MARJORY DOWNES -...... ................ .L.it.e rarv 
NELLE BROWN ....-- --- ...................... ........ n's Ahtletics  ESTHI
R SKRONDAL .................. ..............C.a.l.e..n.d.a.r......
KATHERINE C. SMITH .... ..................................... Art  FRANK D.
HENDERSON ... ... .. ..... ..............  ......M.e.'..s. .A thletics 
FLORIS M. CLARK .....L.e.av.e.s From AI Alaskan Calenldar, Debate  MERCEY 
BROMLEY ........................................... Dramatics,
Organizations  HELEN HIGITOWER .:......... .....................
............ ...... Jokes  I unoIs RIIIN ............... ..... SS.l.as..
.p...s....... nap-.---------- ........................  BI;RNICE JUDISON
............ .Mu.l.l.s.i.c..................  VIOL.E'T M ITc HAM .-----
.......................Cr edentials  IHEELEN MAXSIN ............ Stenogra
pher  ASSOCIATE EDITOR  A N N A R . L IN D ....................... ...... .
---------.-... AA- s-s-o.c.i.a.t.e. E. .d.i.to..r......  One lrundred
Thirty-Five

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~i IJ'~~~~BB  KLIPSUN BOARD  SAM S. FORD .... ... -------
--------------------------C---h--a--i rma n  Lou FOW LER ... ..............
.......-------------------------------- Secretary  H ELEN GOKE .........---
........ ......---..-- -- ---------------.-.--------..---- Class
Representative  HELEN HIGHTOWER
....................................-............ Class Representative 
VIOLET MITCHAM ..... ....................... ........... Class
Representative  JAM ES B EVER ..................... ... ..........
-----------------------...----------------- A dviser  EGGERT A. BURNS
............................... EEdd..i tor, e-officio member  OLIVER R.
INGERSOLL ................ usilfess Manager, ex-officio mnember  The
Klipsun Board of the year 1922-1923, together, with the editor and business
manager, express the hope that this book will be a true representation  of
life at B. S. N. S. Their desire has been towork for the best interests of 
the Senior class and of the entire school.  One hundred Thirty-Six  ___
__._

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HEI,,N IIGHTOWER, Editor SAM S. FORD., Business Mgr.  iM1Rs. CARL IRISH,
Editor ANNA IREGINA LIND, Asst. Editor  THE WEEKLY MESSENGER  Real news,
live jokes, announrements, student and faculty pictures, stu-dent 
opinions, insjpiring editorials-these are but a few of the things that 
have characterized The Weekly Messenger for the past year and made it a 
forceful reminder that the Normal is  a live school-that its faculty and
stu-dents  are actually accomplishing things.  Beginning shortly before
1903, the Students' Association has published  The Weekly Messenger, and
has endeavored each year to make it more rep-resentative  of school life,
more interesting and more worth while in every  way. At first The Messenger
was published quarterly, then monthly and,  since 1916, weekly. The Board
of Control, made up of five students and two  faculty representatives, is
responsible for its management. The  organization  of The Messenger
consists of a business manager, who receives a salary, and  editor-in-
chief, who receives four credits in English for the first quarter and,  if
re-elected, a salary for the second quarter, and a staff of reporters, who
re-ceive  two credits each.  One Hundred Thirty-Seven  ,. r1N dFl to t"I v
n

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The regular issue of the Messenger contains from eight to ten pages,  but
specials containing extra pages  are sometimes issued. A high grade 
quality of magazine paper is used, which makes it more attractive than the 
ordinary school paper. Its attractiveness is further enhanced by the
quality  and beauty of its cuts.  The editorial policy of the Messenger the
past year has been a construc-tive  one, keeping in mind at all times the
best interests of the school. Whole-some  physical and social activities
have at all times been earnestly championed  and high standards of
scholarship continually upheld. The Messenger has also unceasingly urged
student attendance at all school activities. It is com-monly  accepted as a
fact that the Messenger has dcone more than any other one  institution to
create a real school spirit.  At the beginning of the first quarter, Don
Clark, a graduate of Whatcom  High School, was elected business manager. He
gave up this position at the  end of a few weeks, as unforeseen
circumstances caused him to leave school.  Sam Ford, a graduate of
Ellensburg High School, and a student at the  Normal, was then  elected
business manager. Under the business management  of Mr. Ford the Messenger
has been put on a sound financial basis, and a re-serve  of hundreds of
dollars has been built up. The Messenger now carries  more inches of
advertising than ever before in its history, and it is believed  that the
advertisers are getting results.  Helen Hightower, a veteran Messenger
reporter, was elected editor for  the first quarter. She proved herself
very capable, and made the Messenger  a medium of information, instruction,
and entertainment.  Mrs. Carl Irish, a graduate of Winlock High School, was
elected editor  for the second  quarter, and re-elected for the third
quarter. She came well  recommended, and proved herself a capable
journalist. She originated the  Health Column, Student Opinion, and several
other new departments in the  paper. Nothing escaped her all-seeing eye.
She has consistently built the i  paper up to a higher state of perfection.
 Mrs. Vaughan, the Messenger critic, has proved herself a constant source 
of inspiration. She  has set high ideals for the Messenger, and these
ideals  are gradually being reached. Mrs. Vaughan has not only caused
constant  improvement in the paper, but has endeared herself to all members
of the staff  as well.  -0-  One 1 hindred 'Thirty-Eiight

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One Hindred 'Ihirty-Nine

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THE STORM  FIRST PRIZE STORY  HELEN CASE  I know not how long I sat there,
but as what seemed  an unusually fierce  blast of wind burst over the
cabin, I sprang from the chair and began pacing  the floor before the open
fire, blindly groping for some faint trace of the past,  almost frantic,
there alone with the horror of a last memory, a horror made  keener by the
unlashed force of the frenzied elements without, the  barren  lonesomeness
of the room, and the knowledge-or rather sense-of the com-plete  isolation
of the cabin. For I knew not where I was, nor did I know by  what means I
had come there, nor for what purpose.  The past, up to the time  that the
cabin had taken form around me and I had become conscious of the tempest
without, was a blank. A faint sense of expectancy was apparent, but  for
what or whom I knew not.  I stepped to the door; opened it enough to peer
out into the night. With-out  was inky darkness; not an atom of light
penetrated the dull black curtain  that overcast the heavens. The light
from within scarcely  struggled a. foot  into the blinding, unrelenting icy
toirrent that swept past and over the cabin.  The clinking ice-covered
branches of a giant oak that hugged the eaves,  moaned and shrieked
unceasingly; at intervals the great limbs clanking  loudly sent volleys of
their glass coating clattering over the roof. Again I returned to, the
chair before the huge smoke-blackened fireplace  and sat there listening to
the hissing,,sputtering voices of the burning logs on  the hearth, while
uncanny impish flashes and shadows bowed, danced, and  mocked each other
over and about me, while the moaning, clattering fools  cackling without
sent burning, then icy, fingers tracing down my spine filling  my soul with
superstition, dlread, and  unbearable lonesomeness,.  Suddenly the door
burst open and the icy blast swept into the room. The * fire flared and
roared on the hearth and the whole cabin shuddered. I sprang  for the open
door with almost  hysterical relief, and peered again out into the  frozen
hurricane. I could see nothing but a shifting, whirling volume of grey  and
even that faint trace of the nig'ht was almost obliterated by the
wind-driven particles of snow and ice that heat into my face with blinding,
suffo-cating  force.  I stood for a moment breasting the storm, with the
wind rushing in about  me chilling the very fire in the hearth, trying to
force my vision out into the  lashing elements, half expecting:, wildly
hoping that it would encounter some  living  thing, probably some wild
thing caught out in the storm, seeking shelter,  for even my wildest hopes
could not imagine any human being out in such a  night. Then through a
blast of less snow-filled air it seemed that I discerned  something, a
faint outline of darker substance than the snow-covered earth  that lay
without in the space that should have been lighted by the open door.  With
one hand clutching the door frame, I ventured a step into the night, my 
foot touched-I almost stumbled onto something soft. Groping about, my  hand
encountered a. mass of snow-covered cloth and then a shoe. I uttered a  One
Hundred Forty

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smothered -cry and my lungs filled with ice and my breath stopped. I
stooped  to drag the thing into the cabin, then realizing the comparative
lightness of it,  I gathered it into my 'arms, staggered into the cabin and
deposited it on the  floor before the fire.  Closing the door, I rushed
back and began frantically tearing at the  frozen cloth, th'at I now
realized inclosed a human figure. I loosened the outer  covering and as the
hood fell back, my brain reeled, and for an instant I almost  held my lost
memory within my grasp, for what I saw before me was a  woman, hardly more
than a girl. Memory hovered close for an instant, and 'then was gone. I
knew that it was she for whom I waited but that was all,  except that she
was dearer to me than life itself. Flinging myself at her side  I tore frc
m her, her outer garments land shoes and began vigorously chafing  her body
and hands. I worked, numb with fear; praying, pleading, then  demanding
life for her. After hours it seemed I felt the pulse tremble and  'the hand
I held grew soft and warm.  I arose, drew the rude couch before the fire.
Lifting her upon it I covered  her with a blanket and then threw more wood
on the fire.  When I returned to, her side, her beautiful blue eyes were
open and she  gazed into the fire. Her gaze wandered about the flickering'
walls, then  stopped when they encountered my own. "Oh," she cried in a
queer anxious  voice. "Hurry! Hurry!" For an instant a strange convulsion
of thought  seized me and the forgotten past was almost within my grasp. I
strove after  it with every ounce of will power that I could muster, but
with no avail, I  stared hard into her face, but she had already fallen
again into deep slumber.  Settling back in my chair by her couch, I sat, my
eyes never leaving her,  as tho she were the only tie by which I retained
my reason, even my life. I  seemed to be fighting some unseen force ,that
menaced her as well as myself.  I know not how long I sat there with that
wild melody of the night in my ears,  my soul crying for her to awaken, for
well I knew that she held the key to my  present unnatural trouble. Yet I
dared not awaken her.  At length her Keyes opened and ,for an instant
wandered about. She  saw  me; a blank, bewildered look came into. her eyes
and she struggled for an  instant to arise; then as  tho still too
weak,,she settled back into her couch.  Then she spoke.  "I can't seem to
remember where we are. What 'are we doing here ? Oh,  I don't know who we
are."  I staggered and cried aloud with disappointment. I did not answer,
for  I dared not tell her that since I found myself in the cabin hours
before, that I,  with all my might had been trying to solve those very
mysteries. Then omit-ting  mention of myself I told her of my taking her in
out of the storm. She  listened, her eyes wide with wonder.  "Silly," she
said, "I haven't been away from you even. I belong here  with you."  "I
know that," I hastened to reply. "But-" I halted at a loss what to  say. 
One Hundred Forty-One

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Her eyes filled with pity at my bewilderment and she sat erect, her little 
white hand slipped into mine. "Tell me what is the matter, (lear," she
said. "I must know now."  I gathered her into my arms and a feeling of
peace and contentment came  over me, such as I had never known before. Then
I told her of my own lost  memory, for now it seemed a matter of no
importance. With her in my arms,  nothing mattered; life, even death, must
be full now. I knew that of the past  I held the greatest and most
wonderful part. Then I added, "So you see, dear, I don't know either, but
we will prob-ably  remember all when morning comes and the storm ceases."
But in my  own mind I doubted it would cease.  "But," she quickly
exclaimed, "I wish I knew why I was out there in the  storm." Then a soft,
puzzled look came into her eyes and she seemed to be /  listening for
something. She crept closer into my arms and almost in a whisper added. "I
almost hear something out there as if it were calling me.  Don't you know?
Can't you see that we lack something? If we could stop  the storm and could
remember we could have it."  I answered, honestly enough, not being sure I
wanted anything changed.  "I feel nothing but content."  So with her in my
arms I sat, my heart filled with wonder and peace, my  brain dull and
drowsy. I must have been dozing, until something suddenly  sounded from
without that brought me up with a start. It must have been a  cry, yet I
knew it was impossible. I looked at her.  "Did you hear it too ?" she
whispered. "No," I lied. "I just remembered what you said when you first
awak-ened.  You said, "Daddy," and told me to hurry!"  For an instant
startled despair flooded her eyes. Then they became little  flaming sparks
and her mouth grew hard. She sprang from my arms and  grasped the huge iron
poker from near the fire and raised it high above my  head.  "Fool," she
cried, "Hurry !"  The poker descended and darkness came.  I opened my eyes
and became conscious of a strange, crackling, roaring  sound, and a strong
odor filled my nostrils. Through a haze I made my way  out through the
smoke-clouded room. My brain cleared. This  was no cabin,  but our own
home. I darted through the hall to the nursery and grabbed the  sleeping
baby, took him to his wide-awake and now hysterical mother just as  the
firemen came rushing up the stairs. We turned just in -time to see the fire
 coming through the partition into the baby's room.  I never mentioned my
dream to her and am inclined to think that she  does not know of the night
in the cabin. Yet sometimes, when the wind blows  and the snow flies, that
soft, puzzled look comes into her eyes and  it seems  to me she is
unusually attentive to little Billy.  One Hundred Forty-Two

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PORKY'S PAY  SECOND PRIZE STORY  MARGARET L. STAPLETON  The strings of
lights down Western Avenue shone dim and hazy through  the thick, chill fog
of an early morning in November as Porky stepped out of  a hospital
stairway and shuffled along past the inviting signs of chop houses  and
quick lunch counters. The aroma of strong, steaming coffee cried
appeal-ingly  but vainly to him-for Porky was broke.  He muttered curses
against the reasonless efficiency of the progressive  Western city which by
its well-organized and united administration of charity  prevented the
dalliant sponging from one organization to another that had  elsewhere
supported him. In desperation, since his arrival in the city a week 
before, he had accepted the job of distribution of bargain-screaming
advertise-ments  for a Jewish clothing store. The papers he had distributed
in the near-est  garage receptacle; the proceeds, a half dollar, had
provided three meals of  semi-satisfying quality. Sadly he faced the
inevitable-work.  An hour later his application for that which he most
detested met with  success. The shrewd foreman of a wharfage company had
gazed appraisingly  from his unshaven, vacant face to his ham-like arms and
set him to work  unloading bags of cement from a scow. The work was not of
a kind con-ducive  to mental fatigue, but, as the day wore on, and a
drizzling rain began to  leak out over the city, Porky longed for the
solitude of a hospitable shed or  doorway and the solace of flapjacks or
beef sandwich.  As noon approached, in spite of the weariness produced by
the heaviness  of cement sacks, lifted by muscles unused to work, all
thoughts were swept  away by a ravenous hunger. As the men, set free at
noon, started to leave  the dock, Porky stepped up to his employer.  "Say,
boss, lend me a quarter against the day's pay," he entreated.  The man
gazed at him suspiciously.  "I know your kind," he said. "If I pay you
before night you'll jump the  job. Nothin' stirrin-'."  "Lend me a quarter
and I'll pay you tonight," he whined to a fellow worker,  a tall, gawkey
man with a sallow face.  "I don't make a principle of lending," he drawled.
"Besides, my allowance  from my brother, the Duke de Goof, hasn't arrived
this month. I'm rather  low  myself."  By this time the crowd of workers
had scattered and Porky was left to  lie flat upon an irregular mountain of
sacks and contemplate the ironies of  fate thruout the noon hour.  If the
morning had seemed long, the afternoon was endless. Porky's  fatigue,
mounting each weary moment, increased his natural aversion to work. 
Finally, when he was sure that all the clocks in the world had stopped, the
whistles brought relief. As it happened that Porky was farthest from the 
gang-plank when the whistle blew, he was. the last to reach the shore.
About  to touch it, he was met by the returning foreman.  One Hundred
Forty-Three

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What! The job's not done! Hey, there, you big piece of cheese !  addressing
Porky, "you stay on and finish !" he bawled.  Red revolt rose in Perky's
1;osom, but long experience as the under dog  gave wisdom. He turned back
to the unfinished task and set to work fever-ishly  in order to complete it
as soon as possible. Each sack seemed heavier  than the last. A defective
sack scattered the fine white (lust into the air. His  eyes smarted and his
hands were raw and red. But in spite of it all there arose  to cheer him
visions of hot, thick pancakes reeking with butter and maple  syrup. Juicy
steaks and enormous helpings of mashed potato floated before  him as in the
deepening gloom he sought the shore and presented himself to  the foreman
who sat at a desk in the dimly lit outer office of the transportation 
company, making out his reports at the end of the day's work. The man
care-lessly  made out a slip, remarking :  All  the fight of Porky's
make-up arose. With shaking fist he glared at  the man behind the desk.  "I
want my pay now! Right now ! D'you hear? I don't want it to-morrow!  I want
it now!" he bellowed.  For a minute the two men gazed at each other. The
foreman had risen  and was taking in the other, coolly, calmly inspecting
him from head to foot.  "You'll take your pay tomorrow or you'll leave it.
Now, shut up and get out before I forget I ever hired you !"  Sullenly
Porky seized the pay check and slunk out of the office. The  world was
again reduced to a gray, cold, foodless void.  Early the next morning the
boy who came to clean the office found a tall,  timid figure crouched
against the doorway. Porky's eyes had a look of mute expectancy as he
awaited the late arrival of the spruce and prosperous looking  clerk. He
stepped up to the window and presented his check.  "Let me see," said the
man. "Ten hours of work at forty-five cents. Four-fifty. Not married, 'are
you?"  "Nope," growled Porky.  "Now, do you happen to have fifty cents ?"
"Why the Sam Hill do you want to know ?" Porky muttered.  "Well, you see
that will be needed to, make the five dollars for your  bachelor tax."  U 
One Hundred Forty-Four

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ON THE WAY  THIRD PRIZE STORY  IULIA SEMPLE  At last the packing was done
and Miss Jane sat waiting on the front  porch for the rig which was to take
her to the Home. Her lips trembled as she  gazed around.  "Good-bye," she
whispered. "Good-bye."  Not wishing to be detected by Sarah, who might
return  at any moment,  she wenit down the walk to take one or more look at
the cherished rose bushes.  A few straggling buds were, left, though it was
late October.  "You are beautiful," sheisaid, as she plucked a half-blown
bud, "but one  ;day you .will be withered like this one." She held up a
dried and faded one. "Life was made so."  Sarah's voice came clearly from
the kitchen.  "The rig is here."  With a heavy heart Jane walked down the
!path. A heavy middle-aged  man descended from the wagon and proceeded to
load the trunk and various  other bundles.  "Good-bye, Sarah," called Jane
from the high seat.  "Good- bye, Aunt Jane. Let m.e hear if you get there
all right."  "I'll drop a line tomorrow. You've been real kind, Sarah." 
Suddenly, Sarah climbed into the wagon and caught the slight figure in  her
arms.  "Oh, you're so good," she whispered. "I hope you'll be happy. You 
know if you hain't, George and I will be glad to have you come back."  Jane
Clemmy caught her lips hard between her teeth. Then she spoke  calmly.  "'I
 know, dear, but I'll be all right. Go on. Go on quick," she breathed  to
the driver.  They had traveled perhaps two miles in silence when the man
pointed out  a new brick school house on the site of the little old frame
one thlat had  burned down'the summer before.  "It's got electric lights
and a water fountain," he boasted.  "My, don't times change ithough ?"
exclaimed Jane Clemmy.  Again there was silence.  "I don't  know as I've
been over this road in years," she continued at  length. "My niece and I
usually went the other way by railroad, but I guess  there's no railroad to
the Home. That's why they had to send."  "It was no trouble for me. Ever
see the Home?"  Jane Clemmy shook her head. "No," she said slowly. "No.
They say  it's nice."  "It is. I know the matron. She's a nice woman." 
"She is ?"  "Yes, ma'am. I worked the farm for her before I bought one of
my own  joining' it."  One Hundred Forty-Five

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They were approaching the old church.  "My land !" exclaimed Miss Jane.
"Don't that look natural? Let's see.  The cemetery is over there, ain't it
?"  The man assented.  "Would it be asking too much, would it carry you too
far out of your  way, to take me there? I'd be willing to pay you extra." 
"That's all right. Won't take five minutes. Your folks buried there?" 
"No," she shook her head. "All the Clemmys are buried  over to Sleepy 
Hollow burying ground."  The man started, and looked at her as if seeing
her for the first time.  "So you're a Clemmy. Your niece being a Davis, I
didn't'know." He fumbled  the lines nervously. "She's my sister's daughter.
When her mother died she came to live  with me."  They were nearing the
entrance.  "There it is," she exclaimed, pointing to a large maple tree in
one corner  of the grounds. "Would you mind driving in the shade of that
tree.?" "Thank  you," she said with a deeply indrawn breath, when they had
reached the place.  "I just wanted to see how it looked."  The man cleared
his throat as if to speak. Jane waited politely but as he  remained silent,
she continued. "When I was looking over my things to come  away, I found a
rose that was given to me here by the young man I was to  marry.  "We
thought the tree hid us that day but it didn't."  She gazed at the man
beside her as if seeing him for the first time. "His  nose reminds me some
of yours. Otherwise there is no resemblance." He  opened his mouth but no
words came.  Jane went on. "Someone saw us and told my father. Father
thought  I had been deceiving him so he vowed I'd never leave home again. I
never  did except to go to church with him and sister Susan, until after
father died.  I had one letter from him. Father burned it before I had a
chance to read  it." She paused. "For as much as five years I believed and
hoped."  "How do you mean, believed ?"  "Believed he'd come for me. But I
really never held it against him after  the first. I hain't had much
happiness in my life, except what Sarah brought  me. She's going to get
married now. That's why I'm going to the Home.  I mean she'll have her
chance. Not to be shut up with a hard old woman."  "You ain't hard,"
asserted the man.  "I might get so."  "And you ain't old, either."  "That's
because you're about my age, you think that."  "You deserve ... I hope you
deserve better than to go to a Home," said  the man- solemnly. .  "Oh, they
say it's real nice there," responded Jane Clemmy with deter-mined 
cheerfulness. After a pause she continued.  One Hundred Forty-Six  I - -

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I didn't need to go to the Home, but when Sarah told me she was going  to
get married-well I just wanted her to have her chance-to be happy.  It was
somehow a comfort and relief to talk to this gentle voiced man.  The sun
had sudenly sunk out of sight. The early October dusk was fast 
approaching. In the chilly air Jane shuddered.  "You cold ?" asked the man
gently. He clambered from his seat to the  rear of the wagon, coming back
directly with a warm shawl which he spread  over Jane's lap.  Standing
beside her, hat off, "Jane," he said, "look."  Startled, Jane obeyed. 
"Why," she began, faintly. "You ain't?"  "Yes I yam. It don't seem fair to
let you go on thinking me a stranger."  Her hands fell and she sank limply
against the back of the wagon seat.  "Oh," she faltered, "what have I said
?"  "It's all right what you said." He drew up the sagging shawl. "I ought 
to have gone to your father. But when you didn't write, I thought maybe you
 didn't care."  He put his hand over both of hers to still their trembling.
 "Listen, Jane. We were  both young and foolish then. When you didn't 
answer my letter, I went away to try and forget. For ten years I wandered 
around thinking perhaps-"  "What were you thinking?"  "Perhaps you might
write-and tell me what I wanted to know-what I  asked in the letter." 
"That was the letter Father burned."  "I had just  made up, my mind to try
again when word reached me you were  married."  Jane Clemmy looked fixedly
at his face. His smile removed the last doubt  of his identity. "Well of
all things," she said.  The man went on. "We can get a license at Harlem-" 
"License ?"  "Jane, I hate like everything to take you to that home.  If
you will marry  me tonight, I'll try to make up."  Jane Clemmy sat silent.
A tumult of feeling-fear-hope--- joy---dread,  surprise passed through her
mind.  "Why," she exclaimed suddenly, "I can't I've applied, and my
entrance  fee is paid."  But as if it were 'a cobweb, the man brushed the
obstacle aside.  "Anyway, I'll have to tell the matron," said Jane.  The
remainder of the journey was spent pleasantly in talking over old times and
in planning for the future.  Jane insisted upon explaining to the matron. I
doubt very much if she   made herself understood, for the matron remarked
after she left, "Was she  reported insane ?"  One Hundred Forty-Seven

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THE DREAM  SECOND PRIZE POEM  MABEL H. JOHNSON  The Sun has gone-  His
ardent orb has settled in the west-  But sweet the afterglow!  Sweeter than
words can tell,  Beyond the touch of artist at his best.  How sweetly
thrills the heart  With tender warmth,  As, gazing at the summer sunset
sky,  The lingering token of a day gone by,  I see the lovely colors come
and go  In slow and melting changes. Here in the dreaming purple twilight 
Returns the charm of life  To soothe the pain  That else would poignant be,
 Before the starlight  Speaks through the night  Of day's eternity.  The
glow is gone.  The sky  is gray and amber;  But shading deep  To darkness
and the night.  The stars come dimly out,  Reflecting  in the water,  And
answered back z  By millions sparkling bright.  Sparkling and darkling, 
The stars above and under,  Answer my longings  And fill my soul with
wonder,-  Wonder and longing  Akin in earth and sky.  The stars see not 
Their million bright reflections;  Nor do they feel the kindling human eye.
 Yet  do we see and feel,  We long and wonder,  Dreaming that they  Our
longings can supply.  The night is gone-  The clear day gathers in the
east.  Our dream is done.  One Hundred Forty-Eight

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Beneath the sun  Our duty stands forth in its sober dress.  The task today
has set must be the best  We needed rest-  Th.e sweetest dreams and rest
were ours.  But now, refreshed and strengthened  By those dreams, that
sweet repose,  We gather all our forces  For the task the sunlight shows. 
Our heaven glows  not now  With the lights of other worlds;  But day
confines us to our own  And to its needs.  The vision of the night 
Prepares the day its deeds-  The vision leads.  -- 0-  GHOST SHIPS 
MARGARET HAYWARD Ghostly ships from over the seas  Are wafted to me by the
summer breeze,  I see your decks  Like far-off specks  Of star-dust over
clear blue seas.  What do you carry, sailing far  Oh ships from the evening
star,   Do you carry gold  In your deep, deep holds,  Dear gaillant ships
from afar?  Sail to me, thru the dusk that glows  Thru the wavelets that
come and go,  Sail to me, oh ships,  For the end of your trips,  Is here,
in mly heart, I know.  One Hundred Forty-Nine

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THE MAN WHO CAME BACK  THIRD PRIZE STORY  C. H. HAESKE  The day was dying;
the month was dying; the year was dying; and  someone was saying that the
stranger was dying in the deserted shack on  Thunder Creek.  "He'll last a
couple days at th' most, an' then you fellows got to help me  dig a hole
fer him." It was the man who had found the stranger that was  speaking. 
"Aw, toss 'm in the river," suggested another burly miner, flipping his 
cards on the rough table.  With that the five men who had been playing
cards arose from the boxes  on which they were sitting and moved restlessly
about the room. Their  movements caused the flame from the oil lamp on the
stove to quiver, which  made the shadows of the men assume grotesque forms.
 "Say, gang !" a voice came from the corner. "Let's roam over to. the old 
shack and give th' bum th' once over."  "Huh, might jus' as well. Can't get
a kick out o' playin' poker with a  forty-card deck. Anyhow, none of you
birds got much cash, so wot's the  use."  And the dealer gathered up the
abbreviated deck and stuck it in a chink  in the wall.  "Vatch a dead man
die? Das ban von fool vay to commence das noo  yar," one of the players
observed.  Old Timer, who had been sitting by the stove remarked dryly,
"Well, 4  gents, this here year is already nineteen four, and it's fifteen
minutes gone  liOW.  The new year's rejoicing consisted of a few yawns.
Some one was  cursing the new  year; another was "damn glad nineteen three
wuz gone;"  another was finishing his stock of golden liquor. Thus the new
year had come  into Glacier Camp.  The men were preparing to leave; one of
them touched the old man on  the shoulder.  "Well, Old Timer, here's yer
coat an' lid; come along; the whole bunch  are going; anyway the tramp took
yer old shack t' croak in, an' yu might jus'  as well hop along an'  enjoy
yerself."  Old Timer put on his coat and followed the miners.  The seven
men walked silently in single fire along the treacherous moun-tain  path.
Their lanterns cast weird reflections in the darkness of the wintry  night
against the snow. Some one stumbled and swore loudly; his voice  echoed and
re- echoed thru the tall trees that surrounded the illuminated space  thru
whch seven bulky forms were continually moving. The mournful howl  of a
wolf blended strangely with the voice of the miner.  One Ihundred Fifty

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Half an hour later, after having climbed, stumbled, and slid down a steep 
incline, the tumbled down shack  was reached. The leader of the cavalcade
en-tered,  stopped short, and muttered:  "Well, I'll be damned ;- he's
dead."  The others followed in and gathered around the cot of the dead man.
 "Ain't he a hell of a lookin' specimen ?" observed one of the men.  The
assemblage agreed with him. The corpse was hideous, ravaged with  disease,
unkempt, unshaven, his grey hair tangled, his figure gaunt like that  of a
scarecrow.  "My God !" The men quickly turned their eyes on Old Timer who
was  standing horror struck by the side of the bed. He fell to his knees,
took the  man's hand and stared at the ruby ring the man was  wearing. 
"He's come back-The ring I gave him-It's Andrew---He's come back."  Spring
had come to Glacier Camp. An artist could have found a thous-and 
inspirations in its majestic grandeur; but to the miners it meant mud, 
wash-outs, and the chances of finding a vein of ore uncovered by the
slides,  the chances of having their little mines cave in.  A solitary
horseman was approaching the old cabin on Thunder Creek.  His remarkable
athletic build was, brought out strongly by his eastern riding  clothes.
His  face had a cynical look which was accentuated by an already  grey Van
Dyke beard.  As he neared the cabin, his attention was caught by a lonely
grave. He  leaped off his mount and read the inscription on the  rough
white-washed  cross.  g1VDR w PATERS  The horseman stood for a moment over
the grave; then mounted his  horse and rode along tlhe trail. As he was
riding, a voice startled him.  "'Yo mister !"  One Hundred Fifty-One

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He turned; it was a ragged boy on 'a ragged horse.  "Where dja git them
pants? Gosh, they look funny. You don't live  here, do yu? Gosh, that's a
beaut of a horse; how much dja pay fer him?-"  then he stopped for a
second. "Say mister, wot wuz yuh doin' at the old  Patterson shack ?"  The
stranger had been smiling, but now his attitude became serious.  "That
grave-who is buried there?"  "Aw, that's Ole Timer's brother. Ole Timer, he
used to tell me all about  him; yu know Ole Timer, don'tja? He shows me how
to make traps'n snares.  One (lay me an him went hunting an'-"  "But what
about his brother?" the stranger interrupted nervously.  "Aw, he lived in
the ol' shack with O1' Timer 'bout twenty 'r thirty years ago. The dead guy
found a good mine; it's no good now, but he got a lot of  money for it, a
million dollars maybe. That's pretty much fer a no good  mine, ain't it,
Mister?"  The stranger nodded and the boy continued.  "Anyhow, this fellow
told ;the Ole Timer he's goin' to Seattle 'r Noo  York. Say, wuz you ever
in Noo York? Anyhow, he sez he wuz goin' to  git Ole Timer'n a couple
years, but he don't. He come back  though this win-ter,  but paw sez he
looked like the devil. Gosh, I wish I could have see'd him.  He died an' my
paw helped bury him;. My paw-"  "Boy, take me to the place where Emil
Patterson-I mean Old Timer  lives," the stranger spoke hurriedly.  "Yer
there already. He lives in that there bunkhouse, right over-  GOSH."  The
boy was standing alone gaping at a five-dollar bill in his palm.  The door
to the bunk house swung open and the stranger entered. Old  Timer was
seated in a corner pounding some pieces of quartz. He looked up.  Staring
at the stranger, he dropped his tools, rubbed his eyes and looked again, V 
his body trembling.  "OH, GOD!-IT CAN'T BE-ANDREW---ANDREW---YOU ARE  DEAD
AND"-He arose slowly, his eyes terrified.  The stranger put his arms around
the old man and spoke stumblingly,  "Emil-it took a long, long, time, but
thank God, I've come back."  Ono HIundred Fifty-Two

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THE WAVES AND THE GULLS  THIRD PRIZE POEM  MARGARET HAYWARD  I  The
swish--swash of the waves  The billowy, willowy waves  With their caps of
white  Glistening gay in the light  And their dark green gowns  Rustling
with silken sound.  The swish-swash of the waves  The billowy, willowy
waves.  II They beat on the shore  The hard, pebbled shore  With their
eager hands  Outstretched on the sands And utter glad cries  As they turn
to the skies  While they beat on the shore  The hard, pebbled shore.  III  
The gulls' graceful sweep  Their deep, gliding sweep  And their giddy, gay
whirls  Caught by the wind as it swirls,  Their sad, wailing calls  As they
lightly fall,  In their graceful sweep,  Their deep, gliding sweep. IV 
They light on the shore  The self-same shore  Where the waves in their play
 So restlessly lay  Their long, slender fingers  A gull softly lingers,  On
the hard, pebbled shore,  The self-same shore.  One Hundred Fifty-Three

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A DREAMER OF DREAMS  VIVIEN LOWMAN  A dreamer of dreams, one bright spring
day,  Was dreaming dreams in a carefree way.  He drcamned dreams of the
things he was going to do  When the time would come for dreams to come
true.  Oh, the conquests he'd make when he set to work;  The tasks he'd do;
he would not shirk.  The world would resound with praise to his name.  The
people would stand in awe of his name.  He dreamed, and the time to prepare
went by,  He dreamed, but work he did not try.  A dreamer of dreams, one
warm summer day,  Sat dreaming dreams in his usual way.  He dreamed of the
way to fame and power,  He dreamed of the things to do that hour,  Of
places of trust and highest esteem,  Where things of import ,might be done
by him,  Of honors to alccrue from efforts put forth,  Of people acclaiming
his own true worth.  He dreamed, and the days slid quietly on.  He dreamed,
and nary a vict'ry was won.  A dreamer of dreams, one cold winter day,  Sat
dreaming dreams in a tired way.  He dreamed of things he might have done, 
Of imposing honors he could hiave won.  He dreamed of  chances since gone
by,  Of worthwhile things he did not try.  Oh, the many things that might
have been Had he only known what he knew now, then.  He dreamed, and the
cold gray skies,  Cast the last dark mist down over his eyes.  The hustling
mass that men call life,  Went bustling on in its usual strife  And those
that saw asked what he'd done,  Then, soon forgetting, passed quickly on. 
One Hundred Fifty-Four

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MY ROOM  GEORGE SHIERMAN  My room is not an attic  At the top of fifty
stairs,  Winding up to heaven  Between the Polar Bears;  But from my two
lone windows  I can see the stars hung out,  Though my room is not the
attic  That artists rave about.  My room is not a garret  Above the topmost
flight, Draped with ,shining cobwebs  That mystify the night;  But from my
two lone windows  I can watch the moon go out,  Though my room is not the
garret  That poets sing about.  My room is not a belfry  With panes of
painted glass,  Of pious saints who peer  At the people as they plass;  But
from my two lone windows  I can hear a, Voice no doubt,  Though my room is
not the belfry  That the clergy preach about. My room is not an attic 
Beneath the studded sky.  My room is not a garret  Where dreamers love to
lie. My room is not a belfry  With painted panes of glass;  But from my two
lone windows  I can see the whole  world pass.  It may seem rather odd, 
But from those two lone windows  I can worship God.  One Hundred
Fifty-Five

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LETHAEUM p  GEORGE SHERMAN  O send me to a land  Where I may forget,  Down
by the Lethean River,  Where Space and Time have never met,  And years roll
on forever.  Where the mystic atmosphere  Makes dusk and dawn as one,  And
the mild moon is just as dear  As is the rising sun.  Where there's dim
luxuriant growth,  And trees would scale the sky,  And a goddess breathes
on both,  And lo-the clouds move by.  I would hear the wind caress  The
seaweed's golden tresses,  Which rise and fall upon the breast  That the
tide possesses.  And wakes each sleeping harmony  That lies in moss
enchanted, And courts the woodland violets  Until a kiss is granted.  I
would sail a painted boat  And place in it a dream,  And lie and watch the
white clouds float  Within the silent stream.  I would make a. rustic lute 
Of  reeds and fragrant grasses,  And play upon the strings to woo  Each
wave as it passes.  I would read the  sky at night,  The moon among the
stars,  And paint the sunset, and the light  Behind her purple bars. One
Hundred Fifty-Six

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At eventide the weeds would bend,  And I would sip the stream.  The revelry
of day would end  As does a painted dream;  For yesterday will seek to die 
When memory has flown,  And tomorrow breathe a sigh As does the rose, full
grown.  So send me to a land  Where I can forget,  Down by the Lethean
River, Where Space and Time have never met,  And years roll on forever. 
-0-  WE  MARGARET HAYWARD We're never too old for lovin';  We're never too
old for tears;  We're never too old for hopin',  Thru all the long, long
years.  We're always ready for givin';  We're always ready to cheer; 
PIVe're always ready for livin',  Thru all the long, long years.  We're
preparin' for all the, sorrows;  We're preparin' for all the fears; We're
preparin' for all the to-morrows  Of the long, long years.  One Hundred
Fifty-Seven

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EPILOGUE  AGNES M. GORZELANCYK  On a hill, like a castle standing  Old and
grim with towers ascending  To the mighty dome of Heaven  To the azure blue
of Heazen  Is our Normal, loved and reverend.  Round about it, tall and
many  Stand the trees, like giant sentinels  Ever guarding-guarding-
guarding-  Night and day with arms outstretching  As if asking benediction.
 Here the swallow and the martin  And the birds of various plumage  Have
their haunts among the gables  Build their nests among the gables  Build
their nests among the treetops  'Mong the flowers of rarest perfumes,  Fill
the ethereal air with, music  And the human heart with gladness.  Far below
the mighty ocean,  Eons old, and yet containing  All the youth, the spell,
allurement  Of the day when first created.  In its heaving, restless bosom 
Are the secrets of the ages  All the legends, myths, and tales  Of how thru
the countless ages Man has struggled for existence,  Thru the golden days
of sunshine  Sends its breezes to the hilltop, Where they play about the
campus  Singiing songs of love and beauty.  When at night the moon is
journeying  O'er the sky in all her glory,  Leaving trails of gold behind
her  On the dark and murmering waters,  Like a comet sailing earthward, 
Thru the space with course uncharted  What a spell of mystic magic  And
strange feeling of contentment "  Falls upon the weary spirit.  Far against
the dim horizon s Loom the mountains, the Olympics,  They the time-keepers
of centuries  And the guardians of the valley.  One Hundred Fifty-Eight

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Now they gleam against the heavens  Likle the priceless pearls of princes 
Now they flash with hues o' brilliant  Like the sapphires of the rajahs. 
By the side of the glimmering ocean,  At the feet of the Olympics  Is a
city, young and prosperous,  Is a city in th.e making.  And ever as days go
onward  Are her eyes turned to the hillside  Where stands like an ancient
castle  Our own Normal, loved and reverend;  Our own Normal, growing dearer
 As the days go on their journey.  Oh! You Senior class of students Who
have labored, toiled and struggled  Thru the years with endless patience 
Who have suffered and endured  Many hardships, yet were happy  In the work
that you had chosen,  Who have about the campus  In that paradise of
beauty,  Joined the breezes, and the songbirds  In their hymns of love and
nature,  Who have made the halls re-echo  With your merriment and laughter,
 Who have ,grown to love your teachers  For their wisdom and their
guidance,  Learned to know them and to love them,  And to part  with them
with, sorrow.  You who've strolled along the beaches  'Neath the silvery
shimmering moon-light,   Watched the ever-changing wonders  On the
mountains, the Olympics,  Spent long hours in toil and frolic  In that
Normal-By-The-Sea,  You are leaving all forever  To go forth to meet your
future.  As you journey down life's highway,  While the years will be your
milestones,  Think sometimes of the hours many  That you whiled away in
gladness.  And you know as you bid farewell,  Tho your soul is sad and
sorrowful  That the heart of your Alma Mater  Will be with you always,
always.  One Hundred Fifty-Nine

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LEAVES FROM AN  ALASKAN CALENDAR  by  FLORIS M. CLARK  One Hundred Sixty 
a

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~3~-~d~EI  FOREWORD  If I could only show thee as thou art,  So pitifully
few are those who know;  If I could only paint thy inmost heart,  Thou
strangle, sweet land of mingled sun and snow.  A few there are who brave
thy cruel pain,  And wrest a welcome from thy bitter wrath;  And none who
knows thee but returns again,  To follow to the end thy lonely ipath.  To
such, thy treasures. thou shalt freely give,  His roof shall be the stars,
his couch the fir;  Thy peace shall fill his soul, for he shall live  As
thy High Priest, thy Heart's Interpreter.  One Hundred Sixty-One  ___ ____ 
I

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- ~~a~~~i~  STEAMER AT NIGHT  FIRST PRIZE POEM.  FLORIS M. CLARK  Throb of
the cngine and rattle of cables,  Lights o'er the water, a voice of
command;  l/hat hopes are with you, what joy 3you are bringing,  Gliding
majestically up to the land.  Lift of t

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RETURNING  1'LORIS M. CLARK  Behind, an ever-lenzgthening wake of foam, 
Gray sea, and low gray hills and chill gray sky,  The gulls, down-swooping
on their tireless zings,  Utter their plaintive cry.  But now the mountains
reach encircling arms;  Forgotten is that long white wake of foam;  Before
me lies the sunset's road of gold;  The Lonely Land is welcoming me homne. 
THE DAY THE MAIL COMES IN "Hello, Central. Have you heard from the
Northwlestern?"  "Yes. Expected sometime this evening. She's been
storm-bound all  (lay behind Shelter Island."  Just how many times (luring
the afternoon Central had answered that  same question, I did not try to
guess; for the steamer had two weeks' mail,  and all through the little
town people were straining their ears against the  north wind to catch her
whistle.  It was nearly an hour later that my telephone rang again, and out
of the  night came the operator's cheerful message.  "The Northwestern has
just docked. Yes, don't mention it. Goodnight."  One Hundred Sixty- Three

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As a lonely school marm who had expected to leave friends and civiliza-tion
 nearly two thousand miles behind, I had never ceased to marvel at the 
warmth of the welcome with which the town had received me.  As I put on my 
wraps and furs, I thought with a little glow of the dozens of firesides
whose  owners were likewise preparing to brave the storm in response to
that message  out of the night. Truly the little cheechako school teacher
had speedily found  her place in the town.  When I preached the post
office, it was crowded. Behind the tiers of boxes,  the postmaster was
moving busily. Some had already received letters and  were reading them,
serenly indifferent to envious glances.  A tall, finely built man in a
heavy mackinaw sand fur cap eagerly drew a  square envelope from, his box.
"I knew I'd hear from Billy," he said. "Two  winters now he's been at the
University and he's never yet missed a boat. No,  sir! He's joined a
fraternity and he's got his football letter, but he's never  yet been too
busy to write to his Dad."  A pretty native girl slipped shyly into the
room, and drawing out a pink  envelope, eagerly scanned the contents, her
dark face lighting as she read.  When she folded the letter her big eyes
were luminous and her whole face  seemed to glow softly as she stole
silently out again into the night.  A business man at the writing, shelf,
anxiously scanning a pile of official  looking letters was suddenly
interrupted by the chatter of a group of rosy  girls, muffled in bright
colored scarfs, who swept into the room like a flock  of bright- plumaged
snow-birds. They were met immediately with much good  natured banter.  "Run
along, Kids; you won't get any mail tonight."  "'Aw, those men o' yours
have forgot you long ago. I'll bet they're steppin' Seattle girls right
no;w."  "You keep still, Charley. I guess you've got nothing to say. You
wait around here every boat for a letter from that blonde tourist in
California."  Aloof from the banter slouched a tall, fair-skinned young
fellow with the  wide grey eyes of a dreamer. His hat brim was pulled low
but it could not  hide the longing in his sensitive face. He straightened
up with a smile as I  spoke to him.  "Oh, no, ma'am, I really didn't expect
any mail. I just hang around  from force of habit, I guess. You see my
folks think I'm sort of a black sheep,  and my girl thinks I ought to have
made my fortune and been back long ago,  so I don't get many letters." Then
all the wistfulness returned to his face,  "But when I see those fellows
all reading their mail, seems as if someone  ought to write to me
sometime."  I scanned quickly my own mail. Letters from family, from
friends, from  classmates, all with the same refrain:  "Why will you stay
up there, where it is so cold and lonely? It's a  shame to think of you
wasting your life in that  dull place, when there's so  much going on 'down
here? Won't you give it up and come back ?"  I looked once more around the
room. They would never understand. I  could never make them understand. But
here I had found reality. Comedy,  romance, yes, and tragedy; they were all
encompassed within the four walls of '  that little post office.  One
Hundred Sixty-Four

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DAY OF DARKNESS  Boom! Boom! Boom! Crash! With anxious eyes, the
inhabitants of the  little town of Seward rushed out of their homes. What
was this terrible  thundering that seemed to echo ',round the world? Was it
the day of judg-ment?  Not a person spoke. Far to the west, over the famed
Mbunt Lowell, appeared a glow, brilliant, gorgeous, bright red, appearing
vivid and more  vivid every second. Still the noise kept grumbling on.
People looked at each  other with fear in their faces, and at length,
mystified, went slowly back to  their duties.  The day passed; and the
second; and the third; and still those horrible sounds continued.
Vegetation grew sick, turned yellow, shriveled up and died.  And still that
mysterious fire-cloud hung over the mountain like a marvelous  curtain.
Vague reports came in of explosions in the mines, but these could  not be
confirmed. Finally on the third day, a boat was sighted in the harbor. Soon
a crowd had assembled on the wharf to meet it-a connection as they  thought
with the outside world. As it neared the landing, the more sharp-eyed 
distinguished the form of a fishing boat from Seldovia, filled with
ner-vous,  excited men. Plainly they had important news to tell.
Breathlessly the crowd on the wharf awaited the landing of the schooner. As
the boat drew  nearer, the fishermen commenced shouting, and the anxious
spectators could  barely distinguish the words, "volcano," "Katmai,"
"erupting."  Two. hundred miles west of Seward, towering majestically over
the In-dian  village of  Katmai, stands Katmai volcano. Surrounded by
lesser vol-canoes,  Katmai stands king over the vast area  that comprises
the "Valley of  Ten Thousand Smokes." Little did the people of Kodiak, Wood
Island, and  Katmai Village realize that the depths of this huge mountain
was full of dust,  ashes, pumice, and hot, seething lava which was some day
to boil over and  ruin their little villages. But on the sixth day of June,
1912, Katmai started  the awful eruption which has since caused the making
of a national monument. During the three days that the people of Seward
were wondering and fearing,  a mass of ash and pumice, whose volume has
been estimated at five cubic  miles, was thrown into the a'ir and spread
over an area as  large as the state  of Connecticut, its depth varying from
ten inches to ten feet. Ash fell as far  as Ketchikan, nine hundred miles
away. Do you remember the peculiarly  cold, wet weather of 1912? Katmai 
was responsible. The great quantities  of fine dust which winds distributed
throughout the world had undoubtedly,  scientists say, a profound effect on
the weather.  Kodiak, one hundred miles distant from the volcano, was
buried a foot  deep in ashes. People despaired. Could anything live there
after this? Surely it would be years before vegetation could grow again.
But, as it has  been expressed, the ash-fall was the "best thing that ever
happened to Kodiak."  After an interval of only two years, plant life grew
with marvelous rapidity.  But at Katmai Village the effect was far
different. There you will not find  the green- covered hillsides, but
wreckage and desolation everywhere. While  One Hundred Sixty-Five

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the village of Katmai was not in the direct line of destruction, the flood
which  followed the eruption completely wiped out the little settlement.
Fortunately,  at the time of the explosion, the Indians had gone  to their
fishing grounds.  They returned to find their town a mass of quicksand,
roofs washed off from some of the houses, others filled to the eaves with
pumice stone, and the little  church where they had worshiped undisturbed
for so many years, completely  truined. A river, six miles wide and several
feet deep, had left its work of  destruction behind it. Strange as it may
seem, during those awful sixty hours when Katmai was wreaking her vengeance
on the world, not a person lost his  life as a result of the explosion.
Throughout the three days of intense black-ness,  so dense that a lighted
match could not be seen in front of you, some ,  unseen Power held sate the
life of every person.  Naturally an eruption of such size and encrmity soon
drew the attention  of the whole world, and accordingly the National
Geographic Society that  summer sent an expedition under the leadership of
George C. Martin to  explore  this wonderful country. Alaska! They
shuddered at the very  thoughts of that ice-box. But after arriving at
their destination, they found  that the winters of Boston ,are much more
severe than the winters of Kodiak  and that vicinity. After reaching the
Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, they  pitched their tents and prepared to
retire for the night. But why weren't they  cold? They couldn't understand.
Imagine their surprise, on lying down, to  find they were uncomfortably
hot. But when one of the men, in desperation, thrust his thermometer into
the ground and watched it rise to the boiling  point they understood, and
put their blankets under them to keep cool. The  ground on which they were
lying was part of a gigantic chemical laboratory:  namely, Katmai Valley.
On entering the valley, an amazing sight met the  eyes of the explorers. As
far as they could see, great columns of white smoke  rose gracefully into
the air from fissures and fumaroles, and yet they were  surrounded on all
sides by glaciers. Close to the very base of- the glaciers rose  the steam,
and curled around the mountain wall five miles beyond.  The party found
Katmai to be the greatest active crater in the world,  many times larger
than the famed Kilauea. The crater  is three miles wide  and three
thousand, seven hundred feet deep.  It is no wonder that the people of
Seward wondered and feared during  those three days of terrible suspense.
But when it was over, and the little  town lay covered with ashes, they
realized what an unusual and wonderful  manifestation of nature they had
seen, and were proud to say that they had  been through the eruption of
Mount Katmai.  RUTH F. PEDERSON.  One limdlred Sixty-Six

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A DAY THAT LASTS ALL NIGHT  June in Alaska! Was ever such weather or such a
country? Words simply cannot paint it. Service came close to it in his
poetry, and Curwood  has caught a bit of it in prose,  but there are no
words in the English or any  other language that can give an idea of the
way this valley looks today; the  blue mountain tol:,ped with glaciers that
shine like crowns of diamonds; the  sun sparkling on the waters of the bay;
the waterfalls lacing the mountains  like white ribbon. In the States,
people are suffocating in the heat, but up  here the air is so fresh and
'bracing it makes one feel like squaring his should-ers  and tackling all
the difficulties in the universe.

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I have often tried to decide which of all my Alaskan days has been the 
most interesting, but now I am nearly certain that it was yesterday and
last  night. I have seen many festivals and celebrations here, but last
night's  stands out from them all because it is truly and distinctively of
the North.  June 21, the longest day in the year, is the day on which all
Alaska holds  carnival. Of course here in the southern part  of the
territory we cannot see  the midnight sun, but that makes no difference in
the celebration. So last night at eight o'clock the towns-pe:ple gathered
at the foot of Lake Dewey  Trail to start on the annual Midnight Sun
picnic. It was just a little after  sunset in the valley then and the
orange glow had not even begun to fade from  the peaks as we started up the
trail. It was only a short climb to the lake-, and  by the  time we reached
it our guides had a bonfire blazing. For the next two  hours everyone
amused himself in his own way. Some fished, while others  tramped the
swamps, braving mosquitoes and gnats for the sake  of the great  blue
violets that grow there. These northern violets are wonderful in size and 
color but I was disappointed to find that they have almost no fragrance.
The  children scattered everywhere, playing tag in  the: woods and skipping
stones  over the water. Some even went in wading, altho the :water was
ice-cold  and  Alaskan nghts are always chilly. A group of old timers sat
around the fire  and swapped yarns of the  early days on the trail. As I
watched them peace-fully  puffing at their pipes it was difficult to
realize what hardships they had  gone through for the sake of the gold they
expected to find.  At II o'clock everyone gathered around the fire for
supper. It was as  nearly dark then as it ever is during these June nights,
a dense blue twilight  in 'the open spaces, shading to real darkness only
under the shadows of the  trees.  I shall never forget that picture; the
firelight on all those faces, with the  black wall of the mountain behind
and the lake in front, a sort of shining blur  in the blue dusk. Somewhere
in the shadows a waterfall dashed itself down  over the Crocks, 'and the
air was heavy with the sweet breath of the marsh-hyacinths  that the
children had gathered in the swamp below.  Just at midnight, when our
campfire had burned to a bed of embers, a  sudden glow appeared across the
lake, and we saw ;a yellow ball of light  appa.rently just rising from the
water; for the path of its reflection extended  across the lake nearly to
our feet. There was a moment of silence,  then someone exclaimed, "The
Midnight Sun, of course!" and the tension  was  broken with a laugh. A
frame covered with yellow cheese cloth, a strong  searchlight and a little
ingenuity  were all that had been used, but the effect,  to me at least,
was startling. ' A clear tenor voice started the air of Auld Lang  Syne,
and in a moment the whole company w:as singing. It was the last ,  touch
needed  to make the night 'perfect.  The crowd separated into small groups
after that, and the sky was  already growing light in the east when we
started on the downward trail.  Not yet two o'clock, but on every side of
us the birds were waking with gay  little calls of greeting.  One Hundred
Sixty-Eight

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Suddenly I felt an impulse to know whether the charm and power of this 
land was real or whether it held me merely because of its novelty. I turned
to  the girl who had been my guide and companion since my arrival, pilotng
me  around the pitfalls which wait the unwary cheechako, and unlocking to
me  many secrets of the North. I knew that she had graduated from a
Southern  university, where her charm and ability had opened to her many
desirable  doors, but in the face of all protests she had quietly returned
to her native  mountains, insisting that her work and happiness was there. 
"What is it that makes people stay here," I said. "You, for instance, with 
your talents and education. Are you really satisfied to use them here?" 
She stopped on a huge, jutting boulder, and I followed her glance as it 
swept the valley. Above the mountains, shafts of gold and rose-color were 
just piercing the purple mist. The little town at our feet looked very
peaceful  in the early morning light. A. clean 1breeze from the bay brushed
our faces.   For a few moments she seemed to forget my question; then her
clear,  dark eyes came back to my face.  "What sane person," she said
slowly, "would be willing to live in a city  after he had seen this ?"  -
o-  VISION  FLORIS M. CLARK  In the chill greyness of the dawn,  With
singing hearts, we faced the trail,   Thru the hot noon we struggled on; 
Upward till nerve and strength must fail.  A little more; a few steps more;
 Each snow bank is a milestone past;  One rocky slope to struggle o'er  And
then-the peak at last!  The endless moun tains, glacier crowned;  The
glorious reach of pines and snow-  God shows such things to men sometimes, 
But they must climb the peaks to know.  One Hundred Sixty-Nine

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A PRINCE CHARMING  OF THE FAR NORTH  When I was a child, I made a trip to
Nome, Alaska, on a two-masted  schooner. During the long six months of the
voyage I had many new and  interesting experiences. One of the most
anmusing of these happened at one  of the Umiak islands, where our boat had
gone to escape the ice floes which  we had encountered in the open sea.
Here we saw our first Eskimos. Shortly  after our appearance in their bay
they paddled out to us in their skin boats and swarmed over our decks,
seemingly as much interested in us as we were in  them. Our captain told us
that these islands were out of the way of the  general run of boats and
that prolbably nothing but a few whaling vessel had  ever touched there. 
At any rate, these Eskimos had evidently never before seen a white child, 
for no sooner had they spied me than I immediately became the object of
their  curious regard. They crowded about me, a noisy, chattering group.
They  seemed to be drawing each other's attention to my good points and bad
 points. They were not content with a perfunctory examination, each
striving  to out-do the other in discovering some strange new feature.  One
comely young Eskimo boy, about sixteen I should say, seemed to  have taken
a particular fancy to me and made known t6 us by signs that he  intended to
bring me a pair of moccasins, or "mukluks," as they call them.  But alas!
This young boy, in making his appraisal of me had not noticed  the size of
my feet. He, no doubt, thought that I would conform to the proper 
proportions of an Eskimo child, and Eskimos have very small hands and feet.
 Now, as a white person, I have never been especially noted for my big
feet,  but according to the Eskimo ideal I was a complete failure.  The boy
proudly brought his "mukluks" to me. They were made of  reindeer skin and
were a wonderful product of the clever fingers of the maker.  After we had
exclaimed over their beauty, he insisted on trying them on my  feet
himself. Unexpected denouement! They were too  small! Far too small !  I
prefer to state it that way, altho I know the Eskimo boy thought my feet 
were too  large. We could not understand a word which he said, but 
nevertheless he had no difficulty in making known his extreme disgust. He 
also succeeded in showing me just how much too large my feet were. His idol
was shattered, and while I had no very great desire to play  Cinderella to
an Eskimo prince, still I would like to have had those moccasins,  even if
I could not wear them. But my Eskimo proved to be an "Indian  giver," for
as soon as he had convinced himself that I could not possibly wear  the
"mukluks," he stalked off with them, and the last I saw of him he was 
paddling for shore as fast as he could go. No dou;t he already h'ad in mind
 some dark-skinned Eskimo maiden whose feet were worthy of his gift. MRS.
LAURA BERKELEY.  One Hlundred Seventy

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I I  MY MOUNTAIN  FLORIS M. CLARK  I know the far blue mountains  At the
horizon's end;  B tI all, I know another one,  A close, familiar friend. 
At sunrise its cloud-banners flu.ng  Thrill like a bugle call.  It stan(s,
a shining sentinel,  When length'ninlg shado s fall.  At cveniig, on m11y
tired heart  It pours its healing bahn;  It wraps me in its silent
strength;  It soothes me with its cahn.  I love the far blue mountains 
That guard the glowing West,  But close and still, my mountain stands-  The
frienld I love the best.  One Hundred Seventy-One

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i V Wtuli 'G  L' ENVOI  Blue skies above me, but bluer still are skies
which I know bending ten-derly  over a little Alaskan valley. W\Vhile
mountain peaks shine in the distance,  but whiter and more lofty are the
mountain summits which memory sees,  towering far to the northland.
Pleasant faces and friendly greetings meet me  on every side, but always in
my heart is a yearning for the hearty hand-clasp  of a com;rade of the
North. F r that is the penalty which Alaska sets on  all who, having once
known her spell,  wander from her borders. Their path-ways  may lead them
to the ends of the earth, ut in their hearts shall  be a  loneliness and
longing which shall never be stilled until they have turned their  faces
again toward the North: toward the green shores and snow-crowned  mountains
of the Great Country.  Ohe I1 undred Seventy-T'wo

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One Hundred Seventy-Three  I

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One Hundred Seventy-Four

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MT. BAKER EXCURSION  Once a year the student body of Bellingham State
Normal School goes on  a pilgrimage to Mt. Kulshan, The Great White
Watcher. As is the custom  of all earnest pilgrims, the Normal professors
and students start with the  rising sun in a caravan of large Hudsons, the
muffled roar of whose mighty  engines stirs an accompanying echo of
pulsating thirobs in the hearts of the passengers.  Three hours later a
hundred or more Normalites start the long upward  journey, plodding on and
on through solemn forests which gently sob in  sympathy with the ever
swelling drone of myriads of waterfalls.  By four o'clock, almost seven
hours later, everyone is in Camp Helio-trope,  which is eleven miles frem
Glacier and a mile above sea level. Through  means of a well-organized
staff, everyone is put to  work and within three  hours, camp sites have
been chosen, fires built, countless pails of water  brought from a
turbulent glacial stream, supper cooked and served, utensils  washed, beds
made, firewood piled up, footgear changed, wet clothes or shoes  drying by
the several camp fires, and everyone "comfy-like." Then, O, those
enchanting, lingering hours of sunset, dusk, and campfire!  A blood-red sun
plunging deep,  deep into the Pacific, a sky all afire, a snow-cap  bathed
in a western glow, a glacier bejeweled under a moon, a roar of  cataracts,
a moan of :a forest, a great crackling campfire, a sound of music,  voices
and laughter, a song-"Nearer, My God, To Thee," and taps, a heap  of coals,
and blackness, blackness all about, with the stars, the moon, and the 
Great White Watcher hovering overhead.  Four o'clock in the morning
everyone is "rolling out" to the call of  reveille on a bugle. By six
o'clock everyone has eaten; secured his frugal  lunch of graham crackers,
raisins, dried prunes, chocolate bars, cheese, and  possibly  an orange;
has had his shoes and equipment inspected; has fallen in  line; has
received orders of how to conduct himself on the climb; has painted,  and
is off with every cell of his body atingle.  Up, up, up they go, oh, how
slowly, but always going, all in step with  the slow chant of "lift your
foot, step, place, or rest." Scouts are ahead,  always within sight of the
line, picking the trail around yawning crevasses, across snow-bridges,
along rocky ridges, and across steep, icy slopes where  an ice 'axe must be
used to cut steps, and possibly they have to descend a  crevasse and cut
steps up the other side and through a cornice of snow or ice  which
generally overhangs the upper side of a crevasse.  One Hundred Seventy-
Five

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At four o'clock the weary but determined line has reached the highest  part
of the great flat dome. For some five or ten minutes they look off into 
space, momentarily oblivious of the freezing gale, in their wonder and awe.
 There they are more than two miles up in the air tugged by icy blasts a
sheer  droop of a mile only a few feet away with clouds scudding past far
below,  intermittently blotting out and revealing a  wilderness of
mountains and snow-capped  peaks, endless forests, glaciers, rivers, and
lakes. To the west is the  great rolling Pacific Ocean.  Then these
pilgrims, feeling O, so insignificant, but yet somehow  nobler,  for they
have seen and felt a little of that something that people call God, turn 
their backs and leave it all behind, until the next year when the snows
start to  melt and that Something calls them back again.  EVYRELL E. RICE. 
-0--  One Hundred Seventy-Six

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One Hundred Seventy-Seven

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HANNEGAN PASS HIKE  About sixty ,enthusiastic students climbed into stages
in front of the  Normal Dormitory one Friday afternoon 1ate last July.
Three and one-half  hours later we clambered down from our seats in a
different world, yet only  fifty miles from school. We were at Shuksan,
rightly called by the road  builders, Mosquito Camp. We snatched our
luggage and fled up the trail to a  mosquitoless camp. At a point half a
mile up the trail a creek made a splendid  cooking camp and there a hearty
supper was prepared. We were entirely  willing to eat everything in sight
and looked interestedly at one fat packhorse,   but Mr. Bond gasped and
informed us that we had better leave a little for  breakfast. Back in our
blankets we slept on heaps of spongy moss and were  up early next morning
and on cur trail up to Hannegan Pass.  The trail led through swamp, across
creeks, through stretches -of silent  firs, and beds of lilies shoulder
high. All the while we heard the roar of the  Ruth 'Creek, which the trail
followed, and, to the south and west we could  see waterfalls over a
thousand feet in height. Farther on we crossed a wide  expanse of snow
which had slipped from the mountain above and had carried  rocks and great
trees 'with it,ti ll it had even dammed Ruth Creek. It was the  first
avalanche many of us had sleen and we stopped to  fix the pictures of it 
in our memory. As we left the avalanche, some stopped to get an ice-cold 
drink from the creek flowing beneath the snow.  The trail grew steeper and
steeper on the hillside mountain flowers made  their apearance;
monkeyflowers, bluelips. and vellow deer-tongues; all helped  to make the
meadows a vast flower garden. We crossed a yellow meadow,  passed through a
belt of timber, and arrived at our destination.  A little lake in the Pass
had two outlets. One drained to the east into Chilliwack Lake and Canada,
and the other to the west into Bellingham Bay,  through the Nooksack River.
 Beyond Ruth Creek, Ruth M1Vountain towered  6,ooo feet above sea level
southeast of us and we could see through a gap the  jagged pile of shale
and ice that is called Mount Shuksan.  After dinner, we climbed Goat
Mountain and saw our first ptarmigan.  We spent an hour on top and returned
to camp and supper. We loafed, sang,  and told stories underneath a moon
that looked as though we could touch it from the tall tree over the camp.
The distant snowfields gleamed softly in  the moonlight: the roar of snow-
fed torrents came to our ears, while the  fire snapped and smoked merrily
and the cool fresh air finally persuaded us to  rest. Before we stumbled to
our blankets, Mr. Coughlin had us sing the  Mountaineer Evening Song.  One
Hundred Seventy-Eight

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Next morning, Ruth Mountain was climbed and when dinner time came  it was a
tired group that tried to eat everything in sight. Packhorses were  then
loaded and we started the ten-mile hike to Shuksan. The trail down  seemed
about half as long as the trail up, and we reached Mosquito Camp  before
seven o'clock, where we were joyfully welcomed by mosquitos and  stage
drivers. Eleven o'clock that night found  us back at school hunting for 
hot water, soap and food. Our memories of the trip are linked with the
thoughts of three teachers who made the trip not only possible but a
success.  There may be other hikes,  but we who have been on trips such as
Han-negan  Pass, will always feel something missing. A place will be vacant
in  our hearts and by the campfire that no other can fill.  We can only
hope for those here this next summer as many happy and  successful hikes as
we can remember.  -R. T.  One Hundred Seventy-Nine

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THE EVERGREEN STATE  By EFLLA HIGGINSON  My chosen state, to thee-  Cleft
by the Opal Sea, Evergreen State!  Land of the emerald ferns,  Land where
the sunset burns--  To thee e'er turns,  With thee I wait. a  When sunset
fires thy peaks,  Mountain to mountain speaks-  "Dark hours a're near !" 
But when the night is done  Rays of soft color run  Up from the rising
sun,-  Flashing-"Good cheer !"  Thy future shall be grand,  Arise and take
thy stand-  Strong, proud and free!  In the world's march, keep tread 
Where Truth's white star has led,  Let no hard word be said,  Ever, of
thee!  All thy mistakes are past, Lift up thy head at last-  Smile thro'
thy tears!  Thy darkest hour is gone,  Hail, hail the golden dawn- Press on
thy course, and on  Thro' all the years!  One Hundred Eighty

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One Hundred Eighty-One  I I C~ arr

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THE PHILOS  As May draws to a close, we add another chapter to our book of
"Philo  Life." History, they  say, repeats itself, and in the case of the
Philos, it is  each year repeated more loudly.  The club beg:an its
twenty-third year with vim, each old member on the  look-out for live
prospective members. In almost any corner of the hall  between classes,
just such conversations as this ensued: "Who did you say? What can she do?"
"Oh," came the reply, "She can sing, play the violin, and  really her
readings are wonderful." "All right,' 'was the response. "I'll put  her
name before the membership committee." As a result, the students admit-ted 
to the club that first quarter had abilities similar to the ones above men-
tioned.  Initiation was the first main event of the season and such weird
intricacies  as the candidates were forced to go through! However, they
appeared at  school the following day with the Philo brand on their
foreheads and smiles  on their faces, proud of the fact that they were
Philos in spite of those lame muscles and sore joints.  An event toward
which all Philos looked forward was the Annual Birth-day  party  given at
the home of Mr. 'and Mrs. Philippi in November. It re-sembled  a "family
reunion," for all the former members of the club who found  it possible to
attend, gathered around the fireplace of "Mother" and  "Father"  Philippi.
Imprcmptu speeches were demanded, giving the old members an  opportunity to
relate  their experiences since leaving school. According; to  custom, the
Philo Game was played throughout the evening. Some of our  One Hundred
Eighty Two

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members are becoming expert at this game for it was only after a long,
difficult  fight that the honors were given finally to Marguerite Saddler,
while Herbert  Cederberg received the consolation prize.  Another important
social event took place at the Pheasant Tea Rooms,  February 17, in the
form of an Annual Banquet. The room was appropriately  decorated in the
Philo "Green and White." the color scheme being carried  out in the place
cards and favors. Herbert Cederberg, our capable president,  acted as
toastmaster and once more the old members were called upon to "give  an
account of themselves." The program was exceedingly educative as well  as
entertaining, especially to the ladies present, (both married and
unmarried)  for Mrs. Carver passed on that valuable information, "How to
Cook and Keep  a Husband." We well know that Mrs. Carver is especially
qualified to discuss  such a subject.  There were several other interesting
numbers on the program, after  which the members, both new and old, were
given  an opportunity to get  acquainted. All are looking forward with keen
anticipation to next year's  banquet. The last main event of the season
will take place at Lake Whatcom in the  form of a week-end party. This is
to take place in the near future. The old  members have pleasant memories
of those good times last year and the new  members have heard enough about
them to be anxiously awaiting the eventful  days to arrive.  However, all
has not been "play" for there is also a serious side to the  club. Every
two weeks on Thursday evening the club meets for literary and  business
purposes. These meetings are always educational and informational. 
Practice in parliamentary drill, debate, music and readings constitute the
pro-grams  and we are proud to say that we have real talent along these
lines.  Often the lives of such men as George Washington, Lincoln, Vachel
Lindsey  and others are studied. This year the club over- stepped its
literary bounda-ries  and accepted the Thespians' challenge to a game of
basketball between the  boys and girls of the two clubs. The Philo girls
upheld the long end of the  score, but the Thespian boys took home the
laurels. The "calm after the  storm" took place in the cafeteria and both
clubs went home perfectly satis-fied  because of the true sportsmanship
shown.  The Philos are proud to claim as members of their organization
three  young men, Maurice Thomas, Guy Bond and MNr. Rankin, who took 
prominent  parts in helping to win the Inter-Normal Basketball championship
for our  school. One of its number, Bob Tunstall, made the debating team,
and sev-eral  of the girls made the Freshman and Sophomore basketball
teams; in fact  seven out of eleven on the Sophomore team were Philos. When
we stop to  think about it, there is not a single school activity with
which some Philo is  not connected.  And now we must close another chapter
of Philo life, but do not think  we have finished. The Philos will never be
finished for they are "alive"-  Yesterday, Today, and-Forever !  One
Hundred Eighty-Three

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I I  THESPIANS  Dramatically speaking, the first event of the school year
was the fall  try-out. Who lives that does not quake at the thought of
trying to impress  solemn-faced judges with one's supposed talent. This is
followed by the ordeal  of waiting for the final decision and the nervous
excitement of searching through the names given in the list of lucky ones.
In the event that one is  successful, one looks again, once, twice, three
times, to be sure. Then with  a sigh of relief and satisfaction one
experiences the delight of being a Thes-pian  once and for ,all.  The fall
initiation will be remembered by a large group of, at  that time,  scared
though happy looking Thespians. As the details of said initiation are  a
deep, dark secret, we can just say that the banquet which followed closed a
 most thrilling and enjoyable evening. One Hundred Eighty-Four

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Mr. Horace Rahskopf of the Expression Deparment, and sponsor of our  club,
lent his valuable time and assistance in our work this year.  The following
plays were preseinted : "The Great American Family," "The Dear Departed,"
"Miss Civilization," and "Riders to the Sea," the last  mentioned being
given also in assembly.  The happiest event of the year was our banquet.
February 22 has been  made the permanent date for the Thespian Annual
Banquet. This year it was  held at the Pheasant Tea Rooms, and decorations
suitable- for George Wash-ington's  birthday anniversary, added much to the
brightness and happiness of  the occasion. Everyone left convinced that
never had he enjoyed a more de-lightful  evening.   At the close of the
spring quarter, the Thespian Dramatic club will  present its annual public
recital. As this book goes to press, the play has not  yet been selected,
but as it is to be a Thespian production, its quality is assured.  We close
with a toast-"To all Thespians-Past, Present, and Future."  -o-  One
Hundred Eighty-Five

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RURAL LIFE CLUB  Those of us who have been fortunate eniougli to have our
names listed  among the members of the Rural Life Club feel that we have
gained much  which we could not have otherwise secured and which will be of
lasting  benefit in all organized activities, community and social affairs.
Recognizing  the fact that the world judges by results, the club has aimed
to secure results  not only in immediate pleasure but that will fulfill, as
well, the remote aims  incorporated in the constitution. 4  The regular
meetings are devoted to programs consisting of music, plays,  debate,
readings, the discussion of  problems of current importance, and of 
community singing. No member could ever forget our club songs and the old 
familiar "get acquainted" song after having participated in singing them. A
 portion of each program is devoted to parliamentary study, followed by the
 practice of the same. Parent Teachers' Associations have been organized
and.  meetings conducted with members serving as officers or patrons,  and
ques-tions  which might arise in connection with such an organization
discussed and  answered. The social side has not been neglected. Many happy
play-times have been  enjoyed together, in the gymnasium, our regular club
room and elsewhere.  These activities consist of:  October 31-Hallowe'en
party in gymnasium.  December 21-Christmas party in room 308.  February
15-Valentine party in room 308.  March ..-.A nnual Banquet, Pheasant Tea
Room.  May ......- Annual Picnic and farewell meeting. One Hundred
Eighty-Six

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The club has aimed to uphold the standards for which it was originally 
organized-chiefly the discussion of  land participation in problems
pertain-ing  to rural and community life. These are social as well as
intellectual. The  membership is limited but well chosen. Each individual
is an active member  contributing  in some way two or more times each
quarter.  The sponsors are:  MISS KEELER MR. HECKMAN AMR.  BROCKMAN  MR.
COUGHLIN (deceased)  While this has been one of the happiest and most
successful  years of the  club's history, it has also been the saddest. We
mourn the loss of our beloved  sponsor, Mr.  John Vincent Coughlin, who
answered the call of the Grim Reap-er  in January.  We cannot close the
annals of the year without paying tribute to the  man who was ever ready to
advise, assist and lead in every good way; whose  usefulness commanded
unselfish service from others; whose cheerfulness begot  cheerfulness, and
whose devotion will ever be an inspiration to those who have  been
privileged to work with him.  /  -~ '.-  One Hundred Eighty-Seven

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e I  DRAMA CLUB  OFF ICERS  ROBERT CAULKINS ................... ........
... ............. ........ President GERTRUDE MORGANTHALER
.......................... Vice-President  M AUDE W ITHERS
..................................... ................... Secretary  VICTOR
H. HOPPPE .....---------.............................. Director of Pla s 
The Drama Club of the B. S. N. S. was organized February 12, 1923,  having
as the faculty advisory board the following members: Mr. V. H.  Hoppe,
chairman; Mrs. Vaughan, and Mr. J. F. Caskey.  The passing of the class
play may at first seem regrettable. True, it is  an old-time institution
that has become dear to the students, but even things  long cherished must
give way to those which promise greater value for the  time expended. In
this case the aim is for more skilled action and a higher standard of
production.  During the year the dramatic department of the Normal has
given con-siderable study to the problem of school plays, with the result
that this club  shall take over the productions formerly given by the
various classes.  The club will draw its membership from the entire student
body, through  the usual system of try-outs. These inter-club try-outs will
be the means of  determining the casts for the various plays to be
presented. Each quarter,  one main play of high standard will be produced. 
One Hundred Eighty-Eight

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Students desiring to make a special study along these lines will, if
show-ing  sufficient talent and aptitude, be able to do continuous and
progressive  work during their entire Normal training.  Much of the best
literature of today, as well as that of days past, comes  to us in the form
of the drama. It is vitally necessary that training of su-perior  merit be
carried on along these lines, so that student-actors may more  faithfully
interpret the messages which our present-day dramatists are cre-ating.  The
membership is limited to fifty students, and to secure an appointment  to
the club roll will be considered not only a position of high educational
value,  but also one of honor in the student body.  -0-  One Hundred
Eighty- Nine

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-,a IE~  Y. W. C. A.  OFFICERS.  V IVIEN NE C ROXFORD
........................................------ ----------- RUTH MARKHAM
........................ ............... Vice  ISABELLA ANDERSON
...................- ------------ -  D  OROTH Y PARSONS ........

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our representative to the International Student Volunteer Convention three 
years ago. When school opened last fall she returned to graduate and was 
then elected president of the Y. W. C. A. Both her faithfulness and
earnest-ness  will be remembered by the many fortunate ones who have been
in contact with her.  During the summer quarter of 1922, the Y. W. C. A.
was under the  fadmnistration of Vivienne Gunderson. A great deal of credit
should be  given to her for the splendid work .which she dlid and the
spirit of friendliness  and co-operation which she always showed toward
everyone.  The Meeting's Committee has dlone excellent work in arranging
the  Thursday programs, in which we have heard a number of especially
gifted  speakers. Many are or have been missionaries in foreign lands and
have gripped us with their stories of the power of Christianity. Among the
most  prominent speakers are Miss Heller, Y. W. C. A. Traveling Secretary;
Mr.  Hartlett, National Student Volunteer Secretary; Mrs. Powlison,
recently in  work in Smyrna; Miss Bergman, missicnary from Korea, and Mr.
Davis,  Secretary of South America Inland Mission. Mrs. Campbell, of
Seattle was  again joyfully welcomed to inspire us with her messages and
magnetic per-sonality.  She was the speaker at the annual Bible Institute
which was held  January I Ith to the 14th, with six addresses.  Nine Bible
classes have been organized under the capable leadership, of  Mrs. George
McL. Miller, Miss Sperry, Miss Woodard, Mrs. Vaughan, Mrs. Gunderson, and
Miss Keeler. The book of Genesis has been studied during  the winter
months. More than two hundred have been enrolled in the Bible  classes with
an average attendance of one hundred fifty.   At the beginning of the
school year, bouquets were given to the new  girls with greetings from the
Y. Wi. C. A. Narcissi were grown and taken to  those who were ill. The
girls have also met the trains and boats at the opening  of each quarter. 
During the fall quarter a pleasing social event was given by the Y. V. C.
A. girls to the faculty and the students of the Normal. This was held in
the  beautiful drawing room of Edens Hall, which was richly decorated for
the  occasion. At this same time a very enjoyable organ recital  was given
by Mrs.  Mathes to which all girls of the school were invited.  In the
month of December, Dr. Mathes gave a most impressive lecture  on his
experiences in the World War. It was well 'worth hearing and many 
interesting as well as instructive facts will long be remembered.  The Y.
W. C. A. has been an inspiration for many girls to continue the  work and
many of the girls are in far away countries doing missionary work.  Among
those who have left from this Normal are:  INDIA-Emma  Rexroth.  Abbie
Johnson Smith, who died in 1920o.  Mary Campbell.  One iundred Nin
ety-onie

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 192

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BURMA--  Ethel Hunt.  Esther Nelson.  SIAM-Mabel  Jordan, who sailed August
io, 1922.  CHINA-Lydia Berthold.  Edna Whipple.  Nina Gemmell.  Mary
Millican.  Bergliot Evenson.  Susie Claussen, who sailed August 24, 1922. 
Maud Whipple, who sailed August 24, 1922.  PHILIPPINES-Olive  Rohrbaugh.
KOREA-Lois  Henderson, who sailed September 8, 1922.  Clara Gordan, a
graduate and faculty member.  SOUTH AMERICA-Anna  Brown.  Fay Bruneau. 
HAYTI-Violet  Parker.  PORTO RICO-Luella  Airth. PERSIA-Carrie  Nagley. 
Ethel Scheidemantel  Olive Wolfe, who just returned.  NEW MIEXICO-Mabel
Tillman.  Mary Bauma.  Johanna Van Dyken.  This year's work will close with
the feeling that those girls who have  attended the Y. W. C. A. have been
richly repaid, and it is hoped that many  more girls will join  in the
inspiration, knowledge, and cultivation of good  friends that one gains
from this association in our school.  One Hundred Ninety-Two

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 193

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STUDIO ART CLUB  Sponsors:  MISS MARIE CAREY DR.USE  MISS MARGUERITE LANDIS
 MISS MIARJORIE JOHNSTON  Tuesday Evening.  My Dear,  You have asked me
what one thing during my year at Normal has given  me greatest pleasure-let
me tell you a story and see if you can guess.  Last fall, when I was
registering, I met a lady who wore a strange ring  -it attracted me-not an
ordinary signet ring, this, but a tiny gold palette.  I did not know then,
but imagine my happiness later when I learned that,  not  only Miss Druse,
but I. too, could wear the gold palette. I had been voted  into the Sudio
Art Club. From that time on, the third floor of the North  Wing was my
rendezvous. For, you see, our club is of the opinion tha't work  which
affords pleasure is much better than merely aimless play. And so we  spend
two  evenings each month in doing some kind of art work. First, we  did
landscapes-some in charcoal, some in pencil, others in water color and 
still more in cut paper. Really, my dear, I wish you could have come to our
 Mid-Winter Exhibit! It was well worth seeing ("if I do say it shouldn't," 
One Hundred Ninety-Three _ _1___ r~iiEl-_rul*ej~i~-~.a_ r* -~~p~-sasr 1
B~t~h~~

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 194

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I  as old Mrs. Gray used to say). And the Spring Exhibit was even
better-the  student work from the whole  department just more than filled
all the rooms.  And People! We certainly served 'tea to many those days. 
Not only did we work with our hands, but also with our minds. A study  of
artists and various phases of art was made by reports on reference reading 
each meeting. This work partly answered for the course in History and 
Appreciation of Art, which so many of us wanted, but could no't seem to 
wedge in between requirements.  Did we work all the time? Believe me, no!
You remember I told you  about the midnight luncheon honoring the November
graduates. And our  wonderful banquet in the spring! And when I have lots
of 'time I'll tell you  about the funny stunts at January initiation. 
Perhaps you know some of the  girls who were officers-at least you've 
heard of them:  QUARTERS  Presidcl t  Vice Presidenit  Secretary  
Treasurer  Now, can you  ments ?  Ist and 2nd  JULIA WHITMORE  JESSE
CLARKEN  LA VERNE STUBER  LoUISE YOUNG  LoJuISE YouNG  MARGARET WARD 
DOROTHY LEE  MARTHA THOMPSON  guess what was mostly responsible for my
happiest mo-  As ever your loving,  Cousin Mary.  Postscript-  Almost
forgot to mention  on the prettiest Russian blouse;  uses for their
designs.  the  wood-block prints we made. I put mine  some of the girls had
very clever and original  Mary.  -0-  One Hundred Ninety-Four

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 195

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SOURDOUGHS  Those who have sought to further their education here in B. S.
N. S.  have not failed to notice in their midst 'a group of radiant, happy,
people who  looked as if at any minute they might jump behind a sled, crack
a whip, and  call "mush" to a team of dogs as they started on a journey
over the frozen  winter trails of northern Alaska. Bonded together by a
mutual love for the  Northland these "old timers," early in the year,
organized themselves into  the exclusively Alaskan club known as the
"Sourdoughs." Requirements for  membership were made quite liberal, the
only condition being that the candi-date  must have set foot on Alaskan
soil. Officers were elected as follows,  these having retained their
positions throughout the year:  President-Floris Clark.  Secretary-Frances
Hillary  Treasurer 'and Reporter--Norah Matson  The aims of the club have
been to stimulate interest in this northern  territory, and incidentally to
give the members a good time socially. We hope  our fellow students and
faculty members have pardoned us for the times we  have lauded the merits
of this land until our hearers wished that such a  country had never
existed. May we now th'ank them for their courteous  attention? So much of
erroneous material is seen concerning Alaska that we  have labored
diligently to correct false impressions.  The first social event of the
year was the banquet held at the Hotel  Leopold on the Saturday preceding
Hallowe'en. The table was tastefully  One Hundred Ninety-Five

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 196

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decorated in colors of the season, handmade place cards adding the artistic
 finish. President and Mrs. Waldo were honor guests on this occasion. In 
the second quarter a party was held at the home of Mrs. Berkeley, which was
 enjoyed by a large number of the members. The third quarter brought an 
evening at  Mr. Kolstad's cabin on Lake Whatcom. Good timne? Why, of 
course, always when we go there!  Both faculty members and students are
included in the membership as  mlay lbe seen by the following list, the 
"real Alaskans" have been listed first:  Mrs. Adele L. Bunting, Skagway. 
Floris M. Clark, Skagway. Imogene Benedict, Sitka  Norah Mattson, Douglas. 
Mary Monagle, Juneau, Anchorage, H]ope.  Marie Etta Marsden, Ketchikan. 
Mary Visoja, Douglas.  Lil lian Lacey, Hunter Bay.  Lillian G. Kennedy,
Ketchikan.  Frances Hilleary, Fairbanks.  Ralph Miller, Petersburg. 
Blanche Fulton, Nellie Juan.  Olive Wolfe, Sitka.  Blanche Cloetta, Juneau.
 Mir. and Mrs. John Dindall, Circle City.  Lillian Manberg, Douglas,
Dawson, Juneau.  Ruth F. Pedersen, Douglas, Seward, Skagway.  Mercy G.
Bromley, Hyder. Mrs. Catherine K. Roberts, Fairbanks.  Sam Ford, Juneau. 
Roy Swenson, Juneau.  Marvin Kleve, Juneau.  John Fuller, Lower Yukon. 
George Stephens, Bering Sea.  Other members who have not been residents: 
(Honorary Members)  Mrs. and Mrs. Shiels,  Miss M. Belle Sperry.  Mss Marie
C. Druse. Miss Catherine Montgomery.  Miss Exean Woodard  Miss Gertrude
Longley.  Warner W. Thomas. Thomas Frank.  Miss Norah B. Cummins.  Arthur
Kolstad.  Miss Mabel Z. Wilson.  Miss Irene Lopp.  One  Hundred Ninety-Six

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 197

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HOME ECONOMICS CLUB  Someone asked me wl:at we girls of the Home Economics
department  did to fill ulpi all our time down there, insinuating, I
suppose, that we had so  much spare time that we wrote our lesson plans
during Dietetics, and our  letters during Pattern Drafting. I wish scme of
those people could have seen  us "down there" this past year.  The machines
were kept humming by the girls in the sewing classes  from eight until
almost five every dlay. The result was, with the untiring  ,and inspiring
help of Miss Longley, some of those good-looking dresses and  skirts you
saw and admired in the halls. The girls of the cooking class must  have
believed the adage, "The way to a man's heart is through his stomach,"  for
the luncheons they l:repared and served would have tempted and satisfied 
any man- tempted him by their daintiness and satisfied him by their correct
 calorie content.  One 1Hundred Ninety- Seven  ____IU~~_

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 198

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If anyone thought we had time to write lesson plans during Dietetics,  I.
wish he could have seen us chasing those elusive enzymes, under the
di-rection  of Miss Countryman, and measuring hundred calorie  portions
and-but  I mustn't give away all our secrets. Just take the course and see
for  yourself how fascinating it is-and how much time you have to waste! 
"From point B draw a line AC locating point M by- " The hour never  seemed
long enough in Pattern Drafting to accomplish all we planned to do.  The
paper blouses and dresses were even better than the patterns we could  buy
because, you see, we discovered we were not all perfect, and those
pat-terns  fitted us where we weren't, as well as where we were. How much
more  confident we felt this spring in selecting the materials for our
spring dresses, ,  after our courses in Textiles! All those hours seemed
repaid in a moment.  As we look ahead and plan our homes, what a blessing
our course in House-hold  Management is to us. We've learned how to make
dollars stretch and 1  expand by proper distribution; we've learned how to
make those future homes  attractive, economical, and sanitary.  After all
this, you shouldn't need further proof that we were busy  "down there," 
but here is the crowning proof: We didn't have time for one  party in
either the fall or winter quarter. The wonderful spring weather  proved too
much for us, however, and we decided to have a party on Friday,  the  13th.
\What clay could be more auspicious! Of course, we had a good  time-we
always do. The party proved so much fun, we planned a picnic,  which we had
later in the spring. The food? Just 'ask anyone who was there  if the girls
of the Home Economics department can cook!  I *s  Frst- Wee/( 4t NrMA4L One
Hundred Ninety-Eight

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W. A. A.  OFFICERS  BERNICE JUDSON .....
---------------.......................-..-.-
-----------..-..-..-.-..-..-..-..-.-. -  President  EMMA COFFMAN ..........
....... ................. ................ Vice Presidcllt  MRS. JESSIE
CARVER ....................................... Secretary-Treasurer  PEARL
WHITMORE -------------------------------------
----A...s..s..i.s..t.a...n--t-
-S-e--c-.r.e...t.a..r..y...........--------------...  The Women's Athletic
Association was organized in September, 1922.  Its purpose is to promote
high physical efficiency among women of the Normal  School, to foster
college spirit by developing inter-class athletics, to provide  recognition
for athletic ability, and to foster good citizenship.  Membership is open
to all under-graduate women in the school who have  obtained at least a "C"
grade in all classes and have earned the required one  hundred points.
These points may be earned under four different heads:  Sports, health,
general, and athletics. A definite number of points must be  earned each
quarter in order to retain membership in the association and to  keep up
the interest.  It is hoped that girls going out into their own schools will
organize  girls' athletic associations in high schools and the upper
grades, having in  view the same ideals and purposes as our own association
with slight varia-tions  in the constitutions to suit the needs of the
girls in the community.  The association plans to put on at least one good
show each year. The  first of these was given last February. The main
feature was a minstrel  show, with three lesser numbers. Judging from the
size of the crowd and  the remarks heard the following week, the show was a
huge success.  The Association has enjoyed many good times and since the
fine weather  began, long hikes with lunch in the  open. Several hikes were
taken during  the fall, one of these was a hike to Lake Padden followed by
a breakfast of  ham, eggs, fruit, and coffee, then a hike back in time for
church.  The Association is as yet in its infancy with a membership of
about  thirty. It has already many extensive plans for the future and
entertains  hopes of becoming one of the foremost clubs of the school. 
Three cheers for Miss Long, our organizer and sponsor! No club ever  had a
more worthy or helpful leader than she has proved herself to be at all 
times. She holds a very warm place in the heart of every W. A. A. girl. 
One Hundred Ninety-Nine

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A I  THE "W" CLUB  OFFICERS  T'I:OMAS FRANK
--------..................................... ......P. resident  AR IE
THOMAS ....................--.--.---.--.-- ------............------------
Vice President  WILLIAM RUE ................--.--
.--.--.-.--.--.--.--..................
.S..e.c.r.e.ta..r.y---T-r-e-a-s-u-r-e-r------------------------  The "W"
Club of the Bellingham State Normal School was organized by  eighteen
enthusiastic and forward-looking young men  who had received  letters for
their athletic achievements during the previous months of the  school year.
This club is sponsored by Mr. Carver, our athletic director and  coach.  To
become a member of this club,  it is neessary for the men engaged in 
athletics to gain a letter in one of the following competitive sports:
Football,  track, basketball, and baseball.  The purpose of the Club is to
develop a higher standard of athletics and  to increase the academic
efficiency of the athlete. Mr. Carver and those young  men who have, during
the past year, attained high standards in athletics, and  who are
interested in the continuation of these standards, have felt it advisable 
and necessary to organize a club wherein they could work with these ideas. 
This organization will do much to attract that type of men who are most
desirable in the carrying out of the educational work of our land. No doubt
 it will also help to popularize (our school and make it one among the
leading  Teachers' Colleges of America.  Two Hundred

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-- li~i~'a FB  NEWMAN CLUB  M r . T. NI ...........................  Miss
REGINA FRANK ...................... MIss CECELIA KNAPSTEIN ........  ANNA
MURA..................  BERNADETTE COOPER ......................  LouISE
YOUNG ... ...........  AIEINE LA

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 202

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As a club, we have experienced a great many successful social events. 
Among the most prominent was the banquet which welcomed our president, 
Mir. D). B. Waldo to our institution. We were fortunate in having at that 
banquet a few notable guests, among whom were Dr. G. W\. Nash, our former 
president; Commander and Chaplin Broadman, of the U. S. S. New York; 
Lieutenant Commander Dwyer of the Australian Navy, and Reverend Fr. 
Barrett, .pastor of the Assumption Church, Bellingham.  The club looks
forward every year to the entertaining of the St. Martin's  boys who
compete with our teams in various forms of athletics. A banquet  was given
in honor of both the basketball teams at the Pheasant. We may  also mention
the Hallowe'en Dancing Party, the supper at Fairhaven Park,  and several
hikes which can be added to our social calendar.  So far, only the pleasant
side has come to view, but we, as members of q  the Newman Club (this may
well apply to our whole school) have keenly felt  the loss through the
death of our honorary member, Mr. J. V. Coughlin, who  took such a great
interest in our club and its activities.  Many plans are being made for the
coming months, among which are  week-end parties, hikes, beach suppers and
the like.  Everyone of us greatly appreciates the privilege of being
brought closer  together in such a social way.  ANNA MURA, President  -0- 
l'wo Hundred Two

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LEOWYRHTA CLUB  The Leowyrhta Club has been brought to its present status
since the first  of this year. As sometimes happens at Normal, no old
members had returned  at the beginning of the year to take up the club
activities. From the Story  Telling class came a few girls who formed the
new Story Telling Club. The  club thrived and grew; a new name "Leowyrhta"
was given to it; and a new  constitution was adopted.  Under the
sponsorship of Miss Sperry, Miss Montgomery and Miss Ja-cobs,  who
conscientiously directed the club movements, the society has become 
recognized as a prominent organization of the Normal.  The aim of our club,
which is primarily to tell stories, has been well car-ried out in this
year's work. Talented members have been sent to neighboring  juvenile
libraries, to P. T. A. meetings, school functions and similar places  -much
to the delight of the various audiences. At times the  club extension 
department has shown near-panics by the many calls coming in for the
de-lightful entertainers.  The club meetings were made especially
interesting to the members by  programs comprised of types of stories and
given by different groups. Music  and dancing were included in some of the
programs.  It is very obvious that the Leowyrhta will prosper and develope
as it has  in the past year and for this we shall also have to thank our
club officers who  are:  M RS. CARL IRISII ..................----------
---.---.---.---.--.--...-. .-.-.-P.-r.-e.-s.-id.-.-e.n-.-t. ............. 
Mss MARGRY DowNES ................---------V-i-ce.
.P.r.e.s.i.d.e-n-t-------------.  MISS MARGERY cCLOU
............................S.e.c.r.e.ta.r.y.........................-
----------------------------  MIss EMMA COUGHMAN ....
---------------------T--re-a--su-r.e.r............................  Two 
Hundred Three

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page [204]

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1i;  Y -"  r;  sa  w,"  Z t3 sq r  i. 10

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 205

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EDENS HALL  A large house full of girls, I88 girls, living together busily,
happily, and  harmoniously; this is Edens Hall. When we first arrived and
were conducted  up the stairs, and down the corrido'rs to a room with two
"vanishing" beds, we  were rather meek and quiet, but by the end of the
first week we were less quiet, and 'at the end of the second we were
sufficiently acquainted to have  crowds gathering in one room  or in the
Lobby, and here they still gather. It  is to be feared that there is too
much noise at times ncw, but who can live  without having a hilarious time
occasionally?  There have been many social affairs in the hall, among them
the Hal-lowe'en  party with confetti "'n everything." Perhaps the most be
:utiful  party was the colonial costume 1party, when the birthdays of three
famous  people were-George Washington's, Miss Meek's, and Miss Shuey's. W\V
 are looking forward to a boat trip dlown Lake Whatcom just I:efore the end
 of the quarter, and we will also enjoy many more hikes.  Many lasting
friendships have been made, and many characters have been  broadened by
life in Edens Hall.  OFFICERS  FALL QUARTER MYRA H EY COCK --. ....
....P.r..e.s.i det  MAY PHINNEY -...........-....-...... ... . ...........
Vice President EVELYN MYERS .......... ...S.e cretary-Treasurer  H ELEN
ARMSTRONG .......... -------......................... ....F..i re Captain 
KATHERINE SMITH .........-----...---------............. Messen.ger Reporter
 WINTER QUARTER  MAY PHINNEY ................. ................. .......
Presiden t  LAPEARL MOORE V.i.c..e.. ..P...r..e..s..i..d...e..n..t.....V 
'I[ABEL HICKSON .. - -cr............................... . Secretary-T
reasurer ETHEL MOORE ----- . -.............................. ...........
Fire Captain  MARGARET WARD .. .. ........................ ..... M
Jessenger Reporter  SPRING QUARTER  NELLIET McKINNEY ..-.-.-
.................. ........ ..... President  RPBECCA ARNI LL ....
.......................... ..... Fice President  Los TIM  MEN --.-....-
---------------.-------------- Secretary-Treasurer  ELMA GRAHAM
...................... .......... ... _ Fire  Captaiz  ALICE BANBURY
........................................ iMessenger Reporter  Two Hundred
Five

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 206

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1  ALETH EIA  FIRST QUARTER OFFICERS  EDNA CARNINE ........--..-..-.. ..
............................... President  GLADYS HUGHES
..............-.-..-.-.-.-..-.-.-. ............. Vice-President  CCECLIA
HUNTINGTON  ........................................... Secretary  BLANCHE
HJERTOOS ..-------- ...............................T..r.e.a.s.u. rer 
SECOND QUARTER OFFICERS  SIGNE MARIE FLINN .. ........................ ..
President  VERGIE CLARK .......-......................--..... ....
Vice-President  ALICE BANBURY ............................................
........... Secretary  ELIZABETH ISAACS ......... ---------------------
------------.............................------- Treasurer  THIRD QUARTER
OFFICERS  CECELIA HUNTINGTON ........ ................. .............. Pre
sident  REBECCA ARNELL ...................................................
ice- President  MARTHA AVEN
............-------------------------------..-..-...-.-.-.--.-.-.-.-....
S.e.c.r.e.t.a.r.  IRENE GEROW ...............
............................... Treasurer  Two Hundred Six

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 207

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The room was dimly lighted. Shadows of witches and ghosts flitted  across
the indistinct walls. An atmosphere of mysterious exaltation was  created
by those who had just survived the preternatural secrecies of the
ini-tiation.  Suddenly the room became lighted, changing it into the golden
glow  of Hallowe'en merriment. The president, Edna Carnine, gave her
address  welcoming the new Aletheian members-and cur activities for the
year had  begun.  Silently the wisdom of our old, old owl has led us, step
by step, into the  realms of lofty ideals and high ambitions. Aletheia has
always stood for all  that is great in every art, and our sympathy and
appreciation extends to  every corner of the globe. Many of the programs
have consisted of the thor-  . ough study of some vital problems
confronting America today, such as the  Negro problem, by Gladys Sturman;
America's Stand on World Peace, by  Agnes Miles; and Americanization, by
Rebecca Arnell. Other countries have  been included on our programs, such
as the Political Situation in Ireland, by  Vivienne Croxfo'rd; Armenia's
Political History, by Betty Lyman; Mussoline,  the Leader of the Fascisti,
by Emma Larson ; Miss Longley's talk on Hawaii,  and the Problem of the
Turks, by Sylvia Barret. The arts have not been  neglected. Programs have
included a study of Opera, Turkish Rugs, and  the Little Theatre Movement.
The observations of the constellations on   clear nights has been another
fascinating study.  One of the biggest events of the club this year was the
 annual banquet  held February 24, at the Leopold Hotel. The floral
decorations of pink and  white tulips hamonized beautifully with the rose
and gray motif of the table.  Sparkling wit and humor predominated, as each
merry toast was given. The  - extreme simplicity and sincerity of Miss
Woodard's address on the Function  of Woman's Clubs, will linger long in
the memories of those present. Aletheia  wishes to express her deep
gratitude for the patient and endless devotion Miss  Woodard has shown to
the club. Aletheia has the honor of having in her midst many of the
Normal's  prominent women. The club is proud to claim Rebecca ,Arnell as
one of its  members. Both the club and the school are very much indebted to
her for  the important part she played in winning for us the
never-to-be-lost Allison  cup. She is also a member of the Board of
Control, and vice-president of the  Y. W. C. A.  Two other members of
Aletheia have served as presidents of the Y. W.  C. A. this year-Vivienne
Croxford and Ruth Pederson. Mention should  be made of the play that
Margaret Risser wrote for us during Good English  week. The play was very
successfully presented in the auditorium, and did  much for the promotion
of good English. Mildred Stout, of the debate team,  is another faithful,
loyal Aletheian. That the members of Aletheia are versa-tile  in their
talents is shown by the fact that Edith Parks carried off the prize  for
the Klipsun cover design. Aletheia as a whole will ever cherish, not only
now, but in years to come,  the thoughtfulness of Magdalene Larsen in
presenting to the club, the Aleth-eian  Owl, our symbol of Life, Purity and
Truth. Two Hundred Seven

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 208

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I  OHIYESA  OFFICERS  First Quarter:  JANICE BROOKS
............................................................................-.-.-.-.-.-..-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
--P--r--e--s--i dent  AILEEN JOHNSON ..
---------------------.....................-------------........................--
Vice-President  AGATHA Fo E ..---
---------......................--.-.-.-.-.... ... .....
..................---S-- ec...r..e...t.a.. ry  EDITH SMITH ..........
------ - --- ------.................---------.... Reporter  Second Quarter:
 IMPIE SAARI--..- - ----..-.-..-.-. ...................................
-----.....P...r...e..s...i dent  FLORIS CLARK ... .............
............. ..................----
----V--i-c--e-----P--r--e--s--i-d--e--n--t-------  EDITH SMITH ..
-----------......----------------------------------. Secretary DOROTHY
JONES
.................................................................--------------------------------------...----
Reporter   Third Quarter:  AGATHA FOLEY
-------------------------------...................................-------
-----P...r..e sident BLANCHE PENNICK
...........................................................
V------P--r--e--s-i-d--e--n--t--------------ice .REBA M1IDDLESTAKE
......--------------...................-------------............ ----
------- Secretary  EDITH BURTON
........................-----------...........--------------------.
Reporter  OPAL ARMSTRONG .............................
------......-------------..S...a...r..g...e. ant-at-Arms  DOROTHY W ARD
......... -----------..-.- .-..... .................
..........---------C---h--o--r--i-s--t-e--r........  -0-  Two Hundred
Eight

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 209

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OHIYESAS.  In the moon, when all things, lyausing  Turn for one last look
at sulmmer,  When the smoke from burning forests  Veils in blue the hills
and ocean,  To the Great Lodge by the water  Came a little band of maidens 
Of the tribe of Ohiyesa.  Far away their 1paths had led them  Through the
long hot days  of summer,  But the ties had not been severed  Which had
bound their hearts together.  Scarcely were their greetings finished  When
they met in solemn council,  In the lodge of their wise leader,  Sponser
from the tribe of Wallace.  Long they sat in talk together,  For a new
chief must be chosen,  And new members must be welcomed  With all rites and
ceremonies.  Each must prove both brave and loyal  E'er she wore the
eagle's feather,  E'er she could be called "The Winner."  Many times the
maids assembled,  In the cold, still nights of winter;  Miany councils held
together,  Gaining every night new knowledge, Strengthening bonds of love
and friendship.  Many things they. learned together  Of the lands across
the ocean,  Of strange languages and peoples,  And the records they had
written.  Now were added to their number  Two called Honorary Members, 
Helpful friends and kindly critics,  One from out the tribe of Osborne  One
from out the tribe of Roberts,  And the evenings round the campfire  Were
the brighter for their presence.  Two Hundred Nine  I -

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When the moon of lighted candles  Stcle across the snowy campus,  All the
maidens, happy-hearted Gathered 'round a shining fir-tree.  On whose
tinsel-laden branches  Found they gifts for one another.  And  each
tssue-covered package  Caused a merrier peal of laughter.  Later, when the
pussy willows  Showed  their silver tips on Sehome,  Once again the maidens
gathered,  This time 'neath the Osborne totem, Where with gayety and
laughter  Passed another happy evening.  Green were leaf-buds on the
hillside When to all the elder members  Were sent summons to a council, 
The Grand Council, held each twelve moons.  Some of them obeyed the
summons,  Others messages of greeting  Sent, to show they still were loyal,
 Show their hearts were ever faithful,  And around the council embers  One
by one they were remembered,  While the singers made sweet music  And the
wise ones told last glories  Of the tribe, and future triumphs.  Each one
felt a strain of sadness  At the thought of bonds soon broken,  At the
thought of friends departing,  But the long trail of the future  Shows the
lodge each year grown stronger,  Shows unsevered ties of friendship;  And
each year shall bind more closely  In the pledge, "Be Brave, be loyal," All
who wear the eagles' feather.  All the tribe of Ohiyesa.  Two HIundred Ten 
I

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BUSINESS GIRLS' LEAGUE  The Business Girls' League was organized by Miss
Exean Woodard,  Dean  of Women, in 1916. The League has no officers and no
dues. It is  merely a group of young women employed in some form of
remunerative  labor who meet in open forum from time to time and discuss
problems of  mutual interest.  At one of the most successful mee'tings of
the current year, the Business Girl's budget was discussed as follows:  How
should a Business Girl in B. S. N. S. invest her spending money,  spring
quarter :  a. If she has only $25.00 (above room and board).  b. If she has
only $50.oo.  c. If she has less than $25.00.  The topic of another
interesting program was "How shall a Business  Girl invest her 24 hours per
day ?"  Two H-lundred Eleven

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This ambitious group of young women turns to varied and interesting  forms
of employment in order to help defray expenses. At the present writ-ing, 
the following is an approximate estimate of the number employed at some 
time in each division:  Swimming Teacher ....................... I 
Cateress .... .................... ..... .I................  Nurse
............ ......................... I  Night Secretaries
................2......................  Janitors Assts. ..........
................ . ... ..  M usic Teachers ....
2........................................Dancing Teachers
...................... 2....  Theater U sherers .... ............ ........ 
...5............  Stenographers ...................... ....6
...............  Library A ssts. ................. ...... .... ...---.---
.7.......  Assts. in Cafeteria ... ... ..........2.3 ....  Dining Room
Girls, Edens Hall .....9.....  C olledtors .....................
.........4....... ............  O ccasional H elpers
..............6.o.........................  School U sherers ..........
....... . ......7.................7  Student H elpers
...........................I...o. .2.....  Clerks
........................................ -----47  Naturally, the members of
the Business Girls' League lead, very busy  lives. Holding down two jobs at
once requires an accurate time .budget as  well as expense budget,
therefore, one of the chief problems of the League *  is to, provide
opportunities for 'the cultivation of friendships and the promotion  of
wholesome recreation.  For five years the annual League Banquet has
outranked all other stu-dent  banquets in point of numbers. The fifth
annual banquet was held March  24th in the Home Economics Dining Room with
70 Leaguers in attendance.  Ellen Gustafson, one of the members, acting as
cateress, displayed remarkable  skill in the art of cookery.  Miss
Catherine Smith, as  chairman of the decorating committee, carried  out the
Easter motif in place cards, table decorations and  window draperies.  The
color scheme of yellow and white, and an interesting centerpiece
repre-senting  a  large easter egg, drawn by fluffy yellow chicks, added
much to the  pleasure of the occasion.  The name of the native state being
given in response to roll call, the  interesting fact was discovered that
the business girls represent many states  of the union, sa well as foreign
countries. From as far south as Maryland  and Tennessee; as far east as
Michigan and Ohio; from the plains of Minne-sota  and the Dakotas, from
California, Canada and Alaska they come. Two  from Sweden, two from Norway,
three from  Canada, two from England and  five from Alaska, the Business
Girls have come to the Northwest either to  make their homes or to receive
training for the profession of teaching.  Two Hundred Twelve

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During the course of the evening the following program was rendered:  Music
.......... ------------------------------ ---.............................
Business Girls' Trio  Zetta Squire, Cello; Cora May Squire, Violin;
Gertrude Egbert,  Piano.  Original Poems
...............................-.-.-..-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.--------..-..-.....
--- Adaline LaRouche  Club Songs  Symposiarch, Exean Woodard  A Snapper-up
of Unconsidered Trifles .............................. ..........
Shakespeare  Anna Mura  She Looketh W ell to the W ays of H er H ousehold
..................................................... Bible  Thelma Dock 
Music Hath Charms to Soothe the Savage Beast
................................................ Conreve  Emma Coffman  The
Turnpike-road to People's Hearts, I Find -.....
--..................D....r.... .W....o lcott  Marjorie Downes  A ll the W
orld's a Stage ............... ----.-.-....... ........ .......
............... ..... Shakespeare  Ruth Wallbom  Lydia, a Seller of Purple
.....................--------.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-
--------.............. .......... Bible  Cecelia Huntington  A Good Book Is
the Best of Friends, the Same Today and Forever ...... Tupper  Helen
Hightower  A V ery Present H elp in T im e of T rouble
...........................................................................
Bible  Florence Bechtel From time to time during the banquet, the guests
joined in singing the  chorus that has expresed the fine spirit of the
Business Girls' League for the  past five years:  Business Girls! Business
Girls!  Bound to win  out are the Business Girls,  Business Girls !
Business Girls!  Overcomers are the Business Girls.  -0-  A SONG OF LIFE 
At dawning, when the sun blinks through the doorway  And nestles in the
corners of your  room  You feel a sense of thrill-a note of laughter  That
banishes all thought of care and gloom.  You hear  a robin on your
window-ledge a-chirping,  ,A child's glad echo wafted up from streets
below,  A silver maple blowing in the wind-hush,  And waters made with
waves of crested snow.  In every nook, Dame Nature heralds gladness,  While
glints of sunshine conquer weary strife,  Until 'we learn to weave our
dreams of efforts,  And make a smile our daily song of Life.  -ADALINE LA
ROUCHE.  Two Hundred Thirteen

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I I  YOUNG HOUSEKEEPERS  The first group of Young Housekeepcrs of the
Bellingham State Normal School were called together in 1916 by Miss
VWoodard, Dean of Women.  This group is largely made up of young women who
live so near Bellingham  that they are enabled to spend many week ends in
their own homes. Realizing.  that lbecause of this, these students missed
many of the social functions and other activities of school life, Miss
\Voodard gathered this group together  to promote friendship and
sociability, to discuss problems peculiar to the  group, and, in general,
to strengthen the bond between the school and this  relatively large group
of the student body: Of necessity, the meetings  cannot be frequent, but
they are marked with earnestness and keen interest.  Two Hundred Fourteen

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At the beginning of the year, at one program the topic discussed in open 
forum was "-ow to Secure a Well Balanced Meal" emphasizing the value of 
variety in foods, and naming simple, wholesome dishes that provide the 
necessary elements. Each little "family" was provided with a chart setting 
forth: Ist, the proper selection of foods; 2nd, the amount of calories
required;  3rd, a comprehensive list of foods with caloric values, and the
relative expense.  The great event of the year was the mid-winter picnic to
which each of  the 75 Young Housekeepers responded to roll call by giving
the name of her  birthplace. The following program was rendered:  The Story
of Ten Little Fairies .................................... Emmalise Sanford
 Rumplestiltskin ......... ..................................... Ruth Reef 
Concert Paraphrase of "Cld Black Joe" ................ ............. Chas.
Gimbel  To the Rising Sun ................... .......... ......... Trygve
Torjusson   By Lenore Henspeter  To a Wild Rose ...................
............................ ...... .. MacDowell  Cello and piano by Zetta
Squire and Lenore Henspeter  A number of Young Housekeepers have been
prominent in school ac-tivities  during the year. Edna Anderson, a member
of the Girls' Quartette,  Zetta Squire, cellist,  and Rosa Addington,
reader, have furnished entertain-ment  to many civic organizations in this
jity and elsewhere. Edith Parks,  another Young Housekeetper, won the
Klipsun prize for the best cover design. Mildred Anderson and Christina
Peterson helped to make this a banner year  in (lelbate for the B. S. N. S.
  Two lm11111red Fifteen

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I I  THE ALKISIAHS  The following paragraph is an extract from the first
Messenger ever  published (1899)  on file in the library:  "A telephone
conversation between two Normal students:  " 'Main 161, please.'  " 'Hello,
Edith-So you want to know about our Literary So-ciety,  the Alcott? Of
course, I will tell you the officers-Miss  Carrie Risedorph, president;
Miss Marie Ames, vice-president; Miss  Bertha Kale, secretary; Miss Mamie
Barr, treasurer."  " 'What did you say?' "  " 'Yes, our society is sure to
have its place in the front ranks  of the Whatcom Normal School.' "  The
club has changed its name since that far away time, as has the school,  but
the aims of the Alcott continue in the Alkisiah Club.  Two Hundred Sixteen

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Practice in public speaking, opportunity to keep in touch with public 
events, and experience in altruistic club work are offered all our members.
 Due to the faithfulness of our efficient officers, and especially to the 
loving service of our sponsor, Miss Moffat, who gave so willingly of her 
time and assistance, we have enjoyed a most profitable year.  At one of our
most interesting meetings, Miss Alice Longley, who teaches classes of the
foreign born, spoke to us upon "What is Being Done to  Eradicate Illiteracy
in Bellingham." This is one of the topics being taken  up by the Federation
of Women's Clubs this year. The study of this subject  wil lbe of service
to those who participated in it, when they meet the problem  in their own
communities and schools.  Some of our programs have been devoted to the
lives and works of well-known poets. One enjoyable program dealt with
prominent persons in  present-day affairs. Musical selections and readings
have lent variety to many  of our meetings.  The club, in connection with
the Home Economics department, sponsored  the Home Products Week in the
cafeteria.  The sale of Christmas seals in the Normal was carried on by the
Alki-siahs  as a part of their Federation work.  Some  improvement each
quarter has been made in the Alkisiah room at  the infirmary.  Our chief
undertaking this year has been the beginning of a fund for  building the
Alkisiah lodge at Normalstad. Varied are the ways in which the  fund has
grown. The sale of sandwiches, ice cream bars, and popcorn balls  during
recreation hour, at basketball games, and at Edens Hall on Saturday 
mornings has proved profitable and popular.  That the social side has not
been neglected, those who attended the de-lightful  Thanksgiving meeting at
the home of Mrs. Van De Wetering, and  the pleasant evenings at the homes
of Miss Moffatt, Miss Forest, and Evelyn  Moussou, will bear witness.  The
initiation, which took place in the first quarter, was a hilarious affair, 
enjoyed by even the victims. Much latent talent for impromptu speaking was
discovered among the members.  Our annual banquet held at the Leopold Hotel
on February 27, was un- usually  successful. The decorations and favors
carried out the club colors of  purple and gold in a pleasing fashion. Many
former members from a distance  were with us, and their account of other
days of work and frolic, was one of  the features of the program. Our
faculty members by their presence and words of encouragement, helped to
make it a memorable occasion.  MIss EDITH SWICK ..............-....----
-------------------------- President  MYRTLE ROSENQUIST -------
-----.-..-..------ ---------------- Vice-President  Lois  TIMMEN
..---......--.-.-.--.-.-.-.--.-.-....-.-... ----------- Secretary  BETTY
YoST ... ------ ----------------.............-----
---..........------------..... Treasurer  ETTA PITTMAN
........-.--.--.-.--.--.--.--.-.--.--.--.--.-.--.--.--. ..----- H ostess
Two Hundred Seventeen

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Two Hundred Eighteen

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Two Hundred Nineteen

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MISS LULU BETT  A Prize Play by Zona Gale.  The play under. study by the
Dramatic club and which is to be given at  the annual June commencement is
"Miss Lulu Bett" by Miss Zona Gale.  The artificiality of  the stage has
become such a fixed institution that to  attempt reality and so depict life
genuinely is a daring and clever thing to do.  It is for this that Miss
Gale was awarded the Pulitzer Prize by Columbia Uni-versity.  The
popularity of the play and the enormous sale of the book attest  its value.
 What Sinclair Lewis in "Main Street" did for the American small town, 
Zona Gale has done in this play for the humdrum  American family. It is as 
if the merciless camer!a snapped life at its unposed moments and we see
before  us a typical suburban hiome living its every day life just as you
and I see it  about us daily. Dwight Herbert Deacon, the elf-acclaimed
maintainer of the home, is a  man made in his own image. His suave remarks
land banality get him no-where  save in his own estimation and in that of
his ever fawning, aping, and  inefficient wife, Ina Deacon.  The stage has
always pictured children as lovable little darlings, and we  gasp as Monona
Deacon, the youngest offspring of this pair, in deliberate plot-tings  and
petulency establishes her reputation, "the world's most disagreeable  stage
child."  The strange part is we  gasp but once, then embrace, then love,
this  spiteful, nosey little chit. Why? Are we too of this family? Possibly
we  are beginning to read beyond mere words and to see her play as Miss
Gale  would have us see, it.  To complete the trio, we have Grandma Bett,
equally keen of wit as of  tongue, who sees even further than we do into
the heart of this high priest  of egotism, Dwight Deacon.  In the midst of
this Miss Lulu Betts slaves-awiakes-moves on.  The play is styled a comedy
of manners. Tears are closely akin to laughter and Miss Gale in one master
stroke succeeds in creating a unique  realism permeated with tenderness and
sympathy.  The cast of the play gas it will be presented in the Normal
auditorium May 29, 1923, is as follows:  MISS MIRIAM SHERMAN
....................---............ ...M..o nona Deacon DEWEY BOWMAN
........................................ Dwight Herbert Deacon  ADDA
WILSON...................-----  --... ...I.n.a . Deacon  KATHERINE SCHUPP
.............. ................... ..... LuIl Betts  OLIVER NELSON -- --
-------------------.....................B...o...b...b..y... ...L arkin 
SLOANE SQUIRE - - Mrs. Bettt.......................................... 
JESSIE BERYL WILSON ................................... Diana Deacon  H
ORACE W ALKER. ............-..................... . .--.-.-..-..-.-..-.
-.-.-N.- -ei-l- -C-o rnish  ANGUS BOWMER ...............
................................ ... Ninian Deacon  Two Hundred Twenty

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Two Hundred Twenty-One  I

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CLEF CLUB  OFFICERS  DAGMAR CHRISTY
.....................................-----------...... President  MIARY
PASSAGE .......-----......----......----- ..... Vice-President  DOROTHY
ROBERTSON ........................... ........... Business Manager  DOROTHY
SCHAFER ..........................S..e.c.r.e.t.a.r..y. a..n.d. .T..r.e.a..s
urer  EDNA ANDERSON ........................... ............... ----
Librarian  MIss 3ELTON ................................................
Director  MEMBERS  Dorothy Robertson  Maybelle Jackson  Edna Lindstrum 
Verna Norell  Viola West  Irene Stewart  Alice Kaufman  Ruth Magner  Louise
Lonsdale  Mary Passage  Vivian Johnson  Irene Alexander  Dorothy Schafer 
Mrs. Whipple  Edna Anderson  Ozona Ordway  Dagmar Christy  Dorothy Miller 
Marian Eager  Catherine Meyers  Elizabeth O'Neill.  The Clef Club consists
of twenty-four selected voices. The club has  favored the students in
various assembly programs, and has given several  numbers at Commencement
exercises, all of which were greatly enjoyed.  The club also gave an
evening's entertainment over the radiophone. The  Spring Opera, a
delightful evening of music, concluded the work for the  year. With the
able assistance of Miss Belton, the  Clef Club is successfully  carrying
out its aim of setting a higher standard for music in our school.  Two
Hundred Twenty-Two

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QUARTETTE  M ARION EAGER ..............................-------.........
First Soprano  ALICE KAUFMAN ...................-.-..-..-.
...........-----------------------.......------- Second Soprano  EDNA
ANDERSON .... ----------- ......................-------------------------.
First Alto  DAGMAR CHRISTY ...--------------....-..-........ ......
----------------- ----.-..-..- Second Alto  The quartette has been the
leading factor in the Music Department this  year. I't is in such demand
that many requests have to be denied. The girls  have entertained the
students on many occasions and have done a great deal  of entertaining for
different organizations. At the present time they have six  programs on the
extension list, where they will be assisted by individual  members of the
department.  Two 11undred Twenty-Three

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A  BOYS' QUARTETTE  For the first time in several years we have a Boys'
Quartette. Mr.  Raymond, a local teacher, made a call and the response was
splendid. How  little we realized that the shouting quarterback on the
football team and the  rooters on the side lines could put their vocal
cords to another, and more  euphonious use. We are expecting something very
good in the near future  from this group. In fact, we are assured of this
with Mr. Raymond in charge.  Two Hundred Twenty-Four

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NORMAL ORCHESTRA  MR. WILLIAMS ................ .................. .....
......... Director  FIRST VIOLINS Arthur Thal  Marion Westerla nd  Al'ta
Keough  Frances Brown  Feda Schultz  SECOND VIOLINS  Marie LaCompte  Madge
MacIsaac  CELLO  Zetta Squire  Eleanor Whisner  FLUTE-P'ICOLLO  Carroll
Haeske CLARINET  Walter Romersa  PIANO  Bernice Judson  This year, under
the direction of Mr. Williams, the Normal School Or-chestra  has made an
enviable name for itself. The entertainments g:iven by  the orchestra were
not confined to assemblies, but extended as far as the  Rotary Club,
Teachers' Institute, Radiophone, and the two high schools. The  Orchestra
has mastered some very difficult numbers, as well as the lighter  popular
kind.  We owe a great deal to Mr. Williams, whose service in the Music De-
partment  of the school cannot be given too much praise.  CHORAL CLUB. 
With the opening of school this fall the reorganization of the Choral  Club
found a membership of nearly a hundred mixed voices. The club meets  once a
week and is working up a big production to be given sometime in the  next
quarter. This club is also under the directorship of Miss Belton, who is  a
great inspiration to the workers.  Two Hundred Twenty-Five

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DAILY MESSENGER  Formerly the Weekly Messenger  VL. 46, No. 167 Bellingham
State Normal School, February 23, 1946 PRICE ONE CENT  DR. SAM S. FORD, OF
ALASKA FUNDS APPROPRIATED FOR  HERO!  Word has been re-ceived  here by
friends  that S. S. Ford, Litt. D., Ph.D., Y. W. C. A.,  graduate of the
Teachers'  College at Bellingham,  and Unique Professor of Metaphysics and
Higher  Electricity in all Alaska,  has saved the life of  Uug Klopj, a
native of  Gluugav. The details to be in-ferred  are that Dr. Ford  and Uug
Klopj were  walking along a trestle.  Uug Klopj fell through  into the
water below.  Dr. Ford plunged into the  tide to save the lad. The  waves
produced by Dr.  Ford's violent contact  with the water washed  Uug Klopj
inshore a dis-tance  of three hundred  feet, to a point nine feet  above
the ordinary level  of the river. Cognizant  of Dr. Ford's heroism,  the
authorities of the  Teachers' College at  Bellingham will confer  upon him
the degree of  Bachelor of Arts.  The letter also told of  Dr. Ford's
reading a dis-sertation  before a Spoof-um  Society entitled "The  Ethical
and Material  Value of Soft Soap as a  Conductor of Electri-city."  Dr.
Ford's son has just  entered our College of  (Cont. on p. 37)  -B.S.N.S.- 
ARTHUR THAL  RASPS STRINGS  Seven thousand stu-dents  crowded the Kibbe 
Hall last evening to  hear Arthur Thal, the  violinist. Mr. Thal has 
played before the rulers  of Europe and will now  start on his third world 
tour. He has studied in  France, Germany, and  Italy. Eleanor Whisner and 
Bernice Judson, who ac-companied  Mr. Thal  yesterday evening, were
enthusiastically welcom-ed.  One of our students  (Gertrude Egbert) recalls
 quite vividly the impres-stion made upon her as  Mr. Thal played "Thru 
assemblies in '22.  the Night" at one of the  We are proud to wel-come  Mr.
Thal who has  further developed his  ability to exorcise one's  cares and
to make life  again  worth while by  the strains of sweet mu-sic. 
-B.S.N.S.-  FIRE ! FIRE !  Catastrophe  on  The !Hill  Amid the screams of 
sweethearts and the  hissing of the streams  of water as they were  played
upon the roaring  flames several thousand  students watched the  south wing
of the boys'  dormitory become en- gulfed  in flames.  It so happened that 
the young men had  piled scores of mattress-es  below the window  of  room
613 to insure a way  of escape should the  Dean happen in on their  poker
game. At 3:05 a.  m. a board squeaked in  the hall. One of the  boys
happened to be  puffing on a cubeb,  which he promptly threw  out of the
window. In  no time the mattresses  were roaring vigorously.  Then the door
opened.  The  Dean looked in. The  boys ran to the window  and jumped to
the con-clusion  that they were  gone. The firemen, hav-ing  been summoned
by  Mr. Kibbe, who had seen  the blaze while correct-ing  papers, already
had  seven lines of hose in  action.  Owing to the bravery  of Fire Chief
Carl Trigg-vi  the building was  saved. Fireman Lowman  was severely burned
 about the wrists and  will be unable to talk  for several weeks.  Miss
Beryl Wilson  fainted.  Mr. O. Hoggatt, with  the other men, was  caught. 
- B.S.N.S.-  Service !  Dear Mr. Editor:  Why, may I ask, can-not  the
elevators be on  time? It is the same  thing, day after day.  We're late,
always late.  Do you know that I was  late to two classes yes-terday? And
why? May  I ask you, why? For  the simple and insig-nificant  reason that
the  elevator boy tried to kiss one of OUR stu-dents  who was chewing  gum
and for this reason  his mouth got stuck so  that he couldn't call off  the
floors. How did I  know where I was?  Oh, it is terrible to  think that
such a con-dition exists in this, our  Washington State Teach-ers' 
College. Can't we at  least have the privilege  of being punctual?  I hope,
Mr. Editor,  that you will bring the  necessary pressure to  bear upon the
elevator  boy, thru your paper, so  that I may be spared the  grief of
being tardy.  Yours,  Bertha Splitdorf,  Editor's note - Who  was "one of
OUR stu-dents"  ?  -B.S.N.S.  Student Opinions.  (We will not print any 
opinion that smacks of  slander or of malicious-ness.  At least, don't go 
too far. We wish this  department to be a digni  fled guider of opinion. 
Please sign your 'name.)  -B.S.N.S.-  THESPIAN CLUB  HOLDS PARTY The
Thespian Dramatic  club held its twenty-first  annual Washington's 
birthday party at Barry-more Lodge, the Thespian  bungalow at Normalstad. 
It was a glorious cele-bration.  Covers were laid  for 75. The table was a 
daintily decorated with  the club colors, orange  and black. Roast wild 
duck was the 'main at-traction  as they were  procured by Mr. Rahs-kopf. 
Miss Helen Goke,  an alumnus of 1923,spilled  a cup of coffee on the  new
tablecloth.  Dr. Fay Jenkins gave  an interesting after-din-ner speech
entitled "The  Love Scenes of Tomor-row."  Mr. Benson was called  upon.
Much to the as- tonishment  of those pres-ent,  he announced his
en-gagement  to Miss Sloane  ((Cont. on Page 14) FUNDS RAISED  FOR LIBRARY 
Legislators Loosen Up.  At one of the most sen-sational  sessions of the 
Washington Legislature  the Stovel-Frank bill  passed the Senate by a 
majority of three votes. Senators Morganthaler,  Zimmer, and Cederberg 
spoke for the measure  amid the cheering of the  three hundred and fifty 
students that filled the  galleries, the yelling be-ing  led by Mrs.
Shidell,  nee Pennington, State  Lung Inspector.  Causes Riot.  Our veteran
librarian,  Mabel Zoe Wilson, was  invited by Speaker Biles  to address the
Senate.  She promptly made mon-keys  out of the opposing  factions to  the
extent  that the Sargent-at-Arms  Rice was instructed to  play a fire hose
upon the  unreasonable legislators.  In the course of her  remarks, Miss
Wilson  stated that the old  building erected in 1929  is entirely and
absolute-ly  inadequate, that the  upholstery is coming off  the
chaise-longues in the  reading room, and, that  the book shelves had had 
to be placed as close  together as four feet.  She said further that if 
the money were not ap-propriated  within ten  minutes she would have  a
filibuster started on  the Haeske Anti-Flirting  Bill.  Vote Implored. 
Owing to the reputa-tion  of Miss Myers, the  leader of the faction
op-posing  Mr. Haeske's bill,  the solons howled that  the vote be taken. 
Crowd Goes Wild.  After the vote was  taken and the result  made known the
cheer-ing  throng milled for an  hour and thirty-five min-utes.  Miss
Wilson was  carried out over the  heads of the enthusiasts.  (Cont. on p.
9)  -B.S.N.S. Wife: "Do you object  to my having - $200 a  month spending
mon-ey?"  Oscar Lindstedt: "Cer-tainly  not,  if you can  find it
anywhere."  Two Hundred Twenty-Six  NEW LIBRARY

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Two Hundred Twenty-Seven

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Sept. I I.-Registration.  in' " Huge number  Sept. 1.2-Classes! Hey, 
CALENDAR  We find ourselves clutching for more "book larn-of  strange faces
seen about school.  you've got my chair!  Sept. I3--Boys still meek and
submissive.  Sept. 5--We like all the new teachers of the  school, and hope
they like us. The li-brary  force is very good.  Sept. I8-Mine are nines.
What are yours?  Girls are praised for wearing shoes that  fit them.  Sept.
19-We meet Miss Shuey, the new social  director of Edens' Hall, at the
girls' as-sembly.  We like her.  Pres. Waldo speaks at Kiwanis meeting. 
Sept. 20-Work on the new athletic field progressing rapidly. Looks
hope-ful.  Sept. 21-Football prospects fine-thirty-five young braves line
up. Put on  your smoked glasses? Them new football suits is dazzlin'. 
Sept. 22-The school mixer is a regal affair. The coronation of the Prune 
Queen and the Spring Dance climax the cap.  Sept. 25-Assembly- Prof.
Kolstad, "Levels of Human Experience."  Sept. 26-Boys go through the
inevitable  change. Note item  for Sept. 13.  o a Sept. 27Miss Belton could
get song out of a  stone. AInyhow, she made us sing.  Sept.  29-The Y. W.
C. A. reception at Edens'  Hall-a very beautiful affair.  Sept. 30o-The
Normal second team defeats  Fairhaven eleven in initial football game  of
year. Score, 19-2.  Oct. 6-The trustees and faculty tender Presi-dent  and
Mrs. Waldo a reception at Edens  Hall. About four thousand invitations 
issued. School orchestra furnishes the music.  Oct. 9-Yell leader tryout in
Assembly. Missed it, Boy! Haeske takes chip  out of platform in making an
animated and enthusiastic leap from the  assembly floor to the platform.
Haeske wins.  Oct. o--Business Girls' League reorganized by Miss Woodard.
Membership  is hopefully large.  Oct. 13-Every Friday afternoon we have a
recreation period from three to  five o'clock. Games are played from three
to four, and then from four  to five we dance. Rules for dancing issued.
Take heed! ! Children's  party-oh, excuse me! ! Freshmen mixer in little
gym. Girls whose  Two Hundred Twenty-Eight  -- -I.-----

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names begin with A, B, C, D, are invited-and, of course, all the boys. 
Oct. 14-Football team defeats C. P.  S., 14 to 7, at Tacoma. Good work ! 
Oct. 16-Glee club and quartet selected. Ttwenty-one lucky members in the 
glee club, and five-no, no, only four in the quartet.  Oct. 18-Just at
about this time all we hear is 30-o10, 30-10. We finally get  curious as to
what it really means.  Oct. 19-We lose a hard-fought game to the U. of W.
Frosh team. Score is  9 to o. Well, I guess we can't expect to win all the
time.  Oct.  2o--Quotation from Messenger-"Warning! No more dancing in room
 308. The objection placed on dancing in this room is based on the fact 
that the plaster in the room below is not able to withstand the shock." 
STnr TEL/Nvoc Ass Oct. 24Where will they put them? New ship-ge  yrscae ment
of books and magazines arrives for  Library. We must have a new Library, 
and should do everything possible towards _-un.., ,. making the wish a
reality.  Oct. 27-NOrmal-St. Martin's game. Scores,  7 to 7, with the
accompanying thrills.  / Oct. 28-Sourdough Banquet at the Leopold  Hotel. 
. Oct. 30-Morning assembly in charge of  Story-Telling class. It was the
best story-  ,5 'eofe boys telling we've heard for a long time. Oct.
31-Good English Week has begun! Don'tcha dare let anybody git  your tag. 
Nov. I-Hurray! Miss Mead, the school nurse is back again.  Nov. 2-Football
team leaves for Ellensburg.  Nov. 3-Ellensburg outplays us. Score, 19-0. 
Sophomores' "Punkin" party. Every sort of costume was in evidence. The
judges had a hard time in making their decisions as to which costume  was
the cleverest, funniest, etc. Cider and doughnuts were noted for  their
fast disappearance.  Nov. 6-Thurlow Lieurance and company gave a delightful
concert in the  auditorium in the evening. The impressive Indian melodies
kept the audience spell-bound.  Nov. 8-We have Miss Reynolds, primary
supervisor in the Seattle schools,  with us. She gives us some very
enlightening lectures throughout the  day.  Nov. io--Mr. Rahskopf reads
very successfully J. M. Barrie's "What Every  Woman Knows."  Nov. 15-Mrs.
John Roy Williams speaks to us in assembly, upon the subject  of the
American negro. Her talk was exceedingly interesting.  Two Hundred
Twenty-Nine

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1 1  Debate rry-out in room Jo0 Nov. i7--Debate try-out in room 308. The 
prospects are encouraging. Nov. 18-Charles Crawford Gorst, the "bird  man,"
comes. Chirp! !  Nov. 22-Another lecture course number.   ' Vachel Lindsay
fascinates us. The poem  about the "cally-ope" kept us on the alert.  v, )
Nov. 24-The Training School Thanksgiving  play, "The Harvest Festival," is
pre-sented.  Miss Crawford is to blame for its great success.  Nov.
29-Commencement. Forty-nine pairs of hands feverishly clutch di-plomas.
Stephen I. Miller, of the U. of VV., gives the address.  I2 :oo0n0o,o
n-School's all right-in its way. Right now we're more con-cerned  with
something else! Home and Thanksgiving.  SECOND QUARTER  Dec. 4.-VVe resolve
to really study this quarter. Do we keep our resolutions ?  Well, you know
how it is.  Dec. I  I--Frenzied dash for safety staged in evening. No fire,
but lots of  smoke is discovered at Edens Hall. A motor burned out in the
engine  room. .The goldfish are reported as recovering very nicely from the
 shock of being so forcibly rushed from the building.  Mr. Kibbe comes to
school with his face badly lacerated. He  refuses to  make any statement,
but sleuths are making thorough investigations to  make sure there is no
foul play. Hey, there ! Watson.  D)ec. 12-Basketball squad chosen. We're
pleased to see both old and new  satellites in the line-up.  Dec. 20-The
Christmas spirit pervades the school.  Dec. 21-Christmas program and tree,
7:30 p. m., in the auditorium. The  wish, "Oh, to be a chee-ild again," is
realized.  Dec. 22-We leave school for the holidays.  Dec. 25-A Merrie
Christmas! and  Jan. I-A Happie New Year!  Jan. 2-We come back-which is the
worst  part of going away.  ' .\ Jan. 8-I2-Dr. Emanuel Sternheim, eminent
sociologist, lectures daily upon a variety  of subjects. Is there anything
you would  like to know? Ask Dr. Sternheim!  Jan. 12-Normal, 25;
Ellensburg, 16. What's  - - this ? Why, this is the score of one of the  1S
- best basketball games of the season.  Jan. 13-Normal, 32; Ellensburg, 18.
Again!  • We hate to boast-but our team is just 
naturally good.  Two Hundred Thirty

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Jan. 18-Seattle Club Formal at Edens Hall. What's this school coming to? 
Jan. 2o-Cheney Normal versus  Bellingham Normal. Guess who won? Score  20
to 16, in our favor.  Jan. 24-May Peterson, noted lyric soprano of the
Metropolitan Opera Com-pany,  appears in a recital. The students will
always remember her for her  charming personality and beautiful voice. 
Jan. 3 i-Much of President Waldo's time is being spent at the state
legislature  wc rking for the interests of the school.  Feb. 3-Sophs give a
party at Edens  Hall. Games and dancing kept everyone  in beautiful
spirits--oh, and of course-the refreshments helled. Feb. 9-The greatest
stage success of the season-the \. A. A. Vaudeville  Show. The e.-tire
company is ncxw on tour between Ferndale and Lyn-den,  playing packed
houses.  Feb. c--St. Martin's College loses to our team on their floor.
Score 24-21.  Good game.  Feb. 12-The Normal Dramatic Club is organized and
 duly launched. The  nmemhership is limited to students who were successful
in try-outs. It  prcnises to be a very successful club. The entire school
expects to enjoy  its gcod work.  Mr. Klemme's speech on "Lincoln" is
punctuated with a pretty little  earthquake which ripples over the school
without doing any real   damage.  Feb. 1 3-Our basketball team in
Ellensburg captures another victory.  Feb. 14-First debate of the season.
We are victorious over the U. of W.  Badgers. Success Number One! ! 
Francis Joyner, a great character artist, is here in the evening. Makes  us
laugh, makes us cry-and almost scares us out of our wits when he  she ots
off the gun.  Feb. I5-Pres. Waldo leaves for the Middle West to attend
educational meet-ings.  Feb. 16-Members of the faculty play over at Edens
Hall.  Feb. 17-Philo and Alkisiah clubs have their annual banquets. Each
club  had the best time of all.  Feb. 20-Freshmen girls win first Kline Cup
game from Sophomore team.  Good game! Score 29-24.  Feb. 21-Dean Bolton, of
the University, talks upon the high ideals of edu-caticn.  It is meant that
that is his subject, rather than the fact that he  was stan(.ing on them. 
Feb. 22-No schccl! Hurray! Thanks, George.  Feb. 23-Ssh-secret. A good way
to get a cedar chest is to make one in  manual training. Industrial Arts
projects on exhibit in room Io8-a  beautiful display.  Cast for play, "Miss
Lulu Bett" chosen.  Feb. 24-The Alethian Banquet at the Leopold. Banquets
are quite the thing  this time of the year. We wish we belonged to ten
clubs.  Two Hundred Thirty-One

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Feb. 28-Training School Orchestra plays in Assembly. The children almost 
seemed smaller than the instruments they played-no doubt about the girl  at
the piano-but every child is a fine musician.  March I- Messenger comes out
one day earlier, because the quarter ends on  Friday. Big inter-normal
debates. The cup is ours!!! The debating  force this year is unusually
strong.  March 2-Commencement. Large class graduates. All things come to an
 end, even a quarter.  March 3-Well, well-another vacation. We had almost
forgotten about it.  Who said that?  March 12-Hello! Back again? We have to
adjust ourselves all over again.  March 13-President Waldo returns from the
East. He has much to tell us.  Two of our debating teams debate in Oregon
at Pacific University and  Linfield College. We lose; but winning isn't
everything.  "- - March I6-Green Messenger appears. By way  of explanation,
we mean the color used  "1 in printing of the school periodical, the 
Weekly Messenger, was green.  In the evening-big St. Patrick mixer.  MONe
An' begorry, a truly good time we had of  p(Iae5 it, too.  S. . Miarch
17-Faculty forum banquets the debate  and basketbal teams at the Leopold.
All  these teams deserve much praise and at-  PA RICK '-- tention.  March
19-What's this on the horizon? A men's quartet. Well, we declare!  March 2
iAnother good musical program. Our old friend, Mr. Weir, is  with us. Seems
good to see him-and he seems happy to see us.  March 23-Klipsun
authorities, after much thought and deliberation, select  prize winners in
poetry and story contest. It was a very close race. Rural  Life Banquet. 
March 24And still we have them!! Business Girls' Banquet and also the 
Ohiyesa Club Banquet occur the same evening.  March  26-Assembly lecture,
"The Trial of Christ," by Frank I. Sefrit, Bel-lingham  newspaper man. 
March 27- We're going to have a modern radio outfit soon. There will 
hardly be a thing within thousands of miles that  we'll miss.  March 28-We
always enjoy the musical assemblies.  March 29-Our Tulip Queen nominated.
She is the choice of eleven selects.  April 2-Mr. J. J. Donovan, recently
returned from the Hawaiian Islands,  tells us many interesting things about
them.  April Io-Cortot, the pianist, plays for us,-and now we all know why
he's  famous.  Two Hundred Thirty-Two

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April 20-Make an early application if you ever want to play a game of
ten-nis.  The courts are mobbed. M!ay 17-18-The Art, Manual Training, and
Home Economics departments  hold Open House. Were those things made by
Normal Students? Well!  May I8Freshmen Reception to the graduating class. 
May 23- Commencement play, "Miss Lulu Betts" presented by Drama Club. 
Exceeds most sanguine expectations. Cast and directors cover themselves 
with glory.  May 25-President's Reception to graduating class.  May 26-Big
Alumni Banquet.  May 27-Baccalaureate services to graduating class. May
28-We're too excited to do much thinking. Graduating Sophomores  are having
a busy time.  Class Day Exercises-Lotta Phun!!!!  May 29-"Twenty-fourth
'Annual Commencement" is the way it's listed in  the  Blue Book and it
means that we graduate!!!  -0-  AN UNSOUGHT JEWEL  I should love 'to see
you, Look into your eyes,  Hear the pretty tales you tell,  The suffocating
lies.  But when I think of coming,  I weakly say, "I won't."  Because we
women know you men  Like us when we don't.  Still all the time I want  to
come,  Yet I recall the rule  That women must remain aloof  And unconcerned
and cool.  But if you only knew my thoughts  And what they hold alway,  I
wonder if you would like me  For having stayed away?  -M. K. MYERS.  Two
Hundred Thirty-Three

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_ ___ I  IiI4  Two Hundred Thirty-Four

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Two Hundred Thirty-Five

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CONTRIBUTORS  We wish to thank the follow ing i.rns, who, ti.rough their
contributions,  have helpe( to make it possible to put out a Ilipsun of
this size and qualityy:  BARKER'S BAKERY,
..................................... .... People's New Market  C. H.
BARLOW, Trunks and Leather Goods .............................. 211 W.
Holly  BARTHOLICK BROS., Shoe Repairer
............................................ 217 W. Holly  B. B. FURNITURE
CO ...................................... Bay and Prospect  B. B. GROCERY
CO ............................ . .. 1311 Elk  BECK'S BAKERY
........................................ Alabama and Cornwall BELLINGHAM
BAY IMPROVEMENT CO ................... Elk and Holly  BROWN BARBER SUPPLY
CO........................................ 217 W. Holly  CAINE-GRIMSHAW CO
........... ........................ Roeder and B  JOHN F. CAMPBELL, Dodge
Bros. Cars ........ 317 N. Commercial  J. C. F. COLLINS, Optician
........................................ 1312 Dock  HARRY DAWSON'S
RESTAURANT ....................................... 111 E. Holly  ENGBERG
DRUG CO .................................... Elk and Holly  FLORAL EXCHANGE
.... . ................................ 1330 Dock  GAGE-DODSON CO., Clothes
for Men ..................................... 203 W. Holly  GRIGGS
STATIONERY AND PRINTING CO ............. 212 E. Holly  HODGE   PREBLE,
Boots  and Shoes .................................... 110 E. Holly  GEO. J.
HOHL CO., Garden and Flower Seeds .............. 1322 Railroad  HOTEL
LEOPOLD . . ...................................... 1210 Dock  JENKINS-BOYS
CO., New and Second Hand Store .......... 210 E. Holly  Two lHundred
Thirty-Six

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 237

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CONTRIBUTORS  We wish to thank the following firms, who, through their
contributions,  have helped to make it possible to put out a klipsun of
this size and quality:  KRAM ER QUALITY SH OES
................................................................ 214 E.
Holly  J. M. LAUBE   SON, Auto Supplies
............................................. 1210 Elk  R. H. LEACH, Mnfg.
Jeweler ............................ ........ 1334 Dock  LEWIS MOTOR CO.,
Nash Cars ......,................. Commercial and Magnolia  LIBERTY CAFE
........................................ 2071/2 E. Holly  MAKE OVER HAT
SHOP ........................................ 1247 Elk  NORTHWESTERN FUR
SHOP, John Slaninka, Mgr......... Alaska Bldg.  OWL PHARMACY, Drugs
.......... ............................. Dock and Holly  PAGE AND SNYDER,
The Tyre Shop ................................. Elk and Magnolia  F.
REICHMAN, Merchant Tailor ..................................... 1305  Elk 
RICHELIEU CAFE ........................................ 1220 Dock  SAYER'S
GROCERY ................. .... .. 11.6..1..9.. ..G...a..r den  SETZER'S
GROCERY .......................................
............................ Elk and Jam es  SINGER SEWING MACHINE CO
........................................ 1222 Elk  SMITH MOTOR CO
.................. ......... Elk and Magnolia  SPEIRS   SPEIRS, Auto and
Sign Painters ................ 1856 Iron  VIENNA DYE WORKS ...... EE.l.k...
.a..n..d... .C...h...e.s. tnut  GEO. H. WEIR CO, Auto Parts
..................................... .. 1202 Elk  J. P. WOLL, Optometrist
.... 205 W. Holly  Two Hundred Thirty- Seven

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 238

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j"]I IIIIIIIIIIIIIII 11IIII11111 1111 IIIIIIIIIIIICII IIIIIIIIIICII III
IIIIIII IIIIII lillul IIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIil ]IIIIIIIIIni I llulull1
lIIIIIi IIIIII Il llE**  a  THIS IS OF  SPECIAL IMPORTANCE TO  THOSE WHO
WILL TEACH  NEXT YEAR  The policy of this school is to always keep in touch
 with its graduates and former students so as to be of  assistance to them
whenever needed.  The Co-Op., being a part of this insitution, also 
desires to keep in touch with its patrons, and has this  proposition to
make :  To those of you who will be located in places where  it will be
impossible for you to get many of the things  needed in teaching, we will
agree to fill any order sent  us  provided oe have the goods in stock and
providing cash  is sent to cover. You are all more or less familiar with 
our prices, so in making your remittances please send  enough to cover the
articles, together with the postage.  If there is anything left we will
return the balance to you  or give you credit for same.  = ADDRESS ORDERS
TO  NORMAL BOOK STORE  C. C. BAUGHMAN, Manager BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON 
']IIInli] unu I uuI Iu[ ] u IIIIIiII IunII IIIInlu iiIIIIn I u nuuitt n
IIIIIIIII uIII Iu na lIInIi ll   '{l llllll ll
llllll€lllOl ll]r1tO1i 11' 111 o  lll ll  Ir llllllr
lllIIlrln lIIIII'Il lllIIIl lllllr111111l:lllllll'lllllIIIr  Two lunidred
Thirty-Eight

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Two Hundred Thirty-Nine

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 240

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* 1111171111111111111[ IIIII1C II1I1I1I11I01l71l1 l1l11l1I 1I1
11l1l1lllrl1l L]111111111111[71111111111110]llllllllll llllr1 1ll1l
110IIIIIIIlIlIiIlIlIlIl7lrl'rJ' Jlllllllillr,  NORTH PACIFIC COLLEGE 
SCHOOLS OF DENTISTRY AND PHARMACY  THE ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER
27th, 1923.  Students are required to enter at the beginning of the
session.  Requirements for Admission  Graduation from an accredited
four-year high school or academy or an  equivalent education, fifteen
units, thirty credits. In the near future  requirements for admission to
the study of dentistry will be advanced  to include one year of college
pre-dental training.  Courses of Instruction  The course in Dentistry is
four years.  The courses in Pharmacy are three and four years.  The length
of the annual session is eight months.  Recommendations for Prospective
Students.  Prospective students preparing to enter North Pacific College 
should include in their academic studies physics, chemistry and biology. 
The year of college pre-dental training should include English, Physics, 
Biology, Inorganic and Qualitative Chemistry.  For Illustrated Catalog
address  THE REGISTRAR  East 6th and Oregon Sts. Portland, Oregon  *3  Two
IHundred Forty

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 241

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**"]IIIIllIIIIIIllIIIIII~llinIIIIIIIII1I Ill IIIIIIIIHII1H11I1II1I1I1I1I1I
II111111lll lllI ll ll l uII 1IlllIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIEIIII
IIIIIII1ulIIIllC.;  FERRIER- MAGNUSON COMPANY  BANNERS - PENNANTS - CAPS 
MONOGRAMS - ATHLETIC LETTERS  Mail Orders from all parts of the United
States Filled Promptly  907 Elk Street Phone 1645 Bellingham, Wash.  DO IT
NOW  Phone Any Dealer  for  BELLINGHAM  COAL BELLINGHAM COAL MINES  Phone
551  Two Hundred Forty-One

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 242

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(PERSONAL)  A i6th and Garden car collided with a milk truck and sent can
after can  rolling down the hill. Soon a large crowd gathered. A very short
man came  up and stood on tip-toe to see past a stout woman in front of
him.  "Goodness !" he exclaimed. "What an awful waste !"  The stout woman
turned around and glared at the little man and said,  sternly, "Mind your
own business."  -0-  Bob C'aulkins (reading Virgil) : "Three times I strove
to cast my arms  about her neck, and--that's as far as I got, Miss Ullin." 
Miss Ullin: "Well, Mr. Caulkins, I think that was quite far enough."  -o- 
Prof. :"What would you call  a man that pretends to know everything?" 
Freshman: "A professor."  -o--  Tunst'all: "Who was that actress I saw you
with last night-the leading  lady ?"  E. Rice: "Of chorus."  -o-  "That
'Lovin' Sam' in the 'W' vaudeville reminds me of a river."  "How's that?" 
"His mouth is bigger than his head."  -o-  J. Themes: "I hear your roommate
has a baby saxophone."  C. Shidell: "Yep, and it'll be an o rphan soon." 
-0o-  Ikey:  "I bet you can't guess vot I got in my house."  Jakey: "Vot
you got, a little home brew?"  Ikel: "No, a little Hebrew."  -0-  Red
Opstad : "You know, there is an old saying that ignorance is bliss." 
Madeline Koester  : "If that is all true, then you surely must be happy." 
-o-  First Girl (to second girl, going down the hall) : "Can I go, too?" 
Second Girl: "Sure, you can go."  John O'Rourke (near by, teasingly) : "Can
I go, too?" Second Girl: "Yes, you can go to--"  -o-  Cop: "Here! Where did
you steal that rug?"  Tramp: "I didn't steal  it. A lady gave it to me and
told me to beat it."  -o-  "Pa, what is the Board of Education ?"  Pa:
"Well, when I went to school it was a pine shingle."  Two Hundred
Forty-Two

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 243

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Why d'o Normzal S'tudonts R  Eatat= = CASCADE  LAUNDRY   JACK MAR'TIN'S?  y
- y ~ DYE WORKS  M y  a -=  and C  c R=  = y  Y = =  = A  - y  y -  = n  =
y  R -=  y -=  = A  - Y  - y  y = =  - y3  -  R  y -  - ^  - y  V
7111111111111L7111111111111C]IIIIIIL 11111117IIIIIIL 111111 L
IIIIIII7111111tl 1111110 IIIIIILu1I 1117111111L 11111t1]IIIIII[;  '.rwo
rtyThre Hunred

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Two Hundred Forty-Four

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 245

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*MIlIlII1II IIi lIIIIIl llui IIIulIIIIl lII I1 ll IIII II IIIIIIIII IIIII
lli I IIIIl IIIiIII I llilllllit]IIIIIIIIIIlIIC711III IilIiI AMERICAN
NATIONAL BANK  South Bellingham, Wash.  CAPITAL, SURPLUS and U. P.,
$200,000  DIRECTORS:  CYRUS GATES E. B. DEMING T. M. BARLOW  J. i.. EASTON
B. T. DRAKE C. F. LARRABEE  I. J. ADAIR = ",1]111 IIIIIIII:Il li1111
lluIIIII[ llull flll il ninnl fl l11111 l i ll llill a nrill I l IIII [l
111llinim1ll innu11IIIIIIln*IIllIil" With Best Wishes to the  WASHINGTON
STATE NORMAL SCHOOL  FACULTY AND STUDENTS  SEARS ROEBUCK AND CO.  SEATTLE
WASHINGTON  PACIFIC COMPLETE  LAUNDRY HOUSEFURNISHERS  "He Profts Most
Goods Sold on  Who Serves Best" Easy Payments  1312-14-16- 18 Commercial St
 Bellingham Washington  PHONES 126 and 127  llllll l illlllu lll IIIIIII
lllllllllllll lll 0]IIIIIIill llullll llllll * Illlin llllll lllllllrJ Illu
IIIIIll llln]li iii]IInunlIItIIlIlrI Two Ut-'dred Forty-Five

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 ]IIIIIIIIIIII II111111111I111111111I1I1I1IIIlI IIIllIIIII IIIIIllu lIIIIII
III IIIII 1111111111I1I[Il lID 1111II IIIIIIIIIIIIlIIIIIICI IIIIll IIIII
IIIIIIIIIII ilio  -MEN, YOUNG MEN  AND BOYS  The Largest and Most  Compelte
Line in Will Find it pleasurable and  the City profitable to buy their  --
CLOTHING HERE  SMILES 'N CHUCKLES PELEGREN  CANDY SHOP  1319 Dock St.  
FRASER  Next to Royal Bakery 122 East Holly Street  V 71(IIIIIIlI l l
lllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII II IIIIIIII nillil liln alr Q" IIIIlll l IIII
1111I1I1II1I1Iu1 I1II1II1IIIII II1u IIIIIIIlIIlIll lII [II 1111 THMORSE 
HARDWARE  HOME STORE COMPANY  1308 to 1314 EST. 1884  Y BAY STREET =
Importers and Jobbers =  A. LAWSON  - REACH ATHLETIC GOODS  FISHING TACKLE 
DRY GOODS, CLOAKS, - ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES  SUITS, DRESS, WAISTS "MOHAWK
TIRES"  and  Ladies' Furnishings 1025-1047 Elk St.  Less 10% Bellingham,
Wash.  "Quality - Service"  Two Hundred Forty-Six

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 247

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4 y ~r  i pqp  ~; ~ CIl 'I _ (  1~~ l~lu X1;.. _-o  '\ l:I O IIS' +omL"  (
11 " " ait  .a  I'  I'I II~I  I~CiI  a'11 II P'o - '0 4-0  .. 1 V I h o - 
C1 -- ( ~oaI  I~~~~~~ I d . -  Az  I II;I \I~j I L (3 (1) ° C 
_' ~~~~~ ~ iIIlIf-+ 4  II f o w C  4  111 ol . 0C  Two Hundred Forty-Seven

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 248

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George Abbey: "Why do blushes creep over girls' faces?"  Maude Withers:
"Because if they ran they would kick Ulp too much  dust."  -o-  As I
chanced to pass,  I saw a beaver damming the river,  Near by, Alvin Gergor,
out of gas,  Was doing the same to his flivver.  -0-  Bob Tunstals' 300 in
weight,  He attempted to vault o'er a geight,  But the thing was so high 
That he fell on his igh,  Which, indeed, was a terrible feight.  -0-  Frank
Locke: "People living together for a long time grow to look  alike." 
Twyll'a Rand: "If that's the case, you can consider my refusal final."  -0-
 Egert B.: "You're not two-faced, anyway."  Bob  C.: "I'll say I'm not."  S
BBg.:e rt" If you were, you wouldn't wear the one you have on."  Bob. C. :
"I'll say- - What ?"  -o-  Miss Belton (to Arthur Thal) : 'Will you play
'Down by the Old  Mill Stream' ?"  Arthur: "Sorry, Miss Beltcn, but I'm
dated up for this week."  Have you ever noticed how easily some of these
teachers of ours shake a  piece of chalk with that "seven come eleven"
motion?  -0-  ALAS, I GIVE UP I've racked my br'ain, and others,' too, 
I've plundered obscure scribblings,  To find just one original joke Unlike
these modern quibblings.  But all in vain; of no avail;  They cannot be
uncovered-- ,  The only joke, I  guess, is me--  May I stay undiscovered. 
-H. H.  Two Hundred Forty-Eight

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 249

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WASHINGTON GROCERY COMPANY  WVHOLEVSALE GROCERS  Distributors of  BLUE AND
GOLD  W-G CAN GOODS  BELLINGHAM - - - - WASIINGTON  1IIiIIllIIIIIIIIIIl
lluIIIIIIII111IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllu11111iulllIIIII1llu l
illllIIIDlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlll IIII IllIIOlullulllIIIll.ll  Oldest
Book Store in Northwest Washington=  E. T. MATHES BOOK CO.  HEADQUARTERS
FOR SCHOOL SUPPLIES  Mail Orders Filled Promptly - Mail Us Your Magazine,
Subscriptions  TYPEWRITERS BOUGHT, SOLD AND REPAIRED.  Bellingham - - - - -
- Washington  millIIIIIa fl1111111111I1 1[IInIIIl uIIi IC unI lluC llnfllul
illIIIIIIllu lulullI li llululIIII I Iii IIIIIIIIII IlinIIIu liai11 11
11IIIIII i Iist5C  V 1 11111ii minIILI miInIin flu n111 11111111 111l1
n1111I1II IIII II1[]II ii lia n illllll in IIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIII IIIIl lull:
 BATTERSBY'S  Always Reliable  FOR YOUR GRADUATION  ADLER GLOVES FINE
FOOTWEAR BEST' SILK HOSIERY  For Party and Reception, Athletic and School
Wear  KABO CORSETS  Exquisite Laces Have Spread the Fame of Thy Battersby
Store  1313-15 Commercial Street Bellingham, Wash.  °'= I ll In
IIn i n un u lunIlu I ll lI uull n I u I u m Two Hundred Forty-Nine

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 250

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Two Hundred Fifty

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 251

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**2111111111111 1IIII l11111 I111l IIIIIlIIIIIIIII llillK201IIIllulli
nillIIilll[III1llIIIIIIIC IIIIllifillE3IIIII [llI II IlII*RIIII;[FOR A
SAFE, COMFORTABLE,  INVIGORATING TRIP  BETWEEN  BELLINGHAM  AND  SEATTLE 
TRY THE STEAMER  LOW RATES  O N E WA Y
.................................................$R O U N D TR IP
.................................................$STR. KULSHAN  LEAVES
BELJLINGHIIAM, Daily .............. 10:00 A. M.  LEAVES ANACORTES, Daily
......1.1.:.1.5. A... .M... ..  ARRIVES Seattle, Daily ..........4:.00.
.P... M.. . ......................  LUNCHES SERVED STATEROOMS  CITIZENS
DOCK CO. - H B. SIMMERMAN, Manager  AGENTS FOR  PUGET SOUND NAVIGATION CO. 
V7 11II7II1II1II1I[[IIIII lIIIl IIlI llllllllllllll llll llllllll[I
Illl1r:l1IIIIICIIIIIIwo I IIIII ft-llO nllell l [IIIIIIlIIIIIIII 1c3llll ll
inicIIIII[IIIIII]II1II Two Hundred Fifty-One

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page [252]

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bP  : -i   lt; x.  9ow  A~i~eI 1 #~f  OMlGd1 * 4   gt;~~a~ ~  y 0.7E r)
eets  - pY x i i3 f k lt;Ni'r's vt

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 253

     ----------

* IiIIII ll llm li lll [IIIIIIIlll ll l I l I uIIII I mIIII
IuIu7.llllI1I1II1C1 111 11111I1 1II IlliI III II IIIIIIII IIIIIIlil ll 
SCHUBBES "Don' Worry  213 E. Holly Street Doan Can Plan It."  New and
Distinctive  GOWNS Any kind of building anywhere,  anytime, with or without
 superintendence  Models Temptingly Crisp and  dainty in Taffetas, Crepe
back  Satin and Canton Crepe.  CAPES AND COATS T.F. DOAN  FEATURING  the 
ARCHITECT NEW VOGUE  = - 217-219 Sunset Bldg.  In Summer Weight Fabrics
PHONE 1800  " 21 1111 1IIIIIIII I IIII I  IIIIII IIIIII DIIIIIIIIIIIIII1
11111llllI IiIIIIIlluIIIIIII IIIIII IIllIIlI IIII11111111II IIIIIIIIIC Ill
ulllllII]III IIIIl I ll 1IIII IIIII iul[  Designed for Appearance-Built for
Endurance-Priced for Economy  PHILLIPS SHOE STORE  "Where Quality is Higher
than Price"  113 West Holly Street  ! lllllllllIlIlIClIluI Cll IlII
IIIIIIII IIIIIlI ll II111111[1I1II IIIIIIIlllll ]IIIIllIIIII[] I llll
llllll lllull l llllIIlIllIlIl IIlIIIlII lCrIIlII I lIIIIIIIIIIDIIIICII
IlIllllul Ill lltllll  =M illinery  Sweaters  YNeckwear  Blouses LINDEKE'S 
DISTINCTIVE 1 3 3 2 DOCK ST.  DIFFERENT BELLINGHAM, WASH.  $ Il[IIIIIIIIll]
m[ il u[]u [ll[]III[[ll[+ 1u[]  Two Hundred Fifty-Three

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 254

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*]I III[II 111111 11 1[ ][ 1 r D[]] ] 1 [1  r]lllllllllll[]lllllllll  I 
l[]  I  u lllllllll ] ll lllll llllll lll  ~ PLUMBING, HEATING and WELDING 
Y9  CHRISTOPHER   FARQUHARSON  Phone 2221 1306 R. R. Ave. Bellingham, Wash.
 STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING  V]I IIr IIIDII III[]IIIIIII]IIIIII[]IIII
rII]IIII1I1I1I1[1 I1I1I11V1 I1II1If11111101 11111111 111111[1 111111[1 fl
1[111111111111r~ ["  Q"+]II1I IIIIIII IIIIIIII[II I1I 1I1I11
111]1I1II1I1f[I IIII II1 111111]11111111111[1l 1I1I1IlIlIrI
IIIIlIIr]IIIII[lI1III III IIIIII[I IiII ll l 111111111111E]1111[71IIIIIII
II II I I I111111111111E"I]*9  G s  M -  " -5  c  * CLARK ELECTRIC COMPANY 
1322 COMMERCIAL STREETI  Y I  n  Y Y  THE  NORTHWESTERN NATIONAL BANK  M id
  Corner Railroad and Holly Bellingham, Wash.  T i  e= I II I1Il
l1l111111111j1 [11 r ] ] j ]1 j ] ]  w h  MEBR FTE EERLRSEV SSE  Y Y 
WeSlctYu con  V  ConrRira n ol elnhm ah  R y EETRCCOPN  Y 33OMEOIL SRE 
]nnnE nnu~unu]uunnnnanun~uun[nuu~mnunuuanu~nuunnuauuu.  Tw ude FfyFu

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 255

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**]iIIll IIIIIIIII IlluIIC71 IIIIIIIIIE2IIII IIIII III[2I I
I[2IIIIII11l71illll [2II1llIIII1lluIII3llII IIIII
[2IIIIIIIIIIIIDIIIII1llIIIIE]III II11111111[11111111111  WHO IS YOUR
DAIRYMAN?  .- Do you get filtered, pasteurized, properl ycooled milk ? 
2.-Where is the cream line? Dots the milk test 4.0 butterfat?  3 .- Do you
use DARIGOLD milk, cream, ice cream? If you do, all the questions  here are
answered with a big YES.  4.-Do you use Lynden Butter? Be sure that you get
the best-else you are the  loser.  Call phone 1930 and ask for your nearest
Grocer or Merchant. He has it for you.  We'll tell you who he is.  WHATCOM
COUNTY DAIRYMEN'S ASSOCIATION  1419 Dock Street - - - - - - - Bellingham,
Wash.  c °  NORMAL GROCERY  We Take This Means of Thanking You
for Your Patronage  for the Past Year  PHONE 1041 P. G. GULBRANSON, Prop. 
211111111111ll1inul IIIII 1rmilll 1111n1 nillininicallinIIIIII
InflIIIIIIIII 1nnillullli 11 11nflilicallullinlin lIllIIIIIllu
lIIIIIIII1nt]IIIIIIIIIII[r21IIIIIIIIIIIC IIIIIIll 1nc  *="I7II II1 11111I1
1IIIIIIlIIlI I I lll ill II II lit l lll it 1  I IIIIII IIIII LllI IIII
IIII II1ll 11111 1111[]111 1 11I I l 1IIIIIIIIII  HAGEN   HOGBERG PAINT AND
 WALL PAPER CO.  PAINTING, DECORATING, PAPERHANGING  We Carry a Complete
Line of Paints Varnishes, Brushes, Etc.  WE HURRY  1307 Elk Street PHONE
8bb Sunset Bldg.  V ]IIIIIIIII IIIC71I1II1I II[111111111IIIIIIIIIE2IIIIII
7llII 11iII 1111 1 711111lll [lilllli lll [lilll21111111111111Mil3IIIliItI]
IIllIIIIllu l illl illu IIIIIllIII 311IIIllII14  QUALITY MEATS  BARTON  
CO.  SEATTLE, WASH.  BELLINGHAM BREMERTON PORTLAND  ASTORIA PORT ANGELES
TACOMA  Two Hundred Fifty-Five

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 256

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VV  Oh! The Central Building stair, social stair,  Every landing 'a
reception for the fair-  Groups in animated giggle  Love to stand and gasp
and wiggle  Love to squirm and dluck and wriggle,  As in vain they try to
pass  Up the stair.  -o-  GLIMPSES FROM BACHELOR LIFE  Oliver Nelson: "Say,
Dewey, you got my ink?"  Dewey Bowman: "No."  Oliver Nelson: "Then what are
you using in your fountain pen ?"   Dewey Bowman : "Oh, I just filled it up
with some of that coffee you  made for breakfast."  -o-  Kolstad: "What do
you think of the extra-hour-of-daylight scheme?"  Mildred Byles: "What I am
for is more moonlight."  -o-pftkniL  Two Hundred Fifty-Six  -- -- * 1 l

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 257

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*I* I l I II IIIIIIIII1I1II1I 71[711 111 1 1 llu ll IIl I II " ]I1I"IO I
IIIIIIII IIIII IIIIIII1il u II1IlIlI IIIIlIl:r 7 l1IIII il III IIIIIIQ
WHERE ARE THE BEST M. J. O'CONNOR  CANDIES MADE? 1021 'Elk St. Phones
417-482  THIS IS A  SERVICE STORE  SHEPHSWEe RD'S Carry the Very Best Goods
 and  Cater to the  The Largest Refreshment VERY BEST TRADE  Parlor in the
City Included in that class of trade  are a great number of  the Nor-  =
mal students and a number of  CANDY Y the faculty. We wish to assure  AND
them that we appreciate their  AND =  - - patronage, and that their credit 
ICE CREAM is always good with us.  X 1llnllu  ll I1I 7I1n 1 111111 10 1
11111111110111III1I 111I1IIuIl]lIl IIIIIlIiI l
imilllIIIIII7llIl7lllllinllan11 IIIIIiiill ll III1l1u 11 lu1I IIII1c  ";]
IIIIIIIIIII I]IIIIIIII7111 11111111111111l17 171111 u  This Space Purchased
By  THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK  [ [ B[E LLINGH[A M, [ W[]A SH. [' [*  Two
Hundred Fifty-Seven

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 258

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Two Hundred Fifty-Eight

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 259

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$" IIIIIIII IIIIU IIIIIIII lu IIIIIIIII1I ICIIIIIIIIII1II II1II1IIIIIII
III111 II I II II 1I 1I11111111111 11111lI1] 1IDI ] 11 l1I I[I1 11111111111
1,]1  NORTHWEST A. J. BLYTHE  HARDWARE CO. PLUMBING  A complete line of
Reach Sporting   HEATING CO.  Goods, including Baseballs, Bats,  Gloves,
Mitts and Masks. Our Tennis line is complete. We have a  large assortment
of Rackets to  choose from.  Would be Glad to Show You  Just Diop in and
See Us. A  NORTHWEST  HARDWARE CO. PIPE  FITTINGS FIXTURES The Big Hardware
Store on TELEPHONE 55  Holly Street  1313 Railroad Ave. 
]IIIIIIIIIIlIlIllIllIlIluIl lll l lllllll lllI IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
IIIIlul IIIIIII IIIIIIII II IIIIIIIII]l l I llllIllllll  WHATCOM FALLS MILL
CO.  MAN U FACTUJRERS LUMBER - SHINGLES - BOXES  G. Street and Waterfront 
BELLINGHAM - - - - WASHINGTON  "]IIIIIII uIIIII11111111l11111111 11111u111
11 7 111IIIII II IIIIIIIII IIL III IIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIlII
IIIIIIIIIIII[t]IIIIIIIIIIII[I IIIll ull IIIll ulIIIIIIIII[  J. H. BLOEDEL,
Pres. J. J. DONOVAN, V. Pres.Pres. W. C. MILLER, Secy.  COLUMBIA VALLEY
LUMBER CO.  PHONES 1493-1494  You live but once. You will probably build
but once. Build right.  Build the modern and easy way. Ask about our
building service.  We can help, you.  E. E. LeValley, Manager  Two Hundred
Fifty-Nine

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 260

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Elsie Wright:  Mrs. Carver:  "How do you tell if your face is clean,
without a mirror ?"  "Look at the towel."  -0-  Sam Ford: "Oh, dear, I've
got so much to do."  M'rs. Irish: "May I helpl you?'  Sam F. : "Oh, no;
it's mostly brain work."  -0-  Mr. Phillippi: "Arloween, name three things
that contain starch."  Arloween Cross  : "Two collars and a cuff."  -0- 
Dickie Carver (to his dad) :  machine ?"  "Papa, did Edison make the first
talking  Mr. Carver: "No, sweetheart-God did."  -0-  Edna Anderson (calling
to Dewey Bowman, who was shaving in the sun  on his back porch) : "I see
you are shaving outside today."  Dewey B.: "Great heavens, did you think I
was fur lined ?"  -0-  Mrs. Irish (to Miaude Withers): "What would you do
if the world  would come to an end?"  Maudie W.: "Mercy! It would scare me
half to death!"  -0-  "Walt" Vanderford (to Randy Dawson, who had sat on 
"Ouch! Get off my head!"  -0-  his note book) :  M.rs. Hussey: "What do we
mean, Mr. Frost, by 'The Voice of  Spring' ?"  F. Frost: "I don't know,
unless it's a sneeze."  Two Hundred Sixty  _ _ _ ____ ~ gt;~E~bE~,~_=C

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 261

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* 21111111 11111 ]llIIIIIIGII I IIIIIIIII III l IIIIIIIII III lI IIIIII
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII II IIIIC III1 il l l lIIC11111111
1111IIlIIIIICIIIIlCIuI"Special Prices on  GRADUATION AND APPLICATION PHOTOS
 SANDISON  "Photos That Please"  Woolworth Bldg. Phone 989 
211111IIIIIIIDII I IIIuI ll IIIIIII u IIIIIIIIIIIII Dil lillIIID IlIIIIIul
l7I I nIIII Illmill ill uIIIIIIIII IIIIllI IIII [IIIuIIIIIII illu llnalnI
IIIII[  Quality Wins in the Long Run  The Confectioner Who Uses SUPREME
CHOCOLATES  Is Building a Reputation for Quality that is the  STRONGEST
FOUNDATION OF' SUCCESS  BELLINGHAM CANDY CO.  *! 1111111Hill Ill inIIIIIIII
IIIII 1I 11111111 Il IIIIIIIIIII IIIII 11il 11 . * 
7111111111IIIIIIIIIIllul1II1111I1II1I1 iI[ IIIIIIII IIII1111111IIIIIIIIIII
Im IIIIIIlli  - BELLINGHAM  ART STORE NORMAL Hemstitching  -" BAKERY All
Kinds of Fancy Work BAKERY 1323 Dock St.  1111111111[IIIIII IIIIIII III
[IIIIlI II IIIII IIIHI IIIIIIII[IICI IIIII11[IIlIlII IIIllII  627 HIG
STREET  WE THANK YOU  For Making Our Businsss a  PLEASURE ty  And Wish You
Success  Il IIInri lllin[711131II1II1I1II1II IIlIll uln IIIII[llnaninnll
lullr  1 i  Two Hundred Sixty-One

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 262

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Angus Bowmer: "Say, Carl, can you dig me up a girl for tonight ?"  Carl S.:
"Sure, but wouldn't you rather have a live one?"  -0-  Peggy Hayward (upon
receiving a beautiful bouquet from R. W.)  "Aren't they wonderful! I see
there is a little dew on them, yet."  R. WV. (flustrated) : "Oh, don't
worry about that. I'll settle next  month."  -o-  Elsie V.: "HIcw fear did
ycu get from loo in your Ed. 20 test?"  B. P.: "Just three seats."  -0- 
She: "He was driven to his grave."  He: "He sure was. Did you expect him to
walk?"  -0-  Mr. Philliplpi: "Why didn't you filter that, Carla?"  Carla
LaVigne: "I Nwas afraid it wouldn't stand the strain."  - 0-  Gertie E.:
"Can I get in through the door?"  Mr. Grady : "Maybe; a piano box went
through this morning."  -0-  Mr. Kclstad : "Have you done your outside
reading?"  D. Bowman: "No, it's been too cold."   -0-  Bob Caulkins : "A
fool can ask more questions than a wise man can  a:nswer. Isn't that so,
Mr. Rahskopf ?"  Mr. Rahskopf : "Er, why! I can't answer that."  "The
butcher said it was spring lamb."  "He is  right," grunted H. Walker. "I'm
chewin' one of the springs now."  -0-  Dewey B : "This wind chills me to
the bone."  Oliver N.: "Silly, wear a h'at."  Two Hundred Sixty-Two

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 263

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*ilIIIIII IIIII1I1 11l111111111 IIIII miIIIIIII I llIIIIII lI
IIIIIIIiIllIlI IIIIIf llllIl IIIIII IIIIlit ]IIIC IIIIIIIII DIII11 l IIIIII
IIII ]liIlIuI I 1lII1ll For Oxfords and Shoes  that fit and wear, styles 
that are supreme and ex-elusive,  prices that are  fair- WALKOVER  BOOT
SHOP  i 1111111III11I1I lu l IIl I1111111u1II IIIIIIII IIIIDI11111illl lII
III I i i lluIIIIlI IIIIIII 1llIIID 1IlIllI IIIIIIDII I  Catherine Myers,
(speaking of Egbert Burn's watch fob) : "What a  pretty little check you
have on your trunk."  -0-  Gertrude Egbert: "Whenever I looked intelligent
in social science Mr.  Bever never failtd to call on me."  Doris Turner:
"No wonder you never made any recitations."  Be Up-to-Date in Your Teaching
 Use the Modern ff/'ay of Canning  Appoved by the U. S. Dept. of
Agri-culture  and used in their canning club  work thruout the United
States. In  use in Domestic Science departments  .... of Colleges and
Universities. Thous-ands  of families do their home  canning with a  BURPEE
CAN SEALER   Sea's, opens, and re-seals both pint  and qua t sanitary tin
cans. No glass  to break, no rubber rings to fit; saves  time, labor and
money and gives you  a better canned product.  BURPEE ADAMS IRON WORKS  80.
BELLINGHAM, WASH.  %"? [ [ [ [ ] i]  [ [ *  Two Hundred Sixty-Three

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 264

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Two Hundred Sixty Four

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 265

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*IIII[llIIIIalullIIIIIIluluIIlllll IIIIIlulluIICIlll IIII[]IllllIIIlIIIIID
rIIIIIlIIIILIIIIllIIIIII7 I*  PHONE 254  Full Auto Equipment Lady Attendant
 Day and Night Service  HELPFUL SERVICE  By men capable of looking after
detail, no matter how small or how great, and will  assist and advise you
so as to eliminate all  worries possible. WHITFIELD-MARK CO.  Funeral
Directors 1146 Elk St.  I11111111111[I IIIIIIl IIIIII
IIllIIIII]IIIIIIIIIIII 11IIII IIIIIIIIIIII III IIlIIIIIIIIIIIII
IIIIl1111111111I1 1I[I1I1I1I1II1I1I1I1II1 IIIIIIIIII *  2111I1I1I1II"; "D]
I1111111 1111I I IIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIII[IIDlil luIIIID IIIIII llIIIII
Ilillll1l [7 IlllI Illllll IIIIIII 7IIMI IIIIIllu lIIIIIIII DIIIIIIIII I
miIIIIl ik*,1111  CLYDE BANKS PHOTO SHOP  Specialists in  KODAK FINISHING,
ENLARGING, COPYING, COLORING  AND FRAMING  Photo Finisher for the Co-Op.
Bellingham, Wash.  A BRIGHT CLASS ! EH ?  Mr. Philippi (to Warner T) :
"What is ordinarily used as a conductor  of electricity ?"  Warner T.:
"Why, er-er."  Mr. Philippi: "Correct, now Miss Obermeyer, wjhat is the
unit of electric  lpower ?"  Sally 0: "The What?" M1\r. Philippi: "That
will do. Very good !"  -0-  Mr. Kihbe: "What is the difference between a
voter and a citizen?"  Mary Cutting: "A voter is one who votes, and a
citizen is one-er-who  cits ?"  *;] IIIIIIIIIIIIIII[IIHIDIlIIllI lI llIll
lli I I] l Iil l llIIIIII IlIl l lIIlI IIUIIlIiIuI[ IIII
II[llIlIlIrIIIIIIII II III III III IIIIIIIIDI:I IIIIIIIIII IIIII[rI
SYNONUYMOUS TERMS  Bellingham, Normal - Good Teachers  Oldsmobile Cars -
Good Cars  HESS MOTOR CO.  AGENTS - OLDSMOBILE CARS MACK TRUCKS 
Accessories and Parts  EFFICIENT SERVICE - COURTEOUS TREATMENT  206
Prospect Street Phone 328  Two Hundred Sixty-Five

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 266

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Y Y  Y n  _ y  _ Y  Y V  Y n  Y Y  = Y  _ y  " uauuu[7nuu7uuu uuumuuu7unu" 
Frances Clausen (to Warner T.):  "What's the most venomous thing  next to a
girl?"  Warner T: "Me next to a girl."  -0-  Mr. Kolstad (arranging class
al-phabetically):  "Will those standing  please take the vacant seats
except the ones you are sitting in."  "She loves me knot," sighed  George
Abbey, as MIaudie gazed at  his new speckled necktie.  -0-  WITH APOLOGIES.
 There was a young lady named  Hacket,  Whose jaw, when it moved, made a 
racket,  She said what she thought  Consequently said naught  For brain she
just seemed to lacket.
Vnnnuumnnulanuuuunu7nunumnlcumau[uuu[uunn7uun7uunnunnamunnmnnnnnnumunluunlunn7nnuuun
Bellinghat'l s Favorite for  u u  Telnty Years  ROYAL ICE CREAM  u u= 
ROYAL DAIRY PRODUCTS CO.  = =  Y  **nnuumliuntlmlinliiiunmnlninii nmiannl
nn unumie~lnnm~nloil inlnlialtlia tluiuma c:  T H
71111111111[711111111111117111111111111[711111111[7111111111111[7111111117111111111111[11
]111I111111111[11711 111111I[I71 1111111111111111111I11I11 I1[I I1ICIl1 111
1o"o  Two Hundred Sixty- Six

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 267

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Miss Christy (in sight singing) : *nuunnnu mrInI nuninununu u nucali nnuuu
.l  "Milicent, what do we mean by a  scale ?" YOU CAN FIND  Milicent De
Haven (after long de-  Everything You Want  liberation): "Why,  isn't it
the outer  covering of a fish ?" FOR GRADUATION  -o-  The reason why, when
jokes are At Prices  That You  sprung Can Afford to Pay  Some people remain
still,  And never even try to laugh o .  S'to hide their dentist bill. c 
-0-  Frank Lock: "Well, I'm going to KKEEMPMHAPUHS AU CO. _  the hospital
tomorrow, to be operated Dry Goods Ready-to-Wear  On. "Woman's Furnishings 
Twylla: "Well! I hope everything  comes out all right." *IIIIIIIu
IIIII1IuIIuIIn1u nuanunu Inunu numuI  **]IIIII IIrlllll lIll lll IIlIl lull
illllll1[1IlI  lllllllll ll lIlIIlII IIII Il7lll Il7 ll IIllllu lllrlHl I
llrl l mll1 11u11lilllul[llll lillrl H l lll lr IIiIliIl IIIoIIIr  * "WHEN
YOU MOVE"   SThat Furniture, Piano, Trunk or Baggage  PHONE 70 or 15  Fire
Proof Storage Elk and Magnolia Sts. SWe Crate and Pack for Shipment  MODEL
TRUCK   STORAGE CO.  Fire Proof Storage Elk and Magnolia Sts. We Crate and
Pack for Shipment_  * 11111lIl I I 11r[r7111111 11111111 [ 111111 1111111
IIIIIIIlli l IIIIIllllll l ll llll Ill III l I IIIIIII I i[i ili 
KUEHNOEL'S HEMSTITCHING PARLORI  HEMISTITCHING PLEATING BUTTONS  BUTTON
HOLES CHAIN AND CABLE STITCHING  Also Pinking and Plain Stitching  =1312A
Dock Street Phone 83  1111111111111111111IIIlTwo Hundred Sixty-Seven  Two
Hundred Sixty-Seven

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Q+ 1111111 111 111I1111111 1 L711[11 lIII I IIIIIIIIIIIIl lll*  -THE-MANX 
HAIR STORE  1216 Dock Street Bellingham Washington  Visit Our Attractive
Parlors  You will be convinced that it is  a pleasure to have your work
done  by us.  Only the most Skilled Operators ly  Employed  We are
Specialists in Electrolysis   Scalp and Face Massage  Marcel Waving and
Fancy  Hairdessing done by Experts.  We carry a complete line of Hair 
Goods, Toilet Accessories  and Shell Goods.  JESSIE E. LEE  ° II
11111l1 71l1l1 111l1llllI lIlI IIIII IIIlli l IIIIIIIII II1illllllllIIIn1 
BEAUTIFUL ART GIFTS  PICTURES FRAMING  Choice Selection of Many Attractive
and Useful Articles  Suitable for All  Mother Day Cards, Place, Tally and. 
NV-I E Evryday Cards  a.t r ho 204 W. Holly Street  Bellingham Wash.  .
IIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIDlll 1u lI II l IIIIII IIII illIulill millI tlu uIII
ulIIDIIlnulIIIGIII IIIDl lulillllu mllI i u nIIIIIll  IIIIllIIII lIIIIIIIII
IIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIID1 lllIIII lu IIIIIIIIIII
IIIIIIIIIIID111111111111II[IIIIIIIIII7IIuI1U1 lu1u1m IIll IIIllIIII11
IIIIIIIIIIII IIllillullE  LOID ]SHP  HEADQUARTERS FOR SCENIC VIEWS 
COLORING, ENLARGEMENTS, FINE FRAMES  Kodak Finishers for the Co-Op. See Our
Pictures in the Klipsun  IIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIITwo Hundred
Sixty-Eight  Two Hundred Sixty-Eight

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I  *;r]tII111111 11111I IIIIII II*IIIIILIIulI IIllIIIIIIlIII IIIC[IIII
IIIII1I1 illl"l $"]IIIIIIIill IIIIIII I l lllullt IIIIIIIlIll ulll I
IrIIIIIlI IiI WEDDING  ENGAGEMENT RINGS P U B L I C  SMARKET  Platinum,
White, Green or FRYE   CO. NATatural Gold 120 E. Holly Phone 832  Can be
Seen at All Steer  Q = Government Inspected BluWASLtaLmGRpE NM'eSaets  to)
W(Se ucccaetesrs orfo r Banquets. Quality  (Succteos)s or always reliable.
Call us up. We  S will advise you as to cuts, etc.,  WILBER GIBBS _ gratis,
where you can get tender  T-Bones and real New York Top  115 E. Holly St.
Bellingham, Wn. Sirloins.  Miss Frank: "When I was a young- V]mui an lln
lnaallin  ster we used to spend most of our time  in trees." (and Miss
Frank didn't live  in prehistoric times either!)  o- LUDWIG'S  Student,
answering phone calls in  main office: "School nurse is wanted." for  Miss
Rice: "Punch Miss Mead." ARTISTIC JEWELRY  -o-  FINE WATCHES  Mr. Grady
(peering into Mr. Bond's -  room, reads on blackboard) : "Find DIAMONDS
greatest common denominator."  Mr. Grady : "There that thing has  been lost
again."  -O- 12505/2 Elk St.  Hotel Henry Bid.  Mr. Hunt (in Geography
methods) : Bellingham, Washington  "Miss Parsons, have you ever seen a 
mountain range ?"  Helen Parsons: "Oh, yes, Mr. Hunt.  W e use one entirely
for baking." ufll  aulllul allnnull l lsllc luulnluln ulli  Two Hundred
oixty-Nine

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 270

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= HiIGH GRADE PORTRAITS  KODAK FINISHING COMMERCIAL WORK  STEEPLE'S STUDIO 
207 E. Holly  Art Frames and Moulding  IIIIIIIIIII ll[l ll Hllll[l 1
111l1l1 Il llml]l1ml1ul1l1 l1u1l1l1 11111[ 3u lll[131[[33[u3 1111E11111111
11 Hllll m ]Illl[llm llnllIII1111 [

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11 11111111 11ll IIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIISMll gl lil I I t3IIIIIIIIIIII[ IIIIII1
 THE BEST OF EVERYTHING~  Y_ R  = Y  SHOE  in  REPAIRING  R -  - Y  - Y 
LONGWOOD'S  SHOE SHOP  Next to American Theater  *IIIIll[]lllIllin m I
llllI111 li171 I111llim illIII1[II u lIIIIII II I II11II ilic  Miss
Johnston (inspecting pottery  matter with Miss Whitcomb's mug?" 
111111111111 I1111111 11 IIIIIIIIIII in1llu llHIIIII III IIIIIIIIIIIDII
IIII  V -  MULLER   ASPLUND  W' A  JEWELERS =  To The Normal School Trade 
Normal School Class and  Society Pins Particular Attention Given to  NORMAL
SCHOOL STUDENTS  MULLER   ASPLUND  Adjoing 1st National Bank  cl  =  Y 
IIIII)llilll[]II IIlilii lluICII IIIIIIIIiI[711IIllIIIII[IuII IIIIIIlIInII
IIIIIII11cQ  cut outs) : "Now, class, what is the  -0-  Bill Benson
(umpiring baseball team in a city school) : "Foul."  Fresh Pitcher:
"Where's the feathers?"  B. B.: "My Boy, this is a picked team."  -0- 
g*2111IIIIIIIIIIl IIIIIIIII 111[lllll l l l I lllll IIIIIII ll fl I I I I I
I I 11II1111IIIIIIIIIIlIIIIIIIIIIIIlIIIIIIIIIIIIlIIIIIIIIlllllIIllII For
Better Things in Confectionery  THE PALLAS  The Home of DE LUXE Chocolates 
LUNCHES ICE CREAM  IIIIIII III und111111u[]S111lu11 1I1 1111vnCII[]IIIIII
Il II iII I[]nIIIIlluyOllIIIICIIJIII[n lIII IIIIIIIII]IIIIIIn[]uC] lll
illell*  Two Hundred Seventy-One

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page [272]

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Oi  Do 9.  4e . l Q Y C +  ,g-whey  C~r::

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 273

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** llIIIlll Ul l IIIIIIG IIIII l11l[1]1iI1I1I1Ii1 llIIIIIIIIilluILIIIIIl
uL]II 111111111111[]IIIIIIIIIIII1 I1II1 111111111[1i1ll1 llum l l 7illl
lllluI II  Phone 416 110-17 Elk St.  SANITARY  MEAT CO.  We Handle Nothing
but the  Very Best in  MEATS and PROVISIONS  - And Our Prices Are Right 
SCall Us Up and Give Us a Trial IllU[]IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIliIIIIIIIi lI
nlIalI] lIlInIInuIIuI I II IIIIII lllnillll  r  i 111n1[171 1 n111[ II1111[
11111111[7111111111nni1i nui l[ IIIIIl inllite  -=  o HOTEL VICTORIA 
BELLINGHAM'S NEW HOTEL  12th and Harris  The HOTEL VICTORIA is admirably
equipped throughout to make your stay in  Bellingham one of pleasure.  The
rates are reasonable. The service is of the best.  First-Class modern
structure, consisting of one hundred beautifully furnished rooms,  half
with private bath  The best dining-room in the city. Ideal for banquets,
private dinners, etc. Good  music. Excellent food.  Dinner Dances Wonderful
Floor Genuine Entertainers  FREE GARAGE  Two Hundred Seventy-Three

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GOING HOME  Then Lock over our line of  TRUNKS SUIT CASES BAGS  All to be
Closed out at Half Price ,  SLadies' Ready-to-Wear BASILS Dry Goods = 
Shoes Men's Furnishings  4 IIII ll11111111[1111111IIIIIIIlIuIlIIIIlIlIl
1111luluIIIIlluc]IIIIIIIIlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIi nIllulnIIIIIIIu
nimiIIIIIlIIIIIIIIlII IIl1lEQ  V 214 llull uit l lll lll llllllllltl l1ll
l31 1 l[ Ili iiIIIIIII llll IIIIII IIIIIIIII II lll1ll1 lt1l 1111111 lIII
IIIII1 3 llllllllI  a THE BEST IN GRADUATION DRESSES  A Large Assortmcnt of
High Quality Shoes and Slippers  10% Discount on all goods to all Normal
Students  MONTAGUE   MCHUGH  . Illl ll illl llllllllljCl l I IIIlli II III!
illIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIII I IIIIIIIIIII I III IIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIi
IILIIIIIIIII llllllltlllllll  IF IT'S DONE WITH  HEAT  You Can Do It Bettzr
 RANGES WATER "Vulcan" WITH HEATERS  "Wedgewood" " Ruud"  "Clark Jewell''
''Reliable''  G-A-S  HOUSE HEATING "Hall" Hot Air - "Argola" and "Ideal"
Water and Steam  PUGET SOUND TRACTION, LIGHT   POWER CO.  " IIIIIIIIIIIII]
IIIuI1I1II1II1II1III IIIII II II IIl lu l IIIIIIIIIIUII IImI IIIlIlI I
IIIIIIIIIIlI uIlIII III I IIIIIIIIIII1 11111l 1I Ii III  Two Hundred
Seventy-Four

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BELLINGHAM PUBLIC  MARKET  Flowers for Every Purpose  Fancy and Staple P
Corsages and Wedding Bouquets  Groceries  BERRY'S FLOWER SHOP  MARKET
GROCERY  Phone 842  I[IE 1111 111 IIIIIIII1111111111 u11Iul 111 u I[ IIIII
111 i lllll°[ul llll[ui  lll  ll  lll] ll[ ll l l [  7  ll  u 
lll  I  [  III ulllll  i Independent Meat   Sausage I  Manufacturing Co. =
If you haven't tried Bread and  0. BRATTKUS, Owner  Pastry at the Public
Market  All Kinds of Bakery, you want to try it to-  Fresh, Salt and Smoked
Meats day Its the best for the least  Specialist in German Sausages  PHONE
350 money  211 11111 111[711 111111111 )Il l1111111111[171
2HIIIIIIIIE111111 1111L27H illl1l li IIIIII 1ll 1III7HIII[ll1ll[7II1Ill
IIIIIIIII [ 71 [7III 111II  OLD HOLLAND BELLINGHAM FISH CO. OLD HOLLAND  5
CREAMERY CO.  - All Kinds of Fresh Fish CREAMERY CO.  Smoked and Salt Fish 
Smoked and Salt Fish We Carry the Most Complete Line of  RETAIL AND
WHOLESALE . =A LDairy Products in the City.  PHONE 406  COTTAGE CHEESE our
SPECIALTY  WATKIN'S PRODUCTS  - MARKET SHOE  - and  SHOP  MARKET CANDY SHOP
° You Get the Best for Less  Stall 10 Phone 374  A n~mn~ m~mRn
"n Hn"~~~nmn"mE_nmHHm  Two Hundred Seventy-Five

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Miss Sperry: "Who is it that h'as a halo over his head and a great  bunch
of keys in his hands ?"  Normal Student: "That's God's janitor."  -0- 
"This morning an old gentleman was run over at a grade crossing." "By a
train, of course?"  "No, an auto beat the train to it."  -0-  C'arrol H.
(at piano recital) : "What is that charming thing lie is  playing ?" 
Vivien L.: "A piano, y'dub."  -0-  Robert Tunstall: "Why, this room reminds
me of a prison."  Landlord : "Well, sir, it's all a matter of what one is
used to."  -o-  Musical mother (to nurse) : "If baby won't sleep, bring her
here; I'll  sing her something."  Nurse: "Oh, madam, it won't do any good.
I have already threatened  her with that."  -o-  Carroll (sarcastically) :
"Some people think the way to take life seriously  is not to have a good
time."  -o-  "Sit down," said a nervous school teacher to a student who was
making  a noise.  "I won't do it," was the impudent answer.  "Well, then,
stand up. I will be obeyed."  -0-  "Did any of you evr see an elephant's
skin ?" inquired a teacher of an infant class.  "I h'ave," exclaimed one. 
"Where?" asked the teacher.  "On the elephant."  -0-  1111 .'. /XA  Two
Hundred Seventy-Six

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*IIIIIIIIiIIIll IIIIIII IIIIlll11111111111I1I1I1I IIIIII llIIIIIC
IllIIlilIIIIIIIIIt lillmillIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII ll IIIIIIIIIK.) 
HAMMONS   OGDEN  GROCERS  1325 Commercial Street Phone 747  Free Delivery 
]IIIIllIIIIIIIIll IIIIIIIID IIIIIIIII IIClll lI IIIIII I aIIiIl I
[IIIIIlImI IIIilluiII IIiI IIIIII II II lIIII ll iIuIlInImll u lII1 ul
nlluD llnIII  Carl S.: "My arms ache, they are so empty--"  Margaret P.
(interrupting) : "Does your head ache, too?"  -0-  ve Got 
11111[IIIIIIIIIII III11 1IIIu 11111IIIIIIIIII iliim I tIIIIIuI IIIIiimu
lu1111111llnliliull in lilu ilit  EVERY ATHLETIC  ACTIVITY  is represented
Complete  Line of /  ATHLETIC GOODS  and College Athletic Departments 
WRIGHT   DITSON Represented by Piper   Taft  in Seattle, Washington -  *
]IIIIIIIIIIIIC]IIIIIIIIIllIII IIIIIIII ]IIIIIIlilluIIIIII IID llu
llulu1111I1II1I1IILII DIIIIIII llulu ll[  Two Hundred Seventy-Seven

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']IIIIIIlIIIIII 11111111D IIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIllu IIIIIIIIIIIIIIDIII
IIIIIIID IIIIIIIIIIII llIIllullu lllIIllIIIIIIIIIIIIIll IIIIIII [lillluil
ll illllU IIIIIIIIIllu lllIIIlill[£*  Y Every Thing That's  Good
in  ICE CREAM  "None Better"  TULIP CREAMERY CO.  1329 Dock Street Phone
137  11I111 111111 111 1111I1 11 1 u1 II II III1 llu lu IIIIIIn lIIIIIlu
IIIl1lI IIIIID IIIIIIIIIIIIG HIIIIIII1llu l1II1ll1IIII0IIII1lillulu
lll1IIIIIIIID IIII1ll1IIII ,  THE BELLINGHAM NATIONAL BANK  BELLINGHAM,
WASHINGTON  = =  Capital and Surplus $500,000.00  V1 1n11111
u1111111111111nIIIIIlu IIIIIllu I1111111111 u 1111111111111 liII llII II I
I IIIIII 111111011ili IIIIII llnimIIIIIIlIlIIIIIIIfIlil1[WHEELER'S
ELECTRICALLY BAKED BREAD  1307 Dock St.  - "Deliciously Different " 
Excells in Quality  =  ASK YOUR GROCER  _ =  Fresh Assortment of French
Pastry at All Times  Two Hundred Seventy-Eight

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= quality-prTioco  eas tc aproduce  PHOTOGRAPHS  =afford to po =  =a = 
treatmncut an(d careful consideration of yo ur  wishes-is  thc policy of  -
u  = =  S=_  of 415Sifor-nm0s ......  quality--  Two H- undred
Seventy-Nine

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Flora pointed to the masses of clouds in the sky, saying:  "I wonder where
those clouds are going ?"  He:  "I think they are going to thunder."  -0- 
"It's a great comfort to be left alone," said John O'Rourke, "especially 
when your sweetheart is with you."  -0-  "Dewey, do you understand French
?"  "Yes, if it's spoken in English."  Irritable Schoolmaster : "Now, then,
stupid, what's the next word?  What comes after  cheese ?"  Dull Boy: "A
mouse, sir."  -0-  Bill Jones stole a saw, and on his trial he told the
judge that he  only  took it as a joke.  "How far did you carry it ?"
inquired the judge.  "Two miles," answered the prisoner.  "'Ah! Mr. Jones,
that's carrying a joke too far," said the judge, and the  prisoner was
sentenced to jail for three months.  -- o-  Nellie Brown (entering The Owl
in a great hurry) : "Gimmeoneboxof- powderplease."  Clerk (also in a great
hurry) : "Facegunerbugmadam ?"  -0-  The man who wins is the one  whose
head is a parking place for ideas,  and not a mere rendezvous for hair. 
-0-  Mr. Hunt: "Hello! Is this the weather bureau?"  Ans.: "Yep."  Mr.
Hunt: "How about 'a shower this afternoon ?"  Ans.: "Wrong number, sir,
call the sanitarium."  -o-  "Chins in! Aw, Miss Frank, we're getting double
chinned."  -0-  (M* Two Hundred Eighty

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**]IIIIIIlllIIIIIIllu11111111(1111IIIIIIIC1111IIIIIllIIIIItilIC7IIIIIIIIIIIILill1ilitH1lilliluulllfilullllluil1illfil
[]IIlIil IIIIlIL"t  WHEN YOU THINK of ENTERTAINING your FRIENDS  THINK of
the  y =  PHEASANT  Service with a Smile MANAGEMENT MRS. W. H. WILLIAMS 
LINCOLN - FORDSON  SALES SERVICE STORAGE  OPEN ALL THE TIME  DIEHL MOTOR
CO.  Authorized Bellingham Dealers  V IlliIIIIIII
III1111111111I1I1I[liillul lillu  IIIIIllIIII 111i 1 1lillifilllli ll ill
ill llllIIIlilG IIIllIIIIIIC IIIIIllIIII 11illIIIll 1 11illi1llu
IIIIIFIIIIIllIII IIIIIIIII  nI1 I nIIIIII1 I111II1ll1l1in1a1l linalillin
glill illin inIIIIIIu lulIIIIIIII uIIIIIIIIIIIInI[ IIIllulu1
IIIII11117IIIIIIIIII[nflllinulin inIIIIIIII1nIIIIIIIIIII"r Why Adopt 
°THE RICE SYSTEM OF BUSINESS PENMANSHIP  1-It is no experiment.
The results excel others.  2-The system in both movements hnd characters is
better classified than -  any other.  4- The author's personal work in
Bellingham State Normal and in city and  county institutes is a most vital
consideration.  3-The system, without doubt, has more teaching devices and
aids for teach-ers  than ever before presented in any work on writing.  For
Further Particulars Address  W. J. RICE, 227 MASON BUILDING, BELLINGHAM,
WASH.  nlillininu11 IIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIl1II[IIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlin
IIIIIIIII II[InII lll ll n IIIIIIIIIII II l ian  Two Hundred Eighty-One

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 282

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Faculty Fiction ? By the Author of "The Last Retreat"  Mr. Kibbe: "Come on,
Mr. Bever, we can't miss dance hour."  Miss Belton: "Pep her up. Let's do
the 'Shiek' justice."  Miss Wilson: "Pupils in the library may now take ten
minutes of  Phusical exercises."  Miss Long: "Let's lie down on the job." 
Miss Mead: "Moisture is a wonderful thing. The Sophomores go  wading on the
campus tomorrow."  Miss Druse : "If the amount of paints wasted on paper
was diminished,  women would have a cheaper chance at tinting their
physogs."  Mrs. Vaughan: "The dickens with punctuation."  Miss Earhart:
"Nope, can't teach! Your dress is too long."  Miss Woodard: "Girls, he good
sports. Don't get home too early."  -0-  Mr. Phillippi: "What does A. C.
stand for?"  Carl L.: "Just a minute; I have it on the tip of my tongue." 
Mr. Phillippi: "Spit it out, then; it's arsenic."  -0-  Madge Forner
(shaking Molly) : - "Eight o'clock! Eilght o'clock!"  Molly Curtis
(sleepily) : "Did you? Better call a doctor."  -0-  Soph.: "Have you ever
taken chloroform?"  Frosh. (making out program) : "No, let's see, what hour
does it come?"  -0-  Esther L.: "I shall never marry till I find a man who
is my direct op-posite."  Catherine W.: "That's all right. There are lots
of intelligent men in  Bellingham."  ---  " ev  ",  Two Hundred Eighty-Two

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 ' Iilllll[7IIIilll]IIIIIIIL IIIIIIII7IIIIIIIL 1111111[7111111171111111[
1111111171111111[ 1111111[71111111]Illllll[ IIIIIIIIQ  Y  Y  _  A  - Y  YY 
_  Y  Y  A Y_  Y  Y  _  A  - Y  AC  Y  - Y  y _~  -; Y  - Y  Y  A  Y -  _ 
n  A - Y -  Y  Y -  Y -  =A  - Y  Y -  - Y  -_ Y  7111111[ 111111[ Illlll[
111111[ 11111117 1111117111111] llllll] IIIIII] IIIIII[ 111111L 1111llg
llllll7111111$  Tw unrdEihy-he

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W. L. SUTHERLEN A. H. MILLER  THE IRISH PRINTING CO.  PRINTERS  Located in
the Center of Bellingham  Two Hundred Eighty-Four  iK !!llk4l llklUll!V!!
JU!!U!lU !U LJ  c~iu  L

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 285

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AUTOGRAPHS  Two Hundred Eighty-Five  __

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page 286

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AUTOGRAPHS  Two Hundred Eighty Six

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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page [3] of cover


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     Klipsun, 1923 - Page [4] of cover

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