Primary tabs

1926

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926


     ----------

[no text this page]

     ----------




     Klipsun, 1926 - Cover

     ----------

_, _ _  -i  _  .:_..- - -  .. Y" !,r  .ry.. y .. ... ~., .... .. ....f - -
- _ __  ":  r ... :..  - .. fi r.  . _ - -  x  .v ^ .^ - - '1  . s  .  "  r
_ __  .ti - " - _  h ale" _ !r  ; '"  ," lt;iV  .,......  .- . ..... ,._. .
,.....  -: -.. ,.. .... .. ::,-.....:. .,,...P ' .... ,  _-. .. :... . - -
- - - - -  .... .v.'t " 'n'^  :-  .. ,.. v.. ,.  .. .. '"  _  ._ -.. .. ._
_. ,. -  .. ti  :t "  :...,1.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [2] of cover

     ----------

- i  .0  Q  L~

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [i]

     ----------

F:I : -' ;

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [ii]

     ----------

d  r  ,

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [iii]

     ----------

o -- :

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [iv]

     ----------

Copyright  Velma LeMaster, Editor  Albert Tidball, Business Mgr.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [v]

     ----------

The Tear Book  of the  .Associated Students  of the Washington State Normal
School  Bellingham

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [vi]

     ----------

DEDICATION  C.. 0 that spirit  ofthe Vikings  of old which led them to 
brave the dangers of the unconquered sea that they  might discover new and 
better things, we dedicate  this volume.  ,il  . . . . . . .  . . .

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [vii]

     ----------

Contents  DEDICATION  FEATURE  ADMINISTRATION  DEPARTMENTS  CLASSES 
TRADITIONS ACTIVITIES:  ASSOCIATED STUDENT BODY  ATHLETICS  DRAMA  MUSIC 
DEBATE  RECREATION ORGANIZATIONS  HUMOR

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [viii]

     ----------

The Viking  He scorns to rest, 'neath smoky rafter  He plows with his boat
the roaring deep.  The billows boil, the storm howls after  But the tempest
is only a thing of laughter  The Sea King loves it better than sleep.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [ix]

     ----------

Viking Vigil

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [x]

     ----------

*1  _ .. __ _ _

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [xi]

     ----------

Classes

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [xii]

     ----------

;U

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [xiii]

     ----------

Activities

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [xiv]

     ----------

f:14  :  -..1  ":yi%  a

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [xv]

     ----------

Or ganiza tions

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [xvi]

     ----------

1

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [xvii]

     ----------

'  2'  1  ..  \ a  ._  -  -

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [xviii]

     ----------

- --  C  a 0  I:, P  -I  : ;~ ~

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 9

     ----------

+"  i4.  -  ?:; .. cae

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 10

     ----------

4  (I."r ,  .I  A ,.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 11

     ----------

4  , ..  _  Y  ' '

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 12

     ----------

.1:  Ile  2..,.  ' T f  ti-

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 13

     ----------

x ; ,W .  rrwai

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 14

     ----------

~ 2 11

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 15

     ----------

Adn  ADELE JONES  Dean of Women  rinistration  C. H. FISHER  President 
JAMES BEVER W. J. MA Dean Dean of  ARQUIS  Men

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 16

     ----------

New Library  The plans for the new Bellingham Normal library have been
completed. Its  erection will mean a great deal to the Normal, from the
standpoint both of usefulness  and of beauty. For a number of years, there
has been a great need for a library.  At first it was only a vague thought,
but now it has become a vital thing of the  near future, through the
acquistion of adequate funds, a building site, and the completion of final
plans.  The new library will stand on Cedar street, facing north. The chief
charac- teristics  of the building are to be s'mplieity in architecture and
a beauty which  comes from perfect proportion. The sloping roof and the
great arched windows  add greatly to the beauty of the structure. The plans
were drawn by C. J. Gould  of Seattle. Mr. Gould is a distinguished
architect of national recognition.   The Normal library will be three
stories in height. The storage room and  receiving room for books, the
mechanical plant, and the cloak rooms will be situated  on the first, or
ground floor; also the first tier of stacks.  On the second floor, facing
the front, there will be a large room, 42 feet by 67  feet, which will
easily accommodate 140 readers. It is planned that this room  will be used
for reserved books and special  subject matter, thus relieving the main 
reading room.  Across the hall from this roem will be located the Library
of Children's I.itera-ture.  This room will be the same size as the room
already described, and will accommodate as many readers. It will also face
the front. The work in children's  literature will be developed rapidly, in
the Normal, both for the child and the  student teacher.  There will be a
special faculty reading room, a small room for the library  staff, and a
work room in the rear of the second floor. On the second floor we also 
find the second tier of book stacks.  But the crowning feature of this new
structure is the beautiful reading room  which will extend the entire
length of the top floor, facing north. The great  arched windows on all
sides of the room, nine in all, will provide an ideal natural

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 17

     ----------

light. This room will easily accommodate 200 readers. The third tier of
book  stacks is connected with the  south side of the room on the left. On
the right side  the cataloguer's room and offices of the librarian and the
reference librarian con-nect  directly with the main reading room.  A large
vestibule, joining the main reading room at the central part of the  south
wall, will contain the main charging desk and the card catalogue. Also, the
 offices of the staff are accessible from the vestibule, for the sake of
convenience. Since the student will enter the reading room through this
vestibule, one can  readily see the convenience of this arrangement. In
fact, in contemplating the  entire plan, it will be observed that thought
has been given to the solution of the  problem of a demand for immediate
and adequate service. On entering the vestibule,  one will find the tools
of the library ready for service, and the library staff easily  located.
The book stacks will be accessible from any reading room.  In planning the
reading room and the special study room, the purpose was to  provide a
place where the school can develcp independent research work  by the 
student and carry on the work which has been started in the
library-instruction class.  HistorU of the Institution  The Viking spirit
dates back many thousands of years but the school in which  it is now found
is not so old. Yet it was more years ago than most of the present-day 
Vikings can remember that the first normal school established in the Puget 
Sound country was located at Lynden, Whatcom County, Washington. This
institu-tion  was organized as a private enterprise, but later an effort
was made to secure  state aid for its support. When this plan failed, a
movement was started for the  establishment of a state normal school in
this part of the commonwealth. The first  step resulted in the passage of a
law creating a commission to select a site somewhere  in Whatcom County.
Several sites were offered, and finally the present beautiful  location was
selected.  In 1895 the first appropriation for a building was made.  The
original building  was erected the next year. After various ups and downs
concerning appropriations for equipment and maintenance, the school
formally opened for work on September  6, 1899.  In addition to the
original structure, eight other buildings have been erected:  the training
school building in 1901, the gymnasium the same year, Edens Hall in  1905
(which was replaced by a beautiful new structure in 1921), the science
annex  in 1913, a central heating plant in 1917, and the Emergency Hospital
in 1921. Now  we are preparing for a new library, and many are the other
plans for the campus.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 18

     ----------

folh Daowinf 14  ALA _ _..'  ;1114t . c  t  l   lt;.  w  -z r. Art-r  l 
yr1  K it  v I  I x  F 2:  x

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 19

     ----------

NAPlot  JUT  \ w  - IFV "Y  k". A  (if ry  lose

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 20

     ----------

40

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 21

     ----------

Alma Mater  Alma Mater, Alma Mater,  Hail, all hail to you.  Honor, fame
and glory, too,  All hail the White and Blue.  (Rah-rah-rah)  Teams
deserving, all unswerving  Hold thy trust in hand,  No better school 
you'll find  In all the land.  t

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 22

     ----------

JUNIOR-SENIORS  Senior College  The Viking spirit will out! For several
years there have been Vikings who  so desired additional education, and who
so loved their Alma Mater that they  have stayed after the regular two-year
course and have taken up third and fourth  year work.  This year there have
been no fourth-year students, but a goodly number of  third-year Vikings
have made up for this lack. The majority of the members of  this class are
students who enter with an advanced classification from other col-leges 
and universities, for according to the law, these students may, after a
year  at a normal school, teach in the grammar schools of this state.  From
this history of these third and fourth year classes, we learn that since 
1923, nearly one hundred three-year diplomas, and approximately twenty
four-year  diplomas have been issued. Of the latter, only two have been
granted to students  who have done all their college work in  this school.
There are five definite  advanced courses that are offered for these
students; they are those in junior high  school, intermediate, primary,
rural, and administrative.  These Vikings of the so-called college group
have not devoted all their time  to study; for among their numbers are
found athletes, dramatists, artists, and  musicians. They also are members,
and many of them are officers, of the various   literary, social,
leadership, and scholarship groups found in this school.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 23

     ----------

PAUL VAN CRUYNINGEN  BELLINGHAM  ESTHER L. ANDERSON  FERNDALE, WASH.  RALPH
P. BAILEY  RACINE OHIO  MARY GERI  SOUTH BELLINGHAM  LILIAN B. MEYS  HULL,
IOWA  WINNIE FERGUSON  LONGVIEW  ADELAIDE NICHOLS  SEATTLE  WARD PRIGG 
VASHON  DELORA NAPIER  HARLAN, KY.  DELIA L. KELLER  L. A. KIBBE  EDUCATION
 EDUCATION

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 24

     ----------

Sophomores  Brave spirits of the Vikings! With the ideals of courage,
adventure and self-sacrifice  the noble class of 1926 embarked, in its
stalwart ship, upon the Seas  of Study and Good Times at B. S. N. S. in the
fall of 1924. Bravely and  courageously has that class carried on the
spirit of the Vikings, and now it sights  the harbor of graduation.  What
have they done to merit such adjectives as "courageous," "brave," and 
"noble?" you ask. The Viking spirit has led many brave Sophs to the front,
and  they have given much to their Alma Mater and in turn have received
much.  On entering that slough of despondency called Freshmanitis this
noble class  bravely fought its way through, and emerged victorious; for
who has not heard  of the feats of the class of '26? Donovan Matheny was
elected Viking Chief of  the class in its freshman year, with Viking Howard
Wilder and Viqueens Evelyn  Hagen and Margaret Chambers to help guide the
'26 ship through the perils of  normal school and the ridicules of
upper-classmen.  With flags flying, the ship sailed from freshman infancy
to sophomore ma*  turity. After testing its strength with such excellent
results, the class had  more self-assurance during its sophomore year. With
Carrie Crippen as chief  and Garland Okerlund, Orlena Young and Margaret
Black to aid her this year, the  ship sailed on without trouble toward the
goal of graduation.  Noble are the men and women this good ship carries
upon its deck. The  brave deeds of the class during this, its last year,
are worthy of honor and praise  from under-classmen. Many stalwart Vikings
of the class of '26 helped the  football, basketball, baseball, tennis, and
track teams to win great victories from  the Savages, Huskies, Wildcats,
etc. Too, there were fair maidens who valiantly  defended the Sophomore
name in hockey, basketball, volleyball, and baseball.   And more, there
were representatives in debate, dramatic, scholastic, and leader-ship 
clubs from these worthy Sophomores; who, I ask, acquitted themselves with 
more credit in the perilous currents and tides of the board of control of
the student  body than these same members of the class of '26?  Two class
dances were given during the year, both of which showed that the 
Sophomores had still another prepossessing characteristic-originality. Both
 dances, one of which was in the fall quarter, and the other during the
winter,  were well attended and much enjoyed by the Sophomores and all men
of the  school. Several class meetings were held during the year for such
weighty pur-poses  as election of officers and decisions on commencement
announcements,  -cards, dresses, and other such necessaries which accompany
graduation.  All in all, the good ship has weathered its way toward the
Port of Graduation  in a  worthy style and from there its crew will embark
in various pursuits.  From this modest account, it may be seen that the
Vikings of the Class of '26  cannot fail, after their two exceptionally
successful years at Bellingham Normal.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 25

     ----------

RUSSEL ANDERSON  ASHFORD  EDITH ALLISON  WINLOCK  ALVERRA ANDERSON 
FERNDALE ANNE ENGELE  PORTLAND, ORE.  SERRENA ARMENTROUT  CENTRALIA  KATIE
ARONES BELLINGHAM  L. AUREN  BELT, MONT.  SVERRE ARESTAD  CUSTER  MARION
AMUNSEN KIRKLAND  LAURA ARUNDEL  ROSLYN  EMMA ANDERSON  SEATTLE  SOPHIA
ANDERSON POINT ROBERTS  MARGARET C. ANDERSON  FERNDALE  DOROTHY ANDERSON 
TACOMA GEORGE ABBEY  ANACORTES  PELAGIUS WILLIAMS  EDWARD J. ARNTZEN 
SOCIAL SCIENCE SOCIAL SCIENCE

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 26

     ----------

RUTH M. ALLEN  TACOMA  FAE ALLEN  SEATTLE  MARTHA C. AVEN  ABERDEEN  L. C.
ALGYR SKYKOMISH  RUTH ANDERSON  LYNDEN  ETTA R. ANDERSON  SNOHOMISH 
LUCILLE M. ALLEN TACOMA  ELENORA ALDRIDGE  ARLINGTON  ELEANOR ADAMS 
SILVERTON, ORE.  GLADYS BURROWS  SEATTLE  FRANCES AMUNDS  BELLINGHAM 
RICHARD BELL  PORT STANLEY LILLIAN BARNES  VADER  ESTHER BUSWELL 
BELLINGHAM  RUTH J. BLACK  VANCOUVER, WN. NORA B. CUMMINS . SOCIAL SCIENCE 
HERBERT C. PHILIPPI SCIENCE

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 27

     ----------

EDWIN N. BAILEY  MENLO  ALICE BUTLER  BURLINGTON  EDITH W. BURTON  POMEROY 
VERA E. BUTLER  PORT ANGELES  HAZEL B. BISBEE  BELLINGHAM  VIVIAN BRELOER 
NAPAVINE ANNA BELLE BOOTH  ABERDEEN  BERTHA BIGLER  GRAND MOUND  AGNES
BESTEL  EAST STANWOOD  LORENE BONEBRAKE  ROSEBURG, ORE.  ADA BRANNICK 
ANACORTES  GLADYS M. BURTON  POMEROY  VERA R. BLANKENSHIP  RANDLE  MAY
BORIGO  CAMAS  RAY BREMNER  BELLINGHAM  HILDA F. ROSENE  LEONA M. SUNDQUIST
 SCIENCE  SCIENCE

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 28

     ----------

GRACE L. BOWEN  BOTHEL  FANNIE M. BRINK  BURTON  MERYL A. BIRD  BELLINGHAM 
SYLVIA BAIRD  WINLOCK  JOSEPH J. BAXTER  MOUNT VERNON  MARGARET E. BURKE 
BELLINGHAM AGNES BUTT  EVERETT  HELEN F. BISHOP  BELLINGHAM  ROSE M.
BACHMAN  SEATTLE  EVA BERGERON  BATTINEAU, N. D.  EVA BOTTS  FERNDALE 
LIBBY BEAN  SEDRO-WOLLEY  ANNE CLEARY  KALISPELL, MONT.  FLO ENA
CHAMBERLAIN  PORTLAND. ORE.  EVELYN CLARK BELLINGHAM  GUNNAR H. BEIrG 
FLORENCE E. JOHNSON  SCIENCE  SCIENCE

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 29

     ----------

MYRTLE CLEMENS  LEAVENWORTH  BLANCHE CUMMINGS  BUFFALO, WYO.  HELEN L. CASE
SEATTLE  EDYTHE CARPENTER  STANWOOD  THOMAS LIEB  BURLINGTON  HELEN M.
CORNER SUMNER  WRENNIE CHAPMAN  FERNDALE  MELBA COFFMAN  BELLINGHAM  INEZ
E. CLARK SEATTLE  RUTH CAUDY  PORTLAND  LULU CHOPIN  MONROE  ETTA COUGHLIN 
OURAY, COLORADO  DORA CADY  TACOMA  MARY CULVER  BELLINGHAM  CARRIE CRIPPEN
 DRYAD ANNETTE H. VAUGHAN  M. BELLE SPERRY  ENGLISH  ENGLISH

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 30

     ----------

DAISY CLAUSON  SEQUIM  MARY CRESPI  CLE ELUM  BEATRICE CAIRNS  VANCOUVER
BERNICE CHRISTIANSON  STANWOOD  GRACE CLAYTON  CASHMERE  VIRGINIA CARLSON
BREMERTON  RAPHAEL H. DAVIS  ANACORTES  KATHRYN DEGEEST  FERNDALE  JANE
DAGGER  RENTON  IRENE DAHNKEN  MOUNT VERNON  GENEVIEVE DUNAGAN  FERNDALE
DANIEL DAMITIO  ELMA  ARLENE DEAN  A BELLINGHAM  JENNIE H. DALING 
WATERVILLE GRACE DOHNER  EVERETT  JEAN LAMBET .ENGLISH « 
BEJOANTSRONCENEG LISH  BEATRICE  JOHNSON ENGLISH

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 31

     ----------

VERA DOANE  AUDRIE, ALTA., CANADA  HILDUR ENGDAHL  MOUNT VERNON  NANETTE
DOBBS PORT TOWNSEND  ELIZABETH EATON  SEATTLE  MARY ERICKSON  CLATSKANIE,
ORE. GENEVIEVE DRESSER  SEATTLE  NANCY ENGLUND  PORT ORCHARD  MARGATET ELDE
 MOUNT  VERNON  ANGUS EDWARDS  SNOHOMISH  KATHLEEN EWART  HARLEM. MONT. 
ELLEN ESTER  AUBURN  MAMIE ENGBRETSON  QUINCY  MRS. STELLA EDSON 
CARBONAODO  STANLEY EVATT  BELLINGHAM  GRACE ERICKSON  KIRKLAND  OLIVE
EDENS .ENGLISH  MAY MEAD NURSE

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 32

     ----------

MARGARET FOSS  SEATTLE  VIOLET TATE  ANACORTES  LUCILLE FORCUM  WHITEFISH,
MONT. ELIZABETH FLORENCE  UNION, N. D.  MARY K. FOSJACK  ABERDEEN  JOHN
FITZGERALD BELLINGHAM  VERA FORBES  BELLINGHAM  MARGARET FISHER  CASHMERE 
RAYMOND FRICK  SDAYTON  HELEN FOUNTAIN  PORT TOWNSEND  ALICE GROBEY  SUMNER
 BENECIA GENTHER   BELLINGHAM  J. E. GRICE  BELLINGHAM  VIVIAN GREEN 
CARNATION  ETHEL GUIBEAULT SEATTLE  ALMA G. MADDEN . S PEECH  VICTOR H.
HOPPE . SPEECH

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 33

     ----------

EMILY HJALTALIN  BELLINGHAM  HARRIETT HEATH  SEQUIM  PHILOMENA HYNES 
BELLINGHAM MARY HOYER  BELLINGHAM  MARY ELLEN HELLERMAN  FAITH HOUCK 
SEATTLE  ALICE J. HERMSEN  BELLINGHAM  REBEKAH HUDSON  ACME  ELSIE HOLLAND 
BELLINGHAM  BESSIE HEARD  EVERETT  OLGA HOGLUND  FERTILE, MINN.  EVELYN
HAGEN  BELLINGHAM  MARY HOSKAMER  BELT  VERNA HESS  BELLINGHAM  KATHRYN
HOLMES  SEATTLE  MARIE C. DRUSE   HAZEL BREAKEY  FINE ARTS  FINE ARTS

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 34

     ----------

NARCISSA HABERSETZER  FRANCES  EDITH HARLAN  EVERETT  MARTHA HERRLE  MOUNT
VERNON  JACK HOFFMAN  REDMOND  HELEN A. HARRISON  FERNDALE  MARY HUSEBY
HELENA, MONT.  JOSEPHINE HANZIK  MALIN, ORE.  LELIA M. HARTLEY  WENATCHEE 
ETHEL HEATH  SEQUIM  LORENCE HEIKELL  CENTRALIA  LAILA E. HONEY  BELLINGHAM
 DOROTHY HILL   CHEHALIS  RUTH E. HENDERSON  PORTLAND  BENNETT HOWARD  SEAT
rLE  ELEANOR HOBBS   TACOMA  MARJORIE .JOHNSTON  MARGUERITE STUART  . FINE
ARTS  FINE ARTS

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 35

     ----------

LILLY JOHANSEN  FALL CITY, WN.  RUTH HOLL  BURLINGTON  MILDRED B. -;ENSE 
MENLO IRENE JENSVOLD  BELLINGHAM  ROBERTA JOHNSON  OLYMPIA  WENDELL IVERSON
 BENTON CITY  ALICE JOST  MOUNT VERNON  MARY JOHNSON  ARLINGTOK  BERNARD
JACOBUS ANACORTES  GLADYS JENSEN  FARGO, N. D.  VIOLET JURSTRUM  GIG HARBOR
 EDITH R. JACKSON  PORTLAND  JULIA JENSEN  ESMOND, N. D.  LAVINA HAASE 
BELLINGHAM  GLEN JONES  BELLINGHAM  GEORGIA GRAGG  HELEN BEARDSLEY , 
PENMANSHIP  LANGUAGE

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 36

     ----------

NORINE KELLOGG  TONASKET  BLANCHE KRAMER  SEATTLE  JESSIE KIRBY  BELLINGHAM
GENEVA KULIN  MOUNT VERNON  HELEN STONE KANAAR  BELLINGHAM  EBBEN KINSEY
BLAINE  MARJORIE LAVEILLE  BELLINGHAM  ERNESTINE LYNN  BELLINGHAM  ZENO
KATTERLE SULTAN  OLIVE LEGOE  FERNDALE  JENNIE LARSON  SEATTLE  JOHN KURE 
GALVIN, WN. IRENE KINGSBURY  BREMERTON  ETHEL KELSO  CHEHALIS  MARGARET
LARAWAY ANACORTES  W. J. RICE  MERCY GOVE BROMLEY  PENMANSHIP  MUSIC

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 37

     ----------

WANDA LINDLEY  CASHMERE  MARCELLA LUSTERMAN  BLAINE  MAYME KOSOLA 
ROCHESTER  ALETHA KELLUM  SEATTLE  ANNIE LAURENSON  SEQUIM  THOMAS LARGE 
RYDERWOOD LOUISE LOMSDALE  RICHMOND BEACH  ANNE C. LEWIS  FERNDALE  FRANCES
LAURENSON SEQUIM  EDWIN LIEB  MOUNT VERNON  JUDITH LONEY  FERNDALE  VELMA
LEMASTER EATONVILLE  RUTH V. LITTLE  SEATTLE  RUTH LIAN  SNOHOMISH  DONNA
LEHMAN BELLINGHAM  HAROLD SMITH MUSIC  MAUD SLAWSON Music

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 38

     ----------

HAZEL MURRAY  BAINVILLE MONT.  MILDRED M. MOORE  EVERETT  VERA LAHTI 
CASTLE ROCK  VIOLA MARCELLE  BELLINGHAM  HELEN E. MAY  SEQUIM  CONSTANCE
LONEY  FERNDALE BERTHA MCMAHAN  CHIMACUM  BERTHA MAYNICK  RENTON  LOUISE
MUMAW  ROCHESTER MARGUERITE MITCHELL  STANWOOD  TONY MUSTACICH  BELLINGHAM 
ALBERTA MCLEOD BELLINGHAM  NINA H. MINTON  WINLOCK  LILLIAN H. MCCALLISTER 
SEASIDE, ORE.  WANDA H. MCCORMICK  PORTAGE  PHYSICAL EDUCATION  ANITA S.
HOWARD . PHYSICAL EDUCATION REGINA FRANK

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 39

     ----------

ADDIE MCENANY  VANCOUVER  MAUDE M. MUFFETT  RIDGEFIELD  MRS. WILMA MOORE
BELLINGHAM  PEARL MEAD  WENATCHEE  ELVINA MAGILL  BELLINGHAM  URSULA
MATTECHECK  HELEN MENZE  FERNDALE  MAMIE MANBERG  ROCHESTER  UNA MORRIS
WASHINGTON, IOWA  MRS. IRENE MACDONALD  HOQUIAM  FRANCES MINNICK 
BELLINGHAM RUBY MAGNUSON  GREENBANK  TROY MOORE  SNOQUALMIE  AGNES E.
MADSEN  KENT  MRS.  SARAH MCGILL  SEATTLE  LINDA COUNTRYMAN . HOME
ECONOMICS  KATHLEEN SKALLEY . PHYS:CAL EDUCATION

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 40

     ----------

RUTH Y. NELSON  KIRKLAND  CALVIN J. NICHOLS  GIG HARBER  MARGARET MCFADDEN 
ALPHA  ADA NORLIN  SNOHOMISH  HELEN NELSON  EVERETT  GRACE MCCULLOUGH 
TACOMA JOANNA OSBORNE  ALMIRA  HELEN MOORE  TACOMA  MARTHA NAPIER  CAWOOD,
KY.  AILEEN  ONSTINE  BELLINGHAM  AGNES OTTEN  SYLVANA  OLLYSUM PERRY 
EVERSON  WILLIAM OLSEN  BELLINGHAM  DONALD OLTS  TACOMA  GARLAND OKERLUND 
ANACORTES  GERTRUDE  LONGLEY HOME ECONOMICS  RUTH SCHWARTZ BALL . HOME
ECONOMICS

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 41

     ----------

MINNIE OJA  SEATTLE  MARGARET PUSEY  ANACORTES  RUTH H. OLSEN  COUPEVILLE 
HELEN PRIMLEY  SEATTLE  ELEANOR PETERS  BELT, MONT.  FRANCES PETTIJOHN 
YAKIMA  LOUISA PIKE  NORTH BEND  CARROLL PEASE  MARYSVILLE  BEATRICE
PHINNEY  MOSES LAKE  FERN PROVAN  SEATTLE  ETHEL PAVEL  CENTRALIA  MINNIE
PINSTER  BUSH PRAIRIE  LINNEA PEARSON  HIGH POINT  MARTIN PETERSON 
SNOHOMISH  CLARA M. ROOP  BENTON CITY LILLIAN M. GEORGE  MABEL ZOE WILSON. 
CATALOGUER  LIBRARIAN

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 42

     ----------

OLIVE RAMALIA  SEQUIM  WILLIAM PERRY  EVERSON  LAILA RUE  BELLINGHAM  HAZEL
LIGHTFOOT  BOTHELL  MYRTLE ROSENQUIST  BOW  MILDRED RICHARDS  COVE, ORE. 
ELLEN RASANEE  OAKVILLE  KATHRYN ROOT  WALLA WALLA  EVERETT POLING  SOUTH
BELLINGHAM  .JULIA RUSK  YAKIMA  MURIEL SHAW  SEDRO-WOOLLEY  OLLIE RUCKER 
MOUNT VERNON ETHEL A. SMITH  SEDRO-WOOLLEY  DOROTHA STOVER  OSTRANDER 
RACHEL SWANBERG SEATTLE  CATHERINE MONTGOMERY TECHNIQUE  MARY E. RICH .
DIRECTOR TRAINING SCHOOL

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 43

     ----------

THERESA SPENDAL  RENTON  GLADYS SCOTT  PORTLAND  DOROTHY SILER  NOOKSACK
GRACE M. SHELTON  GOLDENDALE  DONALD STURTZ  FERNDALE  GUINEVERE STANTON
EVERETT  ALICE STEVENS  COWICHE  MARY SNYDER  LA CENTER  ESTHER SEARLS 
CASTLE ROCK  MRS. CLARA STRANG  DUVALL  ELLEN STROM  SEDRO-WOOLLEY  DOLORES
STRAUB COUPEVILLE  LYDIA SWENSON  EVERETT  JEAN SALISBURY  FRIDAY HARBER 
DELLA SLAUGHTER  LONGVIEW  ANNA J. PETERSON  SUPERVISOR IN CITY SCHOOLS 
FANNIE J. RAGLAND TECHNIQUE

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 44

     ----------

HELENA SCHMIDT  MANSFIELD  ERMA STEVENS  CHEHALIS  LORAINE W. SHARNBROICH 
PORT ANGELES  CORINNE SCHULTZ  MOUNT VERNON  VOLLIE M. SILLS  EVERETT  RUTH
STURMAN BELLINGHAM  MYTRLE TiHOMPSON  MOUNT VERNON  FLORENCE THOMPSON 
SEATTLE DOROTHY SOLDAN  SNOHOMISH  ALICE THEODORSON  SNOHOMISH  HELEN
THOMPSON OLYMPIA  LEAH TAFF  BELLINGHAM  T. R. THORDARSON  BLAINE  SYLVIA
TALLACKSON  EAST STANWOOD  BETH TRUITT  BELLINGHAM  BELLE WALLACE TRAINING
SCHOOL  MILDRED MOFFATT . TRAINING :CHOOL

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 45

     ----------

ESTELLA THORNBURY  CHEHALIS  FLOID VAN ETTEN  BELLINGHAM  RUTH TALBERT 
AMAK AMELIA NEIMANN  CHEHALIS  BERNICE C. VIZIO  SEATTLE  JENNIE VAN WHYE 
LYNDEN  MARY WORLOW  LYNDEN  MARGARET WELTER  GABLE, ORE.  RUBY WALDRON 
HALFWAY, ORE. MABEL WILSON  CLARENCE WESTERLUND  FERNDALE  ELIZABETH WILSON
 SEATTLE MARGARET WILSON  RENTON  LOLITA WILSON  KELLOGG, IDAHO  MARJORIE
WELLS  SEATTLE PEARL MERRIMAN . . TRAINING SCHOOL  BLANCHE E. WOLD .
TRAINING SCHOOL

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 46

     ----------

BERTHA WEBER  PROSSER  PHYLLIS WILLIAMS  SNOHOMISH  MAUDE WAKEFIELD
MILWAUKEE, ORE.  GRACE WICKLIND  SEATTLE  DIETRICH BERGEN  BELLINGHAM 
GLADYS BOURM  JOYCE  MARY BYRNES  CHEHALIS  ANNE CARTER  BELLINGHAM 
MILDRED CLARK GARIBALDI  MARGARET BLACK  VANCOUVER  ARLENE M. CARTER 
BELLINGHAM  THEODORE CEDERBURG  BELLINGHAM  FLORIAN CULVER  BELLINGHAM 
PRISCILLA M. KINSMAN . TRAINING  SCHOOL  ESTHER M. CASELY TRAINING SCHOOL

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 47

     ----------

YUKON DRIVER  ST. HELEN, WASH.  DOROTHY DEIGHTON  WHITEFISH, MONT.  ZOA
HARRISON COWDEN  EAST SOUND  ELEANOR DODSON  BELLINGHAM  ANNE FOSJACK 
ABERDEEN MARIAN COWELL  BELLINGHAM  THELMA GILL  BELLINGHAM  RUTH GNAGEY 
BELLINGHAM MARGARET CHAMBERS  TACOMA  CARL HOGGATT  KALAMA  FLORENCE HOLMAN
 VAUGHN LYDA HAND  CUSTER  MAUDEST HOLLENBAUGH  EAST STANWOOD  GERTRUDE
HOGDAHL TACOMA  EINER FRETHEIM  BELLINGHAM  RUTH E. DILLEY REFERENCE
LIBRARIAN  MARJORIE E. DAWSON  SUPERVISOR CITY SCHOOLS

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 48

     ----------

HAZEL KENOYER  LYNDEN  EDITH KIRKMAN  NOOKSACK  ALMA HAGEN  EAST SOUND 
HELEN LIND  WEST SOUND  LILLIAN LOCY  BELLINGHAM  MRS. MARGARET HEATON 
BELLINGHAM MARION LAKE  CARNATION  HELEN M. KENNEDY  SEATTLE  HALLIE LARGE 
RYDERWOOD ELMA LIND  WEST SOUND  WILMA NIEVEEN  PORTLAND  MAE MCNEIL  PORT
GAMBLE MARJORIE MOSHER  BLAINE  lONEJ. MILES  PORT ANGELES  EDITH MCLACHLAN
 DEER HARBER  THOMAS F. HUNT . . SOCIAL SCIENCE  MRS. MAY LOVGREN
TYPEWRITING

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 49

     ----------

AGNES MANLEY  TACOMA  RUTH CAMPBELL  BELLINGHAM  LULU M. MINKLER  CENTRALIA
HELEN MUGDAHL  ELEANOR OLSON  SEATTLE  MILDRED MATSON  CASHMERE  ANNIE D.
OWENS  TACOMA  LILA J. OKERLUND  ANACORTES  EVA PEARL  NOOKSACK  JANICE
SMITH BELLINGHAM  LESTER RHODES  WINLOCK  HAZEL SLOAN  CERES  FREDA SLATER
BELLINGHAM  MRS. L. N. SHULL  BELLINGHAM  ALICE STROBEL  MOUNT VERNON 
ARTHUR KOLSTAD  RESEARCH AND EDUCATION  FRANK S. SALISBURY  RESEARCH AND
EDUCATION

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 50

     ----------

F. A. STRICKEN  DEER PARK  CORA SIEGWORTH  DRYAD  ELSA SCHUBERT  SEATTLE
ROSANNA SCHROEDER  COQUILLE, ORE.  ERLING THORSEN  BELLINGHAM  MIRIAM
TAYLOR OLYMPIA  RHODA TEAGUE  SEATTLE  ELLEN STRAND  SOUTH PRAIRIE  MARION
D. TAYLOR OLYMPIA  ALICE BOSSE TALBOT  SEKIU  ALBERT TIDBALL  BAWLF, ALTA.,
CANADA MARGUERITE SIGGELKO  SEATTLE  OPAL STOKESBURY  BELLINGHAM  HOWARD
WILDER BLAINE  HELEN TRYGSTAD  PORTLAND  L. D. BISSELL INDUSTRIAL ARTS 
JOHN 'RINDAL . . INDUSTRIAL ARTS

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 51

     ----------

LAWRENCE WERNER  SEATTLE  NEVA WICKERSHAM  CLALLAM BAY  MARY B. TAYLOR
MERRITT.ORE.  LUCIE ANN WILSON  EVERETT  MATTIE VAUGHAN  SNOHOMISH 
GERTRUDE WATSON  ANCHORAGE. ALASKA  RUTH BELL YERION  KENT  ORLENA YOUNG 
MONROE AUDREY WELLS  FERNDALE  VERNON ZACHRISON  BLAINE  THERESA C. GUNTHER
. INDUSTRIAL ARTS  HERBERT C. RUCKMICK . INDUSTRIAL ARTS

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 52

     ----------

Freshmen  The halls were filled with excited and wide-eyed Freshmen rushing
to and fro  without destination or purpose, when, in the month of
September, nineteen hun-dred  and twenty-five, our school opened.  What
Freshmen will forget that day or the succeeding ones, when we stood  in
line for hours, and then received the announcement, "Go home and come back 
later. Don't forget your numbers." What Freshman will ever forget the
intelli-gence  exams and achievement tests or the hundreds of printed rules
and regula-tions  passed out for our guidance?  At first it was an easy
matter to distinguish between the Freshmen and the  Sophomores, but now a
wise one indeed is needed to point out a Freshman.  Our worthy Sophcmores
were a great help to us in finding our way through  the labyrinth of rooms,
halls, and stairways. For that we give them hearty  thanks and have shown
our gratitude by supporting their activities on every hand.  Not many days
after our arrival we enjoyed a delightful evening of entertain-ment  and
dancing. The talented members of our class, as well as one of our 
teachers, were allowed to display  their talents. Speaking of talents, the
Freshmen  have won honors in music, dramatics, and literary work.   Not
long after this first program we gave a dance which also showed our 
ability to give ourselves a good time.  Our businesslike attitude was shown
by the way be fought and scrambled  for places between the bookshelves and
at the card catalogue in the library last  quarter. This spirit, never
lacking in vim, has carried us through so far, and  will, we hope, stay
with us until we can thankfully say, "One more river is crossed."  We
already feel a great responsibilty toward our Alma Mater, and we shall 
fill the places left by, our most high and esteemed friends, the
Sophomores, to the  best of our ability.  We are glad for the prospects of
a new and larger library, so that the incom-ing  Freshmen will not have to
sit on the floor.  In both football and basketball such men as Shelton,
Odell, Keppy, Reed,  Gray and others were the mainstays of the teams. In
girls' sports, also, our  girls have shown their mettle by taking the
laurels from the Sophomores in both  volleyball and hockey.  Soon after the
beginning of our sojourn in the land of knowledge, we banded  ourselves
together, and chose a trustworthy president, Mr. Hankins, who has proved
himself very adept in this office. For his helpers we close Alice Cutts as 
vice-president and Vesta Larson as secretary-treasurer.  We are exceedingly
grateful to the faculty, who have stood by us and have   been our friends
through thick and thin, so that when we leave, as most of us  will next
year, we will look  back with pleasant memories upon the days spent  here
and the friends made here.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 53

     ----------

m . s3 'a+w . ; r " , , i' y  yE f 5; :c j'Y« z 7" 'cy  ..  . , 
' '  ,, , z  i  3 .:. i ,,..HSS ,  '  :  +a,  hw W _, ~ } ,, " 3^ ; ", .
'." wr a rrF ... =? y c '; M' urn  s ,,«. ..T., y.. r a :! . -.
, * . -IF , ,F y y ,t s ' i r r4 y , , 3 :.  J ^ « mo'" w?".
'.'h ' y r {... y « ti .fin tits'" 't" 'l --  .. ;  .:. #  x
"'vim'  , , . t  r  ;,  ' x °_  ' lt;

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 54

     ----------

r -  i  .

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 55

     ----------

--77  Traditions

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 56

     ----------

Traditions  In the dim ages gone by, a hardy people took to their tiny 
shell boats and fared forth onto the unconquered sea. Neither the 
superstition of the ages nor the almost insuperable obstacles of  storms
and tides deferred them from journeying far. Just what  ideals and visions
of the future were theirs is not wholly evident,  but the crumbling walls
of a little church, the remains of one of  their tiny boats, or a moldering
heap that was once a tower, are  mute testimony of their conquest of the
unknown. But that these  sea rovers were ever ready to fearlessly seek
newer and better  things than were theirs, is clear. Like the relics which
tell the tale of their wanderings, the tra-ditions  of an institution
indicate its burse and  tie up the best of the  past with the future. The
building of traditions is a matter of the passing of time, but our Alma
Mater, though young, has some custcms which we hope they will dig-nify. 
Some of the blocks of our tower of tradition have already crumbled and have
 been replaced; others are as sound as when first built into the wall,
while our newer  blocks, it is hoped, will withstand the ravages of time.
There are interesting customs  of the past, some of which have fallen into
disuse, and others of the present which  we hope will be continued through
the coming years.  TULIP QUEEN  Bellingham's Tulip Carnival, an annual
celebration, is perhaps one of the most  beautiful of its kind. In the
spring when fields just off Bellingham are ablaze  with tulips, the whole
town joins in a week of festivities wherein the tulip reigns supreme. The
Normal-by-the-Sea is not behind the others in its participation.  Not only
does it conduct booths and carry on other activities, but it also  offers a
candidate for election as Tulip Queen. On more than one occasion the  crown
has been given the candidate of the White and Blue.  ANNUAL CLEAN-UP DAY 
Out of the needs of the school during the beginning years of its life, grew
a  custom that was continued for many years but failed to become a
tradition.  Perhaps in those days the love of the students  for the Alma
Mater was not  greater than that of the present students, but it took a
more practical form of  expression. Annually the students would turn out in
old clothes and spend the day  in manual work about  the campus and Sehome
Hill. They constructed paths,  tennis courts and tracks, cleaned up the
campus  and  cared for the shrubs, cleared the underbrush on Sehome  and
constructed trails through its woods. In fact they  turned their hands to
anything that made the school  and its surroundings a better and more
beautiful place  in which to live. 1K This custom slowly died out, partly
because urgent  Sneed of work of this type no longer existed. However,  the
idea of giving one good day's work for the Alma  Mater-perhaps along some
other line-might well  I P be revived.  SUNSET TRAIL  Sunset Trail was
first opened by Mr. Martin  \J Olson, a member of the Board of Trustees,
for his own  r convenience and for the pleasure of those at Normal. ,V
?rThis trail leads through the woods from the end of  I High Street to
Sunset Knoll overlooking the bay. So  beautiful was its shady, winding path
that it became

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 57

     ----------

quite the habit for couples to steal away and stroll along it during 
leisure hours. A wild strawberry patch at the end of this "lovers'  lane"
also became quite famous. It is said that strawberries could  be picked
there even out of season if one but believed-and dared.  The wheels of
progress have blotted out the dear old trail. Its  lovely associations,
that bade fair to become traditions, must fade  into the past.  THE "Y"
RECEPTION  Shortly after the beginning of the fall term, a reception is 
held for the new students. This reception, which is given under  the
auspices of the Y. W. C. A., is one of our very oldest traditions. Never
has the Association failed in assisting our efforts to make  new students
feel that we are glad to have them in our institution.  FACULTY TRADITIONS 
The faculty of our Alma Mater is not outdone by the  student body in the
way  of activities. Not only are they always ready to join the students in
any frolic, but they have four events among themselves which are to be made
traditional.  During the fall quarter a reception is held for new faculty
members. The Battle  of the Mountain Snows occurs in the winter quarter,
and, like the proverbial lambs,  they hold a frolic known as the Faculty
Frolic in the spring. A salmon bake in  the summer finishes this round of
traditional functions.  WALK OF MEMORIES  During the two years a class is
at Normal there accumulates a mass of  documents and records, associations,
friendships, and grudges-in other words,  many things have become relics
dear to the hearts of the Sophomores or become  things to be forgotten. On
Class Day a metal box is brought forth and  -it is said,  for no one
outside the class really knows-that all these things, the  good and the
bad, are placed within it. Then with much ceremony the box is  interred in
a hole made in the walk that leads south from the main entrance.  Over it
is tenderly placed a marble slap bearing the class numerals. In the years 
to come  these may be read by those digging in the ruins of an ancient
institution,  and when they find a little grudge carefully tucked away in a
corner between the rec-ords  of glorious achievements, they will say, "Ah,
so they were human, after all!"  This custom was started as the inspiration
of Mrs. Ada Hogle Abbott, senior  advisor in 1912. Originally the idea was
that the walk should be constructed  section by section by each succeeding
graduating class. Since that proved too  slow a method for the needs of the
school, the whole walk was built and  now each class merely inserts a slab.
 ALL-SCHOOL PICNIC Almost since the opening of the Normal the stu-dents 
have been dismissed one day during the spring quarter for an all-school
picnic. During the earlier  years of the institution, this picnic coincided
with the annual Clean-up Day. Later the students began to  wander farther
afield for a picnic ground and their journeyings have taken them from the
beauties of the  Pacific to the glories of the Cascades. Each year
stu-dents  are sure that theirs is the most thrilling of all  picnics ever
held. And they have been thrilling, for  on  one, the students were
accidentally submerged in the  lake, on another almost lost in the
crevasses, while on  other occasions they have almost died of mal de mer. 
Yet always they all came home happy and very little  worse for wear.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 58

     ----------

THE KNOLL  About the Knoll, which has itself become a traditional landmark,
 cluster many memories and customs. It has become so wrapped up  in the
life of the school, past and present, it is hoped that the archi-tects  of
the future greatness of the school will not lay desecrating  hands upon its
almost sacred ground.  Since the beginning the children of the training
school have used  it ketfso.r Easter egg- rolling contests and as a place
to hide May bas-  Who has not at least once in his career at good old B. S.
N. S.  stood before its shubbery to have his picture taken? It has always 
been a favorite background for kodaking.  It also has been understood these
many years that the knoll is sacred to  petters. No young man is to be
disturbed if seen on the Knoll with a girl. How-ever,  there is one
drawback to this custom now-the trees no longer droop their  branches
enough to properly screen the interested couples. Another pretty custom in
connection with the Knoll is the use of its as  Greenwood Theatre for the
annual production of a Shakespearean play.  SNEAK DAY  Twenty-six years ago
assembly was in progress as usual when suddenly a  boy jumped to his feet
and yelled, "Come on, gang!" and started for the door followed by every
senior. Soon they had disappeared into the woods, leaving the  school to
the freshmen. This was the beginning of the seniors' annual Sneak Day, 
which was later permitted them as a senior right. The time, the place, and
nature  of the activities are kept a dead secret.  The freshmen, like most
younger brothers and sisters, wanted a holiday, too.  Their protests
finally found sympathetic ears and they were told that if they could  find
out on what day the Sneak was to be made, they, too, could have a day off. 
So today the seniors try to have their Sneak as before and the frosh try to
"get  in" on it, by hook  or crook.  ARBOR DAY  The school has never failed
to observe Arbor Day by planting flowers and shrubbery on Huntoon Drive or
Sehcme Hill. In the earlier days each club  marched out and with great
ceremony planted a tree or shrub on the campus.  With the older members
Arbor Day will always be associated with Miss  Ida Baker and her work in
nature study. Whether the matter in hand was a  lecture or the planting of
vine maple, a part of her spirit was felt. In memory  of her enthusiastic
leadership on Arbor Day, a holly tree from her own yard was  given to the
school after her death. It was planted on the edge of the Knoll  near the
large rock. Her work in nature was further commemorated by Sehome  Hill
being set aside by the school as a bird sanctuary, and by the erection of a
 bird bath in her memory. This last was erected by the Alkisiahs, whose
club  she founded, and sponsored up to the time of her death twenty-two
years later.  EASTER SERVICE  Perhaps the most beautiful and most
soul-stirring custom we have is the  traditional Sunrise Service on the top
of Sehome on Easter morning. All through  the many  years since the school
began, the more devout of the students and faculty  have climbed to the
hill-top that they might sing the glory of God as the rising  sun ushers in
the new day. There with the world and its cares and troubles  below them,
they offer up their prayers and songs of rejoicing as the dawn  breaks, 
symbolizing the glorious Resurrection. These beautiful Easter services, 
under the auspices of the Y. W. C. A., have and always will be carried on
as long  as the school exists.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 59

     ----------

THE MARATHON  Many years ago a wandering cowboy, one Josephine "Curley" 
Hawkings, stopped long enough at the Normal to accumulate a  diploma in a
little less than record time. Used to a hard life he was  much impressed
with the softness of the youth that attended school  here. He conceived the
idea  of a race to the top of Chuckanut.  Through the efforts of Mr. Bond
this race, now called the Mara-thon, became an annual event. The manner of
the race has changed-from  time to time. Formerly it was a free- for-all to
see who could  reach the top of the mountain first, and later, to see which
class  would have the greatest number of its members register at the top v 
during the appointed day. So keen was the interest that boys would  start
at midnight in order to get there first.  In 1909 the Herald offered a cup
to be engraved each year with the name  of the class having the fastest
runners. The race is now well organized  and has  a three-fold purpose: to
be a race for the students, to determine the class having  the fastest
runners, and to determine which class has the greatest number register-ing 
at the top during the day. For  this last a pennant is given.  KLINE CUP
CONTEST  The intra-mural basketball trophy for girls, the Kline Cup, was
given by the  Kline Jewelry Company in 1904. The annual fight for this cup
has become a permanent tradition.  In order to finance the athletic
activities that year the balconies were built temporarily in the little gym
and ten cents admission was charged for the inter-group  games. These games
created much interest and as a result Robert L.  Kline offered the trophy.
In past years, class rivalry was intense. The various  clubs and classes
often marched to assembly carrying banners, singing songs,  and cheering
for their team.  THE CLASS FIRE  One of the amusing customs of the past
that for awhile was considered a  tradition was the Class Fire which was
lighted the night before commencement.   A committee gathered a large pile
of brush and wood on a spot near the beginning  of Huntoon Drive. Just as
the torch was applied, the class, laden with notebooks  and large bundles
labeled "Troubles," and  "Grudges," gathered at the main en-trance  and
began what was known as the Pilgrimage to the Fire. When they  arrived the
line circled about and with great ceremony solemnly consigned their 
burdens to its flames. This was followed by great rejoicing until the last
embers  died away.  MOUNT BAKER HIKE Each summer comes the Mount Baker
climb, the most beautiful and inspiring  of all trips taken by the school.
Only those who by taking a series of preliminary  hikes made themselves fit
are permitted to go. The party usually reaches Helio-trope  Ridge Friday
afternoon, camps there over night, makes the climb on Satur-day,  and
returns to town on Sunday.  After one has taken the ten-mile hike through
primeval forest, Kulshan (Mt.  Baker) in all its glory bursts upon the eye.
Below, Roosevelt Glacier with its  great expanse of blue and white is a
sight not soon to be forgotten, while to the  left can be seen Skyline
Ridge.  And if this were not enough of wondrous beauty  there rises on
every side mountain after mountain.  As awe inspiring as is this sight, it
fades into insignificance when compared  with the view from the top of the
mountain. This really beggars description.  The view with its snow-clad
mountains on every side, and its miles and miles of  country reaching even
to the bay on clear days, becomes an everlasting memory  to those who have
once gazed upon it.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 60

     ----------

President Fisher has made it his custom to accompany the party to
Heliotrope  to wish them off on their climb and to welcome them back on
their return.  The Mount Baker hike custom grew out of the annual excursion
to Glacier,  which was inaugurated in 1906. As an outgrowth of this
mountain trip, Kulshan Sabin has been built near Grouse Ridge for the
convenience of the hikers.  HOME-COMING AND ALUMNI  BANQUET  Can all the
ties be severed, leaving only "memories and best wishes" for the  dear old
Alma Mater? Can any one attend the good old B. S. N. S. and go away 
feeling that he is not inexorably bound to it by ties of sentiment? The
Alumni  say not. Each year they feel the urge to visit the scene that have
become  dear to them. Some the press of life prevents from ever returning,
and others  await only the urge  of a hearty welcome. One of our newest
customs, which we  plan shall become a tradition, and one of the old,
provide this urge. These are the  Home-Coming Day which has been initiated
recently, and the Alumni Banquet held  annually in connection with the June
commencement.  Home-Coming Day occurs annually on the day the B. S. N. S.
plays one of  the other normals on Waldo Field. Great preparations are made
to welcome the  home-coming alumni. The school and all the rooming houses
are appropriately  decorated with signs of welcome. Special music is
engaged. The program usually  includes an all-school  luncheon at noon, the
game played and won, an alumni  banquet in the evening, and a mixer in the
Armory.  The Alumni Banquet occurs on the Saturday of the spring quarters
that pre-cedes commencement exercises. At this meeting the Alumni
Association usually  elects its officers and transacts the business of the
association.  VIKING VODVIL  Our hardy namesakes of the open sea often put
in at secluded bays and  spent the days in feasting and pleasure, and, like
they, each spring quarter we  lay aside the more serious things and give
what is known as the Vodvil. This  show is made up of "stunts" put on by
the various clubs and independent groups.  Though many are as foolish as
the name implies, some are exceedingly beautiful  and finished products.
The best act is awarded a prize. VIKINGS  That the Normal-by-the-Sea should
name its groups of brave and daring con-tenders  for honors  Vikings seems
most fitting. The fearlessness of those hardy old  sea-rovers finds an
analogy in the spirit with which our teams fare forth on their  journeys of
conquest.  The name Vikings has not long been ours,  but it is planned that
it shall con-tinue  for all time.  As we take our inspiration from the
Vikings of the dim  mists of the past, so  out of formless mass of customs
of our short past has grown the spirit of the modern Vikings. And the
Normal-by-the-Sea shall always be ready to fearlessly  seek the bigger and
better things of life!

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 61

     ----------

i _  II  i  i  i  4

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 62

     ----------

~ . ,  ' ,., , '  ' .

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 63

     ----------

The White and Blue  I.  Far above the bay's blue waters, stands our own
Sehome,  Guarded all around by mountains, crowned by Baker's dome. 
Nestling there among the grandeur, reigns the White and Blue, Colors of our
Alma Mater, hail, all hail to you.  II.  Here the youth from farm and
seashore, gather for the year,  Learning truths that shall be cherished,
forming friendships dear.  Soon the ties must all be severed, but they
leave with you,  Happy memories and best wishes for the White and Blue.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 64

     ----------

Associated Students  The year 1926 will long stand out as a ban-ner  year
in the annals of the Students' Associa-tion  of the Bellingham Normal
School.  When school opened for the fall quarter, it  was found necessary
to elect a new board of  control. Don Marquis, president, had resigned  in
order that he might attend Stanford Uui-versity,  while Zeno Katterle,
vice-president, had  resigned to accept the position of business man-ager 
of the Weekly Messenger.  The students entering into their election  with a
great deal  of enthusiasm, chose Elsie  Holland, a former student
representative, for  president, and Inez Clark for vice-president.  The new
president called the first Board  of Control meeting to order October 2
with the following members present: Inez Clark, Mr.  Bond, Mr. Arntzen,
John Fitzgerald, Angus  Bowmer, and Ward Prigg. Maragret Black  took her
place on the board the following quarter.  The executive body of the
Students' Association, believing that a happy  student body is an efficient
one, provided many diversified forms of entertainment  throughout the
school year. The all-school mixers, recreation hours, and the all- school 
hikes found on the 1925-26 school calendar will ever be a source of fond 
memories to the students.  The Associated Student Body took a large part in
putting over the Annual  Homecoming, and judging by the numerous favorable
comments heard on the  campus, this annual feature of the Normal-by-
the-Sea life was a huge success.  The Board of Control held their annual
banquet January 21 in the dining   room of the Home Economics department.
At the close of the banquet President  Fisher gave a very interesting talk,
followed by a talk by Mr. Bond on Board of  Control reminiscences.  A great
deal of praise  is due the president, Elsie Holland, for the efficient 
manner in which she handled the various student body activities. She
labored  faithfully in the interest of the students, thereby winning for
herself the esteem  and good will of all.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 65

     ----------

The Co-Op  The Normal Book Store, owned by the Student Association, is
under the direc-tion  of the Board of Control. This store, operating
through the manager, Mr. Sam  Ford, has as its aim the furnishing of
supplies to the faculty and student body. This  aim is accomplished through
ordering books and having on hand other equipment  for which there is a
constant demand.  Although giving service to the student body at all times
the Co-Op is especially  active at the first of every quarter when new
books are being purchased and the  old ones exchanged.. Through this agency
the students may have films developed and application pictures made. In
addition to this and other services the store offers  a place for the
distribution of student mail. By employing students, the Co-Op aids  those
who wish to work while attending Normal.  The stock of the book store is
kept up-to-date, since all funds except those kept  for emergencies are
used to purchase new stock and equipment. Because of its  proximity, the
store is also valuable to the student body.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 66

     ----------

Weeklj Messenger  The staff of the Weekly Messenger started work upon the
opening of the  Normal school in the fall. With Velta Leaming as editor and
Zeno Katterle as  business manager, the publication was under way in fine
shape. The Messenger  staff took a keen interest in all student activities,
sponsoring a "Hard Lines"  dance in the gym besides helping in other ways
to promote good feeling in the   student body. "Smilin' Bob," a column of
fun, was inaugurated during this quar-ter  and has held the interest of the
students ever since. A literary contest for  students of the Normal was
held in the fall quarter, and a banquet was given by  the Messenger to the
winners of this contest, at the Victoria hotel. The winter quarter saw a
change in the editorship of the paper, when Norman  Burchette assumed the
directing end of it. During this quarter many changes  were made in the
form of the Messenger. A new design for the name was  adopted and
single-column editorials were started. The Messenger staff sponsored  a
Valentine box in the winter quarter, which caused much fun and merriment
when  the lucky ones were announced at recreation hour. A special edition
of  the paper came out on Valentine's Day and much fun was created by the
appear-ance  of the big "scoop" concerning the supposed marriage of two of 
the Normal  students.  The staff of the paper remained practically the same
during the spring  quarter, with the exception of a few reporters who
dropped out of the game.  The Editorial Council, composed of students who
had sufficient training in  newspaper work to enable them to act as an
advisory board to the editor, func-tioned  in an able capacity. The staff
of the paper was composed of students  who had had preliminary work in
reporting and collecting of news and a basic  training in the actual
management of a newspaper. It acted as an advisory board  to the editor,
also. Two quarters of work with the Messenger, or  the equivalent  on other
college papers, was required to obtain a place on either the council  or
the staff. The publishing of the paper was done under the supervision of
the English  department of the Normal. Mrs. Ruth A. Burnet was in charge of
this part of the  work. Each person connected in any way with the actual
work of publishing the

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 67

     ----------

paper feels a keen interest in the welfare of it and of the school. In that
way  the students receive not only first-hand instruction in newspaper
work, but gain  an insight into the working of the school.  The actual work
of printing the paper was done down town by Miller and  Sutherlen, where
the students on the staff were in charge of the makeup of the  paper.
Everything except the actual setting of type was in the hands of the 
students of the journalism classes of the Normal. A wealth of valuable
experience  was gained by the members of the Messenger's staff.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 68

     ----------

Klipsun Board  VAUGHAN, Advisor LEMASTER, Editor TIDBALL, Business Manager 
BLACK, Sophomore Rep. ERwIN, Freshman Rep.  Klipsun Staff  STURTEVANT,
Recreation NELSON, Music WEBER, Women's Athletics O'CONNER, Recreation 
FITZGERALD, Humor PARKINS, Art CLARK, Debate CULVER, Drama  RoTCHY, Art
BURKE, Art DODSON, Sophomores EGRERT, Freshmen HOWARD, Traditions BAXTER,
Men's Athletics BURGHOFFER, Art Editor KIBBE, Snaps

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 69

     ----------

fXIII___~I- - ItI l~ r -.l ll__-l..-.I L.-.IX ~ . L_.~ Ill-I. 1I.IX~)
I~-f*X~- ~-II _..XI L~I-II-~  "  ii  ig 2 . A  11

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 70

     ----------

High Tide  I edged back against the night,  The sea growled assault on the
wave-bitten shore,  And the breakers,  Like young impatient hounds,  Sprang
with rough joy on the shrinking sand.  Sprang-but were drawn back slowly. 
With a long, relentless pull,  Whimpering, into the dark.  Then I saw who
held them captive;  And I saw how they were bound  With a broad and
quivering leash of light,  Held by the moon, As, calm and unsmiling,  She
walked the deep fields of the sky.  -Jean Starr Untermeyer.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 71

     ----------

Athletics

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 72

     ----------

COACH CARVER  After a year's leave of absence, Coach Sam Carver returned to
Bellingham  Normal and assumed coaching duties.  He brought many new ideas
from Stanford University, where he studied physical education under Glenn
"Pop" Warner.  Coach Carver is now serving his eleventh year as athletic
director at B. S. N. S.,  turning out strong, clean teams who play the game
on the square, and portray the   fighting Viking spirit of old.  ASSISTANT
COACH HAROLD KEENEY  Coach Keeney, formerly ceach at Bothell High School,
was appointed assistant  to Carver at the beginning of the athletic season.
 While at Bothell High he turned out at least one championship team every
year.  He handled baseball exclusively this season, and has proved an
efficient coach in  this sport.  Many hours of untiring effort were spent
by him in helping whip the Viking  aggregation into shape.  ATHLETIC
MANAGER  Thomas Wynn was appointed athletic manager by the Board of Control
at the  beginning of the season. Manager Wynn has worked faithfully at
every sport, re-lieving  much the burden of the coaches. He always has a
good word for every player  when it is most needed.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 73

     ----------

Mens' Athletics  FOOTBALL SEASON 1925  When Coach Carver issued his first
call for football men, only four lettermen  were to be found in the squad. 
With these men as a nucleus a machine was perfected that could not be
stopped.  The team was light and fast, making up in speed what it lacked in
weight. An  aerial attack of almost college caliber was developed, the
Vikings using it very  successfully against the University Frosh.  The
schedule was against the team, since they had to play the powerful Cheney 
Savages before being fully organized. Only two defeats were suffered by the
squad,  dropping one to Cheney at Cheney, and losing a tight game to the
University Super-  Varsity.  The football season was a decided success and
the biggest factor in making it such  was the cooperation and effort of the
players in trying to build a winning combination.  There were men who
turned out every night, knowing they could not make  their letter, but
giving their time and ability to keep the team up to form. It is  this
spirit that keeps the Vikings foremost in athletics, and brings
championship  to the school.  Prospects for  a strong aggregation next year
are very good, as many of the  lettermen have voiced their intention of
returning to the Viking fold next fall.  SCHEDULE  October 10, at
Beilingham . . Vikings, 39; Seattle College, 2  October 17, at Bellingham .
.. . . Vikings, 9; St. Martin's, 0  October 24, at Cheney . . . . . .
Vikings, 3; Cheney, 41  Actober 31, at Bellingham . . Vikings, 0;
Super-Varsity, 3  November 7, at Seattle  . . . .. . . Vikings, 13; Frosh,
6  November 14, at Bellingham . .. . . Vikings, 46; U. B. C., 6  November
21,  at Bellingham . . Vikings, 36; Ellensburg, 6  Total scores . . . . . .
. . Vikings, 136; Opponents, 70

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 74

     ----------

F t ; .: x . c.v;r .Ai, n., .: , Zx. " 3*:. -:;,x ;u gt;.' +s r. . "s
Y...W.'.,,........ .yf... ,.yr... ...,...1'.  4  Alt  I Baxter  ONO  A  r 
..i  CUD  A  . RT  Viw A 

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 75

     ----------

t =  y .  40-  CIF' t E  gt; ' Y  .40  z.  Gray ROX  viiii, "'

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 76

     ----------

i  .  {  «k4  -Aur  t  f  1  ft  #  Mi  k  00

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 77

     ----------

Kam  b '  l gt; .  gt; sx. ' 1 i. N A, ft,, .  N ri f^ 'Sf" ' ^ S/ 1:' gt;
E y: Y : .' , "Y F 4' tis{ .  F toy t i 1 M 1f fF.y.''  fi ~ Ft vy  gt; SAY
FAY r C r ; loci j  w1 .  . m a  «mQ it, tit xz :v r' ". ". . 
of. .r in  r : r A;  gt;'  tit  A  g  too *1 v  1  kne  S  ^  t "All  y, I
lt; n 1f i sir ".F.  -7 7 7 ,  4  VIA;  10 I ~,N. i ^ XT -iiC ' a v .: +d
ii.i -  x " . *".  tit

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 78

     ----------

Basketball  BASKETBALL SCHEDULE  Jan. 9-Bellingham Vikings.......... 42 
Jan. 16 -Bellingham Vikings -........ 33  Jan. 22--Bellingham Vikings
.-..... .35  Jan. 30-Bellingham Vikings.......... 30  Feb. 2- Bellingham
Vikings.......... 26  Feb. 4-Seattle Vikings..........--------.... 38  Feb.
5-Seattle Vikings- ................. 39  Feb. 6-Lacey
Vikings..------.........--- 39  Feb. 18--Ellensburg Vikings....-..... 39 
Feb. 19- Cheney Vikings ............... 11  Feb. 20-Whitworth
Vikings.......-.. 38  Feb. 22-Gonzago Vikings ............ 20  Feb.
27-Bellingham Vikings ......... 23  Mar. 5-Bellingham Vikings.......... 42 
Total Scores Vikings..................458  U. B. C............1.7........ 
St. M artin's................ 17  Ellensburg.................. 25 
Cheney.-----.....--.....------....... 25  Whitworth ----..----............
12  U. of W. Frosh-......... 35  Seattle College .---....... 20  St.
Martin's..........--------...... 21  Ellensburg.........---------....... 29
 Cheney----....--- .......-----.......... 28 
Whitworth..---------............... 24  Cheneyv .............33-........ 
U. of W. Frosh-......... 24   Seattle College....--....-----... 34 
Opponents --............. 344

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 79

     ----------

BASKETBALL  At the beginning of the basketball season Coach Carver faced a
problem, since  no lettermen had returned. However, when he issued his
first call for hoop artists,  about fifty men were out for a place on the
coveted quintet, the coach cutting the  number to sixteen after a couple of
nights' practice.  From these men he selected eight which made up a squad
finished in every  respect. O'Dell, Keplinger, and Benson took care of the
forward berths, making  the speediest combination the Vikings have had in
many years. Rhodes and Haw-kings  were the pivot men, and were good
marksmen as well as fast on the floor.  Stickney, Reed, and Tidball held
down the guard positions, each one capable of playing a steady game. They
were experts at checking, and showed what they could  do in this respect in
 the Cheney game.  Only three defeats were suffered by the Viking team this
year, two of them  coming from the Cheney Savages. Although tying for the
Tri-Normal champion-ship,  the team lost in the playoff, but showed work
equal to that of the Cheney team.  A fast five-man offensive helped score
many points for the Blue and White  quintet, and a fast-breaking five-man
defense spelled defeat for their opponents. With most of the team coming
back next year, Coach Carver has hopes of bring-ing  the championship back
to Bellingham.  SUPER VARSITY BASKETBALL  Under the direction of Coach
Keeney, a super- varsity basketball team was  organized which consisted of
the subs on the first and second teams. This quintet  closed the season
without a single defeat.  They turned out every night against the first
team, this  giving their superiors  invaluable practice.  Among those
defeated by the Supers was the fast Frye quintet  of the City  League, and
the Concrete tow nteam, which had not tasted defeat for two seasons.  Games
were also played with several of the high schools of the county.  Guarding
the forward berths were Wilson,  Harper, and Davis. Mowler and  Hawkings
held down the centre positions, while Morse, Baxter, and Christman  took
care of the guard stations.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 80

     ----------

HAROLD HAWKINGs-"Hawkie"  Although lacking a few quarters of  making his
letter, Hawkie played an ag-gressive  game and was a sure shot  around the
basket.  LYMAN STICKNEY-"Stick"  Stick was a clever guard, and showed  his
ability to score, besides checking his  man. His quick diagnosis of plays
kept  the opponents' score low.  EARL KEPLINGER-"Keppy"  Being the smallest
man on the team, Keppy made up for it in speed. He is a  dead shot from any
angle.  WILLIAM TIDBALL-"Bill"  Bill was a great defensive guard, and  was
always the stone wall of the Vik-ings'  defense.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 81

     ----------

RAY O'DELL-"Ray"  His fast floor work and clever shoot-ing  made Ray high
point man of the  season. He  had a deceptive way of  shooting and was too
speedy for any  guard to check.  LESTER RHODEs-"Les"  Les was the general
of the team,  holding the team together through  many crucial places. He
was a clever  floor man and a dependable scorer.  GEORGE BENSON-"Bens" 
Being aggressive and a good shot  made Bens a valuable man to the team.  He
was a persistent player throughout  the season. FLOYD REED-"Rudy"  Rudy was
a bulwark on defense, his  accurate passing and checking making  him an
indispensable player to the team.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 82

     ----------

Baseball  Prospects for a championship baseball team were very bright at
the beginning  of the season, as there were five letter men turning out,
and several new men were  very good. When the spring quarter started,
however, Staggs and Davis, two letter-men,  failed to return, as did two
other regular infielders. Coach Keeney faced a  hard problem in trying to
find players to fill these positions. A combination was finally found that
worked together well, and the team seems to stand a good chance  of winning
the flag again this year.  Several practice games were played with local
high schools, and this gave  Coach Keeney a chance to watch his men under
fire. Two conference games have  been played with the Vikings winning both
of them.  The first game was played with Seattle College, and they were
sent away with  a 9 to 6 defeat at the hands of the Viking tossers. The
game was featured by heavy  hitting by both teams. In the ninth inning with
the score 6 to 5 in their favor,  Kure, second sacker, smacked out a home
run with bases filled, winning the game.  The next game was played with St.
Martin's and the Vikings again came  through with an 8 to 5 victory. This
was the first time a Blue and White nine had  ever defeated a St. Martin's
ball team. Coach Keeney's men took an early lead  which was never
threatened throughout the game. Patterson, Viking pitcher, hurled  a flossy
game of ball, being air tight in the pinches, and striking out eleven men.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 83

     ----------

Track  Track is a sport which includes many varied accomplishments. It
offers  greater opportunity to display athletic skill than any of the major
sports.  Many new stars have been discovered in the practice events this
year. It is  not possible to report the results of the Tri-Normal meet but
the line-up for the  track  team promises a great deal.  In the dash events
Coach Carver has Prigg, a two-year letterman and high- point  man in the
last year's meet, and Hemmi, a former Whatcom High School star, who  was
with the Frosh last year.  The short-distance events are run by Reeves and
Stickney, both being good at  quarter mile, while Reeves can also run the
200-yard dash and also the half mile.  Hawkings, Sullivan, and Abbey  are
half milers, and each one is capable of  running a good race. This is
Hawkings' and Sullivan's first year at track, and with  another year's
experience they should be record breakers.  Abbey and Korsboen run the mile
event, with Abbey running a fast race. This  is his second year and he is
expected to break the Tri-Normal record.  In the field events Large,
Stickney, Shelton, and Beighle are showing up best.  Orr,  Large, Hoggatt,
and Beighle are the squad's entries in the jumps, and  much is expected of
these men in  the meet.  Evatt and Hoggatt have been going over the hurdles
in fast time, and they  are sure to be winners in these events.  A dual
meet was held with the College of Puget Sound, April 24, when the Vikings
swamped the Loggers by a score of 88 to 34. Large and Hoggatt tied  for
high-point honors with sixteen points each. Prigg, Viking sprinter, won the
 dashes, with Hemmi placing second.  Friday, May 7,  the Viking cinder men
clash with U. of Washington Frosh in a  dual meet at Seattle.  May 22, the
Tri- Normal meet is held at Cheney, and this is the big meet of the  year.
According to all early indications it looks like a successful track season
for  the Viking team.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 84

     ----------

Tennis  Tennis is a favorite sport at Bellingham Normal school, and when
Coach Carver  issued his call for  racquet wielders, eleven men responded.
Broadbent and Fitz-  Gerald, two lettermen from last year, are again on the
team.  The ladder system was used in deciding the places on the team, and
some very good matches were played in the tournament. Broadbent, Wheaton,
FitzGerald,  Sullivan, and Keplinger finally secured the first five places
and represent the  Vikings this season.  At the first meet of the season 
the Vikings played the racqueteers from St.  Martin's, taking all five
matches. Broadbent, FitzGerald, and  Wheaton played  the single matches and
were not defeated by the college players.  FitzGerald and Sullivan also
took their doubles match by defeating their  opponents in straight sets. 
The most closely contested match of the meet was the second doubles
encounter.  Broadbent and Keplinger, although pushed hard the first set,
won the second  set and match easily.  Friday, May 7, the Vikings lost
their first match to the University Frosh by a  score of 3 to 2.  Wheaton
won his singles match after three torrid  sets, being the only Viking 
player to win a singles match. Broadbent and FitzGerald lost their singles
matches  by close scores. In the doubles, Wheaton and FitzGerald won their
match, tying up  the score. But Broadbent and Keplinger lost in the
doubles, and the Frosh walked  off with the honors.  The results of the
Tri-Normal Tennis meet are not available as yet, but it is  hoped that
Bellingham will again secure the pennant.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 85

     ----------

Women's Athletics  As our Viking men have grown in cour-age,  strength, and
achievement during the past year, so have our Viking Maids.  Hockey was the
first major sport to  be taken up in the fall. The girls  turned  out twice
a week in large numbers. A  sophomore team and a freshman team  were
organized. The two teams played  three games to decide the championship, 
which finally was won by the Frosh. With even more zeal the girls turned 
their attention to volleyball. The turn-out  was large and a team was
chosen for  each of the classes. Again the Frosh  proved superior in skill,
winning the cham-  HOWARD FRANK SKALLEY pionship by a large score. 
However, basketball has been by far the most popular sport  at the Normal. 
Miss Frank coached the Frosh and Miss Skalley directed the Sophomores.
Large numbers turned out to represent the respective classes, so each group
was divided  into four or five teams. A schedule was arranged so that
different teams played  each other every night. However, toward the end of
the season two class teams  were chosen and the teams played for the Kline
cup. The sophomore team was  successful in claiming the trophy.  In the
spring the Vikings take up tennis, track, and baseball with a surprising 
amount of vigor and enthusiasm. The annual tennis tournament is the
crowning  feature of the athletic season during the spring. Both singles
and doubles are  played. The popularity of this sport keeps the courts full
throughout the day.  The spring track-meet for the women offers an
opportunity for all the women  of the school to display their athletic
ability because of the variety of events. A  person may enter three events,
and must win at least one first place in order to get  a letter. The team
having the highest number of points wins the tournament.  Baseball is
another spring sport which offers inter-class competition.  Swimming has
just recently been added to the list of major sports. Under  the direction
of Mrs. Howard and Benecia Genther, three teams were organized to 
represent the three different classes. In this meet the Freshmen were again
vic-torious,  with Sophomores second, and Juniors third.  The Board of
Control has this year decided to present letters to all those  playing the
required amount of time in the games and who deserve to win letters.  The
sports in which letters are given are hockey, volleyball, basketball,
tennis,  track, baseball and swimming.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 86

     ----------

FRESHMAN-From left to right: Mae Goodman, Alice Lingley, Elizabeth Camp,
Marie Martin, Edith  Cox, Vesta Larson, P1 yllis Crabill, Mary McCush,
Orlena Moore, Verta Templeton, Evelyn Harno, Josephine Smith, and Dorothy
Norris.  SOPHOMORES--Left to right: Mamie Manberg, Martha Napier, Elizabeth
Florence, Margaret Black,  Harriet Heath, Evelyn Clark, May Hoyer, Bertha
Weber, Olive Ramalia, and Jessie Kirby.  Hockej  This is the first year
that hockey has been played successfully here for a long time; and the
girls are to be commended for their good sportsmanship in playing  against
all odds. The games were often postponed on account of the rainy weather, 
but after long delays the games were finally finished.  A squad of about
seventy girls turned out at the first part of the quarter, and  from these
girls, under the coaching of Miss Skalley, two teams were chosen, one to 
represent the Sophomores and  the other to battle for the Frosh.  Hockey is
one of the most difficult games for a team to play, as it requires
co-operation,  a quick eye, and a ready club. Good sportsmanship was
emphasized.  The girls stayed with their team from the beginning of the
quarter to the end,  whether they made the first squad or not.  After five
or six weeks of practice, teams were chosen, the Sophs electing Evelyn 
Clark captain, and the Frosh choosing Vesta Larsen. These two teams now
played  against each other in practice, until the end of the season, when
the inter-class games  were played.  The inter-class games attracted great
interest on the part of their fellow class-men  who attended the games. The
first game ended in a 3-3 tie; the second was a  4-0 win in favor of the
Freshmen. The Sophomores rallied at the beginning of the  last game and
carried off a 5-3 win. However, the points for all the games were  totaled,
this giving the Freshmen 10 points to the Sophomores' eight, the Freshmen 
thus winning the tournament.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 87

     ----------

FRESHMAN-Tow row, left to right: Alice Lingley, Mae Goodman, and Vesta
Larson. Bottom :-ow:  Phyllis  Crabill, Mary McCush, and Orlena Moore. 
SOPHOMORES-Top row, left to right: Martha Napier, Mary Hoyer, Evelyn Clark,
Margaret Black.  Bottom row: Alberta McLeod, Olive Ramalia, Bertha Weber,
and Jessie Kirby.  Vollejball  Hockey was followed by volleyball on the
sport calendar of the Viking Maids. The teams all practiced together on the
three courts of the big gym. A unique  feature of the practice lay in the
fact that every n'ght the winners of the first ten  minutes of play between
these various teams would play together to determine the  winners of the
day.  After several weeks of this kind of practice, squads were chosen,
with Jessie  Kirby captain of the Sophomores and Alice Lingley leading the
Freshman team.  At the end cf the season a tournament consisting of three
games took place.  The first one ended with a large score in favor of the
Frosh, the second with the  Sophomores for in the lead, while the third
went to the Frosh who ran up another  large score. So the Frosh won their
second championship.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 88

     ----------

OLIVE RAMALIA  MARGARET BLACK  ELIZABETH ATKINS  AMELIA NEIMANN  FREDA
SLATER ELSIE KELSO  BERTHA WEBER  JESSE KIRBY

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 89

     ----------

PHYLLIS CRABILL  ALICE LINGLEY  EDITH COX  HARRIETT HUDNALL  EDITH BURTON 
LUCILE YOUNGBLUTH  MARY MCCUSH  CLARA LITER

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 90

     ----------

Swimming Team  Top row, left to right: Benecia Genther, Esther Pallas,
Ur-sula  Mattercheck, Lillian McCallister, Mary Fosjack, Esther Spauld-ing.
 Second row: Gladys Green, Agnes Madsen, Edna Munsen,  Bernice Olliver.
Bottom row: Vesta Larson, Eleanor Adams,  Phyllis Crabill, Clara Leonard,
Evelyn Clark, Anna Marie Cronin.  Life Saving Corps  Top row, left to
right: Grace Bowers, and Elvina Magill.  Second row: Bernice Oliver,
Lucille Forcum, and Erna Olson.  Bottom row: Benecia Genther, Evelyn Clark,
Miriam Taylor, and  Margaret Black.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 91

     ----------

Baseball  SOPHOMORES-Top row, left to right: Evelyn Clark, Margaret Black,
Beatrice Cairns, Lorene Bone-brake,  Ellen Strand, Ethel Heath, Hilma Eko.
Second row: Lillian McCallister, Mary Fosjack, Hilda Woodeage,  Martha
Napier, Olive Ramalia, Dorothy Norris. Bottom row: Mary Lou Shuttle, Lilly
Johansen,  Constance  Loney, Jane Dagger, Mildred' Buskett, Wanda
McCormick, and Fae Allen.  FRESHMAN-Top  row, left to right: Clara Leonard,
Alice Lingley, Geneva Rickard, Adrianna Vander-griend,  Elizabeth Scott, 
Agnes Anderson, Phyllis Paul, Harriett Hudnall, Edna Munsen. Second row:
Elvira  Lehtinen, Gladys Green, Phyllis Crabill, Elaine White, Ruth Loreen,
Esther Pallas, Edith Cox, Leslie Brown.  Bottom row: Orlena Moore, Verta
Templeton, Ruth McMeen, Ruth Downey, Fomia Wakin, Erna Olson,  Marie
Tromer, Carolyn Durham, and Amelia Turner.  Track  Top row, left to right:
Lorene Bonebrake, Edith Cox, Clara Leonard, Louise Wall, Margaret Norwood, 
Alice Kirkpatrick, Beatrice Cairns. Mildred Hedberg, Ruby Getchell. Bottom
row: Ella Hunger, Phyllis  Crabill, Mildred Buskett, Harriet Hudnall,
Orlena Moore, Alice Lingley, Dorothy Norris, Fomia Wakin, Edna  Munson,
Wanda McCormick, Ruth McMeen, Thelma Butler,  and Olive Ramalia.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 92

     ----------

Yell Leaders  ADAMS BIRD MCCALL LOGAN

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 93

     ----------

Music

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 94

     ----------

Women's and Men's Double Quarfettes  The Women's Double Quartette had a
successful and pleasant year under the  able direction of Miss Maude
Slawson. Their program for the winter months was  full and interesting.
They made numerous public appearances before the towns-people.  Each time
the quartette sang before the assembly it was enthusiastically re-ceived. 
They appeared in the First Presbyterian church in a vesper service and
be-fore  the Aftermath Club. The Kiawanians and the Rotarians were
entertained at their  luncheons by the girls. The quartette gave several
selections before the Women's Musical Club of Mount Vernon. All the girls
were awarded honor pins for the  service they gave.  The members of the
quartette are Ruth McCullough and Wrennie Chapman, first  sopranos; Louise
Stiger and Lucie Wilson, second sopranos; Anne Olander and  Gertrude
Hogdahl, first altos; Thelma Butler and Gladys Grey, second altos; and 
Ruth Campbell, accompanist.  The Men's Double Quartette was organized and
directed by Mr. Harold Smith.  As they were not organized until the second
quarter they worked under a handicap.  In spite of this they were well
trained, and were received well wherever they ap- peared.  They sang before
the assembly and before the townspeople on several oc-casions.  The
Kiawanis and Niord Clubs were entertained by the quartette also.  Kirvin
Smith and Ted Logan sang first tenor; Don Olts and Norman Burchette, 
second tenor; Ralph Johnson and John Kerr, first base; Dale Annis and
Harold  Hill, second base.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 95

     ----------

Choral Society  "The Last Seven Words of Christ," an oratorio by Dubois,
was presented by  the Choral Society of Bellingham State Normal School on
Friday, April 16, under  the able leadership of Harold B. Smith. As the
Choral Society is a new organiza-tion,  this was their first concert. The
splendid group singing and remarkable re-sponse  to the leader were a
credit to their conductor, Mr. Smith.  The three solo parts were sung by
Mrs. Perry J. Starke, soprano, Mr. Alexan-der  Wallace, tenor, and Mr.
Frank Tiffany, bass. Mrs. Starke, who is from Tacoma,  won her audience
with her clear, sweet voice and with her magnetic personality. Mr.  Wallace
and Mr. Tiffany are very prominent in the musical circles of Seattle.  The
Normal School orchestra, augmented by numerous other musicians of
Bel-lingham, accompanied. The personnel of the orchestra and the Choral
Society  follow :  First Violins: Williams, John Roy, concertmaster;
Heidenstrom, Evelyn; Hermsen, Alice; Monroe, John;  Popple, Helen; Thal,
Arthur.  Second Violins: Ruckmick, Herbert, principal; Laznicka, Vera;
Shryock, Gene; Wellman, Vivian. Viola: Gottschalk, Frank.  'Cellos:
Lusterman, Paul, principal; Allez, George.  Bass: Spees, Boyden. Flute:
Larkin, Pauline.  Clarinets: Schirrmann, W. S.; Maire, E. L.; Walters, M. 
Cornet: Pease, Carol. Trombone: Spees, Harry.  Piano: Holmes, Katherine. 
First violins: Williams, John Roy; concertmaster; Heindenstrom, Evelyn;
Hermsen, Alice; Monroe, John;  Popple, Helen; Thal, Arthur. Second violins:
Ruckmick, Herbert, principal; Laznicka, Vera; Shryock, Gene;  Wellman,
Vivian. Viola: Gottschalk, Frank. Cellos: Luterman, Paul, principal; Allez,
George. Bass:  Specs, Boyden. Flute: Larkin, Pauline. Clarinets:
Schirrmann, W. S.; Maire, E. L.; Walters, M. Trom-bone:  Spees, Harry.
Piano: Holmes, Katherine.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 96

     ----------

Musical Artists  Charles Hackett, tenor, Chicago Civic Opera Association. 
sen, pianist. Friday evening, October 16, 1925.  Star Vicino  The Kiss 
Spiagge Amate  A Pastorale  Extase  Les Papillons  Clair De Lune  Mai 
Assisting artist, Myron Jacob-  .Rosa  Beethovn  Gluck  .Veracini  JDu prac
 (Thaousson Szulk  Sait-Saens  Aria: Che Gelida Manina  (a) Sea Fever  (b)
Evening .  (c) The Fuchsia Tree  (d) Morning Song  Hulda Lashanska, lyric
soprano; Mrs.  November 9, 1925.  .John Ireland  Hageman  Quilter  
.Quilter  Grace Marshall, accompanist. Monday evening,  Spiagge Amate 
She's Fairer Than the Fair Aria: "Ombra mai fu" from "Xerses"  Puccini 
Gluck  Loewe  Handel

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 97

     ----------

Over the Steppe  Serenade  Aria: "Romance de Pauline" from "Pique Dame" 
Staenchon  III.  Aria: "Depuis le jour," from "Louise"  IV.  (a) Songs My
Mother Taught Me  (b) Thy Beaming Eyes  (c) Pirate Dreams  (d) Wings of
Night  (e) To a Mtssenger . .  Benno Moiseiwitsch, Russian pianist.  I. 
(a) Chromate Fantaisie and Fugue  (b) Sonata Appassionate, Op. 57 in F
Minor  Assai Allegro  Andante con moto  Allegro Ma Non Troppo  Presto 
Capriccio in C Major  The Swan  La Vida Breve (First performance)  Mazurka
in A Minor  Two Etudes: F Minor and F Major  Nocturne in F sharp Minor 
Scherzo in B flat Minor  III.  (a) Hark, Hark, the Lark .  (b) Tannhauser
Overture (special request)  Mme. Margaret Matzenauer, contralto,
Metropolitan  George Vause, pianist. Friday evening, February 26, 1926.
Gretchaninoff  Tschaikowsky  Tschaikowsky  . Strauss  Charpentier  Dvorak 
MacDowell  S . Huerta Watts  La Forge  S Bach  SB .eethoven  Brahms 
Palmgren  De Falla  Chopin  Chopin  Chopin  Chopin Schubert-Liszt 
Wagner-Liszt  Opera company; assisting artist,  Widmung  Sapphic Ode  None
But the Ionely Heart  Thy Warning Is Good  Les Filles de Cadix  Les
Papillons  Estrellita  En Cuba  (a) Sea Chantey  (b) En Route  Schumann 
Brahms  Dvorak  SG . rieg  Delibes  .C.ha. usson  SM .exi-an Folk Song  SC
.ub.an Folk Song  III.  GEORGE VAUSE  Over the Steppe  On Wings of Dream 
In the Silent Night  Homing  Grainger  Godard  S Gretchaninoff  . Arensky 
Rachmaninoff  Del Riego  V.  (a) Wings of Night Wintter Watts  (b) Elegy .
. . Massanet  (c) Just a Cottage Small . . . Hawley  (d) Hills (Dedicated
to Mine. Matzenauer) . La Forge  Cecilia Hansen, vionlinist; Mr. Boris
Zakharoff, accompanist. Friday evening, March 12,  1926.  .  .  .  : : : :
:

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 98

     ----------

Ciaconna Vitali  (a) Rondino  (b) Melodie . .  (c) Praeludium and Allegro 
(Arranged by Kreisler)  III. Concerto in M Major, Opus 35  Beethoven 
.Gl.uc.k  Pugnani  Tschaikowsky  (a) Lotus Land . Cyril Scott- Kreisler  (b
Danse . . Cyril Scott  (c) Alt-Wien Godowsky-Press  (d) Spinnlied
Popper-Auer  The Williams Trio, a Bellingham organization, consisting of
Maude L. Williams, piano;  Paul Lusterman, 'cello; and John  R. Williams,
violin, presented a pleasing program in assembly  on Tuesday, February 2.
All the numbers were heartily applauded and the trio responded  graciously
with several encores. T he program was well selected and was sincerely
appre-ciated  by the audience.  Anderson, Maybelle  Anderson, Vera  Annis,
Dale  Auren, Laina  Bachman, Rosemary  Balch, Eunice  Beckman, Alice 
Beckman, Clara  Bergeron, Alma  Bonebrake, Lorene  Bowers, Georgia 
Bremner, Ray  Brown, Leslie  Burchette, Norman  Burrows, Glayds  Burton,
Edith  Burton, Gladys  Butler, Ruth  Butt, Agnes  Cairns, Beatrice 
Campbell, Louise Campbell, Ruth  Cays, Neva  Cowden, Mrs. Zoa  Days, Luola 
Denniston, Frances  Ebert, Maxine Egbert, Edith  Elwell, Pauline  Engele,
Anne  Erickson, Grace  Esterm, Ellen  Evans, Ernestine  Farr, Etta 
Findley, Lillian  Forrey, Verne  Fosjack, Mary  Fowler, Esther  Geer,
Myrtle  Gemmel, Genevieve Getchell, Ruby  Govan, Hazel  Hagen, Alma 
Halverson, Beatrice  EHeggem, Clara  Helde, Mabel  Hill, Dorothy  Hill,
Harold  Hilliker, Doris  Holman, Florence  Honzik, Josephine  Hoskamer,
Mary  Hunger, Ella   Jackson, Dorothy  THE CHORAL SOCIET  '  Johnson, Ralph
 Jondall, Harriet  Jondall, Mildred  Keeney, Phyllis  Kerr, John 
Kingsbury, Irene  Kristofferson, Olga  Korsbeon, Elton  Larson, Jennie 
Lassen, Helen   Lewis, Anne  Lightfoot, Hazelle  Lind, Elma  Lind, Helen 
Lingley, Alice  Loftus, Helen  Logan, Ted Mabon, Lloyd  MacKenzie, Janet 
Magnuson, Ruby  Manke, Evelyn  Viola, Marcelle  MacMaster, Hortense 
Margaretich, Mary  Markham, Pearl  McCallister, Lillian  McCullough, Grace 
McCullough, Ruth   McMeen, Ruth  Monroe, Helen  Moore, Troy  Morris, Asta 
Mosher, Marjorie  Nisckel, Phoebe 3'Conner, Winifred  ,hlander, Margaret 
Olts, Donald  Owens, Annie  Parkins, Alice  Pavel, Ethel Pennacchi,
Fernanda  Peters, Eleanor  Peterson, Evelyn  Peterson, Lillie  Pusey,
Margaret  Richardson, Mabel  Rickard, Geneva  Ringler, Elva  Riel, Frances 
Salisbury, Jean  Sather, Gunhild  Shaner, Marjorie Shull, Mrs. Loretta 
Siggelko, Marguerite  Sisk, Phil-Arlau  Smith, Ethel  Smith, Janice 
Smit;h, Kirvin Steward, Anna Marie  Stewvart, Pearl  Stickney, Lyman 
Stiger, Louise  Strang, Mrs. Clara  Sturtz, Donald  Teets, Myra  Traughber,
Beatrice  Ullevig, Ruth  Vance, Norman  Waldron, Ruby  Walker, George  
Westling, Davis  White, Norma  White, Norma  White, Virginia  Whitegon,
Elaine  Wilson, Elsie Zachrison, Vernon

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 99

     ----------

Drama

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 100

     ----------

Pyjnmalion  MORONI OLSEN PLAYERS  Pygmalion by Bernard Shaw was produced by
the Moroni Olsen Players on  Saturday evening, October 16, 1925. This is a
story dealing with a phonetic expert, Henry Higgins, who takes a poor
flower girl from the gutters of London and trains  her in speech. He thinks
no more of this girl than of a piece of machinery or a bit  of experimental
work. After being with her continually for such a long time he  finds that
her presence is vital to his happiness and he is unable to continue life 
without her.  The Ship, a tragedy by St. John Irvine, was produced by the
Moroni Olsen Players on Tuesday evening, December 15. This is the old story
of a father who  wishes his son to carry on his business and the son will
not conform to his ideas. The  father is a ship builder and the son wishes 
to be a farmer. The father builds a  new ship which is to be the crowning
success of all his achievements.  He is unable  to command it on its maiden
voyage, so the son consents to take his place. It was  not a successful
voyage; the ship was sunk, and the boy, refusing to leave the ship  as he
felt his father would, was drowned.  The Moroni Olsen Players are the only
organization of their kind either in the  U. S. or abroad. They are the
first circuit repertory company.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 101

     ----------

As You Like It  A Shakespearean comedy in three, produced in the summer
quarter. Directed by V. H. Hoppe.  CAST OF CHARACTERS  Duke, living in
banishment  Frederick, his brother and usurper Amiens  Jaques  First Lord 
Second Lord  Third Lord  Fourth Lord  of his doi  (Lords attending on the
ba LeBeau, a courtier  Charles, a wrestler  Oliver, son of Sir Rowland de
Boys  Orlando, son of Sir Rowland de Boys  Jaques, son of Sir Rowland de
Boys  Adam, servant to Oliver  Denis, servant to Oliver  Corin, shepherd 
Silvius  William, a country fellow  Rosalind, daughter to banished Duke 
Celia, daughter to Frederick  Phoebe, a shepherdess .  Audrey, a country
wench  First Guard  Second Guard  Francis Claussen  minions Harold
McTaggart  Clare Mendenhall  Victor Hoppe  Charlotte McNaughton  Howard
Wilder  Thordur Thordarson  Sidney Smith  inished Duke.)  Oliver Nelson 
Howard Wilder  Floid Van Etten   Zeno Katterle  Thordur Thordarson  Angus
Bowmer  Howard Oldham  Melvin Syre  Oliver Nelson  Howard  Oldham  Evelyn
Hagen  Lulu Minkler  Frances Farrar  Millie Bowsher  Will McNeil  Henry
Hoffman SYNOPSIS OF SCENES  A39 I.-Scene 1-Orchard of Oliver's house. 
Scene 3-Lawn before the Duke's palace.  Scene 3-Before Oliver's house.  ACT
II.-The Forest of Arden.  • °

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 102

     ----------

The Goose Hangs High  Fall Quarter. Directed by V. H. Hoppe.  CAST OF
CHARACTERS  Bernard Ingals   Eunice Ingals  Noll Derby  Roda  Hugh Ingals
(the oldest son)  Lois Ingals (twin)  Bradly Ingals (twin) Mr. Day 
Kimberley  Dagmar Carroll (engaged to Hugh)  Angus Bowmer  Mrs. Wanita
McCoy  Theodore Cederberg  Miriam Bixby  John Kerr  Rolina Powell  Ralph
Johnson  Bill Mock  Tom Large  Mary Margaret  Doyle

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 103

     ----------

Friend Hannah  A romantic drama in four acts, by Paul Kester. Produced by
the Moroni Olsen Players, Saturday, March 6, 1926.  CAST OF CHARACTERS 
Betty Trott Janet Young  Margaret Lightfoot Leora Thatcher  Thomas
Lightfoot Moroni Olsen  Isaac Arford .. ....... Gordon Nelson  The Prince
of Wales (afterwards George III) Byron Foulger  Edward, Duke of York Jos.
H. Williams  Charles, Duke of Chandos Gean Greenwell  Lord Butte ..
......... Gordon Nelson  Augusta (Princess Dowager of Wales) Ethel Baker
Robert Clegg Joseph Williams  SCENES  ACT I.-Margaret Lightfoot's country
home.  ACT II.-The parlor behind Thomas Lightfoot's shop in London.  ACT
III.---The parlor at Hannah's house at Hampton.  ACT IV.- The same as Act I
(fifty years later) period 1760-1810.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 104

     ----------

Adam and Eva  James King  Corinthia  Clinton De Witt  Julia De Witt  Aunt
Abbey  Eva King  Lord Andrew Gordon  Mr. Delmatcr  Uncle Horace  Adam Smith
 Elmer Webster  Lilly Johanson  Zeno Katterle   Josephine Price  Hazel
Bisbee  Lulu Minkler  .Ben Howard  Chauncey Griff:th  .Bill Mock  .Robert
Wagner  SCENES  ACT. I.-In Mr. King's home, Long Island. Morning.  Acr
II.-Same. Ten days later. About 5:30 P. M.  ACT III.-The summer kitchen of
the King farm in New Jersey. Three months later. Minick  A comedy in three
acts, by George S. Kaufman and  rmal Drama Club, directed by Mr. V. H.
Hoppe.  Edna Ferber, presented by the Nor-  THE PEOPLE OF THE PLAY (AS THEY
APPEAR)  Lil Corey  Nettie Minick  Anne  Jim Corey  Fred Minick  Old Man
Minick  Al Diamond  Marge  Lulu Deitenhoffer  Price  Mrs. Smallridge  Mrs.
Crackenwald  Mrs. Lippencott  Madeleine Freese  Mary Culver Margaret Black 
John Fitzgerald  Meryl Bird  Theodore Cederberg  .Norman Vance  Peggy
Magoon  Hazel  Bisbee  Norman .Burchette  Angus Edwards  Gladys Burroughs 
Elizabeth Forrest  Melba Coffman  L i MMMM,  yid

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 105

     ----------

Normal by the Sea

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 106

     ----------

Normal b tfie Sea  Although it is the time spent in study and concentrated
effort that gives stu-dents  the practical knowledge to cope with mental
problems, it is generally con-ceded  that their health and general
happiness depend to a large degree upon  their recreation. After
graduation, the memories that are cherished most tenderly  are not
recollections of class work, but of the many pleasures that are enjoyed
dur-ing  school life. So, for the sake of health, happiness, and pleasant
memories, an  abundance of varied entertainments is provided for all
students of the Normal-by-  the-Sea. As this fanciful names implies, the
Bellingham Normal is situated in  a region of wonder, which permits of a
wide field of amusements.  With the weekly recreation hour, club parties
and dances, teas, and student  programs, there is no lack of indoor
entertainment.  Among the outdoor amusements are all-school picnics, the
Chuckanut Mara-thon,  various hikes, and sneaks.  The Viking Vodvil, given
some time in May, furnishes an opportunity for the  display of dramatic and
musical ability, as well as providing much fun for spectators.  When
students have graduated and taken positions as teachers, they  will often
think over the pleasures that were theirs during the good old school  days.
The memories may not "bless and burn,"  but nevertheless they will be 
treasured.  SEPTEMBER 29--ALL-STUDENT MIXER  Who could forget the Kiddy Kar
race between Milton Blonden and Bennett  Howard? And the pennies in the
jar--'member how peeved you were when your  guess was only five pennies
more than the winning number?  The musicians,  from their stand in the blue
and white Viking ship, brought  about the beginning of many friendships.
The freshmen were sort of blue, and-it  seemed so friendly to dance with
some one nice without having to endure those  boresome, formal
introductions. The mixer was the ideal place for making  acquaintances- may
mixers exist always!  OCTOBER 2-Y. W. C. A. RECEPTION  Early in the fall
quarter the members of the Y. W. C. A. held a reception  for all old and
new students of the Normal. The large crowd that attended the  affair
enjoyed the punch, games, and program provided. The organization evi-denced
 at this  entertainment the same spirit of cordiality that they have
continu-ously  shown throughout the year, doing  much to promote
good-fellowship among  the students.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 107

     ----------

OCTOBER 3-KID PARTY  Although this party was sponsored by the Women's
League, no women were present; little girls and boys played happily all
evening without one adult to  supervise them. Even Miss Jones had donned a
hair ribbon and short dress for  the occasion, taking this opportunity to
go back to childhood days. A program  consisting of songs and "pieces" by
the "children," amused everyone, after which  they munched apples as they
frolicked. Later they danced just like "big folks,"  two charming little
girls winning the prize waltz. Strange to say, since the ball  was over,
none of these children have been seen, for they all grew up overnight. 
OCTOBER 28--WOMEN'S LEAGUE TEA  Although this was the first  social
function of its kind to be given during the  fall quarter, the tea was well
attended. Autumn leaves and marigolds were used  as fitting decorations for
the reception room in Edens Hall. A well-chosen program  added much to the
success of the affair.  OCTOBER 31-SEATTLE CLUB DANCE  As an appropriate
way to celebrate Hallowe'en, the Seattle Club gave a  delightful dance on
this night of spooks and goblins. The big gymnasium was  attractively
decorated in black and orange, forming a fitting background for the 
feature dances and songs that were included on the evening's program. An
elf  who danced the Sneak most effectively, gave a fortune to every guest,
foretelling  whatever fate the future held in store for him.  NOVEMBER
6-BARNUM AND BAILEY HOP  This entertainment, which was sponsored by the
Allison Debate Club, was  decidedly different from all other affairs given
at school this year. The semi-circus  idea was carried out in all
preparations, bringing into prominence confetti,  balloons, squawkers, and
popcorn. A prize one-step and a moonlight waltz lent  variety to the hop. 
NOVEMBER 24-COLLEGE CLUB DANCE  Blue and gold, the colors of the College
Club, formed the color scheme for the decorations, programs, and favors of
this pleasing dance, given in the dining  room at Edens Hall. A large crowd
was present, including the U. of B. C. football  squad and several rooters
from that school.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 108

     ----------

NOVEMBER 20-21--HOMECOMING  Bonfires, luncheons, yes, and even a funeral,
were staged in the attempt  to make the 1925 Homecoming the biggest event
in the history of the Normal-by-the-  Sea. The program provided a variety
of entertainments, furnishing ample  amusement for everyone.  The
celebration began Friday night with a pep rally, winding its long 
serpentine down town to the tune of peppy chants. After the townspeople had
 been well informed of the coming celebration, the serpentine came back to
Waldo  Field, where a monstrous bonfire was awaiting their arrival. 
Saturday morning was devoted to the registering of the alumni who had  come
hcme to their Alma Mater. At noon the Viking Vittles, the first all- school
 luncheon, was held in the Normal. Five hundred students and alumni ate 
lunch at Edens Hall and  the school cafeteria. A program, consisting of
stunts  planned by the school clubs, was presented at both places. 
Immediately following the luncheon, the students, led by the Elks' band, 
marched around the track on Waldo Field. Then came the battle between the 
Bellingham football squad and the Ellensburg eleven, which resulted in a
score of  33-6 in favor of the home team.  White and blue balloons, the Pep
Squad, and Ellensburg's funeral were  features of the afternoon's
performance.  At 6:30 the alumni met at Edens Hall for the get-together
banquet, planned  for renewing old friendships. Ellensburg and Bellingham
football men were guests  at the dinner.  At 8:30 the alumni left Edens
Hall to go to the Armory, where an all-school  mixer was given in their
honor by the student body. The alumni serpentine and  the prize waltz added
variety to the entertainment, which brought to a close the  successful
Homecoming.  DECEMBER 5-EDENS HALL CHRISTMAS INFORMAL  With two little
Christmas fairies serving punch to him in an alcove sur-rounded  by silver
stars and Christmas green, who does not hold pleasant memories  of this
dance held in the reception room at the dormitory? Holiday favors added  to
the gaiety, promoting a genuine feeling of congeniality and good will among
 the merrymakers. Everyone who attended the dance reported it to be one of
the  most delightful entertainments of the year. DECEMBER 8-HARD LINES HOP 
Named for Smilin' Bob's Hard Lines column in the Weekly Messenger, this 
dance was sponsored by the members of the paper staff. As an introduction
to the dance, they gave Pigskin's Farewell Party on the main landing at
noon Wednesday,  December 7.  The dance was as original as Smilin' Bob's
column, being held at four  o'clock in the afternoon instead of in the
evening. A remarkable feature of the  dance was the number of young men
attending, there being practically the same  number of men present as there
were women.  DECEMBER 11-FRESHMAN PARTY  After being entertained in the
auditorium by an exceptionally interesting pro-gram,  which included
musical selections, feature dances, and a dramatic skit,  the two hundred
attending freshmen went down to the big gymnasium to dance.  Brownies and
ladies'-choice dances were added as special attractions. Twelve  new
members of the "W" Club demonstrated their musical ability by singing 
"Doodle- Doo-Doo" as part of their initiation duties.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 109

     ----------

DECEMBER 12-SOPHOMORE PARTY  Led in the grand march by Miss Skalley and Mr.
Berg, the members of the  sophomore class enjoyed one of the most
delightful parties of the fall quarter.  Jim Bussing's feature dances and
the vocal solos by Orlena Young contributed  to the fun of the evening.
DECEMBER 17-CHRISTMAS TREE  For this joyous occasion the auditorium was
decorated elaborately with a  Christmas tree, wreaths, and bells. Taking
his stand by the tree, underneath  which all the presents were stacked,
Santa Claus gave out gifts to the expectant  students. And oh, such gifts
as they were: drums, horns, dollies, yes, even kiddie  kars, were
distributed. But one awful catastrophe occurred. Just as Santa Claus  was
coming on nicely with his distribution of toys, his beard revealing dropped
off, a close resemblance to Larry Werner. Regardless of the fact that  the
gifts were mostly "sells," everyone enjoyed the Christmas tree immensely. 
JANUARY 15-THE SECOND FRESHMAN MIXER  The second Freshman mixer was the
first social event of the winter quarter.  The large gymnasium swarmed with
couples wearing the little green ribbons they  received as they were
admitted. Chauncey's Collegians played until "time to go  home," when one
of the most successful affairs of the quarter came to an end. JANUARY
23-SKAGIT CLUB DANCE  The Wisteria dance, given by the Skagit Club in Edens
Hall, was one of  prettiest dances of the year. The dining hall was
beautifully decorated in wisteria  and silver. Pale wisteria-colored half
moons were used as programs, while bubble-like  balloons added attraction
to the favor dance. A vivacious interpretation of  the Charleston was
presented by Ethel Smith.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 110

     ----------

FEBRUARY 6-OUTSIDE GIRLS' INFORMAL  Transformed by gay-colored hearts, the
Edens Hall dining room was a  veritable valentine bower for the informal
given by the girls living outside the  dormitory. New spring dresses,
dainty and gay, added color and grace to the  dance, while the men were
immaculate in their dark evening suits. Clever little  programs, in the
shape of hearts, were given to everyone. NORMALSTAD  Normalstad, a
beautiful eighty-acre tract of land lying along the south side of  Lake
Whatcom, belongs to the student body of the Bellingham Normal. It  derives
its name from a combination of Normal and Kolstad, a member of the  school
faculty who was instrumental in its purchase.  Plans are now being made by
the "W" Club to erect a lodge on this site where  dances, "stag parties,"
and other entertainments may be held.  CHUCKANUT MARATHON  Each year in
May, the students and faculty members don hiking clothes in  preparation
for the Marathon up Mount Chuckanut. Upon reaching the summit,  each person
writes his name and time of arrival in a book provided for that purpose. 
After the names have been counted at the end of the day, the Herald silver
cup is  awarded for the coming year to the group, class, or faculty having
the largest per  cent to reach the top of Chuckanut.  The Marathon, which
was originated in 1909, has become one of the traditions  cherished most
tenderly by the Vikings. ALL SCHOOL PICNIC  Hurrah for the all-school
picnic, when everyone can ditch all thoughts of books and learning, to be
free for a genuine good time! This celebration, which occurs in  May, is
usually held at Normalstad, the school property lying along the south shore
 of Lake Whatcom.  Various sports furnish ample amusement for everyone, so
that the entire day  is filled with excitement, thrills, and good eats.
Races in rowboats and canoes  provide opportunity for all husky athletes to
demonstrate their skill, while climbing  trees for candy never fails to
amuse everyone, even the contestants.  The natural beauty of Normalstad
adds much to the attraction of the picnic,  completing the essentials of a
perfect day.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 111

     ----------

APRIL 1-APRIL FOOL'S DAY  Aside from all minor pranks and jokes played on
this day of Fools, probably  the biggest sensation was created by the
appearance of "So's Your Old Man," a  comic edition of the Weekly
Messenger. What a muddle one's head would be in if  all the news in this
particular scandal sheet where taken seriously! Divorce cases,  marriages,
breach of promise suits, yes, even funerals, all flourished famously under 
the wieldly pens of these sharp reporters.  ARBOR DAY  Each year the
students celebrate Arbor Day by planting shrubs and trees  along Huntoon
Drive and Sehome. The different clubs and organizations take care  of these
and thus help beautify the campus and show their school spirit.  W. A. A.
HIKE  A troup of fifty W. A. A. girls proved their agility and hardiness by
climbing  Skyline Ridge from Glacier on January 23. They waded through snow
past the five-mile  limit, and after eating lunch, sixteen of the more
enterprising members broke a  trail in snow which was waist deep, and
succeeded in climbing within a half mile of  the top. Several of the
faculty members also enjoyed the hike. Miss Frank, Miss  Dilley, Miss
Gunderson, and Miss Rosene represented the feminine element, while  Mr.
Salisbury, Mr. Kolstad, Mr. Bond, and Mr. Berg had the honor of being the 
only men on the trip.  In spite of a few mishaps, such as a sprained ankle
and tumbles in the snow,  the trip was a decided success and the W. A. A.
are planning for more in the future.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 112

     ----------

CAMPUS DAY, APRIL 23  On Campus Day the whole school rallied in support of
Normal's candidate for Tulip Queen, and threw themselves wholeheartedly
into the various activities which  had been planned. The morning was
devoted to cleaning up the Campus and track. It was an in-teresting  sight
to see students working at uprooting dandelions so that the money  saved by
not hiring labor could be turned into the Tulip Queen fund.  In the
afternoon various interesting and amusing sports were participated in  on 
the Campus and at Waldo Field. One of the most spectacular events was a
base-ball  game between the  students and the faculty.  The crowning event
of the day was a carnival dance held in the armory. It was one of the
peppiest affairs ever given at the Normal, and everyone present entered 
enthusiastically into the carnival spirit.  The day's activities supplied
many votes for Miss Culver, the Normal's candi-date,  as well as enabling
every member of the student body to display his school  spirit and enjoy
himself thoroughly.  SOPHOMORE DANCE, APRIL 10  The Sophomore Hard Times
Dance given on April 10 was a very enjoyable  and unique affair. At 9
o'clock it was started with a bang. The orchestra members  were dressed in
old clothes, and on the walls hung gaudy pictures with startling 
appellations. "Photos" of noted students, such as "Flamin' Youth Durr" and
"Kid"  O'Grady, and instructors such as Mr. Rufneck were displayed, and
before the evening  was over almost every couple dancing had taken a sign
from the wall and was gaily  dancing with it. Some of them were extremely
ludicrous but some seemed fitting  and proper.  Two feature dances were
presented during the evening. One was a clever  interpretation of a rowdy
dance by some members of the "Gas House Gang," and  the other was a pretty
costume dance. Punch was served during the evening. Finally the orchestra
played the  strains of "Show Me the Way to Go Home," and the party broke
up.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 113

     ----------

Y. W. C. A. SUNRISE SERVICE  More than sixty girls attended the sunrise
prayer meeting on top of Sehome Hill  on Easter Sunday. The sun came out
and shone upon those gathered at the service.  After songs and prayers Miss
Sperry described the tomb of Christ, which she saw  while in Jerusalem on
her recent trip around the world.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 114

     ----------

Debate  INTER-CLUB TRYOUTS  Unusual interest was displayed in the
traditional Inter-Club debates, which  were held this year during the
latter part of the Fall Quarter. The question debated  by teams
representing the various clubs in school was, "Resolved, That the office of
 State Superintendent of Public  Instruction be appointive, instead of
elective." As  a result of a series of heated debates on this subject, many
good debaters were dis-covered,  and ten people were finally chosen to
enroll in the regular debate rehearsal  class at the beginning of the
Winter Quarter.  DUAL DEBATE WITH CHENEY  What has usually been a
tri-Normal debate became a dual debate this year,  owing to the fact that
Ellensburg withdrew from the league. Cheney and Belling-ham,  however,
agreed to carry on the battle of the intellect.  This exchange of argu-ment
 took place on February 27, and the question under discussion was,
"Resolved,  That the United States enter the World Court with the
Harding-Hughes reserva-tions."  As the United States senate had voted to
enter the World Court under the  Swanson reservations about two weeks
before the debate was held, both sides further  agreed that the action of
the senate would be given no place. in the debate. It was  also agreed that
the negative teams should be permitted to use the Swanson reserva-tions  in
opposing the affirmative, as long as no reference was made to the action 
of congress in entering under these reservations.  The teams remaining at
home consisted of Velma LeMaster, Floid Van Etten,  and Ralph Johnson,
while those representing Bellingham at Cheney were Meryl  Bird, Ethan
Allen, and Inez Clark. The Normal-by-the-Sea was successful in  both
debates, winning at home by a vote of 3 to 0, and at Cheney, 2 to 1.  The
affirmative team argued that entrance would more surely insure world 
peace, as it would create a friendly feeling between the European nations 
and the  United States. The just method of procedure followed by this court
was also ex-plained,  and it was shown that the United States could very
well make use of such a  court in settling commercial, and other disputes.
The negative team showed how  closely this court is linked to, and
controlled by, the League of Nations. They  argued that the same movement
towards world peace, for which their opponents  were  arguing, could be
obtained by making further use of our ambassadors, and by means  of
friendly cooperation with other nations.  Both teams will remember this
debate as one in which everyone had a chance  to travel.  The teams
representing Cheney Normal School proved themselves worthy op-ponents in
every sense of the world, and Bellingham can well be proud of the outcome 
of these debates. COLORADO COLLEGE  On April 3, a team of two men
representing Colorado College met two men from  the Bellingham Normal, at
Bellingham, in a debate on the question, "Resolved,  that Congress be given
the right to regulate child labor."  Floid Van Etten and Meryl Bird, from
the home school, argued for the affirma-tive,  while John K. Emmerson and
Cecil B. Read, from Colorado, assumed the nega-tive  side. This was an
unusually fine debate. The judges' decision, which was in  favor of
Bellingham, by a 2 to 1 majority, showed that the argument was very close. 
We welcome representatives from this college, so far  from our own, and
hope  that at some future time, we may be able to meet this college again
in contest.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 115

     ----------

COLLEGE OF THE PACIFIC  The same question that was used in the debate with
Colorado College, was  also  used in a debate with a women's team from the
College of the Pacific, of Stockton,  California. The debate took place on
April 30, at Bellingham Normal, in a special  assembly. Margaret Black and
Grace Jacobson took the affirmative of the question,  while the young
ladies from California set forth the negative argument.  This was the first
debate at Bellingham in which just one expert judge gave the  decision. Mr.
Matthew Hill, secretary of the Alumni Association of the University  of
Washington, was the judge. At the end of the debate, he summed up the
argu-ment  on both sides, and rendered his decision in favor of the College
of the Pacific.  The argument on both sides was clear and concise, and the
delivery was excellent.  Although there was no cup at stake this year, as
there has been in previous  years, still Bellingham has completed an
extremely successful year in the field of  argument. Out of a possible ten
decisions, seven have been for us, and three against.  Out of the four
debates, only one was lost.  Much of the success of the work must be
attributed to the faithful coaching of  Miss Alma G. Madden, who has charge
of this activity at the Normal. She has  never left a stone unturned in her
efforts to guide and help the teams, and at all  times she has been an
inspiration to those who worked under her.  The debaters of this year pass
the torch to those of future years, hoping that,  for the love of their
alma mater, they will hold it high.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 116

     ----------

453i

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 117

     ----------

Upper row, left to right: Lyman Phifer, Edward Arntzen, Meryl Bird. Lower
row, left to right;Margaret Black, Louise Mumaw, Katherine Hughes, Gladys
Scott.  Scholarship SociefU  LOUISE MUMAW MARGARET BLACK  GLADYS SCOTT 
President  S . . Vice-President  Secretary-Treasurer  The objectives of the
Scholarship Society are to provide recognition of scholastic  attainment,
thereby stimulating greater endeavor in the entire student body, and to 
provide opportunity for student members to broaden and arouse their
interests in the  various fields of knowledge.  SCHEDULE  Organization
meeting .  Reception for new members  Need for Wider Interests  How to Keep
Alive Through Literature Broadening Our Outlook in the Field of  October
15, 1925  November 19, 1925  December 3, 1925 February 17, 1926  History .
Mar. 11, 1926

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 118

     ----------

Top row, left to right: Zeno Katterle, Evelyn Clark, Paul Van Cruyningen,
Miriam Taylor, Mr. Marquis. Bottom row, left to right: Bertha Weber, Elsa
Schubert, Miss Jones, Lulu Minkler, Elsie Holland. Leadership SocietUj 
FALL QUARTER  MILTON BLONDEN . . . President  ELSA SCHUBERT Vice- President
 INEZ CLARK . . Secretary-Treasurer  WINTER QUARTER  BERTHA WEBER .
.President LULU MINKLER . Vice-President  MIRIAM TAYLOR .
Secretary-Treasurer  SPONSORS-Miss Jones, Mr. Marquis.  MEMBERSHIP-Milton
Blonden, Evelyn Clark, Chauncey Griffith, Bertha Hibner, Elsie Holland,
Lulu  Minkler, Elsa Schubert, Miriam Taylor, Inez Clark, Mary Culver,
Bennett IHoward, Zeno Katterle, Paul Van  Cruyningen, Bertha Weber, Velma
Le Master, Meryl Bird.  PURPOSE  First, to give recognition  to students
fcr good leadership.  Second, to stimulate better thinking in the student
body on the matter of  what  constitutes good leadership, and thus to make
for better selection of leaders.  Third, to lead to a study of the factors
involved in good leadership in order  that the members of the society and
students may better develop their capacities for  leadership.  CALENDAR 
November 5, 1925-First meeting called to order by the old president, Zeno 
Katterle. Officers for the Fall Quarter elected.  December 7, 1925---
Imnportant business meeting. Election of new members took  place. By-laws
of society amended. January 14, 1926-Election of officers for the Spring
Quarter.  February 4, 1926 Insignia for the society chosen.  March 4,
1925-Leadership Society banquet at the home of Mary Culver.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 119

     ----------

Upper row, left to right: Eileen Deen, Ruth Shultz, Debitha Thatcl er,
Olive Cummins, E. Peterson, Miss Rosene, Marie Jordan. Third row, left to
right: Grace Sheldon, Opal Hadly, Ethel Pavel, Bertha Weber, Olive 
Ramalia, Mrs. Clark, Ruth Bump, Violet Strong, Eunice Balch. Second row,
left to right: Frances Finical,  Edna Olson, Mattie Vaughn, Ellen Hunger,
Hortense McMaster, Mamie Manberg, Bertha Nichols, Helen Ken-nedy,  Mabel
Hatch, Myrtle Thompson. First row, left to right: Dagney Jacobson, Mary
Fosjack, Daisy  Clawson, Eleanor Aldrich, Melba DeWitt, Dorothy Goodman,
Elizabeth Florence, Annie Nelson, Bertha McMahon.  Campfire  Each year in
the work of the Campfire one law from the seven  is chosen to be 
especially emphasized. This year "Seek Beauty" holds the honored place. Our
Guardians, Dorothy Goodwin, Myrtle Thompson, Mattie Vaughn, Daisy Clawson, 
Vera Kreisher, Etta Farr, and Frances Pettijohn have been truly obeying
this law  and inspiring the girls in their separate groups to see the
beautiful in all things. Miss  Rosene, of the faculty, has charge of the
main activities of the Bellingham Normal  Campfire Girls. Mr. Berg, Scout
Assistant and faculty member, taught several groups  the art of knot tying.
The Campfire work has only begun in the Normal School, but  we feel that
the true spirit of the Campfire Girl has been awakened and that the work 
will go much farther in the coming terms.  CALENDAR  January 4-11
-Organization of groups, election of group officers and names. February
10-First Council Fire at Edens Hall. Two Guardians received their 
torch-bearers' rank.  February 26-The Nakayaki group have early breakfast
on Sehome Hill.  March 3-Council Fire at Edens Hall under the direction of
the Kly-tea-wo  group. Ranks were presented and Miss Osborne of the
training school gave review  of Bellingham Campfire work.  April 27-Grand
Council Fire with all Bellingham Campfire Girls participating.  Public
attendance was cordially urged at this meeting.  May 14-Camp Samish for
week-end  trip !  June 11-The Northwest Campfire conference and guardians'
training course  held at Camp Samish on Samish Island.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 120

     ----------

Allison Debate Club  OFFICERS  MARY HIBNER  FRANCES M. FINICIAL  MAUDEST
HOLLENBAUGH GLADYS BURROWS  FLOID VAN ETTEN  MR. ARNTZEN  President 
Vice-President  Secretary- Treasurer  Reporter  Parliamentarian and
Sergeant-at-Arms  Faculty Advisor  CALENDAR  November 6- Barnum and Bailey
Hop in big gym.  November 18-Candy making party at Dr. Fisher's.  February
23- Reception for Cheney debate team.  INEZ CLARK  MARY HIBNER  MAUDEST
HOLI ENIBAUGIH FRANCES FINICAL  GLADYS BURROWS  GRACE JACOBSON  EARL B.
O'GRADY  FLOID VAN ETTEN  MEMBERS  RUTH LITTLE  LOUISE CAMPBELL  ANN.4
LEWIS  FRED SOEHL  MELBA D)I: WITT  DOROTHY JACKSON  STANLEY ROE  HELLEN
CHARD  GLADYS GRAY  ETHAN AIL ,R.N  Lois  PECK  ELLEN STEEN  LLOYD E. MABON
 WANITA MCCOY

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 121

     ----------

Fourth row, left to right: Elmer Webster, Norman Vance, Thomas Large,
Harold Keeney, John Fitz- Gerald, Norman Burchette, Bill Mock. Third row,
left to right: Mr. Hoppe, Chauncey Griffith, Robert Wagner, Bennett Howard,
Angus Bowmer, John Kerr, Theo. Cederburg, Angus Edwards, Meryl Bird. Second
 row, left to right: Doris Case, Mrs. Elizabeth Forrest, Eleanor Adams,
Mary Culver, Gladys Burroughs,  Josephine Price, Mrs. Bisbee, and Zeno
Katterle. Front row, left to right: Dorothy Taft, Edith Toppe, Elsie 
Wilson, Lily JoLanson, Lulu Minkler, Mary Margaret Doyle, Peggy Magoon,
Donna Lehman,  Roline Powell.  Drama  MERYL BIRD  MARY L. CULVER  ANGUS
BOWMER  President  .Vi.ce. - resident  Secretary-Treasurer  PURPOSE  The
purpose of this club is the study and interpretation of the drama.  CLUB
CALENDAR  Goose Hangs High  Adam and Eva  Minick  December 7, 1925  March
18, 1926  June 7 and 8, 1926

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 122

     ----------

Top row, left to right: Harold Hill, Dale Annis, Norman Burchette, Kirvin
Smith, Ted Logan, Miss  Slawson,  John Kerr, Marion Walters, Joe Baxter.
Second row: Grace Bowen, Ruth Campbell, Sylvia  Tallackson, Kathryn Holmes,
Helen Trygstad, Wrennie Chapman, Alice Theodorson, Margaret Black, Orlena 
Young, Gertrude Hogdahl, Edith Egbert, Ruth McCullough. First row: Ann
Olander, Aileen Galloway,  Evelyn Price, Erma Stevens, Catherine Wright,
Mary Margaret Doyle, Janet McKenzie, Gladys Gray,  Thelma Butler, Evelyn
Hiendenstrom, Emmeline Moss.  Macdowell  FALL QUARTER  President 
Fice-.President  Secretary  Treasurer  WINTER QUARTER  CHAUNCEY GRIFFITH 
LOUISE STIGER  ORLENA YOUNG  KATHRYN HOLMES  The purpose of the MacDowell
Club is to study noted  positions, to stimulate interest in musical
activities in this  informed on the latest movements in the musical world. 
President Vice-.President  Secretary  Treasurer  composers and their
com-school  and city, to keep  CALENDAR November 24, 1925-Russo-Polish
program. Papers were read, and a number  of fine instrumental and vocal
selections were given.  February 2, 1926--A program of Indian music, part
of which was given by the  Girls' Double Quartette, newly admitted into the
club.  February 16, 1926-Reception in the club room of Edens Hall in honor
of the  new members. An interesting program was given, and everyone had a
jolly time.  CHAUNCEY GRIFFITH  VIOLET HALSTEIN  ORLENA YOUNG  JOE BAXTER

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 123

     ----------

Top row, left to right: Lloyd Mabon, Don Patterson, Reed Nellis, Phil A.
Sisk, Loraine Sharn-broich,  Max Stuart, George Overmeyer, Bryan Hankins,
Mr. Williams. Third row: Ethan Allen, D)on  Sturtz, Arthur Adamson, Edwin
Slocum, Verne Forrey. Jean Salisbury, Marjorie Shaner, Eva Hancock. Second 
row: George Allez, Emma Sando, Edward Alf, Mrs. Batchelor, Olga Hoglund,
Mildred Moore, De Lora Napier, Mrs. Maude Muffett, Marion Brooker. First
row: Blanche Cummins, Ethel Guilbert, Gladys Scott, Hortense  MacMaster,
Elsie Holland, Mary Erickson, Mary Alice Theodorson, Ada Norlin, Josephine
Smith, Zula  Hancock, Inez Clark.  Social Science Club  WINTER QUARTER 
LLOYD MABON  .ALICE STROBEL  GEORGE OVERMEYER  SPRING QUARTER  The above
officers were re-elected. PURPOSE  The purpose of this club is to discuss
and to get  problems now before our Legislature and the world.  SP resident
 SFice-President  Secretary-Treasurer  an understanding of the vital 
CALENDAR FALL QUARTER:  Miss Cummings gave a talk on Nationalism vs.
Internationalism.  WINTER QUARTER:  A social gathering at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Williams.  A talk by Hon. John Kellogg, state representative.  An
illustrated lecture by Mr. J. J. Donovan, on recent Mediterranean cruises.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 124

     ----------

Back row, left to right: Ford, Carver, Rhodes, Abbey, Hoggatt. Second row:
Stickney, Algyer, Kure, Shelton, Broadbent, Fitzgerald. First row: Tidball,
Bengen, Katterle, Werner, Okerlund, Christman.  W Club  The "W" Club is one
of the best established organizations of the institution.  The club was
founded several years ago, by the men who participated in athletics.  The
main purpose of the "W" Club is to raise  the standards of sports, bring
sports-manship  up to a high level, and to promote athletics in the school.
It is the ultimate  purpose of the club to induce all men of the Normal
school to take an active part in  at least one branch of athletics during
the school year.  The "W" Club performs many useful functions. In the 
first place it endeavors  to bring to this school athletes who have the
desire to get an education, secondly  the  club lends aid to and encourages
men who show themselves to be the right type of  individuals for community
workers, thirdly the "W" Club creates and maintains a  spirit of good
feeling among all the men of the school, and lastly, by means of its 
active campaigns the "W" Club advertises- the Bellingham  Normal throughout
the  school year.  The personnel of the club consists of men only. It is
strictly an athletic  organization, and only those men are admitted as
members who have earned a letter  in one of the five major sports:
football, basketball, baseball, track, or tennis.  There have been three
initiations during the past year. It is always customary  to compel the new
members to carry an egg in their left back pocket and to produce  it when
called upon to do so by an old member.  It is the tradition of the "W" 
members to hold an annual dip. The entire  personnel of the club, escorted
by the coaching staff, sojourn  to a body of water.  Here everybody goes
in, coach and "W" members.  Although not a social organization, the club
sponsors one dance every year. In  addition to the dance, the club sponsors
another big feat annually, "The Smokelets  Smoker." Here is where brawn and
brain meet, and everybody yells for the under,  dog.  The "W" Club is
always represented in the annual Viking Vodvil, and their performers
generally receive notable recognition as dramatic artists.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 125

     ----------

Womens Athletic Association  OFFICERS  EVELYN CLARK President  OLIVE
RAMALIA Vice-President   BERTHA WEBER Secretary-Treasurer  ELSA SCHUBERT .
. . . . Assistant Secretary  PURPOSE  The  purpose of this organization
shall be to promote a high physical efficiency  among women of the Normal,
to foster college spirit by developing inter-class ath-letics,  to provide
recognition for athletic ability, and to  foster good citizenship.  The
association has taken an active part in doing service for the school. At
Christmas time the girls decorated the halls with greens. When called upon
to  canvass the residence districts of Bellingham for the annual Red Cross
Roll Call th(  members enthusiastically gave their time to it.  So now a
toast to our advisors, Miss Skalley and Miss Frank, and wishes for  even
greater success in  the coming years.  CALENDAR  October 3, 1925-Hike to
Normalstad.  November 19, 1925--Initiation for Fall Quarter.  November 26,
1926-Thanksgiving breakfast at the Rocks.  December 13, 1925-Hike for
Christmas greens.  December 14, 1926-Decorated halls for Christmas. 
Canvassed city for Red Cross subscriptions.  January 23, 1926-Hike to
Skyline Ridge.  January 29, 1926-Initiation for Winter Quarter. April 17,
1926-Trip to Austin Pass.  April 24, 1926-Hare and hound chase and salmon
bake.  May 31, 1926-Trip to Mt. Constitution.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 126

     ----------

TAYLOR, President KIBEE, Vice-President WErER, Secretary BLACK, Treasirer 
Womens Lcagque OFFICERS  MIRIAM TAYLOR  JESSIE KIRBY  BERTHA WEBER 
MARGARET BLACK  COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN  MELBA COFFMAN  ELEANOR DODSON  VELMA
LEMASTER  LUCILLE FORCUM  INEZ CLARK  LOUISE MUMAW  MARY CULVER  JESSIE
KIRBY  MARY HIBNER  . President  Vice- President  Secretary  Treasurer 
Fellowship  Social  Standards  Social Service  Leadership  Scholarship
Program  Publicity  Election  PURPOSE  To strengthen the spirit of loyalty
and good fellowship among women students.  To develop cooperation between
the student body and the administrative officers  of the  school.  To
provide a means by which the women students may express opinions on
mat-ters  of interest  to them.  To encourage high ideals of character and
social standards.  CALENDAR  October 3, 1925--Kid  party.  October 28,
1925-Fall Quarter tea.  February 13, 1926-Women's League dance.  February
26, 1926-Fashion Revue.  May 9, 1926-Mothers' Day tea.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 127

     ----------

Back row, left to right: Elizabeth Eaton, Ernestine Evens, Emma Anderson,
Cecilia MacDonald,  Bernice Oliver, Ellen Strand, D)orothy Thompson, Ruth
Anderson. Bottom row, left to right: Ruby Getclell,  Opal Hadley, Alice
Beckman, Elsa Wilson. Francis l)enniston, Mtrie Laron, Clara Heckman,
Margaret Wilson, Sylvia Tallackson, Margaret Thom, s, May Mead, Mabel Ab'
ott, Belva Ball, Nora Cummins, Eleanor IPeters.  As not nearly all the
members are in the picture it might be called "a group of Y. W. C. A.
girls," as  well as giving the names.  Y. W. C. A.  OFFICERS  SYLVIA
TALLACKSON  BERNICE OLIVER FRANCES DENNISTON  MARGARET THOMAS  President 
Vice-.President  Secretary  Treasurer COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN  MAXINE EBERT
Social Service  LUCILLE PEAPLES Bible Study  ELSIE WILSON . . . . .
Missionary  ALICE NELSON . Meetings  BELVA BALL . . . Publicity  SPONSORS 
Miss  SPERRY  CALENDAR  October 2-All school reception.  October
31-Hallowe'en party.  November 1-Bible classes started in halls. 
November-Tea for advisory board.  December-Mrs. Cole entertains cabinet.
January 12-15 Bible Institute.  March 12-Hike to the Rocks.  April 4-Easter
sunrise service.  May 14-May blossom party.  MISS MEAD

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 128

     ----------

FLOID VAN ETTEN  GUSSIE OKERLUND  PERRY KEITHLEY  MR. MARQUIS  Men's Club 
OFFICERS  .President  Vice-President  Secretary-Treasurer  Sponsor  PURPOSE
 This club is made up of all men of  the school, and its purpose is to
create a  common interest among them regardless of other connections, to
further cooperation  among the different undertakings of the men, and to
police all athletic contests.  CALENDAR  October 3, 1925-Reception at Edens
Hall; chairman, Garland Okerlund. Smokeless Smoker in big gym. Auspices,
Farmer Kelly.  All men hike; chairman, George Overmeyer.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 129

     ----------

Top row, left to right: Hazel Sloan, Lila Okerlund, Violet Tate, Martha
Napier, Blanche Kramer,  Eleanor Isles, Fae Allen, Stella Lawson. Second
row: Miss, Crawford, Agnes Madsen, Helen Corner, Jane Dagger, Martha Aven,
Francis Denniston, Mina James, Dorothy Pease, Marguerite Mitchell. Front
row: Doris  Cady, Irene McKenna, Bernice Marving, Jessie Wihitten, Bernice
Christenson, Consuela Ramquist,  Miriam  Taylor, Carrie Crippen.  Alethian 
OFFICERS  CARRIE CRIPPEN .. President  BERNICE CHRISTENSEN President  FAE
ALLEN Secretary-Treasurer  FLOENA CHAMBERLAIN . Reporter BERTHA CRAWFORD
Advisor  PURPOSE  To further the study of parliamentary procedure,
literature, music, art, and  social entertainment.  CALENDAR  October 24,
1925-Hallowe'en party.  December 4, 1925-Initiation.  April 16,
1926-Banquet at Leopold Hotel.  April 22, 1926-Initiation.  Indefinite-
Week-end party.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 130

     ----------

Top row, left to right: Bertha Maynick, Mary Byrnes, Vera Kreisher, Theresa
Spendal, Gladys  Scott, Ruth  Gnagey, Frances Pettijohn. Bottom row, left
to right: Irene Kingsbury, Mary Margaretivich,  Myrtle Rosenquist, Alice
Butler, Ruth Butler, Rosanne Schroedor, Miss Moffatt, Olive Gunderson. 
Alkisiah  The Alkisiah Club, which is about to begin its twenty-seventh
year, is very  proud to be the oldest club in the Normal, as well as the
only federated club.  Many changes have taken place in these years, but the
club, as the name Alkisiah  implies, keeps its goal always "In the Near
Future."  "Once an Alkisiah, always an Alkisiah," is typical of the spirit
of the oldest  club on the campus.  The aim of the Alkisiah Club is to
promote an appreciation of literature and art,  current events, public
speaking, and community service. OFFICERS  FRANCES PETTIJOHN President 
NANETTE DOBBS Vice-President  THERESA SPENDAL  Secretary-Treasurer  MIss
MOFFATT . . . . . Advisor  CALENDAR  October 31, 1925-Party for prospective
members.  November 23-27, 1925-Exhibit of originals by Washington artists. 
December 15- 18, 1925 Bulb sale.  February 4-Initiation of new members. 
February 13, 1926-Annual banquet.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 131

     ----------

Top row, left to right: Leila Hartly, Mrs. Ruth Yerion, Margaret Wilson,
Anna Nelson, Margaret  Pussey, Helen Lassen, Miss Merriman. Second row:
Geneva Howerton, Helen Trygstad, Vera Blankenship,  Irene Schagel, Louisa
Pike, Bernice Vizio, Alice Parkins, Gertrude Watson. Front row: Margaret
Glenovich, Melba DeWitt, Ruth Little, Rachel Swanberg, Janice Smith, Mrs.
Grace Marnic, Belva Ball, Grace Wicklund.  Leowjrhta  FALL QUARTER  LEILA
HARTLEY . . President  GRACE WICKLUND Vice- President  RACHEL SWANBERG
Secretary  OLIVE SHAFER Treasurer  WINTER QUARTER  IRENE SCHAGEL . . . . .
President  GRACE WICKLUND . . . . Vice-President  RUTH LITTLE Secretary 
LEILA HARTLEY Treasurer  With only seven old members to start the club off
in the fall, it has grown to its  full capacity of thirty members and has
had a most successful year.  Responses have been made to P. T. A.  calls
and assemblies, besides the regular  weekly story-telling hour conducted at
the three libraries of the city on Saturday  afternoon. At the regular
meetings members of the club have become acquainted with the great stories
of the world. These activities embody the purposes of the  club as laid out
by the constitution. They are Friendship, Love of Good Stories, and 
Service.  During Book Week in November a very interesting program was put
on at the  libraries. The social side of the club has not been neglected,
for there have been  many pleasant evenings together, the annual picnic
being outstanding among these. Sponsors are Miss Merriman and Miss
Montgomery.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 132

     ----------

Back row, left to right: Anne Engele, Opal Johnson, Edith Burton, Gladys
Burton, Mary Erickson. Second row: Miss Osborn, Margaret McKay, Mary Grant,
Lucille Allen, Josephine Markham, Thelma Stendal.  Front row: Miss Caseley,
Ruth Walters, Lorena Muth, Kathleen Bennett, Kathryn Holmes. Ohiyjesa 
OFFICERS  MARION AMUNSON President  LUCILLE ALLEN . . . . . . ice-President
JOSEPHINE MARKHAM Secretary-Treasurer  KATHLEEN PATANA Social Director 
GRACE ERICSON .  . Inter-Club Council Representative  SPONSORS  Miss
CASELEY MIss OSBORN  PURPOSE  Our purpose is to give an interesting social
life to the club members and have  members give talks at various meetings. 
CALENDAR  October 9, 1925 -Fudge party at Miss Osborn's apartment.  October
16, 1925- Pledge service for new members.  October 20, 1926-Tea for new
members.  October 30, 1925-Pledge service.  November 13, 1925--Dinner held
in the club room of Edens Hall, followed by  initiation. December 4,
1925--Backward party given by new members at the home of  Mary Grant. 
December 16, 1925-Christmas luncheon given in the club room of Edens Hall. 
January 20, 1926-Tea given for new members.  February 13, 1926-Initiation
held at Miss Osborn's apartment.  March 7, 1926-Hike and picnic on the
Rocks.  March 19, 1926-Picnic supper on the shores of a lake.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 133

     ----------

Top row, left to right: Norman Burchette, Joe Baxter, Arthur A. Adamson,
John Kerr, Jack  Hoffman, Edward Alf, Larry Werner, Dorothy Taft, Loraine
Sharnboroich, Lloyd Mabon, Ted Cederburg.  Second row: Kirvin Smith, Mary
Hibner, Stella Lawson, Margaret Black, Eugenia Fairbanks, Mr.  Philippi,
Mildred Moore, Thelma Butler, Mary Margaret Doyle, Joanna Osborne, Miss
Lambert, Meryl Bird.  Bottom row: Miss Johnson, Elsie Holland, Florian
Culver, Alice Cutts, Mary Lou Shuttie, Katheryn  Root, Irma Stevens, Evelyn
Clark, Helen Kennedy, Bernice Oliver, Esther Reddick.  Philonmathean  The
aim of the Philmothean Club is to familiarize its members with
parlia-mentary  procedure and organization; to offer improvement for its
members in liter-ary,  musical, and social attainments.  OFFICERS  THEODORE
CEDERBERG  FLORIAN CULVER  GEORGE ABBEY  JOANNA OSBORNE  HELEN KENNEDY  /I
DTPT n  President  ice-.President  Secretary-Treasurer  Club Critic 
Reporter  F lt Advisor  CALENDAR October 22, 1925-Initiation and party in
gym.  January 15, 1926-Birthday party at Mr. Phillipi's home. February 12,
1926-Initiation in gym.  March 5, 1926-Philo assembly.  March 5,
1926-Banquet and dance at Hotel Leopold.  u y so

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 134

     ----------

Top row, left to right: William Perry, Ted Logan, William Olson, Lyman
Pfifer. Second row: Ray  Bremmer,  Bernard Genther, Edith Egbert, Jean
Salisbury, Elva Ringler, Dorothy Thompson, Dorothy Siler,  Troy Moore.
Front row: Bennett Howard, Janet McKenzie, Minnie Oja, Lucille Forcum,
Delia Keeler,  Blanche McLaughlin, Dorothy Jackson, Gunnar Berg.  Rural
Life  OFFICERS  LYMAN PFIFER President BLANCHE McLAUGHLIN . .
Vice-President  JOHN KURE Treasurer  LUCILLE FORCUM .Secretary AN(US
EDWARDS Sergeant-at- Arms  The Rural Life Club) is a literary club designed
to be of practical value to its  members, not only while at the Normal, but
also after they have entered the teaching  field. The regular meetings very
successfully carry out the purpose of the club,  which is to familiarize
the members with parliamentary procedure and organization,  to work out
solutions for rural problems, and to provide social interests at the
school.  In addition to these meetings, the following calendar of club
events is being carried  out:  FALL QUARTER:  Halowe'en party. A Sehome
Hill trip.  Christmas party. This party  was postponed this year until
January, when Dr.  and Mrs. Miller entertained the club.  WINTER QUARTER: 
Valentine Party. Banquet at the Victoria Hotel.  Coal mine trip. Postponed
this year until the Spring Quarter.  SPRING QUARTER:  Mountain View hike.
Annual beach picnic.  SUMMER QUARTER: Salmon bake. Picnic. San Juan Islands
cruise.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 135

     ----------

Top row, left to right: John FitzGerald, Thordur Thorardson, Harold Benson,
Paul Van Cruyningen,  Floyd Hendrickson, Ralph Johnson. Second row: Bob
Bowler, Garland Okerlund, Zeno Katterle, Miss Kinsman,  Chauncey Griffith,
Evelyn Hagen, Olive Hardan. Front row: Angus Bowmer, Lulu Minkler, Donna
Lehman,  Alice Gil!espie, Melba Coffman, Mary Culver, Evelyn Lysons, Inez
Clark.  Thespians  OFFICERS CHAUNCEY GRIFFITH . . President  GENEVIEVE
DRESSER . . . . . Vice-President  MARY CULVER Secretary  PAUL VAN CRUYINGEN
Treasurer  PURPOSE  The aim of this club is to study and foster dramatics. 
CALENDAR  Each quarter of this year has witnessed the admission and
initiation of new members.  On February 16 of the winter quarter, an
assembly program was put on. This  took the form of a patriotic program
depicting historical scenes with living characters.  Each year a
home-coming banquet is given. This year is was held February 20  in the
Tulip Room of the Leopold Hotel.  A Pirate Dance is being planned for the
future.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 136

     ----------

Top row, left to right: Bennett Howard, Loraine Starnbroich, Edgar Wheaton,
Burling Lee, Ralph  Baily. Third row: Ursula Mattercheck, Harriet Hudnall,
Thomas Large, Russell Anderson, Elizabeth  Florence, Faith Houck, Wilma
Nieveen, Donald Olts. Second row: Esther Fisher, Jetral Templeton, Helen 
Moore, Mildred Ric ards, Ethel Kelso, Helen Nelson, De Lora Napier, Grace
McCullough. First row: Ferna Provan, Eleanor Adams, Helen M. Kennedy, Ethel
Smith, Lolita Wilson, Edna Price, Hortense MacMaster, Erma  Sadler, Rozanne
Schroeder.  College Club  HELEN M. KENNEDY  ELIZABETH MCCOY  ELEANOR ADAMS 
MRS. FRANK BURNET  MR. ARTHUR KOLSTAD  FALL QUARTER .President 
Vice-president  Secretary-Treasurer  Sponsor  Associate Sponsor  WINTER
QUARTER HELEN M. KENNEDY  LORAINE SHARNBROICH  ELEANOR ADAMS  MRS FRANK
BURNET  MR. ARTHUR KOLSTAD  SP .resident  SV ice-.President 
Secretary-Treasurer  Sponsor  Associate Sponsor The College Club was
organized to provide a way for students at Bellingham  Normal who are here
from colleges and universities to become acquainted and to have  good times
together.  CALENDAR  October 29, 1925-Initiation at Normal building. 
November 7, 1925-College Club party for members.  November 14, 1926-Fall
informal at Edens Hall.  January 28, 1926-Initiation at Normal building. 
January 30, 1926-Party at the big gym.  March 13, 1926-St. Patrick's dance
at Aftermath Club.  May 29, 1926-Spring informal.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 137

     ----------

Edens Hall  FALL QUARTER  ELEANOR OLSON  CARRIE CRIPPEN  KATHRYN HOLMES 
LUCILLE FORCUM  DOROTHY DEIGHTON  WINTER QUARTER  MINNIE OJA  NEVA
WICKERSIHAM  VESTA LARSON  GWENDOLYN SHAKESPEARE  IRENE MCKENNA  SPRING
QUARTER  GRACE SHELTON  MARTHA .AVEN  VESTA LARSON  BERTHA WEBER  JANE
DAGGER  President  Vice-.President Secretary  Social Chairman  SFire Chief 
President  Vice-President  Secretary  Social Chairman  Fire Chief 
President  Vice-President  Secretary  Social Chairman  Fire Chief

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 138

     ----------

Top row, left to right: Bernice Cairns, Erma Sadler, Helene Hefty, Helen
Babcock, Amelia Neimann, Freda Smith. Second row: Margaret Glenovitch,
Marjorie Merrell, Eileen O'Rourke, Bernice Vizio, Anne Marie  Cronin, Mary
Fosjack, Bernice Petersen, Lois Starbuck. First row: Mary Margaret Doyle,
Philomena L.  Hynes, Marguerite Welter, Ethel Pavel, Miss Frank, Lucille
Youngbluth, Mrs. Lovegren. Newman Club  OFFICERS  PHILOMENA HYNES  ALICE
HERMSEN  MARY M. DOYLE  AGNES MANLEY  PURPOSE  All Catholic students are
invited to join our  thus forward the aims of the school and club. 
CALENDAR  October 13, 1926-Newman Club dance.  May-Club dance.  President 
Vice- President  Secretary-Treasurer  Representative  club and to become
acquainted and

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 139

     ----------

Back row, left to right: Maude Barnhart, Helen Case, Emma Sando, Sverre
Arestad, Helen Lofthus, Emma Anderson. Second row: Opal Hadley, Ruth
Magnuson, Anne Engele, Julie Jensen, Marion Anurson, Aletha Kellum, Phoebe
Nickson, Janice Smith. Front row: Hazelle Lightfoot, Marjorie Mosher, Mary
Fosjack, Miss Rosene, Olive Wunderlich, Elizabeth Florence, Don Patterson,
Grace Marnic. Norcentra  OFFICERS  ELIZABETH FLORENCE President  DON
PATTERSON Vice-President  OLIVE WUNDERLICII Secretary-Treasurer  Miss
ROSENE . . . . Sponsor  PURPOSE  A social club organized to  welcome those
coming West to our school, to help  maintain the high standards of social
life in the school, and to support the interests  of the Bellingham Normal.
 CALENDAR  Feb. 13, 1926-Hard Time party.  April 3, 1926-Informal.  April
28, 1926-Hike to Larrabee Point.  May 16, 1926-Breakfast at Whatcom Falls. 
June 5, 1926-Farewell party.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 140

     ----------

Top row, left to right: Anne Engele, Wrennie Chapman, Mildred Richards,
Helen Kennedy. Front  row: Mr. Bond, Margaret Black, Hortense McMaster,
Estl.er Dukes, Elsie Holland, Mary Erickson, Eleanor Adams.  Oregon 
OFFICERS  ELEANOR ADAMS  ESTHER DUKES  ELSIE HOLLAND  MR. BOND PURPOSE  Our
purpose is to perpetuate the feeling of good  from Oregon.  President 
Secretary- Treasurer  Social Director  Sponsor  fellowship among the
students  CALENDAR  October 31, 1925- Hallowe'en party.  February 27,
1926-Hike to Mt. Chuckanut with Men's Club.  February 28, 1926- Outdoor
breakfast at Whatcom Park.  April 16, 1926-Party.  May, 1926-Viking Vodvil
act.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 141

     ----------

Top row, left to right: Loraine Sharnbroich, Marguerite Siggelko, Elsa
Shubert, Irene Kendler, Gene Shryock, Gladys Burroughs, Emma Anderson, Phil
Sisk. Second row: Laura Henderson, Alice Cutts, Gladys  Gray, Helen M.
Kennedy, Inez Clark. Front row: Jennie Larson, Rachel Swanberg, Grace
Wicklund, Esther  Fisher, Minnie Oja, Margaret Ross, Elsie Holland. 
GENEVIEVE DRESSER GENEVIEVE GEMMEL  HELEN M. KENNEDY  ANDREW MCCALL  MIss
PRISCILLA KINSMAN Seattle  OFFICERS  President  Vice-President 
Secretary-Treasurer  Social Chairman  SPONSORS MISS JEAN LAMBERT  PURPOSE 
The Seattle Club is a "good time" club, organized to enable students  who
live  or have lived in Seattle to become acquainted with each other and
have good times to-gether. CALENDAR  October 31, 1926-Hallowe'en dance in
big gym.  April 3, 1926-Spring dance.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 142

     ----------

First row, left to right: Velma LeMaster, Mrs. Bromley, Miss Montgomery,
Frances Finical, Mina  James. Second row: Mr. Ford, Fred Tait, Einer
Fretheim, Sverre Arestad, George Overmeyer.  Sourdough OFFICERS  FRED R.
TAIT President  MRS. E. C. FORREST . . . . . Vice-President  FRANCES M.
FINICAL . . . . Secretary-Treasurer  VELMA LEMASTER Reporter  PURPOSE  To
further interest in Alaska in the school, and to bring together students
from  Alaska.  CALENDAR  October 13, 1925- Hallowe'en party at the home of
Mrs. E. C. Forrest.  December 5, 1925-Party at the home of Mr. and Mrs.  F.
R. Tait.  February 19, 1926-Annual banquet at Hotel Victoria.  March 13,
1926-Party.  April 4, 1926- Assembly--Seattle speaker.  April 17,
1926--Dance.  May 23, 1926-Picnic.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 143

     ----------

Top row, left to right: Louise Wall, Helen Corner, Ted Logan, Kirvin Smith,
Calvin Nichols, Mr.  Arntzen, Mabel Richardson. Second row: Lucille Allen,
Thelma Benston, Evelyn Tolle, Olive Cumming,  Lucille Youngbluth, Mildred
Hedberg, Marie Tromer, Ellen Strand, Helen Monroe. Front row: Velma Le
Master, Agnes Tierney, Merrill Bamford, Olga Christofferson, Janet
McKenzie, Esther Kellogg, Gertrude Hogdahl, Alice  Green.  Tahoma  Motto:
"As firm as the mountain."  CALENDAR  Get-together party.  December 28,
1925-Theater party at Tacoma, Washington.  March 19, 1926-Tahoma Club
banquet.  April 11, 1926- Hike and boating party at Lake Whatcom.  May 15,
1926-Annual Tulip ball.  May 21, 1926-Farewell party.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 144

     ----------

41  ~Do Oc  80~D m~go  sa~Br~  ~

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 145

     ----------

Humor

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 146

     ----------

(Jrnmptd l iii WU4t Assruet of tIW  Appxronrbiin tIrt'r Ent-rIg bg tI~r 31.
T. C.I  O~w tIrir (9riginatt (lnrptu n Ni'3Vnat (gomnptrtion  Irrruri'
amuqn tIr 3 uuatrti of tI~r

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 147

     ----------

Humor  Enter Shakespeare, Valentino, Beelzebub, Napoleon, Hannibal and
Barney  Google. Each registers surprise at seeing all of these, the world's
greatest con-temporaries,  gathered together at one and the same time.
Sweeping the others a  graceful curtsy, Barney opens his coat with one
hand, and with the other opens dis-cussion.  "It's your move, gentlemen,"
says he. "Shall we lay the World Court before us on the table, or shall I
can it and tie it to Sparky's tail?"  "Can the grandiloquence, Barney,"
speaks up Shakespeare, "the devil take me  if I let any rail bird butt in
on my share of the gate receipts. But are you sure  nobody saw us take a
sneak into here ?"  "Not a chance, Bub. Bryan Hankins is making an
announcement in Assembly,  so we'll be safe here for another half hour at
least, but do you think that Angus  Bowmer will outshine Red Harold Grange
on Waldo Field this afternoon?" This  from Hannibal.  "He will if Sverre
Arestad don't slip Gus the oval oftener," grumbled Valen-tino;  "Aristotle
likes to hog the limelight himself too much."  "Nell's bells, Rudy, what
more could you expect with half the scholarship  society turned
professional," said Napoleon, "but 'Chuck' Fisher is turning out a  good
team from the punk material he had to start with. And with the basketball 
squad turning out every night on Waldo Field, too!"  "I'll say Chuck's had
a hard time," put in Beelzebub, "when you have to mould a backfield out of
a bunch like Bryan Hankins, Inez Clark, Meryl Bird, 'Swearing  Aristotle,'
Gus Bowmer, and Elsie Holland, when only Bowmer has had any practical 
experience, you've got a devil of a hoe to row. But 'Chuck' saved the day
yesterday  when he sent Estill in to take Mabon's place as referee, and put
Mahon in at center.  That forward pass that Lloyd heaved was what beat
Notre Dame."  "Yes, but that basket from the 40-yard line with only one and
one-eighth sec-onds  to go was what clinched it," returned Barney. "That
was what took the heart  out of them; they didn't have a chance after that.
Why, when that swished through  the hoop, Sparky cheered so hard that he
couldn't talk above a whisper at the end  of the game."  "Well, it was a
great game, anyhow," said Willie, Rudy and Bub.  "I'm betting Fisher's pets
today," returned Bony, Hanny and Barney.  (CURTAIN)

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 148

     ----------

tiking Rogue (allery  Me Eunning Enarb  ELIAS A. BOND, alias "Slick Dick"
and "Foxy  Pete." He would juggle accounts.  To be released after ten years
of hard labor.  ELSIE HOLLAND, alias "Smart Moll" and "Two Gun Sue." If she
hadn't robbed the mail!  To be released after eight years of good
be-havior.  WARD PRIGG, alias "The Phantom" and  "Greasy Dan." He ran too
much counterfeit.  To be released when fifteen years have elapsed.  INEZ
CLARK, alias "Dangerous Dolly" and  "Irate Kate." A case of "murder will
out."  To be released after another twenty-five years.  ANGUS BOWMER, alias
"Diamond Dan," "Whistler" and "Slippery Fingers." Caught go-ing  over the
border with loot.  To be released after twelve years behind the  bars. 
MARGARET BLACK, alias "Touchy Tess" and  "The Shove." They caught her
selling stolen  goods.  To be released in five years.  EDWARD ARNTZEN,
alias "All-over Art" and  "Risky Ron." Caught stealing government  bonds. 
To be released in eighteen more years.  THE UNHOLY THREE  JAMES BEVER,
alias "Quick Jim" and "Brown  Bear." Caught after absconding with bank
money.  To be released after breaking rock for eleven  years.  ADELE JONES,
alias "Slim Sal" and "Mean  Doll." Robbed once too often.  To be released
in four years.  o ' WILLIAM MARQUIS, alias "Big Bill," "Sly  Mark" and
"Gravy Gene." Shot two police be-fore  capture.  Sentenced for life in
close confinement.

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 149

     ----------

y  46,Mr.  r .Y ,3 « " l ' " , , "' ' ' fir r'" , ,.,,. t  " 
Ilk  A i4  FSF  Tom:'  '4... A 3" Awi a = yx  , , '' 'w4k' +' R#l 'i 3 ?If'
j " i. Dil fSi  lt;7I . L ±i .vr ., ... ,x s f

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 150

     ----------

LONG DISTANCE  Lulu (on phone) : "Is this you, honey?"  Honey: "Yes, this
is Honey, Lulu!"  Lulu: "Honolulu! Great heavens, I'm on the long distance
wires!"  ALL THAT'S NEEDED  Andy McC.: "Are ye guid at findin', Ba's?" 
Prospective Caddy: "Ay!"  Andy: "Then find one, noo, and we'll start." 
NAUGHTY! NAUGHTY!  Stella: "Sheep are certainly stupid animals."  Ward:
"Yes, my lamb."  DEGENERATION OF Young Woman: "And whose little boy are
you?"  Sophisticated "Happy": "Be yourself! Whose sweet mamma are you?" 
WHAT'S THE DIFF?  Ymea: "You should cease drinking that terrible stuff, my
boy It'll eat holes  in your stomach."  "Chris": " 'Asalright. Holesh won't
show when I've gotch my shirt buttoned." A NECESSITY  Sympathetic: "I hear
you buried your wife yesterday, Mr.  "Vell, mein Gott, I had to. She vass
dead."  Kaupp."  Bill P.: "I hope you are not angry with me, dear boy?" 
Floid R.: "No-not angry. Just  terribly, terribly hurt."  MAKING SURE  Abie
was eating his third apple when his father entered the room.  "Say, Abie,
tell me why you are eating so many apples ?"  "Don't you know, vodder, an
apple a day keeps the doctor avay ?"  "I know, but you ate three."  "Vell,
if you must know," says Abie, "I'm in love with the doctor's wife."  Dick
B.: "You think my picture is bad, but you can't paint one yourself." 
Quentin R.: "I can tell when an egg is bad, but I can't lay one myself."

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 151

     ----------

, kFY 'sue A (-  . '1Ylil T r. R'itF i1Y s :_" i lt; w pxr" s
.«i' -I+1'' ^ H f  IV w  Vii? '^lpiikt y Ali r :rr s ' tf ewe  
hj = t « , ,Y: f' ,"-a., ,,, ,,, jet: S .f s e r .- ^, "s  ( x 
« a  ,vi  w. "yR  ta fr t  ,  ' rF A !Y l ( E 1  Y "Iw  77  M

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 152

     ----------

Tommy Wynn :  Harold Keeney:  yours, and put-"  Tommy: "Bah!  Harold: "Thro
 TOO CLOSE KIN  "How do you teach a young lady to swim?"  "Put your arms
gently around her waist, take her hand in  She's my  sister."  w her off
the dock."  WOW!  A student looking through the telescope the other night
said, "God!"   Some telescope !  Miss Lambert: "Bernard, give me a sentence
using the word 'satiate.' "  "Sully": "I took Mary Lou to a picnic and I'll
satiate quite a lot."  She used to sit upon his lap,  As happy as could be.
 But now it makes her seasick  He has water on the knee.  NATIONALITY 
There was a young lady of  Buda,  Whose father was born in Bermuda;  Her
mother, though black,  Was a Czecho-Slovak,  And by marriage a daughter of
Judah.  WHAT'S THE ANSWER ?  The window washer's job is one  Requiring
beaucoop brains;  For he must go (oh, what a pun!)  To such a lot of panes.
 Zeno K.: "Can  Voice: "What?  night ?"  you tell the time, ol' boy?"  Why
in blazes should I tell you the time at this hour of the "Zeke": "Well,
you've got my watch."  WHAT'S IN A NAME?  Rather Deaf Old Lady (helpfully
answering telephone): "What did you say  your name was?"  Voice: "Jones:
J-o-n-e-s. J for Jack, O for Orange, N for  Needle, E for Ed-ward,  S for
Smith."  Rather Deaf Old Lady: "Oh, Smith the butcher--not today, thank
you."  Mr. Kangaroo:  Mrs. Kangaroo :  TRAGEDY IN AUSTRALIA  "But, Mary,
where's the child?" "Bless me, I've had my pocket picked."

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 153

     ----------

! v v'" i i4- R6 ~3'f r a+n "± .," F +"'r:t"' rf'^"''" xkr :; 
tll  x  -lk  opt,  ny,  the  3 yam, x,  «f r  r  x' a  0-0 .r  
pp"Ir  HJ.5  ,

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 154

     ----------

THE EGO AND HIS OWN  My name was Smith. James H. Smith. Not a unique name,
true, but I took a certain pride in it. After all, it distinguished this
microcosm from the rest. It des-ignated  ME.  Then I got on somebody's
maliing list. Within the next two weeks:  A brochure on "The Power of
Personality" came for J. H. Smyth.  H. Smith was requested to sign enclosed
card for sample.  J. H. Smoth was one of the favored few who would be
permitted to buy a  grapefruit farm at rock-bottom prices.  A complete set
was offered to Juno H. Shmittle for 97 cents, money back if not  satisfied.
 Jno. Smith was asked to donate to the Hoboes' Home.  A limited amount of
"Golden Goose" oil stock was generously reserved for  Judas Schmuth.  As a
special try-out offer, Jack H. Schnitzle would be permitted to wear one 
for ten days, free of charge.  Hames Snarth was urged to secure 100 calling
cards, like sample, for 39 cents.  But I fooled 'em. I've clhanged my name
to Stanislaws Prcyssmillikeweiss. If  they misspell that one, I'll never
know it.  Life.  Charlie Cayuse: "The next puncher that tries to ride me is
gonna get bucked  into the middle of next week."  Billy Broncho: "Gwan! You
couldn't even throw the Prince of Wales."  FIGURES OF SPEECH  Meg's right
there when it comes to hair,  Striking midnight blue-  Mag can't be beat
for twinkling  feet,  She'd dance the whole night through,  Mag's got a rep
for endless pep,  She keeps the boy's all shrieking-y1  ?p   h O But Dot's
a vow-you ask me how?  V Uld ] O$ Well, figuratively speaking!  THE ALIBI 
Mr. Grady: "Hey you, quit spittin' out of that window."  Earl O'G.: "What's
the difference? It's starting to rain, anyhow."  EVIDENCE  Evelyn L.: "Did
you ever walk in your sleep?"  Alice G.: "Yes, once. I dreamed I went fcr
an auto ride."  ONE MAN SHOW  "Si" T.: "My dad is an Elk, a Lion, a Moose
and an Eagle."  "Granny" T.: "Gee! What does it cost to see him?"  YES,
VERY CHEAP  Absent Minded  Floid Van E.: (to clerk in store): "I want just
a cheap um-brella,  please, for leaving in street car purposes."

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 155

     ----------

viiking Eogues argue  Mrs. I. T. Vaughan-Died on April Fool's Day. Her
decease came as a dis-tinct shock to a great circle of Normal friends, who
still think there's some catch  to it.  Mr. Victoria Cross Hoppe-He kicked
off without telling anybody.  he always was full of surprises.  But then 
Master Y. I. C. Rhodes-Who always aspired to be a tennis player. He died  a
violent death following the sight of his name  in Who's Who. He could have 
spared himself the trouble. It was another Rhodes.  Miss U. R. Cummings-Who
died a peaceful death while propounding the  gospel of Bull Run. One of her
pupils respectfully and reverently caught her as  she fell from her chair,
and laid her away. He then took over the class just as  she would have
wished it.  Mr. L. A. (Lathetic) Kibbe-He was the Viking patron sport
saint. He de-parted  while showing the boys how to run the cross city. It
was too much for  him when he finished  first.  Master R. A. Y. Odell-He
left us just at that age when he was about to  step from long trousers into
 short ones. He was given a decent burial.  Miss A. B. A. Clark-This is to
correct the general impression that she died  while dissecting an
earthworm. She peacefully passed away with an athletic heart.  Miss I. C.
U. Rosene-She died as she lived, teaching clams the English lan-guage.  Her
funeral, however, was exemplary.  Mr. A. B. Kolstad-He was beloved of
humanity. He is remembered as one  who always tried to make I. Q. tests
easy. With his last gasp he cried: "Give me  life, or give me death!"

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 156

     ----------

1  ,- ry,  /  ,. /  .,  1  ,  l II

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 157

     ----------

Bellingham  Is Proud of  The Normal  and of the teachers  it sends out to
carry on  the work of education Jnion  Printing, Binding  and Stationery
Co.  IN OUR NEW BUILDING ON CORNWALL AVENUE  ABOUT  JULY FIRST

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 158

     ----------

Portraiture  Kodak Finishing  and  Commercial  Photography  of the Highest
Class  JUKES  SUNSET BUILDING  PHONE 678

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 159

     ----------

THE BETTER YEARBOOKS OF THE NORTHWEST  show the fine artistry and
craftsmanship of the) 'Western engraving   Colortype Company.  Schools that
demand the best, year after year  know that " lestern Service "insures a, 
WTetter Annual. Secure the help of experts for  your next book by writing
us at once.  WESTERN ENGRVING   COLORTYPE CO  2030 7ifth venue, Seattle,
Washington..

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 160

     ----------

, fugrrtprl

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page 161

     ----------

Autugwaprms

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [162]

     ----------

 2015-05-082015-05-
08http://content.wwu.edu:80/cdm/ref/collection/klipsun/id/387638763877.pdfpage/klipsun/image/38
77.pdfpage

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [3] of cover

     ----------

. 0 .-I.. 0  ~•~ ~.I -, .r i I ... i1i~~ !!i~~-.~,.l
.iiil il! i ! ! .. 58ri iii~iial  !~i !ii !ii!!i! ii i!iiiii!iii:il~?:i! i
~i~:i ~ ii!!'i !!!i i !i ,! ii i l! i~ii  ii~i %:i:- i~~!i !~!iiiiiiii!
i'i! i! z i~iii ~~ii! ~ii i!,ii i!!i iiiiiiiii iii~ii~iiiiii ii~

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1926 - Page [4] of cover

     ----------

PPPPP