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1928

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     Klipsun, 1928


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     Klipsun, 1928 - Cover


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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [2] of cover

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [i]

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L 0 X  771  __ UK -, ..

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [ii]


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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [iii]

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'THE 1928  PUBLISHED BY  TlLHE ASSICIATL) STUDIEHT IS)DT  OF THE 
BELLINGHAM STATE NORMAL SCHOOL  BELLINGHAM, WASH.

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [iv]

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JUJE~ WtarHiib ,,bLL  JN ii JMIALRnuvs  tLITORS

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [v]

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FORIEW©LL  ,4S THE common things of  today become the valued
relics  of tomorrow, so will our comings  and goings at the
Normal-by-the-sea  become precious memories in the  future. It is our hope
that this  Klipsun will serve as a key to our  memory-box---a key, that
although it  may become antiquated, will never  tarnish, but will always be
a reminder  of the days that used-to-be.

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [vi]

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DE IIEICA] IEDLI  ( O THAT endless stream of yes-terday's  students, who
step from  the pages of this book into the world  of teachers---the lamps
that we have  lighted to guide the Viking ships  over the unknown seas.

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [vii]

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4ARL of cdunqu1rs  THE CAMPUS  ADMINISTRATION AND CLASSES  CAMPUS
ACTIVITIES  THE ARTS  ORGANIZATIONS  SPORTS  FEATURES

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [viii]

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TO THE NORTH STAND THE IVORY COLUMNS

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [ix]

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WHERE LAUGHTER IS WHISKED OUT OF THE WINDOWS

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [x]

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K9  Aibi  44-  U  0:  iti  r  4=  s F'  l = ,  r z  ip c gt;r  gt;i~e gt; 
F t ,£  F i f f

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [xi]

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CAMPUS SHADOWS AFTER THE LAST FOUR-O'CLOCK

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [xii]

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WHEN THE WHITE BLANKET OF THE NORTH-EASTER

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [xiii]

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HERALDS THE TIME OF GALOSHES

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [xiv]

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LASSES are personalities  Born out of the union of teachers  and students 
A motley crowd of individuals  From the jailers---the eight o 'clocks--- 
to the pirouetting "snaps."

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [xv]

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ADMIISTERAGYZTI01    CLASSES  i-J LKa J

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [xvi]


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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 17

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LESDLEL1H 6 flY HEfAGE2  We in this school think of education  in terms of
growth. The work of the classroom and the activities outside the  classroom
are planned to promote the  growth of individual students. The  spirit of
give and take and of coopera-tion  between students and faculty are 
necessary factors in a liberalizing edu-cation.  The program of the school
is  based upon the belief that it is the  spirit  that giveth life. It is a
working  principle with us that children in the  schools are entitled to
teachers with forceful, free and growing personalities.  This school,
situated in the midst of  challenging mountains and the beckon-ing  sea,
constantly stirs up new aspira-tions.  May the memories of days spent  here
ever be  a source of inspiration  PRESIDENT C. H. FISHER for further growth
in service and living.  Three individuals hold the tides of fate in their
hands when the student enters  school. They control and advise concerning
courses, classes, room and board, and  all the essential features of the
student's life. These are James Bever, Dean of  the School; W. J. Marquis,
Dean of Men, and Adele Jones, Dean of Women, the  directors who are "seen"
about so many of the school's activities.  DEAN BEVER DEAN JONES DEAN
MARQUIS  Seventeen

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 18

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MILLER KIBBE KEELER KOLSTAD MARQUIS SALISBURY  LEDTICAT IO  Psychology and
its application to living, studying, and teaching is sponsored  by the
Department of Education. The genetic point of view is taken and courses 
worked out which bear upon the problems of education.  A broad outlook on
the past of education and its significant bearing upon the  present, as
well as the contributions  of modern sociology, science, and philosophy to 
the development of an intelligent point of view on present problems in the
teaching  field, are given in the History and Philosophy of Education. 
PHYSICAL EDUCATIOH  Women must enroll in physical education each quarter.
The courses offered  and required are: physical education 1, folk dancing,
plays and games, swimming,  organization and administration of health
education, and natural dancing.  Men are required to take eight credit
hours of physical education before  graduation. Two hours may be made by
playing on school teams.  PETERS KELLER CARVER BOWEN MEAD  Eighteen

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 19

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FOWLER EDENS SPERRY ULLIN MADDEN HOPPE  LNGL ISH, ELXPRESSION  The English
Department attempts to stimulate intellectual curiosity, and to  deepen and
enrich appreciations of life values through a consideration of some of  the
great writers and thinkers of all times. It also tries to test and improve
students'  ability to write and speak their own vernacular.  The principle
of teaching students to read effectively and speak clearly and  to develop
self-expression is held by the Speech Department as  its aim in a required 
speech course. It offers as well, debating, play production and psychology
of speech.  Regular college work in foreign languages is given, with
special stress placed  on the spoken idiom.  LIIRAJR efTAFF, IDlHIAI S I 
Library Instruction is required of all freshmen. The aim of this course is
to  give students a method of attack in a library so that they may
independently do  research work when they go into practical teaching.  All
students whose hand writing does not come up to standard are required to 
take a course in penmanship. Before a diploma is granted, and before work
in the  training school is permitted, the requirement must be met,  GRAGG
RICE WILSON GEORGE TREAT EWELL Nineteen

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 20

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PHILIPPI SUNDQUIST ROSENE PLATT LONGLEY COUNTRYMAN  CIEHCL, IIHOIEL
LCOHOMICS  A general science orientation course is required of all
freshmen. This gives the  student sufficient background to place man in his
relation to nature. Special courses  are offered for those interested in
advanced work in the lines of science.  The courses of the Home Economics
Department are given mainly  for those  who intend to teach this subject in
the grades. Foods, cookery, nutrition, household management, dressmaking
and a course on Home Economics Education are offered.  fOCIIAML TFI@IAS 
IENCL HICOYFGIh  In the Department of Social Science are taught economics,
geography, history, political science and world economy. Work is taken up,
for the most part, in a manner  that will be of aid to the future teacher. 
A course in hygiene is given for prospective teachers in that line.  Each
curriculum has its required course in mathematics. All work is taken up 
from a teacher-training point of view. WILLIAMS BEVER CUMMINS ARNTZEN HUNT
JOHNSON BOND  Twenty

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 21

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BREAKEY PLYMPTON SLAWSON SMITH MOORE  FITNE iARTcS, HII[IIC  Technical
skill in the teaching of arts in grade school is the chief aim of the  Art
Department. A standard of appreciation and judgement of beauty and
practical  taste is set up by the department.  In the Music Department such
courses as the following are offered, largely  with the teacher's aim in
view: sight singing, appreciation, chorus, orchestra, music  history, class
conduction.  INDUSTRIAL ARTS, TYPING  In a special building and with
special equipment, Industrial Arts is offered as  a comprehensive course
for those expecting to teach in that field from elementary  to senior high
school work.  The fundamental principles of touch typing  are taught to
enable the student to  become efficient enough to use a typewriter for his
own purposes. RUCKMICK MANY RINDAL BISSELL LOVEGREN  Twenty-one

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 22

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'TRAINIHG SCHOOL  Every prospective teacher must pass  through the Training
Schcol before he receives a diploma which qualifies him to  teach. In this
laboratory of education he  has many contacts: through courses in 
Technique he beccmes familiar with actual  class-room method and
management; he  observes expert teaching; class recitations;  students at
work and at play. Difficulties  of special student types, of various
pres-entation  methods in all fields are con-stantly  being worked out in
the Training School.  On the staff of the training school  are: Mary E.
Rich, Director; Augusta  Pragst, Teacher of Technique in Primary  Grades;
Anna J. Beiswenger, Teacher of  Technique in Intermediate Grades; Emma  S.
Erickson, Teacher of Technique in  Upper Grades; Marjorie E. Dawson,
Pri-mary  Supervisor in  City Schools; Anna J.  Peterson, Supervisor of
Intermediate  Grades in City Schools; Fanny J. Rag-land,  Supervisor of
Upper Grades in City  Schools; Orpha McPherson, Supervisor in  Rural
Schools; Priscilla Kinsman, Pre-  Primary Teacher; Ruth G. Strickland, 
First Grade teacher; Mildred Moffatt,  Second Grade teacher; Pearl
Cosgrave,  Third Grade teacher; Pearl Merriman,  Fourth Grade teacher;
Eleanor Osborn,  Fifth Grade teacher; Mary Cole, Sixth  Grade Teacher; Ruth
VanPelt, Seventh  Grade teacher; and Bertha Crawford,  Eighth Grade
teacher.  Twenty-two

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 23

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6THE OFFICE FORCE  Without the administrative officers  and their
assistants the school could not function. The centralization of all
busi-ness,  finance, and registration, other than  that purely executive,
is  in the Registrar's  Office. Permanent records of former Nor-mal 
students, as well as other student in- formation,  are available here. 
Margaret McKinnon, who is the Nor-mal  school accountant, has full charge
of  all school finance; Mrs. Edith Banner is  Miss McKinnon's accounting
assistant, and  Olive Gunderson is the Recorder. She  keeps all permanent
records of the grades,  receives transfer grades from other col-leges, 
grades from high schools, and sends  out the quarterly reports.  Other
offices of the school which  handle a great deal of executive work are  of
the Dean of Women; of the Training  School, and of the Library. Charlotte 
Brigham is the Secretary of Mary Rich,  Director of the Training School.
Kathleen  O'Malley is the school nurse assistant.  She lives at Edens Hall,
conveniently  placed for emergency illness calls from  the organized
houses. Bertha Weber is  active in the Research Department;  Polly 
Learnard is President Fisher's private sec-retary.  Dean James Bever's
secretary, Bertha Sundeen, checks students for graduation,  scholarships,
and absences. Elizabeth  Hopper is the appointment secretary, It  is
through her hands that all teaching  positions of Normal students are made.
Gladys Parr is Secretary to Dean Jones,  and Mary Hoyer is the switch board
oper-ator  in the Main Office.  Mary Ringer is circulating librarian  and
Mrs. Irene Lieske is the Assistant  Librarion. She does the secretarial
work  for the library and has charge of the  periodical room.  Left Column:
McKinnon, Banner,  Gunderson, Brigham, O'Malley, Weber.  Right Column:
Learnard, Sundeen, Hop-per,  Parr, Hoyer, Ringer, Lieske.  Twenty-three

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 24

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CHICHESTER ZACHRISON MURA MILLER  JUNIOREf ANI)D sEIORef  BERNARD
CHICHESTER VERNON ZACHRISON  ANN MURA  IRVING E. MILLER  OLIVE HARDAN 
BERNARD CHICHESTER MARGARET MOORE  HELENE RUSSELL  VERNON ZACHRISON  EVELYN
ANDERSON  Bellingham, Washington  MATILDA J. BARRICK  Bellingham,
Washington  MARY BARRETT  Seattle, Washington BLANCHE BERTRAND  Bellingham,
Washington  MAUDE R. CUSTARD  Ridgefield, Washington DANIEL DAMITIO  Elma,
Washington  VEVA FORREY  Soap Lake, Washington  LUCILLE GREENWOOD 
Bellingham, Washington  SOCIAL COMMITTEES  EARL HEMMI  Bellingham,
Washington  FRIEDA HOLZMEYER.  Forest Grove, Oregon  GLADYS KEOWN 
Bellingham, Washington   VERA LAHTI  Castle Rock, Washington  MARJORIE
LAWSON  Bellingham, Washington  ETHEL LEADBETTER  Ketchikan, Alaska  WADE
MOORE  Fairfield, Washington  President  Vice-President  Se 
retary-Treasurer  .Advisor  SG eneral Chairman  Program Chairman  Feature
Chairman.  Decoration Chairman  Publicity Chairman  EDITH NELSON  Custer,
Washington  MARGARET PHELAN  Portland, Oregon  MATTIE SINCLAIR  Seattle,
Washington  LEE TYLER  Bellingham, Washington  GRACE L. EVANS 
Sedro-Woolley, Wash.  MRS. WINIFRED DUNHAM  Kerby, Oregon  Senior  FRANCES
FINNEGAN  Bellingham, Washington  College Graduate  Twenty-four

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 25

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LOUISE KAUFMAN  Carbonado, Washington  College Graduate Course  EVELYN
ANDERSON Bellingham, Washington  EDITH MINER  Bellingham, Washington 
Senior Course  DALE ANNIS Snohomish, Washington  TLespian Club  Rural Life
Club  McDowell Club  ANN BARTH  Ferndale, Washington  MRS. MILDRED
BACHELDER  Carona, Washington  BRYAN BUCHANAN  Manette, Washington  EBBA
CARLSON  Tacoma, Washington  BERNARD CHICHESTER  Bellingham, Washington 
Business Manager Messenger  '27-28  Red Arrow Staff  Klipsun Staff  "Three
Live Ghosts" Cast  "Poor Nut" Cast  Track '27  HENRY DURR  Everson,
Washington  Drama Club  Philomathean Club  Messenger Staff  "Romeo and
Juliet" Cast and  Business Manager  "Pot Boilers" Lead  "Poor Nut" Cast
Athletics Manager '27-28  RAGNHILD GROTE  Long Beach, California  EDITH COX
 Bellingham, Washington  W. A. A.  EDITH Fox  Auburn, Washington  LILLIAN
HAESKE  Bellingham, Washington Twenty-five

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 26

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OLIVE HALL  Olympia, Washington  WENDELL IVERSON  Hobart, Washington 
College Club  "W" Club  Football "W" '27  Football, Coach, Training  School
'27  RAYMOND JOHNSON  Mineral, Washington OLIVE HARDAN  Bellingham,
Washington  Thespian Club President '26  Drama Club  McDowell Club
Vice-President  '27  World Politics Club  Messenger Society Editor  '27-28 
"Three Live Ghosts" Lead "The Road to Yesterday"  Cast  "Milestones" Cast 
"Craig's Wife"  Klipsun Staff  EARL JEWELL Bellingham, Washington  FRANKLIN
LOCKE  Bellingham, Washington  ELLSWORTH LUMLEY Mukilteo, Washington 
Thespian Club President  McDowell Club  College Club Vice-President  Drama
Club  Messenger Staff  "Milestones" Cast and Student  Manager  "The Road to
Yesterday" Cast Orchestra, Traps and D)rums  '24  THOMAS MARSDEN  Richmond
Beach, Wash.  College Club Secretary-  Treasurer  Track  Basketball, Coach,
Training  School '28  ELI MOAWAD  Kalama, Washington  CALVIN MOSER 
Bellingham, Washington  Vanadis Bragi President '28  Vice-President '26 
Secretary Intra-Mural League  ELLA LUNSTEAD  Willmar, Minnesota  VERNE
MERRITT  Auburn, Washington  Drama Club  MARGARET MOORE  Everett,
Washington  Thespian Club  McDowell Club "Milestones" Cast  AMY MOULTRAY 
Bellingham, Washington  Twenty-six

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 27

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ANN MURA  Clipper, Washington  Junior Class Secretary-  Treasurer  Thespian
Club  Drama Club Basketball "W" '28  FRANCES NOTZ  Portland, Oregon  Drama
Club  Social Science Club  ASTRID NEWMAN  Potlatch, Idaho  Graduate
Lewiston (Idaho)  State Normal '26  PEARL NYSTROM  Longview, Washington 
Two years at Millersville  (Penn.) State Normal School  FRED O'NEAL 
Bellingham, Washington  LAURA RUNYON  Puyallup, Washington  HELENE RUSSELL 
Seattle, Washington GEORGE SHERMAN  Bellingham, Washington  Scribes Club 
Business Mgr. Red Arrow  ESTHER THOMAS  Bellingham, Washington ROBERT
WAGNER  Prosser, Washington  Thespian Club Treasurer Drama Club  Messenger
Editor '27-28  "Adam and Eva" Lead  "Romeo and Juliet" Cast and  Business
Manager  "Poor Nut" Lead  MAUDE WAKEFIELD  Milwaukee, Oregon  JEAN WOLL 
Bellingham, Washington  W. A. A.  Campfire  VERNON ZACHRISON  Blaine,
Washington  Scribes Club  Sage Brush  Club  Men's Club Vice-President 
Messenger Associate Editor  Red Arrow Editor  Junior Class Vice- President 
AUGUST ZOET  Lynden, Washington  Twenty-seven

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 28

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BROWN MCCOOL WHITE TUCKER KELLER  SOPHOMO RES  ALBERT BRowN . President 
LENORE WHITE .Vice-President  DOROTHY MCCOOL Secretary  CARRIE ANNA TUCKER
. reasurer  MISS BERTHA KELLER . . . . Advisor  COMMITTEES  GENERAL
CHAIRMAN-Beth Coghlan.  DECORATION- Dorothy McCool, Chairman; Albert Brown,
Alice White, Burton Adkinson,  Madeline Bosshard. REFRESHMENTS-Eleanor
Bosshard, Chairman; Madeline Bosshard, Milton Field.  ADVERTISING-Olive
Hardan, Winter chairman; Katherine Lawrence, Fall chairman; Golda  Abel,
Lenore White, Alice White, Milton Field.  INviTATIos-Madeline Bosshard,
Winter chairman; Olive Hardan, Fall chairman; Milton Field. 
SOPHOMORE-FRESHMAN TIE-UP  Twenty-eight

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 29

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FRIEDA AASE  Astoria, Oregon  World Politics Club  Y. W. C. A. President,
'27-'28  GOLDA ABEL Bellingham, Washington  Inter-Club Council '26-27 
Social Science Club  Klipsun Business Manager '28 Volley Ball "W" '26-27 
Hockey "W" '26-27-28  Track "W" '27  W. A. A. Vice-President  ELVERA
ABRAHAMSON  Lake Stevens, Washington  BURTON ADKINSON  Bellingham,
Washington  Vanadis Bragi President  THELMA AGEE  Blaine, Washington 
EDWARD ALF  Kent, Washington  DOROTHY ALLEN  Roy, Washington  Alkisiah Club
 MRS. LYDIA P. ALLEN  Orchards, Washington  SEATTA ALVORD  Lynden,
Washington  BETH ANDERSON  Douglas, Alaska  GLADYS ANDERSON Vancouver, B.
C.  INA ANDERSON  Woodland, Washington  NINA ANDERSON  East Stanwood, Wash.
 RUTH ANDERSON  Ferndale, Washington  Tri C Club Vice-Pres., '27-28  Choral
Club  Twenty-nine

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 30

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MARGRIT ANDRESON  Port Angeles, Washington  MARY ARMOUR  Pasco, Washington 
Alkisiah Club   Judicial Board of Women's  League '27  MARGARET C. ASAPH 
Marysville, Washington  ESTHER BARNUM  Morton, Washington  WILBUR BARRETT 
Ferndale, Washington  NELLIE BARTON  Foster, Washington  Vanadis Bragi 
Hockey "W" '27-28  Archery "W" '27  Soccer "W" '28  FLORENCE BEAN
Bellingham, Washington  HAZEL ARMENTROUT  Nagrom, Washington  RoY ARNETT 
Ash Grove, Missouri  "W" Club  Drama Club  World Politics Club  Camera Club
 Track "W" '27  Freshman Class President '27  Secretary Students'
Associa-tion  '27-28  WILLENA BARNHART  Tacoma, Washington Philomattlean
Club Secretary.  Treasurer '28  KATHLEEN BARRETT  Bellingham, Washington
CAROLYN BARRON  Seattle, Washington  FLORENCE L. BAUER  Tacoma, Washington 
Ohiyiou Club Glee Club  BERNARD BEATTY  Ferndale, Washington  Thirty

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 31

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CLAIRE E. BECKWITH  Elma, Washington  ROGER BECKES  Bellingham, Washington 
Entered from University of  Washington  Weekly Messenger Staff  LIZZIELLEN
BELCHER  Deming, Washington ALPHA BELFIELD  Sequim, Washington  HARRY
BENSON  Benton City, Washington  "W" Club Basketball "W" '27-28 ADA
BERGGREN  Vancouver, Washington  EVELYN BERGH  Republic, Washington  MYRTLE
BERGH  Republic, Washington  MARGUERITE BIERSNER  Walla Walla, Washington 
DORA BINDON  Bellingham, Washington  TRYGVE BLIX  Tacoma, Washington  MAE
BLOMBERG  Puyallup, Washington  Tri C Club President '26-27  WINIFRED BOHR 
Olympia, Washington  FAITH BOLENDER  Olympia, Washington  Thirty-one

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 32

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RUTH BOND  Bellingham, Washington  ELEANOR BOSSHARD  Everett, Washington 
Vanadis Bragi Social Science Club  Edens Hall Secretary-Treasurer  JULIA
BOUCK  Bellingham, Washington"  Tri C Club  Scribes Club  RAYMOND BRIGHT 
Chehalis, Washington  McDowell Club  Schoolmen's Secretary-   Trea surer 
"Yell Duke"  Inter Club Council President  ALBERT BROWN  Bellingham,
Washington Vanadis Bragi  Camera Club President  THELMA BORGEN  Seattle,
Washington  Social Science Club Debate Club  Hockey "W"  Soccer "W" '27 
MADELINE G. BOSSHARD  Everett, Washington  Thespian Club Secretary '27 
Swimming "W" '27  Board of Control '28  WARREN BOYNTON  Centralia,
Washington  Drama Club  "Ghosts"  "Milestones"  ESTHER BROADWATER 
Kalispell, Montana  Drama Club  EDNA L. BUCHANAN  Marblemount, Washington 
HAZEL BUCKINGHAM  Kalispell, Montana NORMAN BURCHETTE  Bellingham,
Washington  Drama Club  Philomathean Club  RUBY M. BURDETT  Sandy, Oregon 
MARY BURGHARDT  Twisp, Washington  Thirty-two

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 33

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BERTHA BURKLUND  Everett, Washington  ROSSIE BURNS  La Grande, Oregon 
BEATRICE BURTON  Salem, Washington  RUTH BUTLER  Burlington, Washington 
HELEN CALLENIUS  Sumas, Washington   ALICE CAMPBELL  Carlton, Oregon  HELEN
CAMPBELL  Bellingham, Washington  Tri C Club  LYNDA  CARLSON  Seattle,
Washington  ANNA M. CARLSON  Bellingham, Washington  Choral C:ub  Tri C
Club  ADABELLE CARR  Edmunds, Washington  MARJORIE CAYS  Dungeness,
Washington MRS. ISABEL CHAMBERS  Oakville, Washington  BERNITA CHANDLER 
Bellingham, Washington  HELEN CHERVENOCK  Bellingham, Washington 
Thirty-three

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 34

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JEAN CHISHOLM  Fall City, Washington  FLORENCE CHRISTIANSEN  Stanwood,
Washington Philomathean Club  Basketball "W" '27  FRANCES CHRISTINSON 
Bellingham, Washington  LILLIAN CHRISTOFFERSEN  Rolling Bay, Washington 
Science Club  Girls Scouts President  Choral Club  BETH  COGHLAN  Everett,
Washington  Women's League Commission  MRS. MABEL COLLINS  Portland, Oregon
 ELINOR CONDIT  Southworth, Washington  EVELYN COX  Marysville, Washington 
Baseball "W" '27  MARY CROSBY  Tacoma, Washington  Thespian Club  EVELYN
CROUCH  Grandview, Washington  OLIVE CUMMING  Graham, Washington  ARDELL
DAGMAN  Enderlin, North Dakota ADELAIDE DALE  Anacortes, Washington  ESTHER
DALE  East Stanwood, Wash.  Thirty-four

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 35

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AILEEN DAVIDSON  Seattle, Washington  MRS. ETHEL DAVIDSON  Doty, Washington
 EDITH DAVIS Winnebago, Washington  ESTHER DAVIS  Walla Walla, Washington 
EDNA DESKINS  Lebam, Washington  MYRTLE DIMMITT  Molson, Washington 
MILDRED DICKENS  Marysville, Washington EDWARD DINGERSON  Toledo,
Washington  Philomathean Club  Drama Club  McDowell Club  Science Club 
"Milestones"  "Road to Yesterday"  Extempore Contestant '28  School
Orchestra  ELIZABETH DION  Port Angeles, Washington  LORNA DICKSON  Sedro
Woolley, Wash.  AGNES DOBLER  Menlo, Washington  ELIZABETH DOUST 
Anacortes, Washington  HELEN DORAN  Burlington, Washington Basketball "W"
'25  GLADYS DRANGA  Seattle, Washington  Alkisiah Club  Thirty-five

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 36

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CLIFFORD DUNCAN  Camas, Washington  Thespian Club  Drama Club  Inter Club
Council  Student Organization Council  Messenger Staff  "Dust of the Road" 
MILDRED EARLEY  Great Falls, Montana LEONA EDDY  Blaine, Washington  EVELYN
EDWARDS  Prosser, Washington  Drama Club  "Poor Nut" Lead  ALICE ENDSLEY 
Port Orchard, Wash.  Scribes Club President  Red Arrow Assistant Editor
Circulation Manager  MAMIE ERICKSON  Woodland, Washington  Social Science
Club  RUTH EVANS Seattle, Washington  BERNADINE DUNSFORD  Bellingham,
Washington  RELLA EBELING  Burlington, Washington  McDowell Club  Drama
Club  Philomathean Club  "Road to Yesterday"  "Milestones"  "Three  Live
Ghosts"  DEAN EDMUNDSON  Coupeville, Washington  Thespian Club  Drama Club 
"W" Club Football "W" '26-27  Board of Contral '27-28  President '28  EMILY
ELLIOTT  Puyallup, Washington Thespian Club  EDNA ERICKSON  Valdez, Alaska 
W. A. A.  Oregon Club  Sourdough Vice-President VERA ERICKSON  Malson,
Washington  ROWENA FARMER  Seattle, Washington  Leowryrtha Club Secretary- 
Treasurer  Thirty-six

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VIVIAN FERGUSON  Carrolls, Washington  Entered from East Radford, 
Virginia. S. T. C.  MILTON FIELD  Bellingham, Washington  Vanadis Bragi 
Camera Club  Board of Control '28  Student Volunteer Delegate to  Detroit
'27  ESTHER FORSGREN  Brush Prairie, Wash.  RUBY FOSTER  Yakima, Washington
 Rural Life Club  Vanadis Bragi  TRULA FRENCH  Bellingham, Washington 
IRENE FRETHEIM  Bellingham, Washington  FLORENCE FILION  Port Angeles,
Washington  President Edens Hall Girls '28  ROBERT FISHER  Bellingham,
Washington  Philomathean Club  McDowell Club  World Politics Club 
Messenger Editor, Assistant  Editor  Tennis "W" '27  President A. S. B.
'27-28  Vice- President '27  ANN FOSJACK  Aberdeen, Washington  MARY FOX 
Fife, Washington  CONSTANCE FRIELING  Bremerton, Washington  World Politics
Club  BETTY FRIEDMAN  Bellingham, Washington Choral Club  ELLA FULLER 
Satsop, Washington  NETA GALLAHER  Mansfield, Washington  Thirty- seven

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 38

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FRANK GALLANGER  Lopez Island, Washington  "W" Club Vice-Pres., '27-28
BERTHA GARMAN Vanadis Bragi  Paddle Squad Tacoma, Washington  Track "W"
'27-28  Football  MYRTA GARRISON Mercer Island, Wash.  MARTHA GESDAHL 
Bellingham, Washington  McDowell Club  Basketball  Volley  Ball  Swimming
"W"  VERA GINNETTE  Bellingham, Washington  McDowell Club President
Philomathean Club  W. A. A.  Swimming  MADELINE GOODMAN  Newcastle,
Washington  FRANK GERI  Bellingham, Washington  MRS. ALLA GILMOUR 
Bellingham, Washington  DOROTHY GOLDBERG  Everett, Washington  EDYTHE
GORJUP  Renton, Washington  Archery  Horseback Riding  VIOLET GRAHAM 
Bellingham, Washington  Baseball "W" '27  Basketball "W" '27  Track "W" '27
Volleyball "W" '27  GLADYS GRANMO  Paulsbo, Washington  Entered from
Washington  State College RICHARD GRAINGER  Castle Rock, Washington 
Vanadfis Bragi  JULIA GRAY  Burlington, Washington  Scribes Club  Red Arrow
Editor  Thirty-eiglht

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 39

     ----------

TALMAGE GRAY  Seattle, Washington  Intra-Mural League, Basketball  Board of
Control '28  ALICE GREGOR  Ferndale, Washington  JOEL GUDMUNDSON 
Bellingham, Washington  Vanadis Bragi  Inter Club Council  World Politics
Club  Scholarship Club  Vice-President A. S. B. '27-28  Board of Control
"W"   EDITH GUNDERSON  Seattle, Washington  Vanadis Bragi  Volley Ball "W"
'27  Soccer "W" '27 Hockey "W" '27  ULDINE HAGERMAN  Twisp, Washington 
WINIFRED HALLER  Bellingham, Washington  ETHELYN HAND  Snohomish,
Washington  GLADYS GREEN  Seattle, Washington  W. A. A. President  HARRY
GRIMLUND  Bellingham, Washington  ROBERT GUERIN  Deming, Washington ESTHER
GUSTAFSON  Mount Vernon, Wash.  HARRY HALE  Bakersfield, California 
Vanadis Bragi President '26  Inter Club Council  BEN HAMILTON  Mount
Vernon, Wash.  Vanadis Bragi  Football Baseball  Track  HAZEL HANSON 
Vader, Washington  Leowrytha Club  Thirty-nine

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 40

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LUELLA HANSEN  Anacortes, Washington  PEARL HARMAN  Port Angeles,
Washington  HAROLD HAWKINGS  Concrete, Washington  Football Captain '27 
EVELYN HEIDENSTROM  Seattle, Washington  EARL HEMMI  Bellingham, Washington
 Vanadis Bragi President '27  "W" Club  College Club  Track Captain '26-27 
VIVIAN HERTTUA  Castle Rock, Washington  Leowrytha Club  LEONA HINKLEY 
Ethel, Washington  NOLA HANSEN  Cathlamet, Washington  Thespian Club  JACK
HARPER  Bellingham, Washington  EDNA HAY  Seattle, Washington  BESSIE
HELLER  Seattle, Washington WANDA HENDRICKSON  Brush Prairie, Wash.  Rural
Life Club  ANNA HICKLIN  Mabton, Washington CLARENCE HOLLENBOUGH  East
Stanwood, Wash.  Sagebrush Club  Forty

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 41

     ----------

LENA HOLLINGSWORTH  Arlington, Washington  AGNES HOSE  Kelso, Washington 
Tri C Club  RUTH HOPKINS  Bryn Mawr, Washington  Drama Club  Social Science
Club  HAROLD HOULTON  Bellingham,  Washington  Vanadis Bragi  Drama Club 
Debate Team  Tennis "W" '27  BILLIE HOWE  Tenino, Washington  EMMA HOWELL 
Elma, Washington  Social Science Club  MAMIE HOWELL  Bellingham, Washington
 RALPH HUFF  Bellingham, Washington  Drama Club  "Road to Yesterday" 
"Milestones" "Cl.ildren of the Moon"  ERMA LEA HUNT  Yakima, Washington 
MRS. LORNA HURLEY  Bellingham, Washington  ARTHUR IRWIN  Custer, Washington
 DELMA ISAACSON  East Stanwood, Wash. ARTHUR ISAACSON  Bellingham,
Washington  Basketball '27, '28  Lois JEFFERS  Kelso, Washington Klyteana
Club  Inter Club Council  Forty-one

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 42

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VERA JEFFERSON  Fedora, South Dakota  MARTHA JENSEN  Portage, Washington 
AGNES JOHNSON  Shelton, Washington  McDowell Club  ANNIE JOHNSON  Dabob,
Washington  MARION JOHNSON  Astoria, Oregon  Alkisiah Club  Oregon Club
MYRTLE JOHNSON  Battle Ground, Wash. RUTH JOHNSON  Puyallup, Washington 
IRIS JOHNSTONE  Bellingham, Washington  HARRIET JONDALL  Bothell,
Washington  ALLEGRA JONES  Bellingham, Washington  BERTHA JONES Puyallup,
Washington  Alkisiah Club President '27-28 ELIZABETH JONES  Inter Club
Council '28 Snohomish, Washington  MYFANWY JONES  Healy Fork, Alaska 
Thespian Club Treasurer '28 HELEN KADOW  Vancouver, Washington  Tri C Club 
Forty-two

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 43

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NORMA KALLANDER  Nooksack, Washington  GRACE KEIRSTED  South Tyler,
Washington FRANCES KELFNER  Bellingham, Washington  SUMNER KELLAM  Seattle,
Washington  FLORENCE KELLY  Vandergrift, Penn.  Entered from Pennsylvania 
State Teachers' College;  also from State Teachers'  College at San Diego. 
Tri C Club  MABEL KENDALL  Benton City, Washington  IRENE KEY Blaine,
Washington  MILDRED KING  Kirkland, Washington  ELTON KORSBOEN  Bellingham,
Washington  Vanadis Bragi  "W" Club  Oregon Club  WILLIAM KELLY  Auburn,
Washington  Vanadis Bragi  KENNETH KEVEREN  Spokane, Washington  ESTHER
KING  Lebam, Washington  FOSTER KIRK  Bellingham, Washington  Philomathean
Club  Drama Club  McDqwell Club  Glee Club "Milestones"  "Poor Nut"  JUDITH
KRUEGER  Colfax, Washington  Forty-three

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 44

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EMILE LACKEY  Hartline, Washington  AGNES LAKOW  Puyallup, Washington 
FRANK LANE  Sedro Woolley, Wash.  KATHERINE LAWRENCE  Centralia, Washington
 Alkisiah Club Secretary  Campfire Secretary  W. A. A. Head Usher  Volley
Ball "W" '27-28  Soccer "W" '27-28  Archery "W"  MABELLE LEE  Tacoma,
Washington  ELVIRA LEHTINEN  Aberdeen, Washington  GEORGIA LEWIS  Chehalis,
Washington  FRED LAGGER  Bellingham, Washington  Thespian Club President 
Veterans Service Club  "Romancers"  "Children of the Moon"  "Poor Nut" 
CATHERINE LANDSBOROUGH  Oakland, California BERTHA LARSON  Ferndale,
Washington  Tri C Club  RUTH LAWSON  Bellingham, Washington BEATRICE LEHKY 
Seattle, Washington  Social Science Club Vice-  President '28  MARJORIE
LESLIE Tacoma, Washington  IDA LEWIS  Ferndale, Washington  Forty-four

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 45

     ----------

ESTHER LINCOLN  Carrolls, Washington  CHRISTINE LINDGREN  Manson,
Washington  RACHEL LOCKE  Quinault, Washington  Vanadis Bragi  Social
Science Club  HELEN LOCKHART  Bellingham, Washington  Thespian Club 
HENRIETTA LOHMAN  Bellingham, Washington VIOLET Loo  Astoria, Oregon 
Oregon Club  Social Science Club  LUCILLE LOVING  Burlington, Washington 
Tri C Club  ANN LUND  Everett, Washington  President of all organized 
houses.  MABEL LUNDEN  Kent, Washington DEBBIE LOWRY  Seattle, Washington 
GEORGE LUNDBERG  Issaquah, Washington  EVELYNE LYSONS  Snohomish,
Washington  Thespian Club  BERTHA McKAY  Bellingham, Washington  RUTH
MCCLINTOCK  Bellingham, Washington  Forty-five

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 46

     ----------

ALFRED MCCLURKEN  Richmond Beach, Wash.  Baseball "W" '27  Basketball  JOHN
MCCOY Bellingham, Washington  DOROTHY MCCOOL  Everett, Washington 
Secretary of Sophomore Class Vanadis Bragi Secretary  Drama Club  W. A. A. 
MARGARET MCCOY  Bellingham, Washington Women's League President  Klipsun
Associate Editor  '26-27  MARY MCCUSH  Bellingham, Washington   HARRIETT
McDONALD  Bellingham, Washington  ELSIE MCEWEN  Vancouver, B. C.  Thespian
Club McDowell Club  Basketball  JEANETTE McGUIRE  Seattle, Washington 
Drama Club  Women's League Vice-Pres.  Student's Organization Council 
Vice-President  "Road to Yesterday"  MADGE MCKELLAR Cashmere, Washington 
REGINALD MCKEE  Everett, Washington  Thespian Club  Veterans Service Club 
FLORENCE MCKENZIE  Friday Harbor, Wash.  Leowyrtha Club  Y. W. C. A.  W. A.
A.  LENORE McKINNIS  Wallowa, Oregon  Thespian Club  McDowell Club  FRANCIS
McKINNIS  Imbler, Oregon ESTHER MCMEEN  Bellingham, Washington  Y. W. C. A.
 Forty-six

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 47

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MABEL MCNAIR  Bellingham, Washington  FLORENCE MCNEIL  Everett, Washington 
LENORA MAACK  Onalaska, Washington  Tri C Club  MARY MAHONEY  Tooele, Utah 
FLORENCE MARIS Hartford, Washington  Scribes' Club  HAZEL MAY  Ocean Park,
Oregon  BLANCHE MEEK  Bellingham, Washington  THELMA MIESEN  Beacon Hill,
Washington  HAROLD MAGELSON  Stanwood, Washington  Vanadis Bragi  Service
Men's Club  IOLA MANDALL  Sedro-Woolley, Wash.  Camera Club Y. W. C. A. 
THERESA MATTHEWS  Everson, Washington  ERNESTINE MAYNARD  Great
Falls,Montana  HOLLIS MERCHANT  Mount Vernon, Wash.  CLEONE MILLER  North
English, Iowa Forty-seven

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 48

     ----------

EDITH MILLER  Bellingham, Washington  FREDA MILLER  Anacortes, Washington 
Tri C Club  VIOLA MINNEMAN  Royal Center, Indiana  MARGUERITE MITCHELL 
Stanwood, Washington  ASTA MORRIS Bellevue, Washington  HAZEL MOSSING 
Seattle, Washington  FRANCES MULLIN  Hamilton, Washington  EDITH NAY 
Seattle, Washington  Tri C Club Secretary-Treasurer  '27-28  Alkisiah Club 
Y. W. C. A.  FRANK MITCHELL  Sunnyside, Washington  Vanadis Bragi Treasurer
'26-27  Oregon Club CLARA MORGAN  Bremerton, Washington  Philomathean Club 
IRIS MORRIS  Arlington, Washington Tri C Club President '27-28  ALICE
MULLIN  Bellingham, Washington  SELMA MYHR  Bellingham, Washington 
Campfire Secretary  Scribes Club  Tri C Club  Social Science Club  Y. W. C.
A.  GRACE NEELY  Burlington, Washington  W. A. A. Secretary-Treasurer 
Inter Club Council  Volley Ball  Soccer Hockey  Forty-eight

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 49

     ----------

PHYLLIS NEHER  Blaine, Washington  ELLEN NELSON  Seattle, Washington 
IMOGENE NELSON Mount Vernon, Wash.  Entered from W. S. C.  McDowell Club 
Drama Club  RALPH NELSON Wenatchee, Washington  MRS. JESSIE NESTLE 
Steilacoom, Washington RUTH NEWELL  Tacoma, Washington  REA NEWMAN  Tacoma,
Washington  ELIZABETH NICOLAI  Sumner, Washington  MARIE  NORMANSON 
Sherwood, Oregon  RICA OHLIN  Renton, Washington  MARY NICHOLSON  Tacoma,
Washington  THEO NORBY  Bellingham, Washington  Philomathean Club  McDowell
Club  Messenger Sport Editor  Klipsun Sport Editor  Basketball  Tennis 
Football  JEAN O'BRIEN  Burlington, Washington HELEN OLSON  Kelso,
Washington  Forty-nine

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 50

     ----------

SWANHILD OLSON  Tacoma, Washington  AILI OSTERLUND  Astoria, Oregon  INA
OTEY  Tacoma, Washington  LILIAN OTT  Port Angeles, Washington  W. A. A. 
Archery  Riding  Hockey  FLORENCE PALMER  Tacoma, Washington  GEORGE PARKKO
 Port Ludlow, Washington  Vanadis Bragi ELIZABETH PELLERVO  Astoria, Oregon
 RUBY PERSOHN  Tacoma, Washington  CATHERINE OTIN Arlington, Washington 
CHARLES PAINE  Palisades, Washington  MARY CORBIN PAPE  Hamilton,
Washington  SOLVIG PEDERSON  Astoria, Oregon  Social Science Club  Y. W. C.
A.  MARJERY FENDER  Vancouver, Washington  DOROTHY PERSON  Battle Ground,
Wash.  Fifty

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 51

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ADELMA PETERSON  Brush Prairie, Wash.  ALICE PETERSON  Aberdeen, Washington
 MYRTLE PETERSON  Mount Vernon, Wash.  CLARINDA PINKERTON  Kent, Washington
 Y. W. C. A.  Choral Club  DOROTHY PROUD  Anacortes, Washington  RUTH PYLE 
Everett, Washington  JEANETTE PIERPONT  Canyon City, Oregon  Tri C Club
Secretary-Treasurer  '27. Vice-President '27  Scribes' Club MRS. JOSEPHINE
PORTER  Bellingham, Washington  JEAN PUDDY  Bellingham, Washington MARGARET
QUACKENBUSH  Redmond, Washington  LITA RATHMAN  Bellingham, Washington MRS.
DAVIE B. RAY  Bellingham, Washington  LENA REAVES  Arlington, Washington 
Philomathean Club CATHERINE REEDY  Seattle, Washington  Fifty-one

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 52

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KATHERINE REESE  Tacoma, Washington  DUBOIS RHINE  Sedro-Woolley, Wash. 
ADDA ROBERTS Waitsburg, Washington  W. A. A.  Hockey  HAZEL REEVE 
Bellingham, Washington  GRACE RICHARDSON  Bellingham, Washington  Thespian
Club Secretary '27  McDowell Club  W. A. A.  College  Club  Women's Quartet
 DOROTHY ROBBINS  Arlington, Washington  Sagebrush Club  JOHANNA ROCKSTEAD 
Burlington, Washington  Tri C Club  Winlock, Washington  ANICE ROLAND 
Chehalis, Washington  DOROTHY ROSS  Seattle, Washington  GuY ROWLAND 
Sedro-Woolley, Wash.  IRENE ROLPH  Anacortes, Washington  HELENE Ross 
Bellingham, Washington  MILDRED ROWLEY  Port Angeles, Washington  Tri C
Club  Fifty-two

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 53

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OLGA RUDE  Everett, Washington  OLIVE RUTHFORD  Bow, Washington  ALICE RYAN
 Bellingham, Washington  ELMA SAARINEN  Vader, Washington  MARGARET SATRE 
East Stanwood, Wash.  INEZ  SAARI  Vader, Washington  MILDRED SANFORD 
Sumner, Washington  IRENE SCHAGEL Bellingham, Washington  Thespian Club
Secretary '26  President '27  Vice-President '28  Scribes Club Secretary- 
Treasurer '26-27  Red Arrow Editor Spring '28  Drama Club  Messenger Staff 
DORIS SCHERER  Chehalis, Washington  FAY A. SCHERMERHORN  Bellingham,
Washington  CATHERINE SCHOFIELD  Lynden, Washington  VERNA SCHRAMSKY 
Lyman, Washington  RUBY SCHOONOVER  Nesika, Washington  RUTH SCHULTZ 
Loomis, Washington  Fifty-three

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 54

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BLANCHE SCHUSTER  Tacoma, Washington  EUNICE SCHWARTZ  Yakima, Washington 
JEAN SCOTT  Bellingham, Washington  Philomathean Club  Klipsun Staff  VIOLA
SEARING  Kelso, Washington  MAUDIE SEWARD  Olympia, Washington  Vanadis
Bragi  W. A. A.  Hockey  MATHEA SCOTT  Seattle, Washington  RUTH SEGLEM 
Gig Harbor, Washington  Alkisiah Club  ASA SHERWOOD  Puyallup, Washington 
Philomathean Club  Board of Control, '27  Yell Leader, '27  IONE SHINSTINE 
Bellingham, Washington OLGA SILVOLA  Naselle, Washington  Chorus Club  MRS.
MILDRED SIMMONS  Mount Vernon, Wash.  NELDA SIX  Tacoma, Washington 
Philomathean Club ALFRED SIMS  Riverside, Washington  FRANCES SLOCUM 
Seattle, Washington  Fifty-four

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 55

     ----------

ALTA SMITH  Glendale, Oregon  FRANCES SMITH  Ferndale, Washington  Tri C
Club  DOROTHY SNIDER  Bellingham, Washington  LILLIE SORENSEN  Port
Madison, Wash.  Tri C Club  ETHEL SPRONG  Everett, Washington  Drama Club 
EDNA SMITH  Olympia, Washington  Vanadis Bragi Oregon Club President 
Extempore Contest '27  LUCILLE SMITH  Seattle, Washington  GERTRUDE
SOBOTTKA  Bow, Washington  METTA SORENSON  Nooksack, Washington  CORA MAY
SQUIRE Bellingham, Washington  McDowell Club  Y. W. C. A.  SYLVIA STAPP 
Anacortes, Washington  Lois STARBUCK  Bellingham, Washington  MABEL
STEINBRINK  Doty, Washington  Campfire President  Tri C Club  OLGA STENVAAG
 Astoria, Oregon  Fifty-five

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 56

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MARY STEPHEN  Seattle, Washington  LOUISE STIGER  Everett, Washington 
Drama Club  MARTHA STOCKDALE  Prosser, Washington  Thespian Club  BERTHA
STOEHR  Olympia, Washington DOROTHY STRONG  Canby, Oregon  BEATRICE STURGIS
 Bellingham, Washington  BERNARD H. SULLIVAN  Bellingham, Washington 
Paddle Squad Captain  "W" Club  Inter Club Council  Messenger Staff  Tennis
 Track  Baseball  Football  MARY STIGEN  Port Angeles, Washington  MRS.
RUBY STOCKAND  Hoh, Washington  Rural Life Club President  '20-21  MARGARET
STOCKTON  Bellingham, Washington  HULDA STROEBEL  Mount Vernon, Wash.  Tri
C Club  FLOY STRONG  Bellingham, Washington  MRS. HAZEL STURMAN 
Bellingham, Washington  ANNE SUMMERS  Mount Vernon, Wash.  Skagit Club '24 
Fifty-six

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 57

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ROY SUNDSTROM  Hoquiam, Washington  Scribes' Club  FRANCES TAFT  Hoquiam,
Washington FRED TAIT  Bellingham, Washington ADELINE TARDIF  Sourdough Club
President '27 Potlatch, Washington  Alkisiah Club  EVELYN TAYLOR  Lynden,
Washington  Vanadis Bragi Treasurer DOROTHY THAANUM  Sultan, Washington 
MAURICE THOMPSON  Granite Falls, Wash. Philomathean Club  "Rec" Hour
Committee  RUTH THOMPSON  Everson, Washington  ZYLPHA THURSTON  Redding,
California  MYRA TEETS  Everett, Washington  EDITH THOMPSON  Snoqualmie,
Washington  OLGA THOMPSON  Paulsbo, Washington  MINNIE THORSEN  Bellingham,
Washington HOLLY TISDALE  Lake Stevens, Wash.  Y. W. C. A. Treasurer 
Campfire Secretary-Treasurer  W. A. A. Fifty-seven

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 58

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IRENE TOIKKA  Winlock, Washington  DAVID TOTTEN  Bellingham, Washington 
MARY TRATNICK Black Diamond, Wash.  HENRY TURNER  Sumas, Washington 
International Relations Club  President '27  RUTH E. TURNER  Seattle,
Washington  ALMA UNWIN  Everson, Washington  LORENE VAN COTT  
Sedro-Woolley, Wash.  WILLIAM VAN OVER  Everson, Washington  Philomathean
Club  CARRIE ANNA TUCKER  Bellingham, Washington  Philomathean Club
President  Secretary-Treasurer  W. A. A. Drama Club  Five One-Act Plays 
"Poor Nut" Lead  Hockey  Volley Ball  JANE TURNER  East Sound, Washington 
Entered from University of  Washington  MARGARET TwISs  Iynden, Washington 
Tri C Club   PEARL URMEY  Cascade Locks, Oregon  MARTHA VAN HEE  Port
Orchard, Wash.  W. A. A.  Volley Ball  ALICE VAUGHN  Snohomish, Washington 
Campfire Treasurer '24  Fifty-eight

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 59

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JACOBINA VIK  Westport, Oregon  ENOLA VON SCHEELE  A fognak, Alaska  DELL
WADE  Oak Harbor, Washington FRANCES WADE  Oak Harbor, Washington  VIOLET
WAECH  Tacoma, Washington  HELEN WALSH  Vancouver, Washington  VIOLET
WASHBURN  Brewster, Washington VERNET WAHLGREN  Sedro-Woolley, Wash.  W. A.
A.  McDl)owell Club  CLARENCE WANAMAKER Coupeville, Washington  Football,
'27  "W" Club President  MARY WATKINS  Yakima, Washington  Tri C Club  RUBY
WEAVER  Bellingham, Washington LORNA WEBER  Bellingham, Washington  MAVYS
WEST  Auburn, Washington TRINA WESTERDORP  Philomathean Club  Chewelah,
Washington  Fifty- nine

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 60

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PHYLLIS WESTOVER  Bellingham, Washington  Campfire  Scribes Club  Messenger
Staff CONSTANCE WHEELER  Oak Harbor, Washington  LENORE WHITE  Bellingham,
Washington Philomathean Club Secretary  Vice-President  McDowell Club 
Women's League Treasurer  Klipsun Staff  JEAN WILLIAMS  Issaquah,
Washington  W. A. A. President '28  Basketball  ALICE WILSON  Everett,
Washington  MRS. MINNIE WINSOR  Seattle, Washington  MARION WOLCOTT 
Hamilton, Montana  W.  A. A.  Alkisiah Club  JUNE WETHERELL  Bellingham,
Washington  Drama Club  Scribes Club Vice- President  Philomathean Club 
Klipsun Editor  "Milestones"  Extempore Contest Winner '27  Messenger Staff
 Red Arrow Staff  ALICE WHITE  Mount Vernon, Wash.  Vanadis Bragi  Drama
Club  HAZEL WICKERSHAM  S'ekiu, Washington  LOIs WILHELMY  Seattle,
Washington  HARRY WINSOR Bellingham, Washington  International Relations
Club  President '27  Debate Club  Extempore Contest Intra-Mural Debate 
EDNA WISE  Tacoma, Washington  Vanadis Bragi Vice-President  '27  Scribes
Club Vice-President  Messenger Staff  Red Arrow Editor '28  MARY WREN 
Great Falls, Montana  Sixty

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 61

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DOROTHEA WYNN  Ferndale, Washington  FLORENCE YANDELL  Buckley, Washington 
MARTHA YLONEN  Naselle, Washington  Volley Ball "W"  Soccer  IRENE YOUNG 
Burton, Washington  VERYL YOUNG  Bellingham, Washington GRACE ZANDER 
Bellingham,. Washington  SVEA ZINGMARK Preston, Washington  Thespian Club 
Sixty-on6

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 62

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HELENE W. APPLETON  Bellingham, Washington  KIRBY BALDREY  Bellingham,
Washington MARGARET BEAVER  Seattle, Washington  OLIVE H. BOOKER 
Bellingham, Washington  MILDRED BOTTA  Blaine, Washington  LINCOLN P. BROWN
 Bellingham, Washington  MARY E. CHORLTON  Du Pont, Washington  JESSIE
CHURCH  La Conner, Washington  SARAH CLAY COLLINS  Bellingham Washington 
PERCY J. COX  Puyallup, Washington  ALICE CUTTS  Seattle, Washington 
THERESA DEBOLT  Puyallup, Washington  LORNA DICKSON  Sedro-Woolley, Wash. 
INEZ EBERT  La Grande, Oregon  DORIS FLYNN  Bellingham, Washington  MRS.
MARY LUCE FRENCH  Vancouver, Washington   ALMA FRISSELL  Clear Lake,
Washington  WALTER H. GERRY  Bellingham, Washington  DOROTHY GIBSON  Walla
Walla, Washington  GERALDINE GIBSON  South Tacoma, Wash.  SADIE GIBSON
South Bend, Wash.  BERYL GREEN  Seattle, Washington  MYRTLE HANSON 
Seattle, Washington EDWARD K. HYDE  Bellingham, Washington  MARY E. IVERSON
 Bremerton, Washington  RAY B. JEWELL  Granite Falls, Wash.  Siet:y-two

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 63

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GERALDINE KENNARD  South Bellingham, Wash.  MRS. LUCIE KEPLINGEB 
Bellingham, Washington  HAROLD LANT  Bellingham, Washington  LAVINE LEVISON
 East Stanwood, Wash.  E. JAMES LIVINGSTONE  Chehalis, Washington  BLANCHE
MADIGAN  Seattle, Washington  FARRIS MELROSE Bellingham, Washington 
CHIYOMO NIMOBI  Tacoma, Washington  CLARA O'NEILL  Bellingham, Washington 
JENNIE OUGENDAL  Chinook, Washington  JUANITA POLHAMUS  Seattle, Washington
ROSE PORTMAN  Tacoma, Washington  FERN ROBBINS  Bellingham, Washington 
ANICE ROLAND Chehalis, Washington  DORIS SHERER  Chehalis, Washington  LULU
M. STEPHENSON  Everett, Washington  DONALD B. STICKNEY  Bothel, Washington 
GEORGIA STUDEBAKER  Castle Rock, Wash.  ERIE S. TORPPA  Woodland,
Washington  ELVID E. WOLFE  Bremerton, Washington DORTHEA WYNN  Ferndale,
Washington  Sixty-three

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 64

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THOMPSON DELONG COX MCKEE KOLSTAD  FRESHIMAH CLASS  FRESHI-STANLEY
THIOMiPSON  FRANCES DELONG  GERALDINE MCKEE  LESLIE COX  ED)WIN BENEDICT 
JOE HERMSEN .  FRANCES DELONG  GERALDINE McKEE  ELDRID WOLFLE  CATHERINE
MORSE SOCIAL:  Bill Ree  Rose Br  Elizabeth  Joe Her  Jean Ma  Paul Ho 
Elden B  Alice Su  MAN CLASS OFFICERS  FIRST QUARTER  President 
Vice-President  .Secretary  Treasurer  Student Representative  SECOND AND
THIRD QUARTERS  .President  Vice-President  Secretary  Treasurer  Student
Representative  STANDING COMMITTEES  SCHOLARSHIP:  ves Leslie Cox  ooks
Eldred Bechtel  h Gable Hamilton Church  msen Elizabeth Carl  rquis WAYS
AND MEANS:  well Dean Edmundson  Bond Warren Boynton  ndquist Mary Rowland 
FRESHMAN DANCE  Sixty-four  I

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 65

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IFESHAMI[H CL APd  Sixty-five

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [66]

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xtra-curricular acivities  Are the sugary icings  Of the nutritious cakes
called classes.  Sweet and popular  Like co-education.

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [67]

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CAH1P1IS ACTIVITIE  o F  00  o 0  0 0  FN~F~~ f7

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [68]


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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 69

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4/fIDCIEATEF STULEHT/f  FISHER  ROBERT FISHER President  JOEL GUDMUNDSON .
Vice-President   RoY ARNETT .. Secretary  SPRING QUARTER  DEAN EDIUNDSON
President  EDWIN BENEDICT Vice-President  RoY ARNETT . Secretary  BOARD OF
CONTROL  FALL QUARTER-Robert Fisher, Joel Gudmundson, Asa Sherwood, Dean
Edmundson, Carrie  Anna Tucker.  WINTER QUARTER-Robert Fisher, Joel
Gudmundson, Talmage Gray, Dean Edmundson,  Madeline Bosshard.  SPRING
QUARTER- Dean Edmundson, Edwin Benedict, Milton Field, Madeline Bosshard,
Stan-ley  Thompson.  FACULTY MEMBERs-Mr. Arntzen, Mr. Bond:  GUDMUNDSON
EDMUNDSON BOSSHARD ARNETT  SHERWOOD  TUCKER ARNTZEN BOND GRAY  Sixty-nine

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The Weekly Messenger, a seven column, four page news-paper,  is the weekly
organ of B. S. N. S. Its policy is to carry  accurate, timely reports of
school happenings and of events  of interest to Normal students. A change
of management  came at the end of the winter quarter when Robert Wagner,  a
graduate, was succeeded by Robert Fisher as editor, and  Barney Chichester,
business manager, who resigned, had  his part filled by Harry Appleton. At
the close of the Spring  quarter a new name was chosen for the school
paper, "The  Northwestern Viking," suggested by Mary Hibner in a
school-wide contest.  EDITORIAL STAFF  ROEERT WAGNER, ROBERT FISHER
Managing Editor  ROBERT FISHER Associate Editor  VERNON V. VINE Assistant
Editor  CARRIE ANNA TUCKER Society Editor THEO NORRY Sport Editor  NAOMI
CHASE . . . . Women's Sport Editor  BERNARD SULLIVAN, GLEN FAIRBANKS 
Associate Sport Editors  HERBERT FOWLER Faculty Advisor  MANAGERIAL STAFF
BARNEY CHICHESTER, HARRY APPLETON . Business Manager  BOB WATERS . . .
Assistant Business Manager  WAGNER MYER THAL . .Circulation Manager 
CHICHESTER  FOWLER  STAFF WRITERS  Marie Craig, Grace Gaermer, Margaret
Satre, Irene Schagel, Edna Working, Leslie  Abshire, Myer Thal, Sidney
Thal, Florence McNeil, Millard Sutherlen, Edgar Cox, Glen  Fairbanks, Elden
Bond, Fred Schwan, Gordon Leen, Bob Waters, Mae Barbo, Roger Beckes, 
Bernard Sullivan.  WHEN "THE WEEKLY MESS" WENT TO PRESS  Seventy

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RED ARROW  The Red Arrow, in the second year of  its existence, has proved
an interesting and  worth- while venture. It is Bellingham Nor-mal's  only
literary magazine, edited quarterly  by the Scribes' Club and  outside
contributors.  In attempting to provide material of interest  to varied
types of students, it contains short  stories, poems, satires, essays,
humor, and  editorials. Vernon Zachrison, editor for the  winter quarter
publication, says, "If the  literary experiments found in the Red Arrow 
are taken seriously enough to merit criticism  by readers, the staff will
feel richly repaid  for its efforts."  FALL QUARTER  EDNA WISE . Editor 
GEORGE SHERMAN Business Manager  WINTER QUARTER  VERNON ZACHRISON Editor 
VERNON VINE Business Manager  SPRING QUARTER  IRENE SCHAGEL . . . . . .
Editor  LYN HUGHES Business Manager  Contributors to the fall and winter
Red Arrows were: Arthur Jukes, Edith Cox,  Marjorie Lawson, Alice Endsley,
Jean Chisholm, Paul Booth, Irene Schagel, George  Sherman, June Wetherell,
Rosa Ott, H. I. R., Ebba Carlson, Tom McLyn, Bryan  Buchanan, Madge Boyer,
Luella Jones, Marion Burnworth, Arlene Johanson,  Phyllis Westover, Jane
L'Eveque, Bernard Chichester, Lloyd Beckes, Dorothy  Legg, and M. H. S.  *~
 Seventy-one

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WETHERELL MARQUIS ABEL  IKLIES UH  STAFF  JUNE WETI-IERELL Editor  JEAN
MARQUIS Editor  GOLDA ABEL .Business Manager  Associate Editor, Helen
Smith; Faculty Advisor, Olive Edens; Junior- Senior  Representative, Olive
Hardan; Sophomore Representative, Lenore White; Freshman Representative,
Alice Oakley; Art Editor, Marion Burnworth; Activities, Carrie  Tucker;
Drama, Bernard Chichester; Men's Sports, Theo Norby; Women's Sports,  Olive
Hardan; Organizations, Catherine Morse; Administration and Classes, Naomi 
Chase; Features, Carrie Tucker; Snapshots, Roy Arnett; Debate, Lecture
Course,  Vernon Vine; Music, Sidney Thal; Research, Robert Waters and
Norman Bright;  Art Advisor, Hazel Breakey; Art Editor (Fall Quarter) Ellen
Nelson; Organiza-tions  (Fall Quarter) Ruth Atkins;  Cartoonist, Beatrice
Johnson; Typist, Jean Scott.  In explanation of the co-editors, June
Wetherell withdrew from school during  winter quarter so Jean Marquis, was
advanced from Associate Editor to Editor,  Helen Smith then filling the
Associate position.  HARDAN OAKLEY WHITE EDENS  Seventy-two

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SMITH BURNWORTH  CHASE NORBY MORSE CHICHESTER  THAL TUCKER ARNETT BREAKEY
WATERS BRIGHT SCOTT VINE  Seventy-three

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]DECISIVE LATTLELS OF THE TEARL  Battle: All School Mixer.  Date: September
27, 1927, Tuesday Evening.  Location: Armory.  Besiegers: Frosh, Sophs,
Upperclass-men,  Faculty.  Defenders: Board of Control.  Officer in
Command: Carrie Tucker.  Battle: Y. W. C. A. Reception.  Date: September
30, 1927, Friday  Evening.  Location: Edens Hall Citadel.  Besiegers:
Frosh, Sophs, Upperclass-men,  Faculty. Defenders: Y. W. C. A.  Officers in
Command: Miss Sperry and  Y. W. C. A. Cabinet.  Battle: Kid Party. Date:
October 1, 1927, Saturday Eve-ning.  Location: Artillery Room.  Besiegers:
Women of School. Defenders: Women's League.  Officer in Command: Margaret
McCoy.  Battle: Smoker.  Date: October 1, 1927, Saturday Eve-ning. 
Location: Small Artillery Room.  Besiegers: Men of the School.  Defender's:
Men's Club.  Officer in Command: Earl Hemmi.  Battle: "W" Club Dance. 
Date: November 18, 1927, Friday Eve-ning.  Location: Artillery Room. 
Besiegers: Normal men and lady  friends.  Defenders: W Club.  Officer in
Command: Granville Thor-lakson  Battle: Outside Girls Informal  Date:
November 19, 1927, Saturday  Evening.  Location: Edens Hall Mess Hall 
Besiegers: Girls outside Edens Hall  and boy friends.  Defenders: Women's
League.  Officer in Command: Phyllis Neher.  Seventy-four

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Battle: Masquerade Dance.  Date: October 29, 1927, Saturday Eve-ning. 
Location: Artillery Room. Besiegers: Soph girls, all men, and  Faculty. 
Defenders: Sophomore Class.  Officer in Command: Beth Coghlan.  Campaign:
Homecoming.  Date: November 4-5, 1927, Friday and  Saturday.  General:
Gladys Green.  First Offensive: Pep Rally and Bon-fire.  Date: November 4,
1927, Friday Eve-ing.  Location: Waldo Field.  Besiegers: Associated
Student Body.  Defenders: Board of Control and  Frosh Men.  Officer  in
Command: Asa Sherwood.  Second Offensive: Homecoming Lunch-eon.  Date:
November 5, 1927, Saturday  Noon.  Location: Edens Hall Mess Hall and 
Normal Mess Hall.  Besiegers: Normal Students and  Alumni.  Defenders:
Board of Control.  Officer in Command: Olive Hardan.  Third Offensive:
Homecoming Mixer.  Date: November 15, 1927, Saturday  Evening.  Location:
Armory.  Besiegers: Associated Student Body.  Defenders: Board of Control. 
Officer in Command: Lenore White.  Battle: Edens Hall Informal.  Date:
December 3, 1927, Saturday  Evening.  Location: Edens Hall Citadel.
Besiegers: Edens Hall girls and boy  friends.  Defenders: Women's League. 
Officer in Command: Evelyn Lysons.  Battle: Futuristic Frolic.  Date:
November 12, 1927, Saturday  Evening.  Location: Artillery Room. 
Besiegers: Frosh girls, all men and  Faculty.  Defenders: Freshman Class. 
Officer in Command: Wilfred Reeves.  Seventy-five

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Battle: Women's Sport Banquet.  Date: Dec. 6, 1927, Friday Evening. 
Location: Montague-McHugh Mess  Hall.  Besiegers: Women of School. 
Defenders: W. A. A.  Officers in Command:  Base Captain: Gladys Green. 
Field Captain: Carrie Tucker.  Battle: Rec Hour- Terpischorean  struggle. 
Date: Every Friday-4 to 5.  Location: Artillery Room.  Besiegers:
Associated Student Body.  Defenders: Board of Control.  Officer in Command:
Asa Sherwood.  Battle: Deep Sea Copbat.  Date: January 21, 1928, Saturday 
Evening.  Location: Davy Jones Locker.  Besiegers: Soph Class, Frosh men,
Fac-ulty. Defenders: Soph Class.  Officer in Command: Albert Brown. 
Battle: Outside Girls Informal Com-bat. Date: February 11, 1928.  Location:
Edens Hall Mess Room.  Besiegers: Women's League Battalion  and  Escorts. 
Defenders: Women's League, Head-quarters.  Officer in Command: Phyllis
Neher.  Battle: Collegiate Hop Skirmish.  Date: February 17, 1928. 
Location: Large Artillery Room.  Besiegers: Student Body Regimentals. 
Defenders: Upperclassmen Troop.  Officer in Command: Barney Chi-chester. 
Battle: Edens Hall Rout.  Date: Sunset.  Location: Edens Hall Citadel. 
Besiegers: Dorm Division and Escorts. Defenders: Edens Hall, Headquarters. 
Officer in Command: Edna Wise.  Seventy-six

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Battle: Outside Girls' Informal.  Date: April 28, Saturday evening. 
Location: Edens Hall Mess Hall. Besiegers: Outside Girls and Escorts. 
Defenders: Women's League.  Officer in Command: Phyllis Neher.   Battle:
Polychrome Party.  Date: May 5, Friday Evening.  Location: Big Artillery
Room.  Besiegers: Frosh, Soph Men and Fac-ulty.  Defenders: Frosh Class. 
Officer in Command: Wilfred Reeves.  Battle: Mother's Day Tea.  Date: May
13, Sunday Afternoon.  Location: Edens Hall Drawing Room.  Besiegers: Girls
and Mothers.  Defenders: Women's League.  Officer in Command: Catherine
Morse,  RECREATION HOUR  Seventy-seven

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perhaps  Our drama is made of painted puppets  Our songs come out of a
child's music box  Our speaker's are wound on springs  To the gods who play
with us.

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]IHlE AER  3 1 ml  --- I\ //1

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [80]


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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 81

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IDRAMA  With such competent dramatic companies as the MORONI OLSEN PLAYERS,
the BELLINGHAM PLAYERS and our own DRAMA CLUB offering productions, we have
just  passed through one of the most successful dramatic seasons of which
Bellingham  Normal may boast.  Mr. V. H. Hoppe, Miss Alma Madden and Miss
Martha Dewey have stimulated  a keen interest in dramatics by offering
worthwhile plays, adequately directed,  effectively staged and competently
acted, and have enabled drama to secure a strong  foothold within our
school.  NORMAL AHMA CLIIUE  Mrs. Gubbins  Peggy Woofers  Bolton  Jimmie
Gubbins  William Foster  Spoofy  Rose Gordon  Briggs  Benson  Lady
Leicester   "THREE LIVE GHOSTS"  A Comedy in 3 Acts by FREDERICK ISHAMI 
Dire:ted by Miss Alma Madden   JUNE 6 and 7, 1927  Characters in Order of
Appearance  Olive Hardan  Irene Schagel  Warren Boynton Donald Stickney 
Ralph Johnson  Will Mock  Norma Johnson  Barney Chichester  Dwight Bunnell 
Rella Ebeling  "THE ROMANCERS"  A Three Act Play by Edmond Rostrand 
Directed by Miss Alma Madden AUGUST 17, 1927  Percinet-a lover  Straforel-a
bravo  Bergamin-Father of Percinet  Pasquinot-Father of Sylvette  Blaise-a
gardner  A Notary  Sylvette-Daughter of Pasquinot  Oliver Nelson  Troy
Moore  Angus Bowmer  Ellsworth Lumley  Angus Edwards  Maxwell Lagger 
Evelyn Hagen  Eighty-one

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CAST FOR "CHILDREN OF THE MOON"  CH-ILRDIREH OF IHLE MHOON  A play in Three
Acts by MARTIN FLAVIN  Directed by V. H. Hoppe  DECEMBER 6, 1927  The
Characters  Judge Atherton Madam Atherton  Laura Atherton  Jane Atherton 
Dr. Wetherell  Major Bannister  Walter Higgs  Thomas FRED LAGGER  ELIZABETH
GABLE  DONALD STICKNEY  Norman Burchette  Margaret Green  Lyn Hughes 
Elvira Lehtinen  Bryan Buchanan  Randy Oberlatz  Ralph Huff  Fred Lagger 
MANAGE MENT Business  Properties  Stage Manager  Eighty-two

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IhI-"R" PH IT  A COMEDY OF MODERN YOUTH  By J. C. and ELLIOTT NUGENT  Dire
ted by V. H. Hoppe  FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHTS  February 24-25, 1928 
Characters  "Colonel" Small  Margerie Blake  John Miller  Julie Winters 
"Spike" Hoyt  "Hub" Smith  "Magpie" Welch  Coach Jackson  "Wallie" Pierce 
Professor Deming  "Doc" Spurney  A Freshman  Wisconsin Official  Reggie 
Betty  Helen  BOB WAGNER  THE "POOR NUT"  in Order of their First
Appearance  Ro Arnett  Evelyn Edwards  . . Robert Wagner  Carrie Anna
Tucker  Barney Chichester  Don Stickney  Foster Kirk  Ray Bright  Henry
Durr Norman Burchette  Fred Lagger  Norman Bright  Roy Arnett  Esther
Broadwater  Lenore White  Helen Stine  RUNNERS  WIscoNsIN-Paul Howell,
Frank Evernden, Earl Hemmi.  Oio--Harry Darby, Frank Gallanger.  MANAGEMENT
FOR "THE POOR NUT"  Properties Elizabeth Gable and Helen Stine  Ticket
Sales . Don Stickney, T. F. Hunt  Stage . Frank Lock  "The Poor Nut," in
which the entire Drama Club took part, weas one of the  most successful
plays ever staged in the Normal Auditorium.  CAST FOR "THE POOR NUT" 
Eighty-three

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OU6] SIDL IDEAMA  MORONI OLSEN PLAYERS  The Moroni Olsen Players have
established an enviable reputation during  the five seasons which they have
played here. During the season of 1927-28, they  have produced four
plays-"Mr. Pim Passes By," by A. A. Milne; "Lilies of the  Field," by John
Hastings Turner; "Anna Christie," by Eugene O'Neill, and "The  Detour," by
Owen Davis.  "Anna Christie" was probably their greatest effort of the
current season.  "AHHA CHRI-IIS L'"  A PLAY IN FOUR ACTS By Eugene O'Neill 
WEDNESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 29, 1928  Directed by Moroni Olsen and Byron K.
Foulger  Characters in order of their appearance  "Johnny-the-Priest"
Joseph H. Williams Longshoreman William Lee  Larry, bartender Harry R.
Allen  Chris Christopherson . ..... Moroni Olsen (Captain of the barge
"Simeon Winthrop")  Marthey Owen  Anna Christopherson, Chris's daughter 
Two Men of Steamer's Crew  Matt Burke, a stoker  Johnson, deckhand on the
barge  Leora Thatcher  Janet Young  Harry R. Allen, William Lee  SG .orden
R. Nelson  Joseph H. Williams  "(THE DETOUR"131-11  A  PLAY IN THREE ACTS 
By Owen Davis  MONDAY EVENING, MARCH 26, 1928  PROGRAM  Stephen Hardy 
Helen, his wife  Kate, their daughter  Tom Lane  Dana Lamont  Dora Lamont 
Ben Glenny Weinstein  Jake  Moroni Olsen  Janet Young  Dorothy Adams  Byron
Kay Foulger  Gorden Nelson  Leora Thatcher  Harry R. Allen  Joseph H.
Williams  Thomas Osborne  Eighty-four

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Public speaking as a phase of teacher-training has been well to the
fore-ground  during the 1927-1928 season. About the middle of the fall
quarter, under  the leadership of several first quarter freshmen, the
debate club, "Gavel and Pul-pit"  was formed. Its purpose was to encourage
debate and public speaking in the  school, also to sponsor the intra-mural
debate tournament. Sufficient material  turned out to make ty students
answered  both a men's and a the call of the fall  women's team. In the
quarter. From these finals of this tourna- two successful candi-ment  the
Philomathean dates were chosen,  squad defeated the Frieda Massey and 
World Politics Team Margaret Hill. Equal  an the Philippine ques- nthusiasm
was  evident  tion. From the four in the winter and  teams competing, the
spring quarters, El-following students dred Bechtel and Ber-were  selected
to com- tha Altose winning the  pose the school team: winter contest, and 
Margaret Hill, Frieda Fay Schermerhorn and  Massey, Viola Poyho- Owen
Tarbox chosen  nen, Fay Schermer- from the spring quar-horn,  Vernon Vine,
ter group. These six  and Harry Winsor. contestants then spoke  The
Extemporaneous before the assembly,  speech contest, in the Margaret Hill
was  second year of its life "EXTEMPORE CUP" chosen as winner for  showed
vigorius signs the year 1928, and  of activity when thir- was presented the
Ex-tempore  Contest trophy by June Wetherell, winner for 1927. This cup is
presented  yearly to the winner of this speech contest, who has the honor
of having his or her  name engraved on the trophy, and becomes the guardian
of the cup until the  following year. The Extemporaneous Contests have
greatly stimulated debate  and public speech in the school, and have
brought timely topics before the  student body in a new and interesting
way.  Eighty- five

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 86

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LIECTImURET CODUJWIRSJIB  One of the finest lecture courses ever  offered
by the school was opened by Dr.  Frank Bohn of New York, economist, 
author, lecturer, journalist. "Our New  Barbarism" was the title of his
dis-course  which threw much light on the  press, the tabloid, jazz in our
present-day-  world. Yet as a silver lining to the  dark clouds of
twentieth century  barbarism, Dr. Bohn maintained his  faith in the
ultimate triumph of the  sanity of American people in art and  morals. 
CAPTAIN JOHN NOEL  Perils glamorous, hardships almost  unbearable, joy
unbounded, tragedy  always immanent - such is mountain climbing-such was
the ascent of  Mount Everest, the highest pinnacle  of land in the world.
Captain John Noel, official photographer on the two  fruitless expeditions
to scale the mighty  peak, came to the Normal  on the eve-ning  of November
14, with a message  thrilling in its tales of heroism, sacri-fice  and the
glory  of unknown lands.  He spoke with graphic simplicity but  with
extraordinary vividness of Tibet  with its mysterious people, its quaint 
customs, its social life, of scaling the  mountain bit by bit, until,
within sight   of the summit, the two adventurers  were lost. The moving
pictures which  illustrated the lecture were marvels of  photographic
beauty and splendor.  DR. JAMES MURPHY  Bringing a message new and unusual 
in its content, titled "The Destiny of  Democracy", Dr. James Murphy, Ph. 
D. of Dublin, London and Paris, spoke  on the evening of January 11. He 
startingly portrayed the Italian situ-  Eighty-six  ation,  the attitude of
the British press  and foreign office, the reconstruction  work of
France,-the causes and results of the World War in general.  He pointed to
the realignment of the  masses of Europe along economic  rather than
political lines. "Old world  politics are gone and the traditional 
technique of government is fast becom-ing  an anachronism", said Dr.
Murphy.  MAURICE HINDUS  A Russian by birth, an American by  adoption, and
a journalist by occupa-tion,  Maurice G. Hindus knows Russia  as few men
do, and can speak about it  as no one else can. With the kindly eye  of the
native, and the skeptical eye of  the journalist, to say nothing of the 
observant eye of the true American, he  has taken the situation of present
day  Russia in the palm of his hand and  felt the velvety soft spots of the
texture as well as the pieces of grit. Russia,  long considered the land of
the reli-gious,  was, according to Hindus, the  land of the so-called
religious.  Religion there was a vocation or rather  a duty, easily
forgotten and never  regretted. Consequently, when the  Soviet abolished
religion for the  younger generation, and discouraged  it among the elders,
there was no  nationwide rebellion or regret. There  is no nationwide
rebellion or regret as  far as communism is concerned, Hindus  maintained,
though the country people  object to the methods practiced in the  cities
where objections to private prop-erty confiscation cannot be heard. "The 
situation in Russia," the speaker con-cluded,  "has hopes for the ultimate 
salvation of the country, so that it will  again resume its place among the
world  powers."

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DR. WILL DURANT  Dr. Will Durant, philosopher and  writer, noted for his
popularized phil-osophy  in book form, and his mental  autobiography,
"Transition", address-ed  a capacity audience on the evening of January 27,
1928, using as his topic,  "Is Progress a Delusion?" He replied  that it is
not, using the idea that  "Empires may rise, or empires may  fall, but
civilization goes on forever."  He pointed to the present condition of 
humanity, citing the longer span of  life expectancy, more and better
con-veniences,  labor devices, the spread of  education. Dr. Durant has
been likened  to the late William James, or, "the ideal  of the educated
man. So lightly and  gracefully does his knowleddge sit upon  him that
instead of crushing, it human-izes  him, to our great joy and profit." 
FLOYD DELL  Floyd Dell, the author of half a dozen modern and popular
novels, as  well as several essays on education and  life in general, spoke
on the evening of  March 9, on "Were You Ever a  Parent?" The lecture was
full of wit,  common sense and keen thought. Mr.  Dell defended the youth
of today,  spoke in favor of early marriages,  condemned the modern
intellectual  novel as giving an erroneous impression  of sex and
psychology, and applauded  the progressive advance of woman-hood.  PRIVATE
PEAT  Perhaps one of the most unusual and  interesting lectures given at
the Normal  school for some time was delivered by a  man who came to the
school on short  notice and spoke in a special assembly,  the time being
too short to allow for a  public appearance.  On Wednesday,  April 18,
Harold R. Peat, internation-ally  known as "Private Peat," spoke on  "The
Inexcusable Lie," in which he  denounced the glorification of war and 
graphically portrayed the lurid horrors  of life in the trenches during the
great  world war.  Undoubtedly Private Peat in his  short talk captured the
hearts of his  audience more completely than any  other speaker who
appeared on the  local  platform during the year.  A strange type of
speaker, Peat  proved himself a person whose person-ality  is  forcibly
impressed upon his  every listener. A sudden change of  voice, of attitude,
and of manner, trans- formed  the lecturer from formidable,  demori-like
being to a laughing college  boy, which his speech changed from  that
surcharged with emotion and pas-sion  to that of light humor which placed 
his audience in the frame of mind to  receive the next thought of the
speaker.  The inexcusable lie, according to  Peat, is the glorified aspect
of war  which is taught by the histories of the  public schools. War,
according to the  lecturer, should be pictured as it is, a  horrible thing,
which turns men into  monsters, and destroys the flower of  humanity.
Himself a victim of the fury  of war, Peat spoke with the vehemence  of a
man who has seen once and does  not care to see again.  Eighty-seven

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 88

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MUsIC  Giving to the students of the Bellingham State Normal School one of
the most  musical and artistic programs in many years, the Musical Artists
Course opened  with Edward Johnson, tenor, of the Metropolitan Opera
Company, on December  first.  Mr. Johnson, undoubtedly one of the most
distinguished tenors of today,  gave a program that took the hearts of his
audience. He combined the artist  and the actor, and held his audience
spell bound with his interpretations. His  ability as a singer and his
personality gave the students of this school one of  the events they will
never forget.  Then came Georges Enesco, the Roumanian violinist, on
January 24th.  Words cannot explain Georges Enesco. He is sublime. His
swift bow takes one  here and there, always leaving impressions, giving
glimpses of dreamy lands,  of blue skies, of tragedies, of sadness, for
Enesco wraps himself into his music  and incidently wraps his audience into
himself. What stood out in this concert  was the soft, smooth tones of the
virtuoso, his delicate bowing and his quaint  personality.  The English
Singers were presented on March 8th, in a program of madri-gals,  folk
songs, canzonets and ballads. The many lovers of part singing were  amazed
at the polyphonic effects achieved by this matchless ensemble. The 
freshness and  vitality of their singing has set a standard that will live
for  long. Their perfection of colorful tones was combined with a final
chord  which carried marvelous harmony and seemed to come from an organ
rather  than from a group of human voices  Harold Bauer is truly the master
pianist. On the evening of March 27th,  he proved this by his overwhelming
conquest of technical difficulties, his clear  poetic insight, and his
extraordinary powers of interpretation. Harold Bauer  puts his soul into
the composition he is playing and makes the meaning of the  creator very
plain. This master's playing has such absolute perfection of
inter-pretation  that one forgets his surroundings and is enthralled by the
artist.  Florence Austral, soprano, gave a superb performance, Tuesday
evening,  April 17th. This artist has a dramatic soprano voice of power and
beautiful  quality. Her tones are of such purity that they seem to flow as
smoothly as a   mountain stream. The perfect balance and smoothness of her
tone were perfectly  placed and firmly established. Miss Austral also has
great dramatic ability.  She won an ovation from her audience. WOMEN'S GLEE
CLUB  Eighty-eight

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MEN'S GLEE CLUB  The last number on the Musical Artist Course was the
Barrere Little  Symphony, which appeared on April 19th. It consisted of a
choir of wind instru-ments  combined with a perfect balance in the string
sections. This miniature  orchestra possesses most of the qualities of the
full symphony orchestra yet at  the same time a sweetness and subtle charm
which is lost in the larger group.  All the members of the Barrere Symphony
are notably recognized artists. This  event proved to be a fitting climax
for a most successful Musical Artists Course.  ASSEMELY 1HRODGRAMS  Perhaps
the outstanding concert given in assembly was that of Catherine Wade 
Smith, nationally known violinist, on October 18, 1927. Miss Smith has
almost  perfectly mastered the technique of the violin. She plays with much
feeling,  getting a clear, pure tone, with a lightness that is remarkable. 
The Williams Trio of this city entertained in assembly on October 11, and 
the Underwood String Quartet of Oregon appeared on February 14. The
Underwood  Quartet presented a program of selections beginning with the old
English folk  songs up to the modern composers. The quartet carried a
perfect balance in all  their numbers and obtained beautiful effects in
their melodious pieces.  William H. Clark, baritone, achieved a tremendous
success, and rendered  a program which held the interest of the students..
Mr. Clark sings best in  songs  which call for action, and his rendering of
"Danny Deever," by Damrosch,  proved this. The "Sleepy Hollow Tune," by
Kountz, a dreamy, haunting melody  was also well received.  The spring
quarter was marked with the appearance of Sara Truax, dramatic  reader, and
David Campbell, pianist. Sara Truax presented two plays, both fitting  for
Normal audiences and intensely dramatic. She has a wonderful control of her
 voice and her imitations are perfect. David Campbell gave two interesting
recitals,  on the seventeenth and twentieth of April, lecturing on the
numbers he interpreted.  Mr. Campbell's lectures were  very well given and
informative.  NORMAL SCHOOL MUSIC  The glee clubs, both boys' and girls',
have taken the form of social organi-zations,  rather than classes, meeting
only when it is convenient, with no restrictions  on attendance. The girls
have made one public appearance in assembly. During  the winter quarter, a
grand chorus of one hundred and fifty voices was selected  to take part in
the musical program at the dedication of the library, May fifth.  The
numbers by the chorus were: "The Heavens are Telling," from "The Creation,"
 by Haydn, and the "American Ode," by Kountz. The orchestra, of twenty-five
pieces, also took part in the dedication program. The number played was the
 "French Military March," by  Saint-Saens.  Eighty-nine

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There is a deep pleasure  For the wolf-child  In running with his pack and 
Fighting by his brothers  and we   join clubs.

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ODEGAH 1ZATFD1UN  0  00  IC -

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 93

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TOP ROW-Joel Gudmundson, Clifford Duncan, Selma Myhr, Iris Morris, Rowena
Tarbox. FRONT ROW- Edwin  Benedict, Grace Neely, Olga Stenvaag, Katherine
Lawrence, Clara Morgan, Lenore White. STLUDLEN OLRGANI ZATION COUNCIL 
RAYMOND BRIGHT  MILTON FIELD-Spring Quarter JEANETTE McGUIRE  OLGA STENVAAG
 MLSS HILDA ROSENE  President  President  Vice-President  
Secretary-Treasurer  S Advisor  The purpose of this organization is very
ably carried out in the promotion  of  the interests and activities of all
student clubs; and worthwhile standards are  set to which all Normal clubs
must comply. The membership of this group is  limited to one duly elected
representative from each  club in the school.  Ninety-three

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McCoY McGUIRE WISE WHITE  WOMENLH LEAGUEI  MARGARET MCCOY  JEANETTE McGUIRE
EDNA WISE  LENORE WHITE  JEAN MARQUIS  LESLIE WOOD  GLADYS GREEN  OLGA
STENVAGG  MISs HILDA ROSENE  MISS ADELE JONES  President  Vice-President 
Secretary Treasurer  Freshman Representative  Fresman Representative  W. A.
A. Representative  Y. W. C. A. Representative  Advisor  Advisor  The
Women's League has based most of its organization upon the "Big- Sister" 
movement, which is of much assistance to freshman women. Many committees
work conscientiously on the various activities of this work necessary to
carry on its high  aim of service, and to provide the equally important
recreational and social diversions.  Ninety-four

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LLENS HALL  FIRST QUARTER  EDNA WISE  GLADYS GREEN  EVELYN LYSONS  ESTHER
KING LOUISE STIGER  MISS FLORENCE JOHNSON  President  Vice-President 
Social Chairman  Fire Chief Social Reporter  A dvisor  SECOND QUARTER  EDNA
WISE  MADELINE BOSSHARD  ELENA REAVIS   GERALDINE MCKEE  EDNA WORKING  Miss
FLORENCE JOHNSON  FLORENCE FILLION MADELINE BOSSHARD  ROSA VAN Ess  ELENA
REAVIS  EDNA WORKING  EDNA WORKING SPRING QUARTER  President 
Vice-President  Social Chairman  Fire Chief  Social Reporter  A .dvisor
President  S Vice-President  Secretary-Treasurer  Social Chairman  SR .
e.porter  Student Representative   It is really quite unnecessary to say
anything about the women's dormitory for  almost everyone is cognizant of
the "good times, good management, and good food"  occuring within its
walls. Much credit is  due to the tactful supervision of Miss  Johnson,
which together with the cooperation of the girls, is conducive to
happiness.  Ninety-five

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TOP ROW-Maurice Thompson, Roy Arnett, Robert Fisher, Harry Leatha. FOURTH
ROW-Myer Thal, Vernon Vine, Henry Durr, E'den Bond, Sidney Thal, Foster
Kirk. THIRD ROW-Katherine Korthauer, Catherine Morse, Frances DeLong, Peggy
Pullar, Mr. H. C. Philippi, Nelda Six. SECOND ROW-Willena Barnhart, Jean
Scott, Alice Sundquist, Genevieve Evatt, Dorothy Sollie, Rose Brooks. FIRST
ROW-Vera Ginnette, Lenore White, Jean Marquis, Naomi Chese, Elena Reavis,
Kristine Thordarson, Louise Dunn, Clara Morgan, Mavis West, Elizabeth
Brodt, Fiorence Christianson.  PHILOMATHEAN CLUIE  FIRST QUARTER  ASA
SHERWOOD  MAURIac THOMPSON  CARRIE TUCKER  CLARA MORGAN  H. C. PHILIPPI 
CARRIE TUCKER  IENORE WHITE  WILLENA BARNHART  CLARA MORGAN  H. C. PHILIPPI
 JEAN MARQUIS  ALICE SUNDQUIST  CLARA MORGAN  ELDEN BOND  H. C. PHILIPPI
President  Vice-President  Secretary-Treasurer  Student Representative 
Advisor  SECOND QUARTER President  Vice-President  Secretary-Treasurer 
Student Representative  .Advisor  THIRD QUARTER President  .VicePresident 
Secretary-Treasurer  Student Representative  Advisor  As one of the
snappiest  clubs of the school, the Philo group engages itself  in an
excellent mixture of both serious and social activities. Although primarily
 a literary society, it devotes much time to other worthwhile arts and
pastimes.  Ninety-six

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TOP ROW-Henry Turner, Grace Richardson, Jeanette Meigs, Dorothy Kelly,
Robert Wagner, Geraldine McKee, Ellsworth Lumley. THIRD ROW-Miss Priscilla
Kinsman, Fred Lagger, Elizabeth Gable, Bryan Buchanan, Bernard Chichester,
Leonard Rodland, Reinhold Oberlatz, Clifford Duncan. SECOND ROW- Olive 
Hardan, Evelyn Lysons, Mary Crosby, Daisy Brunt, Anna Mura, Naomi Smith,
Helen Lockhart. FIRST  ROW-Elsie McEwen, Myfawny Jones, Frances Notz,
Margaret Moore, Svea Zingmark, Agnes Johnson, Irene  Schagel, Martha
Stockdale, Mary McCush.  FIRSTHE IAN  FIRST QUARTER  IRENE SCHAGEL  BERTHA
BURKLAND  GRACE RICHARIUSON  ROBERT WAGNER  REGINALD MCKEE MISS PRISCILLA
KINSMAN  FRED LAGGER  IRENE ScH ACEL  GERALDINE MCKEE  MYFAWNY JONES 
LEONARD RODLAND  MISS PRISCILLA KINSMAN  REINHOLD OBERLATZ  MARGARET
EDWARDS  ELIZABETH GABLE  CLIFFORD DUNCAN  HENRY TURNER  MISS PRISCILLA
KINSMAN SECOND QUARTER  President  Vice-President  S Secretary  Treasurer 
Sergeant-at-Arms  SA .dvisor President  Vice-President  Secretary 
Treasurer  Sergeant-at-A rms  SA. d.visor  THIRD QUARTER President 
Vice-President  Secretary  Treasurer  Student Representative  dvisor  As
the name Thespian implies, this group is a drama club. The study of plays 
and of dramatists is taken up and often plays are staged for the benefit of
the club  members. The club presents one of these plays in the one assembly
which is given  over to its capable management annually.  Ninety-seven

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STANDING-Elsie McEwen, Ruby Persohn, Lenore McKinnis, Imogene Nelson,
Dorothy Peterson, Elizabeth  Brodt, Agnes Johnson, Virginia Bever, Cora May
Squire, Elsie Fralick, Vernet Wahlgren, Geraldine McKee,  Ellsworth Lumley,
Elizabeth Gable, Foster Kirk, Frances DeLong, Doris Thompson. SEATED-Grace 
Richardson, Edna Working, Adelaide Dale, Miss Maude Slawson, Vera Ginnette,
Louise  Kaufman, Lenore  White, Dorothy Brown, Garnet Caples.  MILI DiWELL
CLUE  VERA GINNETTE ADELAIDE DALE  HAZEL MOSSING  LENORE WHITE  MISS MAvDE
M. SLAWSON  VERA GINNETTE   ADELAIDE DALE  EDNA WORKING  LENORE WHITE  MISS
MAUDE M. SLAWSON  ADELAIDE DALE  ELIZABETH BRODT  EDNA WORKING  FOSTER KIRK
 MISS MAUDE M. SLAWSON  FALL QUARTER  President  Vice-President 
Secretary-Treasurer  Student Representative  Advisor  SECOND QUARTER 
President  Vice-President  Secretary-Treasurer  Student Representative 
Advisor  THIRD QUARTER  President  Vice-President  Secretary-Treasurer 
Student Representative  Advisor  Devoting itself to the study of music and
the creators of music, this organ-ization  carries on its pleasant labor of
nurturing the aesthetic.  Ninety-eight

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STANDING-Roy Arnett, Neil Miller, Jeanette Meigs, Reinhold Oberlatz, Helen
Stine, Elizabeth Gable, Frances DeLong, Fred Lagger, Frieda Massey, Bryan
Buchanan, Lyn Hughes, Harry Grimland, Ruth Hopkins,  Henry Durr, Alice
White, Warren Boynton, Daisy Brunt, Paul Howell, Elden Bond, Geraldine
McKee, Ells-worth  Lumley, Norman Burchette, Helen Sullivan, Ralph Huff.
SEATED-Bernard Chichester, Dorothy  McCool, Jeanette McGuire, Elvira
Lehtinen, Don Stickney, Peggy Edwards, Louise Stiger, Imogene Nelson,  Ann
Jordan, Foster Kirk.  DRAHA CLUI  DON STICKNEY  NORMAN BURCHETTE CATHERINE
MORSE  GERALDINE MCKEE  JEANETTE McGUIRE  VICTOR H. HOPPE  MISS LILLIAN H.
GEORGE  MISS FILLETTE C. MANY  President  Vice-President  Secretary 
Treasurer  Student Representative  .A.d.visor  .A.dv. isor  .Ad. visor 
"All the world's a stage and men and women merely players", might be taken 
as the keynote of this organization, which presents quarterly, under the
admirable  direction of Victor H. Hoppe, pictures of life's dramas:
sometimes gay comedy and sometimes deep tragedy.  Ninety-nine

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STANDING- Roy Sundstrom, Phyllis Westover, Selma Myhr, H. E. Fowler, Julia
Bouck, Marion Snyder, Bernard Chichester. SEATED-Vernon Vine, Lyn Hughes,
Vernon Zachrison, Florence Maris, Alice Endsley,  Rosa Ott.  SCIR[IIEf CLUI
 ALICE ENDSLEY  GEORGE SHERMAN  JULIA GRAY  H. E. FOWLER  LYN HUGHES  EDNA
WISE  FLORENCE MARIS  H. E. FOWLER  FIRST QUARTER SECOND AND THIRD QUARTER 
SP .resident  Vice-President  Secretary-Treasurer  SA .dvisor President 
Vice-President  Secretary-Treasurer  Advisor  This club was formed as an
inspiration to would- be writers. Manuscripts are  read and criticised. As
a side-issue of this primary aim, the study of various forms  of literature
is taken up, discussed and enjoyed.  One Hundred

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TOP ROW--Margaret Galley, Martha Latenen, Mrs. Margaret Freeborg, Irene
Dixon, Frieda Holzymeyer, Kathleen Reff, Irene Toikka, Esther Forsgren,
Arlene Johanson. FRONT ROW-Miriam Rosenberg, Dorothy   Person, Elsie
Fralick, Marion Burnworth, Mr. E. A. Bond, Violet Loo, Katherine Peterson. 
IDRE GOH CLUI  ELSIE FRALICK  MARION BURNWORTH  KATHLEEN PETERSON  DOROTHY
PERSON KATHLEEN PETERSON  E. A. BOND  ELSIE FRALIC  FRIEDA HOLZMEYER 
ESTHER FORSGREN VIOLET Loo  KATHLEEN PETERSON  E. A. BOND  WINTER QUARTER 
SPRING QUARTER  President   Vice-President  Secretary-Treasurer  Social
Chairman  Student Representative  .Ad. visor  President  V.i  c.
e-President  Secretary-Treasurer  Social Chairman  Student Representative 
A dvisor  The Oregon Club is a comparatively recent organization this year,
for it was  not organized until the winter quarter. It is  purely a social
organization, aiming to  promote the good fellowship of its members by the
many trips, hikes and other social  affairs sponsored by the group.  One
Hundred -One

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 102

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TOP ROW-Calvin Moser, Frank Gallanger, Amie Syre, Audrey Jensen, Nina
Barton, Earl Hemmi, Harry Grimlund, Cecil Anderson. THIRD ROW-Joel
Gudmundson, Nellie Barton, Iris Johnston, Violet Waech, Viola Poyhonen,
Iola Phillips, Edna Smith, Ardel Dagman, Elsie Rapier, Elton Korsboen,
Robert Waters. SECOND ROW-Eleanor Bosshard. Alice White, Marion Corner,
Rachel Locke, Edith Gunderson, Burton Adkinson, Ben Hamilton, Warren
Boynton. FIRST ROW-Rosa Van Ess, Maude Seward ,Dorothy McCool,   Evelyn
Taylor, Evelyn Randrup, Harry Hale, Harold Magelson, Martin Peterson,
Albert Brown, Milton Field.  VAHALIS LJRAGI  FIRST AND SECOND QUARTERS 
CALVIN MOSER President  EDNA WISE Vice-President  DOROTHY McCOOL .
Secretary  EVELYN TAYLOR . . . . . Treasurer  HAROLD MAGELSON
Sergeant-at-Arms  HARRY HALE Student Representative  Miss EMMA S. ERICKSON
. . . .  Advisor  MISS LEONA SUNDQIST . . . . . . Advisor  THIRD QUARTER 
BURTON ADKINSON  IOLA PHILLIPS  ELEANOR BOSSHARD  ALICE WHITE  HARRY
GRIMLUND  HARRY HALE  Miss EMMA S. ERICKSON  Miss LEONA SUNDQUIST 
President  Vice-President  Secretary  Treasurer  Sergeant-at- Arms  Student
Representative  Advisor  Advisor  Formerly under the name of Rural Life,
this organization devotes itself to  literary, social, and "out-of-door"
activities, enjoying talks, prepared papers, field  trips and purely social
affairs.  One Hundred Two

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STANDING-Golda Abel, Emma Howell, Solveig Pederson, Geraldine Warren,
Dorothy Ann Williams, Guy  Springsteel, Thomas Clark, Clarence Berkley,
Margaret Beaver, Frances Notz, Mamie Erickson. SEATED-Mr.  Pelagius
Williams, Thelma Borgen, Marjorie Leslie, Lyn Hughes, Naomi Chase, Clifford
Duncan, Clara Jones,  Elina Keltanen.  SOCIAL CIEHCLE CLUJ  CLIFFORD DUNCAN
 MARjORIE LESLIE  NAOMI CHASE  PELAGIUS WILLIAMS  President  Vice-President
 Secretary Treasurer  A dvisor  Social Science is the main topic of
discussion for this group.  interesting papers on this subject and often
entertains an outside  the weather permits, usually in the Spring, field
trips are taken in meetings.  It enjoys many  speaker. When  place of
regular  One Hundred Three

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 104

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TOP ROW-Edwin Benedict, Joel Gudmundson, Glen ROW-Robert Fairbanks, Henry
Turner, Harry Winsor. FIRST Fisher, HIenry Roberts, Virginia Bever, Frieda
Aase, Miss Nora B. Cummins, Viola Poyhonen,  Florence Maris. 
INTERNAGTIOHAL RELATIOHS CLUB  FIRST QUARTER  HARRY WINsOR   JOEL
GUDMUNDSON  CLARA WISE  CLARENCE WANAMIAKEII  NORA B. CUMMINS  HENRY TURNER
 HARRY WINSOR  VIOLA POYHONEN  CLARENCE WANAMAKER  JOEL GUDMUNDSON NORA B.
CUMMINS  HENRY TURNER  VIOLA POYHONEN  VIRGINIA BEVER  EDWIN BENEDICT GLEN
FAIRBANKS  NORA B. CUMMINS  President  Vice-President  Secretary  Treasurer
 Advisor SECOND QUARTER  President  Vice-President  Secretary  Treasurer 
Student Representative  ,4 dvisor THIRD QUARTER  President  Vice-President 
Secretary  Treasurer  Student Representative  Advisor  As a general
discussion group, the International Relations Club turns its  critical eyes
on the affairs of the world, its politics and daily events. Prepared 
papers, excerpts from current articles, and discussion enliven the
meetings.  One Hundred Four

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 105

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Rowena Farmer, Gladys Hanson, Christine Grimson Bernice Orwig, Mrs. Barbara
Dixon Ewell, Florence McKenzie, Vivian Herttua, Miss Belle Sperry.  LE
OWYRHTITA CLUEI  FIRST QUARTER  VEVA FORREY .  ROWENA FARMER  FLORENCE
MCKENZIE  MRS. BARBARA DIXON EWELL  SECOND QUARTER  HAZEL HANSON  ROWENA
FARMER .  FLORENCE MCKENZIE  MRS. BARBARA DIXON EWELL  MISS M. BELLE SPERRY
 THIRD QUARTER  HAZEL HANSON  ROWEN'A FARMER . FLORENCE McKENZIE  MRS.
BARBARA DIXON EWELL .  Miss M. BELLE SPERRY  President Secretary-Treasurer 
Student Representative  Advisor  President  Secretary-Treasurer  Student
Representative  Advisor  Advisor  President  Secretary-Treasurer  Student
Representative  Advisor .Advisor  To foster the art of story telling is the
aim of this group, which assumes the  pleasant and delighting task of
narrating simply and entertainingly to little  children the tales they love
to hear.  One Hundred Five

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 106

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STANDING-Ruth Butler, Evaline Cowan, Adeline Tardiff, Edna Working, Ruth
Seglem, Marion Wolcott, Marion Johnson, Dorothy Allen, Edith Nay, Gladys
Dranga, Lorene Van Cott, Arlene Johanson. SEATED- Miss  Mabel Zoe Wilson,
Miss Nora B. Cummins, Bertha Jones, Katherine Lawrence, Margaret Hill, Miss
 Mildred Moffatt.  ALI ISIAH CLUE  BERTHA JONES  KATHERINE LAWRENCE 
MARGARET HILL . MISS MILDRED MOFFAT  MISS MABEL ZOE WILSON  'rogram 
President  Secretary  Chairman Advisor  Advisor  One of Normal's oldest
literary clubs, this group is affiliated with the National  Federation  of
Women's Clubs and has as its purpose the furthering of fellowship  and
friendship of not only the members, but outside women as well. The name 
itself is typical of the standards of this society-the musical Indian name
which,  translated, stands for "In the near future."  One Hundred Six

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 107

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TOP ROW-Rowena Tarbox, Miss May Mead, Alma Weber, Nancy Quesenbery, Nina
Barton, Esther Anson.  THIRD ROW-Marie Craig, Lenora Johnson, Myrtle
Johnson, Solveig Pederson, Frieda Aase, Lillian Jacobson,  Myra Teets,
Grace Lytle. SECOND ROW-Miss Belle Sperry, Margaret Galley, Agnes Nicol,
Ethel Burton,  Constance Frieling, Florence McKenzie, Florence Sutherland,
Olga Stenvaag. FRONT ROW-Cora May Squire,  Arlene Johanson, Edith Miller,
Lillian Larson, Holly Tisdale, Miss Ruth Platt, Frances Ragge.  YOUNG
WOIMEH  CHRISI1ANI ASSOCIATION  FRIEDA AASE  MARGARET MCCOY  CORA MAY
SQUIRES  MIss RUTH E. PLATT  MISS MAY MEAD  MIss M. BELLE SPERRY President 
Vice-President  Secretary-Treasurer  Advisor  A dvisor  A. dvisor  As a
branch of the great national organization, this group performs its good 
work. Its members discuss affairs of the day,cultivate Bible Study classes,
entertain  weekly, worth-while speakers and aid in the furthering of many
good causes.  One Hundred Seven

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 108

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STANDING-Constance Wheeler, Phyllis Westover, Lenora Johnson, Miss Hilda
Rorene, Agnes Hose, Mildred Sanford, Selmhna Myhr. SEATED-Jean Woll, Rowena
Tarbox, Alma Weber, Lois Jeffers, Holly Tisdale, Katherine Lawrence.  CAMEP
FIRE GIRLS  Miss HILDA ROSENE  KATHERINE LAWRENCE MABEL STEINERINK  SELMA
MYHR  KATHERINE LAWRENCE  MISS HILDA ROSENE  KATHERINE LAWRENCE  Lois
JEFFERS  HOLLY TISDALE  ROWENA TARBOX  FIRST AND SECOND QUAR THIRD QUARTER 
Guardian  Assistant Guardian  President  Secretary-Treasurer  Student
Representative   Guardian  Assistant Guardian  President 
Secretary-Treasurer  Student Representative  It is really unnecessary to
give an explanation of this group, for the name,  Campfire, is a password
for all that is reflective of fine young womanhood.  One Hundred Eight

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 109

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TOP Margaret Carstairs, Ellen Carstairs, William Kelly, Agnes Hose, Edith
McLachlan, Johanna Rockstead,  Rowena Tarbox, Mabel Steinbrink, Florence
Kelly, Julia Bouck, Miss Orpha McPherson, Martha Van Hee.  SECOND-Ruth
Thompson, Martha Laitinen, Hilda Stroebel, Enola von Scheele, Henrietta
Lohman,  Mary Watkins. Constance Wheeler, Margaret Twiss, Anice Roland,
Esther Gustafson. FRONT-Julia Hoff,  Nina Barton, Florence Passig, Selma
Myhr, Lenora Johnson, Lenora Maack, Ruth Anderson, Frances Smith,  Iris
Morris, Frieda Miller.  AIHR I f6"4 CILP  BERTHA LARSON RUTH ANDERSON  EDTH
NAY  MIss ORPHA MCPHERSON  President  Vice-President  Secretary- Treasurer 
., Advisor  This club was organized to assist those taking up the rural
curriculum and interested in further study of the problems confronting the
rural teacher. The choice  of appropriate literature helps in forwarding
the aim of this group "by promoting  better interests for rural education."
 One  Hundred Nine

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 110

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TOP ROW--Vera Ginnette, Ruth Bradley, Martha Gesdahl, Grace Neely, Vernette
Wahlgren, Carrie Anna SECOND Tucker, ROW-Viola Searing, Maude Seward,
Lillian Ott, Alice Sundquist, Mamie Waters, Jean Williams,  Martha Van Hee,
Jean Marquis. FIRST ROW-Doroti:y McCool, Rosa Van Ess, Frieda Massey, 
Elsie Smith, Margaret Wyant, Rosa Ott, Edith Gorjup, Josephine Quackenbush,
Ethel Maxwell, Katherine Lawrence.  TOP ROW-Marguerite Biersner, Edith
Gunderson, Nellie Barton, Grace Clampett, Lillian Wendland, Lou Austin, 
Winifred Bowles. SECOND ROW-Agnes Nicol, Mildred Denny, Elsie Anderson,
Katherine Foster, Naomi  Chase, Alice Campbell, Irene Larson, Lillian
Larson, Genevieve Evatt,  Mary Fox. FIRST ROW-Ruth Atkins,  Virginia Bever,
Golda Abel, Beatrice Johnson, Arlene Johanson, Elina Keltanen, Rose Brooks,
Violet Graham,  Christine Grimson, Vivian Herttua.  WO LENW ATHLET IC  A
SOCIATION  FIRST QUARTER  (GIADYS GREEN President  JEAN WILLIAMS .Vice
President GRACE NEELY . . . . Secretary-Treasurer  VIOLA SEARIN . Assistant
Secretary  S Student Representative  SECOND AND THIRD QUARTER  JEAN
WILLIAMs President  GoLE, AEEL . . Vice- President  GRACE NEELY
Secretary-Treasurer  VIOLA SEARING . Assistant Secretary  S Student
Representative  Advisors for the whole year-Misses Adele M. Jones, Bertha
M. Keller, M. Theresa Peters,   and Beth Bowen.  This organization is to
the women of Normal what the W Club is to the men.  The membership of the
group is open to any woman desiring to live up to its  standards and to
conform to its laws. The objects of the W. A. A. are the promotion  of
women's sports and the development of fine, healthy young womanhood.  One
Hundred Ten

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 111

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TOP ROW-Harold Hawkings, Earl Hemmi, Stanley Thompson, Oscar Thorsen,
Clarence Wanamaker, Karl  Weber, Roy Arnett. SECOND ROW-Donovan Poorman,
Robert Fisher, Dean Edmundson, Charles Erickson,  Alvin Anderson, Arthur
Isaacson, Bernard Sullivan. Myer Thal. FIRST ROW-Don Stickney, Frank 
Gallanger, Wilfred Reeves, Elton Korsboen, Alfred McClurken, Harry Benson,
George Benson, Mr. Sam Carver.  "W"', 9INPIL LE  CLARENCE WANAMAKER  FRANK
GALLANGER  ELTON KORSEOEN DON STICKNEY  COACH SAM CARVER  President  SV
.ic.e-President  Secretary Treasurer  Student Representative  S Advisor 
The much sought after membership of this organization is limited to those
men   who have earned a Normal letter in some form of athletics. The object
is to promote  a higher type of athletics in the school and to develop a
spirit of competition and  clean sportsmanship.  One Hundred Eleven

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Victory is a glorious thing,  But better far--  " We've played the game."

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SOO Lf  K7ZN~~ZRTJE~I  0  00  0  L  01

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 115

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COACH SAM E. CARVER  Upon whose shoulders has rested the  responsibility of
selecting and training  men to represent the Bellingham Normal  in
athletics.  ASSISTANT COACH EARLE JEWEL  Who came  here from the University
 of Washington to assist Coach Carver.  One Hundred Fifteen

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 116

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FOCIALL SEASOD  October 8....Vikings 31......West Seattle 0  October
15..Vikings 6 - -Cheney 0 October 22..Vikings 7.. U. of W. Frosh 13 
October 29..Vikings 20........St. Martins 7  November 5..Vikings 6 .....- .
Ellensburg 12  November 12 Vikings7.... U. of W. Super  ........Varsity 6
Total............Vikings 77........ Opponents 38  STICKNEY  Four games won,
two games lost; seventy- seven  points scored as against thirty-eight
points  for its opponents-that is the record for the  Vikings Varsity grid
squad for the 1927 season.  The season may be considered a successful  one,
but not highly  successful, for the Tri-Nor-mal  championship went to
Ellensburg when the  SWildcats took the Homecoming game on Novem-ber  5, 12
to 6.  The second defeat was suffered when the U.  of W. Frosh ran off with
the long end of the  score on Denny Field in Seattle.  THOMPSON  Coach Sam
Carver and Assistant  Coach Earl Jewell sent out the initial  football call
for Monday, September 19th,  a week previous to the starting of school. 
Twenty men answered the first call, but  at the start of school, forty men
were out  in suits.  MOLYNEUX  One Hundred Sixteen

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 117

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Nine lettermen were in the lot, and around  these, the task of molding the
Viking football  team was centered. The prospects were sent  through a
gruelling grind, and it didn't take  long for the men to show the results
of training.  The daily work consisted in charging, setting  up exercises,
and tackling the dummy. The line  in particular looked strong, while the
molding  of a backfield combination seemed to be Coach  Sam Carver's
trouble.  VIKINGS 31--WEST SEATTLE  ATHLETIC CLUB 0  In the opening game of
 the season, Belling-ham  Normal ran rough shod over the West Seattle 
WEBER  Athletic Club, to the tune of 31 to 0. Only  two and one-half
minutes were required  by the Vikings to shove the pigskin over the goal
line.  HYDE  A blocked punt, recovered by Winnie Iverson,  husky Viking
guard, placed the ball on West  Seattle's 25 yard line. A pass, Weber" to
Thomp-son,  netted 20 yards, and from the five yard line,  Hawkings plunged
the ball over. Bill Wanamaker  figured. in on the next touchdown by
blocking a punt, and with a few plays, the ball was placed  on West
Seattle's 15 yard line. Another pass, Web-er  to Thompson, put the ball
across the goal. Twice  more, the Vikings scored. Armstrong broke lose
EDMUNDSON  One Hundred Seventeen

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for a long run which set everyone in a frenzy. It  was not only his pretty
foot work but also the  rythmic blocking of his team mates that
contribut-ed  toward the scoring of the touchdown. Only once  did West
Seattle threaten, and that was when  they passed up to the one yard line,
but here  the Vikings put up their characteristic fight and  held West
Seattle in practically the same place  for four successive downs. VIKINGS
6-CHENEY 0 AT CHENEY  For three successive periods, Bellingham and 
ARMSTRONG Cheney went scoreless, but a determined attack  on the part of
the Vikings in the final moments  of play defeated the Savages by a score
of 6 to 0.  Several times, the Vikings worked the ball up to  within
scoring distance, but seemed to lack the  necessary punch to put the ball
across. Captain  Harold Hawkings heaved a pass to Thompson,  REEVES  which
placed the ball on the 12 yard line. From  here, the forward wall opened up
and gave all it  had so that the necessary touchdown could be  gained.
Oscar Thorsen, Molyneux and Eddie  Hyde were the outstanding performers of
the  fray.  VIKINGS 7-U. of W. FROSH 13 at SEATTLE  Failure to cope with
the University Fresh-men's  aerial attack was the main cause for the 
Vikings loss of this game. The Vikings came  back in the fourth quarter
with an aerial attack  that swept the Frosh off their feet, with Erickson 
passing to Armstrong. No less than eight succes-sive  passes were
completed, which is a record  in itself. The ball was put across the goal
line, ERICKSON  One Hundred Eighteen

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and Hawkings drop-kicked for the extra point.  After this touchdown, the
Vikings went on with  the same kind of game, but it was too late, and the 
game ended with the score standing 13 to 7 in  favor of the Fresh. Occie
Thorsen played excep-tional  ball, stopping plays in their tracks and 
spilling interference at will.  VIKINGS 20-ST. MARTINS 7  ON WALDO FIELD  A
plunging, charging, Viking football team displayed the greatest offensive
power of the  seascn when they swept to a brilliant 20 to 7  victory over
the St. Martin's eleven, in a bone  crushing contest that afforded the
capacity gath-ering  of spectators many thrills. Coach Sam Car-ver's  pets
kicked over the proverbial dope bucket,  spilling its contents over the
sloppy gridiron, by  mudding, plunging and passing their way  through a
bewildered Lacey aggregation, for,  GALLENGER  three touchdowns and one
safety. After perform-ing  well, Molyneux, Weber and Erickson were  taken
from the fray with injuries. Cox played  a brilliant game at end, nabbing
several difficult  passes.  VIKINGS 6-ELLENSBURG 12  In this Ellensburg
clash, the game Carver  and his pets had been pointing towards all year, 
IVERSON  the outstanding play of Vick Peterson, Wildcat safety man, with
the end runs of "Tex" Robinson,  caused Bellingham's downfall, in the
second half.  In this fray, as in all other games, the Viking  line play
was outstanding. Bill Wanamaker was  a tower of strength on the forward
wall, playing  from the tackle position. The game that the Vik-ings  had
pointed towards was lost by a score of  12 to 6.  CHAMBERLAIN  One Hundred
Nineteen

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VIKINGS 7-U. of W. SUPER  VARSITY 6  A beautifully executed place kick by 
Leslie Cox gave the Vikings the one point  margin that was necessary to win
from the  University men. A blocked punt put the   ball on the Super's 21
yard line. Here  Hawkings passed to Armstrong, who wrig-gled  his way to
the five  yard line.  Cox  Another successful pass put the ball on the one 
yard line. Chuck Erickson took the ball across the  goal line. The U. of W.
gridders broke through on  one of Chuck Erickson's punts to block it. From 
the twelve yard line, they carried it across for their  lone touchdown. 
The following men received letters:  Stickney-Center  Chamberlain-Guard 
Hyde-Guard  POORMAN  Iverson-Guard  Wanamaker- Tackle  Poorman-Tackle 
Molyneux-Tackle  Thorsen-End  Anderson-End  Cox-End  BECHTEL  One Hundred
Twenty

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Football brought forth an ex-ceptional  display of interest dur-ing  the
entire season -and on  more than one occasion the crowd-ed  bleachers "went
wild" in en-thusiasm  over the struggling  Vikings. HAMILTON  Edmundson-End
 Erickson Back  Smith-Back  Weber-Back  Hawkings--Back  Thompson- Back 
Armstrong-Back  HAWKINGS  Not to be forgotten are the  games played during
"cold snaps" when a shivering, teeth-chattering  mob stayed in the
grandstand to  cheer the team to victory down to the last freezing whistle.
 SMITH  One Hundred Twenty-one

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THORSEN KEITH  WANAMAKER ANDERSON  One Hundred Twenty-two  DURR  LIIPL/-C/ 
r~c~r?

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In summarizing the basketball season of this last  year, the Viking
hoopsters, although not having as fine  a record as the year previous,
nevertheless enjoyed a  successful season, in comparison with the three
Normal  teams entered in outside ccmpetition. Playing fourteen  games, the
Normal Varsity captured five and dropped  the others by close margins.
While their record is not  impressive, the Vikings played good ball and
were im-proving  rapidly in the final tilts. Summarizing briefly,  the
following games were played: ISAACSON  NORMAL 30-HEATER  GLOVE 20  In the
opening tilt of  the season, the Bellingham Normal team dashed off to  an
early lead, and held it to  the finish when they beat the  fast Heater
Glove quintet to  a 30 to 20 score. Through-out  the contest both teams 
checked closely, displaying  fine floor work and defensive  play, but hard
luck at find-ing  the basket. Neither team  was able to locate the hoop
very consistently; as a re-sult  there was little out-standing  individual
playing.  The Seattle quintet rallied in the last half and was up  to
within three points of the  Normal total, but then the  Viking offense got
going  and piled up a comfortable  lead which was held for the  remainder
of the game. Earl  Keplinger was high point  man of the fray with a total 
of 12 points.  BENSON  NORMAL 25 U. OF W. FROSH 38 On the first road trip
of the season, the Vikings  dropped their first tilt to the Frosh, 38 to
25. The encounter started off with a bang, but before it had  gone far, the
Husky Babes were in the lead. With Rutherford and Twilliger leading the
offense, the year-lings  had little difficulty in maintaining a safe
advantage  all through the contest.  NORMAL 17-ST. MARTIN'S 25  In a
thrilling game, the second of the first road  trip, the Vikings dropped a
tough one to the Laceyites.  The St. Martin's quintet played a driving  and
smashing  game, charging through consistently for their goals.  Burger,
guard, was St. Martin's big threat, running  wild to score a total of 14
points alone.  THORSEN  One Hundred Twenty-three

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NORMAL 6-ELLENSBURG 17  In the first Tri-Normal game of the season, the
Vik-ings  dropped a hard fought contest, featured by a close  checking to
the Ellensburg Wildcats. Boasting a State  Scholastic Championship team,
they had a defense that  worked to perfection, it being very seldom that
the  Vikings came within scoring distance. During the open-ing  minutes of
play, the Normal boys just couldn't  hit the basket, while Ellensburg also
had a hard time  breaking through the Normal defense. Failure to score,  in
the opening minutes of play was the chief cause  for defeat.  ANDERSON 
NORMAL 29 Earl Keplinger, Viking for-  CHENEY 33 ward, and Benner,
elongated  pivot man for Cheney. Both  As the crack of the gun teams played
a fine brand  ended the fray and the smoke of basketball although the  of
battle cleared,  the final invaders were stronger in  score showed the
Cheney the scoring department and  Savages with a four point held a slight
edge in hand-lead  over the Bellingham ling the ball. The Vikings  Vikings
in their big Tri- displayed a good floor game  Normal tussle, which was and
showed the old fighting  played in the Whatcom gym, spirit, but went down
to a  the final score standing 33 slightly smoother aggrega-to  29. The
game was fea- tion.  tured by fine shooting by  ERICKSON  NORMAL
31-ELLENSBURG 42  This was the first of a series of games on a road  trip
through Eastern Washington and Idaho. Outscored  27 to  6 in the first
half, the Vikings came back strong  in the last half, revealing their old
fighting spirit by  a dazzling rally which completely overwhelmed their 
eastern rivals, but were unable to overcome the 21- point  lead piled up
the fatal first half.  NORMAL 26-YAKIMA 30  The brilliant work of "Zeke"
McClurken, sensa-tional  Viking forward, who was high point man with  16
markers, featured this tussle. Clarke and Benson  also displayed good ball
for the Normal quintet. Both  displayed good floor work, with an occasional
splurge  of fine offensive play.  JEWELL  One Hundred Twenty-four

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NORMAL 27-CHENEY 45  Cheney again emerged victorious over the Viking  hoop
quintet by decisively defeating the Bellingham  team 45 to 27. This was the
third loss suffered on the  Eastern road trip. Oscar Thorsen, Bellingham
center,  led his team in scoring honors, with 10 points to his  credit. 
NORMAL 32- IDAHO FROSH 24  Taking their only victory in the conquest of the
 Inland Empire, Coach Sam Carver's hoopsters downed  the Idaho Frosh in a
hard fought mix by a 32 to 24  scor2 in a game played at Moscow. The game
was  fast and hard fought with both teams playing a good  brand of ball.
Occie Thorsen ran wild through the  opposition to account for 17 of the
Viking tallies.  NORMAL 14  W. S. C. FROSH 36  Going down to their  worst
defeat of the trip  throughout Eastern Wash-ington,  the Normal Vikings 
fell before the aggressive  W. S. C. Frosh, by a score  of 36 to 14, in a
game that  was featured by spectacular  shooting and close checking  on the
part of the Pullman-ites.  The Vikings were "not  on" and could not get
going  as a unit, falling before a  faster and better groomed  bunch of
players. MCCLURKEN  NORMAL 22-  CLARKE  NORMAL 28  ST. MARTINS 19  Coming
back strong in  the last few minutes of the  final canto the Normal
Vik-ings  beat the Laceyite bas-keteers  from St. Martin's college 28 to 19
in a sensa-tional  game played on the  Whatcom floor. The St.  Martin's men
were unable   to cope with the unexpected  attack, which was staged in  the
final minutes of play.  -U. OF W. FROSH 32  This was one of the fastest
games of the season,  fast playing and team work featured by both sides,
with  the Frosh holding the edge, coming out on top with a  32 to 22
victory.  NORMAL 33-COLUMBIA U. 29  Coach Sam Carver's Blue and White
cagers broke  loose with a driving attack which sent the Columbia  lads
from the Webfoot state home with a 29 to 38  defeat hung around their
necks. The Vikings  displayed  a surprising offensive attack which centered
around  Thorsen, flashy center, who developed another one of  his complexes
with a sum total of 14 points. Working  as a team the locals fought on to a
decisive victory.  One Hundred Twenty-five  KEPLINGER

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TOP ROW- Bernard Sullivan, Robert Fisher, Karl Weber, Theo Norby. SECOND
ROW-Granville Thor- lakson,  Leslie Cox, George Lundberg. FIRST ROW- Elden
Bond.  J UIOTIR VAvRsTY  Boasting a veteran  team, the Jayvees ran rough
shod over all opposition and  ended the season with but one defeat symbolic
of the league leadership, was  Jayvees 44 Modern Woodman 27  Jayvees 40
Shell Oil 57 Jayvees 53 American Legion 27  Jayvees 41 Dist. 301 28 
Jayvees 56 P. S. P.   L. 29  Jayvees 40 Y. M. C. A. 25  Jayvees 60 Modern
Woodmen 21  Jayvees 76 Shell Oil 29  in fifteen games. The Class B Trophy, 
taken for the second successive year.  Jayvees  Jayvees  Jayvees  Jayvees 
Jayvees  Jayvees Jayvees  Amin. Legion  Dist. 801  P. S. P.   L.  Y. M. C.
A.  Ferndale Evergreen  Baker Lumber Fairhaven High  SUIPER VARSIQFJ L  The
Super Varsity performed in fourteen games and took ten, being  up in the
Class A division of the City League both halves. The only losses  by the
Supers during the season were handed them by the Y. M. C. A.  which won the
Class A title.  Super Varsity 46  Super Varsity 39  Super Varsity 53  Super
Varsity 51  Super Varsity 43  Roland Wreckers  Y. M. C. A.  Baker Lumber 
Roland Wreckers  Y. M. C. A.  Super Varsity 42 Y. M. C. A.  Super Varsity
54 Baker Lumber Super Varsity 52 Roland Wreckers  Super Varsity 27 Y. M. C.
A.  Super Varsity 53 Baker Lumber  One Hundred Twenty-six  runners-suffered
 quintet,

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TOP-Assistant Coach Earle Jewell, Ed Hunnicut, Dwinal Smith, Ed Bailey,
Wendell Iverson, Oscar Thorsen.  SECOND-Ed Wingard, Ray Odell, Ronald Jol
nson, Ted Clarke. FIRST-Walter Weber, Manley Parker,  Alfred McClurken. 
LANLLALL  The Viking baseball men have been performing nobly on the diamond
and  the way things look now, it seems that Bellingham Normal will be
represented  by a versatile ball club. The return to school of two of last
year's veterans,  Ray Odell and Eddie Wingard, second baseman and chucker
respectively, greatly  encouraged Earl Jewell, who is coaching baseball,
while Carver is looking after  his track duties. At the time of this
writing, the Viking diamond men have whitewashed several high school teams,
and if they click the old horsehide at  the present clip, they should have
no trouble in winning the Tri-Normal Cham-pionship.  Batteries for the
games will consist of "Bush" Smith, behind the plate, and  Eddie Wingard
and "Granny" Thorlakson, doing the hurling. Both these men  are dangerous
with the club and, while they are performing in the box, will  possibly
resume duties in other parts of the field. With Thorsen at first base, 
Odell at second, Zeke McClurken at short, and Pinky Parker at the hot
corner,  a fast infield combination will be worked up before the season is
over.  Parker  seems to be the weak spot at this time, but he is a hard
worker and should  have no trouble in overcoming his difficulties. 
Johnson, Clarke, and Bailey, all good wielders of the stick, will resume 
fly chasing responsibilities. Many other men are out working hard for
posi-tions  but at the present time, this seems to be the team that will
represent the  Normal on the 1928 diamond in the Tri-Normal games and other
tilts with minor  colleges of the state.  One Hundred Twenty-seven

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TOP--Alfred Standen, Earl Hemmi, Robert Cox, John Bright, Karl Weber,
Stanley Thompson, Ray Bright.  SECOND-Tom Marsden, Tinval Brinkman, Neil
Miller, Clarence Axelson, Wilfred Reeves, Elton Korsboen.  FIRST-Frank
Gallanger, Paul Howell, Foster Kirk, Charles Erickson, Roy Arnett, Ben
Hamilton.  TIRACL  Coach Sam Carver seems to be well pleased with his men
at this stage of  the season and chances to win the Tri-Normal meet seem
excellent. Both Ellens-burg  and Cheney are totally  unknown quantities so
far, but as Viking athletes  now are far superior to last year's
title-holders, the locals should walk off with  Tri-Normal honors. Although
weak in the high jump, broad jump, pole vault, and hurdles, Coach Carver's
1928 track team is unusually good in other events.  Five letter-winners of
former years are leading the pack of aspiring heroes,  which includes
numerous unknowns and young hopefuls.  Earl Hemmi, Bob Cox, and Ben
Hamilton, star sprinters, should give  Normal the strongest combination in
the short runs that it has had for years.  All three are exceptionally fast
men and have had much experience. Bill Reeves,  440 yard man is good but at
present his chief difficulty is getting into condition.  If he is able to
round himself into shape, he should be a sure point getter in  this year's
meet. Frank Gallanger, winner of the half-mile run last year is out  again,
and should win this year. Tinval Brinkman, who hails from Ferndale,  looks
at this time to be the best man in the distances, with Ray Jewell running 
a close second.  Roy Arnett, last year's best discus hurler in the
Tri-Normal meet, will have to step on it to take first in this event this
year as he will now be in  faster company. Oscar Thorsen is out throwing
the plate around, and at the  rate he is progressing should win a place in
the Tri-Normal meet. Ray Jewell  is the best in the shot. "Chuck" Erickson,
winner of last year's javelin throw  at the State High School meet, should
have no difficulty in that event and  should take first place in the Tri-
Normal meet with ease.  The big meet of the year is at Ellensburg, where
the three Normal Schools  will vie with each other for Tri-Normal
supremacy, Cheney, Ellensburg and  Bellingham competing.  One Hundred
Twenty-eight

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With two veterans back and much untested material out for the Normal 
tennis team, strength at first and second place is assured but the strength
of  the Viking third will be doubtful, considering the performance of those
out for  the third post. Fisher and Thal, both dependable portsiders, are
back to earn  their letters again this year. Among those out for third
place, Hamilton and  Bond seem to be the best racquet wielders.  Bob
Fisher, lanky lefthander, who was second man on last year's varsity  squad,
probably will be first man this year. Fisher relies on a consistent
driv-ing  game to keep him to the fore. As a rule he plays a back court
game, occasion-ally  resorting to a net game, his height and reach aiding
him considerably. He  has a strong service, which will play havoc with his
opponents this year. His  reverse service is death on right handers, and it
is almost impossible to drive.  Myer Thal is also a left-hander and unless
something radical happens, he  should be second man without any fight
whatever. His strength lies particularly  in the driving game throughout,
as he is consistently strong on the backhand.  Third place will have to be
fought out, but at the present time, the two  logical contenders for it are
Hamilton and  Bond, with Bond having a slight  edge. If Elden Bond is on,
you might almost say that he could beat the world,  but the trouble is-that
he is seldom on. Bond resorts wholly to a smashing  game, while. Hamilton
lies back, plays steady, and hopes to gain by his oppo-nent's  mistakes or
errors.  This year's tennis team will travel to Ellensburg to take part in
the Tri-  Normal Tennis meet, and there they will have a record to uphold.
Bellingham  Normal has not lost a single match in the years of Tri-Normal
competition. Coach Sam Carver may make arrangements with the U. of W. Frosh
and minor  colleges of the state. Hamilton Church, Myer Thal, Robert
Fisher, Elden Bond, Oren Tarbox  One Hundred Twenty-nine

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KELLER BOWEN GEORGE PETERS  W©IMIE ATHLETII ICS  "To foster good
citizenship and to provide recognition for athletic ability;  To foster
college spirit by developing  intra-mural and inter-class athletics  for
all women, and  To promote high physical efficiency  among women."  "A
sport for every girl and a girl for every sport," is the aim of the Women's
 Athletic Association in this school. The Department  of Physical Education
for  Women plans to have every girl who turns out for a sport, a member of
an intra-mural  team.  Classes select girls who are to represent them on
the inter-class teams. "All-  Star" teams of the school are picked by the
coaches and the athletic managers. Once  a quarter a Sports' Banquet is
held. The Board of Control awards sweaters to those  girls making eight
first teams and gives to them sports letters. Girls' athletics during  the
year 1927 and 1928 have been coached to a finer degree  than in former
years.  Miss Beth Bowen and Miss Bertha Keller have together supervised the
All-Season  sports, while Miss Theresa Peters has charge of the Festival
Dancing. Miss  George has charge of hiking.  An outline of the sports
offered to the women in this school during this year,  is as follows:  Fall
Quarter  HOCKEY SOCCER VOLLEY BALL HIKING  Winter Quarter  BASKETBALL
VOLLEY BALL SWIMMING HIKING  Spring Quarter  SWIMMING ARCHERY BASEBALL
TRACK TENNIS  RING TENNIS  HAND BALL RIDING QUOITS  NATURAL DANCING HIKING 
-One Hundred Thirty

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SOPHOMORE TEAM  Dorothy McCool, Katherine Lawrence, Viola Searing, Anna
Hicklin, Edith Gunderson, Mary Fox, Grace  Neely, Nellie Barton, Jean
Williams.  s0iC6ER11 {  Soccer held an important place in sports this year.
Since its introduction into  Women's Athletics in the fall of 1926 by Miss
Bertha Keller, it has become one of  the major sports. After weeks of
preliminary practise in dribbling, kicking and  blocking, intra-mural teams
were chosen. Each girl made an intra-mural. Then followed the inter-class
practise, and games between the freshmen and sophomores.  FRESHMAN TEAM  
Virginia Bever, Rosa Van Ess, Frieda Massey, Lempi Koli, Genevieve Evatt,
Helen Neilson, Elina Keltanen,  Lillian Wendland, Grace Clampett, Ruth
Bradley.  Keen interest followed this sport all during the quarter. The
sophomores tried  to down the freshmen in order to annex a championship,
but the freshmen had too  fast and accurate a team; so the soccer season
ended with a tie, neither team winning.  However, the players who excelled
in skill, sportsmanship and fine spirit were  elected for the "All-Star"
honor team. Miss Keller coached.  One Hundred Thirty-one

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FRESHMAN TEAM  Irene Larson, Margaret Wyant, Elizabeth Carl, Helen Neilson,
Jennie Soboliski, Lempi Koli, Rosa Ott,  Katherine Foster, Naomi Chase,
Jean Marquis, Virginia Bever, Lillian Wendland, Grace Clampett.  HOCKL 
Hockey, since its introduction into girls' athletics by Miss Kathleen
Skalley  in 1925, has become one of the most popular and successful sports
of the year. This  is one of the most difficult games for a team to play,
as it requires cooperation, a  quick eye, and a ready stick. Good
sportsmanship was ever present this year.  Maude Seward, Golda Abel,
Lillian  SOPHOMORE TEAM Ott, Mary Fox, Martha Gesdahl, Edith Gunderson, 
Nellie Barton.  After a number of practises, teams were chosen. The
sophomores not being  able to down the freshmen in soccer thought they
might gain the coveted champion-ship  for hockey, but it was of no avail.
The freshmen tied the sophomores. So again we had a sport season ending
with a tie. An "All-Star" honor team was  selected in Hockey. Miss Beth
Bowen coached this sport.  One Hundred Thirty-two  Grace Neely,

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FRESHMAN TEAM  Beatrice Johnson, Dorothy Sollie, Alice Sundquist, Jean
Marquis, Arlene Johanson, Margaret Wyant,  Genevieve Evatt, Rosa Van Ess,
Lou Austin, Frieda Massey, Ethel Maxwell, Elina Keltanen, Josephine 
Quackenbush.  VOLLE AI ALL  Volley Ball is often said to be the best sport
for girls. In this game many may  play; each one has a responsible part and
must keep a keen and alert mind. Team  work and cooperation on the part of
every member is a requisite for success.  As in other sports, intra-mural
and inter-class games were played. A great  deal of enthusiasm and keen
spirit were shown in the class games between the Sopho-  Violet Graham,
Katherine Lawrence,  SOPHOMORE TEAM  Jean Williams, Olga Stenvaag, Martha
Gesdahl, Edith Gunderson  mores and the freshmen. But- the freshmen proved
"you can't keep a good man  down" by winning the championship. An
"All-Star" honor team was picked by  the Physical Education Faculty, and
Manager. This team was composed of both  sophomores and freshmen girls.
Miss Beth Bowen and Miss Bertha Keller coached  this game. One Hundred
Thirty-three

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SOPHOMORE TEAM  Violet Graham, Katherine Lawrence, Mary Fox, Anna Hicklin,
Claire Beckwith, Anna Mura, Grace Neely,  Catherine Otin, Jean Williams. 
Basketball has always been a major sport in this school. It was enjoyed by
a  large number of girls who turned out in the winter quarter. Competition
was keen  betweeen teams and enthusiasm was at its height because every
girl was on an  intra-mural team, thus making every one interested in the
sport. The class teams  were elected by the girls, and the championship
games were played off, with a  victory to the sophomores. Grace Neely had
the best record  at basket shooting  The freshmen were out-played in all
departments of the game but tried stubbornly  to score.  FRESHMAN TEAM 
Rosa Ott, Beatrice Johnson, Alice Sundquist, Lillian Wendland, Jeanette
Mackie, Dorothy Sollie, Katherine  Foster, Elina Keltanen, Arlene Johanson,
Josephine Quackenbush. With hiking for women students now an all-year
sport, the Women's Athletic  Association is planning to give girls
opportunities to enjoy the out-of-doors. Some  trips are taken to nearby
islands, lakes, and small mountains. Other longer trips  are taken to
Kulshan Cabin, and the Mount Baker region. Miss George is sponsor  of all
hikes.  One Hundred Thirty-four

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STANDING-Elizabeth Gable, Madeline Bosshard, Maude Seward, Bernice Johnson,
Harriet Dickens, Marjorie  McDougal, Lillian Larson, Mary Fox, Genevieve
Evatt, Martha Gesdahl, Anna Hicklin, Edith Gunderson,  Frances Coshow,
Alice Oakley. KNEELING-Margaret Perry, Helen Britton, Virginia Bever, Jean
Williams,  Grace Clampett, Virginia Adams, Agnes Barton, Christine
Lindgren, Elina Keltanen, Dorothy Sollie, Olga  Stenvaag, Violet Graham,
Lois Brown, Rose Brooks, Betty Coshow.  ITRACK  Track  is a sport which
gives every girl a chance to show any special skills that  she has
developed in throwing, running and jumping.  A class track meet is held on
Field Day, on which day competition is always  keen between the sophomores
and freshmen. Both classes have individuals who  excel in hurdles, broad
and high jumping and discus throwing. The relay is often  the deciding
event.  STANDING-Rosa Ott, Lou Austin, Grace Clampett, Lillian Wendland,
Alice Sundquist, Edith Gunderson,  Marie Wold, Virginia Bever, Violet
Graham, Olga Stenvaag, Helen Neilson, Doris Brown, Arlene Johanson, 
Florence Horswell, Rose Brooks, Ingaborg Olsen. SEATED-Genevieve Evatt,
Dorothy Sollie, Elina Keltanen,  Martha Van Hee, Helen Helland, Jeanette
Mackie, Katherine Lawrence, Jean Williams, Anna Hicklin, Martha Gesdahl,
Beatrice Johnson.  ]ASLBALL  Baseball with its many fans proved a thrilling
sport for the large number of  girls turning out. Intra-murals are picked
and are seen on the diamond at Waldo  Field. Class teams are selected and
they are practicing prior to the championship  games. The sophomores seem
to have the upper hand but the freshmen are going  to "turn the tables" and
get a victory from the "age old sophomores."  One Hundred Thirty-five

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ALL-STAR TEAM  Irene Larson, Vera Ginnette, Rose Brooks, Beth Coglan,
Aileen Arland, Martha Gesdahl, Evaline Cowan.  SWIMMING  Swimming, that
"splashing sport" which affords joy and pleasure to so many  girls here,
was more popular this year than last, due to the coaches, Miss Bowen,  and
Miss  Sullivan, who took Miss Bowen's place during the spring quarter. On 
March 9, 1928, at the Y. W. C. A. pool, the sophomores and freshmen had a 
"Water Carnival," in which the two teams contested for first place in
plunge for  distance, relay, speed and form in stroke, diving and
retrieving relay. The sopho-mores   proved victorious and annexed the
championship.  STANDING-Jakobina Vik, Irene Larson, Katherine Cole, Mildred
Botta, Katherine Lawrence, Agnes Nellie Barton, Nicol, Rosa Van Ess, Vera
Ginnette, Marie Wold, Margaret Perry, Helen Stine. SEATED-Lou  Austin,
Daisy Acl er, Iola Mandell, Alena Bever, Frances Finnegan, Lillian
Wendland, Harriet McDonald,  Dorothy Brown, Elsie Rapier, Martha Ylonen,
Helen Smith, Helen Helland, Naomi Chase, Jean Marquis, Ethel  McClellan,
Edith Faulkner, Lyn Hughes, Katherine Korthauer, Violet Waech.  A RCHERY 
"I sent an arrow into the air. It fell to earth, I know not where!" This 
statement is quite true-according to the girls turning out for archery. It
is a  thrilling and exciting sport. Since the introduction of archery in
1927, it has  become enormously popular. Keen eyes and accuracy are the
prerequisites to skill.  Archery is great fun for all turning out.  One
Hundred Thirty- six

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Vera Ginnette, Thelma Borgen, Lyn Hughes, Naomi Chase, Jean Marquis, Mary
Fox, Arlene Johanson, Doris  Brown, Elsie Rapier, Gertrude Oien, Beatrice
Johnson, Irene Larson, Mary Nielolson.  Was tennis a popular and a very
much enjoyed sport at school this year?  What a question! But it may be
answered easily if one will think of all the girls  turning out at seven in
the morning. This year tennis has really embarked on  a major sport basis.
Instruction for the squad at regular practice times on Tuesdays  and
Thursdays added interest to the season. Class competition in singles,
doubles  and mixed doubles made Field Day a real finale for tennis.  Esther
Forsgren, Florence McKenzie, Lorna Weber, Evelyn Heidenstrom, Billie Howe,
Dorothy McCool,  Zylpha Thurston, Frances Mullen, Lenore White, Adelma
Peterson.  NHATURIAL DANHCING  A new activity which is offered on the
campus is that of Natural Dancing, in  which those interested interpret
music through the art of dancing. A dance recital  is one of their aims.
This school is very fortunate in having Miss Peters to coach  dancing. 
RIIDING AND HANDI ALL  Riding and Handball were two activities, which were
enjoyed by a large  number of girls. Riding proved very popular to the
enthusiastic group of girls  who signed up with Miss Keller early in the
spring quarter. Riding, besides being  an enjoyed recreation, is also a
healthful activity. Handball artists met with   Miss Keller on Waldo Field
and many thrilling afternoons were spent in playing  this much enjoyed
sport.  One Hundred Thirty-seven

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Out of the frying-pan  Into the fire of our laughter  Come the scraps of
conversation  From our pleasure table.

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [139]

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F E B9 S  0  00000  LC:5)

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 141

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Witness ye the original baby-talk lady.  Witness ye the blackened opticals
and hair lines.  Perceive ye the effects of "Blondex", "Golden Glint", 1 
"Hennafoam".  Note ye the sharp, elongated appendages to ye  footwear. 
Hear ye the, "Pwease, big daddy, ah'd love to see the moon."  "One Born
Every Minute."  Pipe  ye the ever-present collegiate female.  View ye the
growing out bob and accompanying bobbypins. Witness ye the original
feminine waist-line tightly girdled.  Observe ye the flapjack shaped
article resting lightly upon  the cerebrum.  Hear ye the "My dear, what a
marvelous moon!"  "Four Out Of Every Five." Note ye the independent
athletic woman.  View ye the ears and the forehead healthily exposed. 
Perceive  ye her flat but firm understanding.  Witness ye the masculine
neckline.  Hear ye the, "What a keen moon  for an all-night trip !"  "No
Other Like It."  One Hundred Forty-one

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A "Weekly Mess" reporter set-ting  out to interview the prom-inent  tries
to stop notables. War-ren Boynton and "Beck" Bechtel  tell the women a few
things.  "Pop" Gwin and Andy talk it over, while the lower  right hand
corner shows the strong support our coaches  are getting.  -One Hundred
Forty-two

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When a fellow is lonesome he hunts up a 'girl  (lower right.)  When a
fellow falls, he goes walking  When he's broke he joins the sweeper's gang 
And when he falls out, he hangs out at "Harry's."  One Hundred Forty-three

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A tug of war proves a delightful diver-sion  after the morning struggle
with the  ash heap.  Hot dogs on the steps of Edens Hall  And the unshaven
history prof receiving his  morning camp coffee  May be laid to those forms
of dementia  Campus Day and overnight hikes.  One Hundred Forty-four

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Playing the mountain goat act.  Kulshan Cabin-a tradition, a
never-to-be-forgot-ten  spot  The nicest place in the world after a 10 mile
foot  jaunt to its door.  One Hundred Forty-f ve

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4s  College education fits one for a  position but ruins one for a job. "J 
o/  0  aGfi  ti  ~~'Czs e  C3 ) 05 (4e~  ' O~  1 SLd  ti 0 ~,. \.e  Ct o 
Ct  Ct~- E  4 6  a  ~~ ' r0  pr  Tv-.  0= 6  t5, O  o  ? ~  "A lite, a
lite", shouted Columbus,  inserting his new Ever-ready battery  and
twisting his Christmas tie.  One IHndred Forty-six  N  0 C'  4s  -o 0  ,0 
-I-PJ2  E~ j  0 l+  0d  e4  Ids,

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Apeo  C -Ph jt or  Thei way 'a to ao Nomlgr' °er'sd hot .  thrui
her Him Book. Q  yo rorI  ,blyIvornal~s aJest. h  S lev d. e ht   bie  v0a1
C 0\ 0 lo Qoo1uality, not quantity. Apply Wil- ~ lie Reeves.  0 sc0  4$  , 
cs o  0-"N 40 bo  1C ti , gt; 0 4. '  C0  One Hundred Fort a-seven

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You've heard of boat-trips? Two  enthusiastic supporters, lower left  hand
corner.  "Normal Students not normal"-when they  don bells or sailor suits
for the soph drag, flip  hash at the Dorm--or Randy and Jimmy-cen-ter 
struggle-any time.  One Hundred Forty-eight

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Famous Last Pictures  "Sparky" and "Doc"  Bringing up the  younger
generation.  A Normal girl will hike for miles and  even climb a tree to
"get her man."  The poor boy in the lower right was  overtaken by two,
while one of those "it"  girls, above, has an oversupply.  One Hundred
Forty-nine

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By the end of the first quarter the  freshman has discovered the hoard of 
future presidents and movie stars passing  in and out of our side doors. 
The student's youthful vagaries are always  lost under a strange and
serious demeanor  when student teaching looms in the foreground.  The
training-school is the  test ultimate for the  would-be teacher of the
youngest generation.  One Hundred Fifty

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Dangerous days!  The training school  and snow!  The youngster with the
glasses and serious  expression  wants to grow up and be editor  of the
Messenger-while even the office force  cram the window for a glimpse of the
vaude-villian  activities of "Willie" and "Beck."  One Hundred Fifty-one

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 152

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Inscription on an atheist's tombstone: "All dressed up and nowhere to go." 
Her-"Do you like conceited men best, or the other kind?"  She-"What other
kind ?"  "Goody, goody !" remarked the upturned tack at the approach of the
Normal  student. "I'll be in a teacher's shoes yet."  Things that Never
Catch Up-  The back wheels  Yesterday  Parents  Neglected notebooks. 
Wonder if the "suit that changed bathing to swimming," has any effect  on
the P. E. 23 classes?  "What is that pasteboard you have?" asked the Normal
girl.  "That's a pawn ticket," I said.  "Why didn't you get two so we could
both go?"  I fainted. Visitor-"What are those two statues of runners on the
athletic field?"  "Those aren't statues. You see Hollinbaugh and Duncan
running the mile."  I eat my peas with honey,  I've done it all my life, 
It makes the peas taste funny,  But they always stay on my knife!  "Say,
Bill," remarks my friend to me one brite glorious morning, displaying  a
most unhappy countenance, "I had a dream last nite. Well, you know what  
dreams mean, and you know what dreamin' about NAMES means! So, according 
to the lady in assembly, I'm making all preparations for a trip to the
insane house."  And these are the poor fellow's very  words. He said to me
like this: "Say,  it sure was RICH. I was riding along peacefully in my
KIBBE KAR, when  who should I bump into but that dere teacher who flunked
me last quarter. Of  course I wasn't out to  HUNT trouble, but thinking of
that flunk sure made me  mad and I' wanted to KELLER rite then and there. 
She sure wasn't what you'd  call a SUNDQUIST beauty, Bill, so can you blame
me? I began to think of the  MANY effective ways to FOWLER. Ah, thot I, I
will CARVER! But just as I  was about to TREAT her thusly, fourteen
policemen grabbed me, one of them  remarking to another, "I'll FISHER out
of the way of this demon." Then said  he to me, "EWELL come with me!" So
what was a poor man to do, Bill? Say,  it was awful. There I was in the
COLE jail with nothing to eat but RICE, and  none of my friends would put
up BOND for me. Ain't dreams terrible, Bill?"  said he to me.  And I was
inclined to agree.  One Hundred Fifty-two

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I ELLINGHAI  Hopes the departing students  will carry away happy mem-ories 
of the days at Belling-ham   Normal; that they have  profited by the
splendid ed-ucational  facilities of this  inStitution; that the training 
here received has laid the  foundation for useful and  happy lives, and 
wishes them  Good Luck and Goodby  UNION PeLHT FING COt ,  Printers of High
Class Publications  One Hundred Fifty-three  - ~lllc -- - -- - -

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 154

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J1 Etr, INc.  'Photographers  'IIO*GIDIRAIPHS  ]I[VE LFlD1RIA2LR9SiK  One
Hundred Fifty-four  __ ~

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 155

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THE BETTER YEARBOOKS OF THE NORTHWEST  show the fine artistry and
craftsmanship of the,  ' estern Cngraving   Colortype Company.  Schools
that demand the best, year after year  know that " 'Western Service "
insures a.  Better cAnnual. Secure the help of experts for  your next book
by writing us  at once.  WESTERN ENGRAVING   COLORTYPE CO.  2030
'ifthcAvenue. Seattle,'Washington.  One Hundred Fifty-five  __ ___ _ ___

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 156

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AUlGEAH-One  Hundred Fifty-six

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AUTOGRAPHS  One Hundred Fifty-seven

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~4UT1GEAIHS  One Hundred Fifty-eight

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page 159

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AUTUOGRIA HI8  One Hundred Fifty-nine

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     Klipsun, 1928 - Page [3] of cover

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-,  ... .. . ;.  .  . _ ,_  . _ .  ~. .: _.  ;;:''  :.  -  ..  _  . -  . , 
.. ' -  :.  ..  .,  .-  . :_  .,  ._ x

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