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1929

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     Klipsun, 1929


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     Klipsun, 1929 - Cover


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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page [2] of cover


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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page [1]


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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page [2]

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r Ii  THE  KLIPSUN  3  y

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page [4]

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ON PUGET SOUND

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KLIPSUN  Published by the  ASSOCIATED STUDENT BODY  WASHINGTON STATE NORMAL
SCHOOL  BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON  C 4

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Foreword  he school year is heavy  with responsibilities and  resplendent
with accom-plishments,  each accompanied  by sorrows and joy. This vol-ume 
embodies an attempt to  interpret a chapter of school life; to picture
things as they  were in nineteen twenty-eight  and nineteen twenty-nine.

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PRESIDENT C. H. FISHER

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Dedication  11 the bright successes  and darker shortcom-ings  of present
students  may seem to future students  but idle play. Today's students 
here offer a challenge to the  class assembled twenty-five years hence to
surpass the  achievement of today. To  that class of 1954 we respect-fully 
dedicate this yearbook.

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CONTENTS  ADMINISTRATION  CLASSES  STUDENT ORGANIZATION  TRAINING SCHOOL 
SCHOOL LIFE  ATHLETICS  SOCIETY

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page [9]

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,,  s

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*

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Far above the bay's blue waters stands our  own Sehome,  Guarded all around
by mountains, crowned by Baker's dome.  Nestling there among the grandeur,
reign the  White and Blue,  Colors of our Alma Mater, Hail, all Hail  to
you.  JAMES BEVER ADELE JONES  Dean of School Dean of Women  W. J. MARQUIS 
Dean of Men

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Barker, Edna T.  Public School Music  B. M. University of  Washington 
Bever, James  Dean, Social Science  B. Ped., A. B., A. M.,  Drake
University; Un-iversity  of Washing-ton;  University of  Chicago Breakey,
Hazel  Art  School of Arts and  Crafts, Berkeley, Cal.;  Bellingham State
Nor-mal  School Crosgrave, Pearl  Training Teacher, Third  Grade  B. S., A.
M., Teachers  College, Columbia Un-iversity; Indiana Un-iversity; 
University  of Minn.; State Nor-mal  School, Terre  Haute, Indiana 
Crawford, Bertha E.  Training Teacher,  Eighth Grade  University of
Washing-ton;  Bellingham State  Normal School Dawson, Marjorie E.  Primary
Supervisor in  City Schools  B. S., A. M. Teachers  College, Columbia Un-
iversity;  State Nor-mal  School, Newark,  N. J.  Beiswenger, Anna J. 
Teacher of Technique  Ph. B., University of  Chicago; A.M. Teach-ers 
College, Columbia  University  Bissell, Lyman D.  Printing  M. P., United
Typothe-tae  of America  Carver, Sanford E.  Physical Education  University
of California;  Stanford  University;  Bellingham State Nor-mal  School 
Countryman, Linda  Home Economics  B. S. Milwaukee- Downer  College; A. M.
Teach-ers  College Columbia  University  Cummins, Nora B.  Social Science 
A. B., Minn. State Uni-versity;  A. M., Colum-bia  University; North-ern 
Normal and In-dustrial  School, Aber- deen,  S. D.  Dozier, Helen Stone 
Physical Education  A. B. Mills College  Twelve

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Druse, Marie Carey  Art  Boston School of Draw-ing;  Museum of Fine  Arts,
Boston; Eric  Pape School of Art,  Boston; Harvard Uni-versity;  State
Teach-ers  College, Winona,  Minnesota  Evans, Cecile Librarian of
Children's  Literature  A. B. Drake University;  A. M., Teachers Col-lege, 
Columbia Uni-versity   Gragg, Georgie P.  Penmanship  Bellingham State
Nor-mal  School; A.N. Pal-mer  School of Pen- manship  Hoppe, V. H.  Speech
 A. B., Denison Univer-sity;  A. M., Northwes-tern  University; Cur-ry
School of Expres-sion;  University of  Chicago  Hunt, Thomas F.  Geography 
A. B., University of  Minn.; A. M., Clark  University; Univer-sity  of
Chicago; Uni-versity  of California  Erickson, Emma S.  Teacher of
Technique  B. S., A. M., University  of Minnesota; State  Teachers College
of  Moorhead, Minn.  Fowler, H. E.  English  A. B. Princeton Univer-sity; 
University of  Washington; State  Normal School, Mans-field,  Pennsylvania 
Gunther, Theresa C.  Industrial Arts  B. S., A. M. Teachers  College,
Columbia Uni-versity;   State Normal  School, Montclair, N. J.  Hopper,
Elizabeth M.  Appointment Secretary  A. B., Smith College; A.  M.,
University of Cal-ifornia  Johnson, Florence E.  Hygiene  B. S., University
of  Washington;  A. M.,  Mills College  Jones, Adele M.  Dean of Women  B.
S., Teachers College, Kangley, Lucy Columbia University English  A. B., A.
M., University  of Washington  Thirteen

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Keeler, Delia L.  Education  S. S., Salina Normal Un-iversity;  A. B.,
Wash.  State College; A. M., Teachers College,  Columbia University; 
University of Wash.;  University of Minn.  Kinsman, Priscilla M. Training
Teacher, Pre-primary  Ph. B., University of  Chicago  Learnard, Polly Dee 
Secretary to the Presi- dent  A. B., Stanford Univer-sity  Lovegren,Mrs.
May G.  Typewriting  Vashon College; Wash-ington State College  McPherson,
Orpha  Supervisor of Teaching  in Rural Schools  Ph. B., University of Chi-
cago;  A. M., Teach-ers  College, Columbia  University  Marquis, W. J. 
Education, Dean of Men  A. B., A. M., University  of Washington; State 
Teachers College, St.  Cloud, Minn.  Kibbe, L. A.  Education  B. S.,
McMinnville Col-lege;  A. B., A. M., Un-iversity  of Washing-ton;  A. M.,
Columbia  University; Belling- ham  State Normal  School.  Kolstad, Arthur 
Research and Education  A. B., A. M., University  of Washington; Stan-ford 
University  Longley, Gertrude  Home Economics  B. S., Teachers College,
Columbia University;  Chicago University  McDonough, Otto G.  Mathematics 
A. B., A. M., University  of Washington  Madden, Alma  Speech  A. B.,
Earlham College,  graduate of Marden  School of Elocution; University of
Illinois;  University of Iowa  Mead, May  School Nurse  R. N., Northwestern
 Sanitarium, Pt. Town-send,  Wash.; Univer-sity  of Wash.  Fourteen

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Merchant, Jessie  Training Teacher, Sev-enth  Grade  A. B., University of 
Washington  Miller, Irving E. Education  A. B., University cf  Rochester;
A. M., Ph.  D., University of Chi-cago  Moore, Grace  Public School Music 
A. B., Washington State  College; A. M., Teach-ers  College, Columbia 
University; graduate  student, University of  Washington; Lewis-ton  State
Normal  School  Philippi, H. C.  Science B. S., A. M., University  of
Missouri; Univer-sity  of Washington;  State Teachers Col-lege, 
Warrensburg,  Missouri.  Plympton, Hazel J.  Art  Ph. B., University of 
Chicago; Reed Col-lege,  Portland, Ore-gon;  Art  Museum,  Portland, Ore.;
Sum-mer  School with Wal-ter  W. Dow.  Rice, W. J.  Penmanship  A. B., B.
S., Central Nor-mal  College, Danville,  Indiana; University  of
Washington, Gregg  School, Chicago Merriman, Pearl  Training Teacher, 
Fourth Grade  A. B., A. M., State  Teachers College,  Greeley, Colorado 
Moffatt, Mildred  Training Teacher, Sec-ond  Grade  University of Chicago 
Osborn, Eleanor Training Teacher, Fifth  Grade  B. S., Teachers College, 
Columbia University  Platt, Ruth E.  Science  B. S., M. S., University  of
Washington  Pragst, Augusta  Teacher of Technique  A. B., A. M., State
Teach- ers  College, Greeley,  Colorado; Teachers  College, Columbia
Un-iversity  Rich, Mary E.  Director 'of Training  School  B. S., A. M.,
Teachers  College, Columbia Un-iversity  Fifteen

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Rindal, John  Industrial Arts  Ruckmick, H. C.  Industrial Arts  B. S.,
Teachers College,  Columbia University;  Pratt Institute, Brook-lyn,  N.
Y.; Univer-sity  of Illinois  Smith, Harold B.  Public School Music   A.
B., Music B, Mis-souri  Valley College;  Northwestern Univer-sity;  Student
of Carl  Busch, Conductor  of  Kansas City Sym-phony  Orchestra  Strange,
Edith R.  Piano  Graduate of Whitworth  Conservatory, Taco-ma,  Wash.;
Oberlin  College; Cornish  School, Chautauqua,  N. Y.  Sullivan, Grace 
Physical Education  A. B., University of Ore-gon  Rosene, Hilda F.  Science
 B. S., M. S., University  of Washington; Bel-lingham  State Normal  School
 Skalley, Kathleen  Physical Education  B. S., University  of  Washington;
Univer-sity  of California;  Teachers College, Co-lumbia  University; 
Bellingham State Nor-mal  School  Sperry, M. Belle  English  Ph. B.,
University of  Michigan; M. S., Wes-leyan  University  Strickland, Ruth G. 
Training Teacher, First  Grade  B. S., Teachers College,  Columbia
University Sundquist, Leona  Science  A. B., M. S., University  of
Washington  Sweet, Laura E.  Training Teacher, Sixth  Grade  4th year
diploma, Bel-lingham  Normal Trent, E. Wilma  Teacher of Technique  A. B.,
University of  Iowa  Sixteen  ~II

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Ullin, Anna  French and English  A. B., University of  Washington;
Certifi-cate,  Sorbonne, Paris;  A. M., Teachers Col-lege,  Columbia
Uni-versity  Williams, Pelagius  Social Science  A. B., Teachers College,
Emporia, Kansas; A.  M., University of Chi-cago;  Columbia Uni-versity 
Wendling, Elsie  Teacher of Technique  B. S., A. M., Teachers  College,
Columbia Un-iversity  Winther, Oscar O.  Social Science  A. B., University
of Ore-gon;  A. M., Harvard  Library  Embodying the ideal of beauty and
utility, the attractive  new library  ranks among the best school libraries
in the United States. The building  is beautifully designed in the
Romanesque style of architecture to har-monize  with the main building. It
was constructed by the best of work-men  during the year 1927-1928 and was
open for use on June 5, 1928. Dr. James I. Wyer, Director of New York State
Library, formerly Director  of New York State Library School, dedicated the
building on that day.  To Bellingham Normal School, this day was one of its
milestones, mark-ing  the realization of a great dream of her students and
faculty.  A spacious reading room covers almost the entire second floor,
seat-ing  some 300 students. Here twenty thousand volumes are on open 
shelves, accessible to students at all times. The coverings on the books 
have been selected in such a way that, on entering the room, one does  not
seem to see the books but perceives a room hung with ancient  tapestries,
blending beautifully with the walls and ceiling. Although  Ringer Reese 
George Evans Treat Wilson  Seventeen

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LIBRARY AT NIGHT  it is mainly a reference and professional library for
teachers, a compre-hensive collection of books on subjects related to a
liberal education  are found on the shelves here.  On the second floor,
too, is situated the delivery hall and the charg-ing  desk serving the
reading room and the closed stacks where choice  volumes and bound
magazines are kept. The catalogue is located in the  left  alcove of this
hall. Nearby are a work room and the offices of the  head librarian, the
cataloguer and the reference librarian. Students may  drop into these
offices any time and the librarians are always ready to help them solve
their problems.  In the reserve book and periodical room on the first
floor, books are found that the instructors require to be read. Current
magazines and  newspapers are accessible, in this room, at all times. The
size of this  room in comparison with the large reading room is indicative
of the ex- tent  to which independent work is being done by the students. 
The children's reading room across from the periodical room pro-vides  a
pleasing contrast with the large reading room on the second  floor. Here
the furniture is designed and arranged to meet the needs of  three sizes of
children, varying from the smallest tots of the primary to  the upper grade
children. Shelves and wall spaces are so arranged that interesting and
valuable accessory material and displays can be brought  before the eyes of
the children. Some three thousand books are found  on the shelves in the
children's room. Courses in children's literature  are given in every
curriculum and it is here that the students find the  books and contacts
that make these courses worth while. The prominent  location of the
children's reading room symbolizes what the school pri-marily  stands for,
the preparation of teachers of children.  Eighteen

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Nineteen

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Twenty

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Banner, Edith R.  Ass't. Accountant  Earley, Mildred  Sec. Research Dep't. 
Gunderson, Olive  Recorder Hillhouse, Wilma F.  Sec. Director Training 
School  McKinnon, Margaret  Accountant  O'Malley, Kathleen  Assistant Nurse
 Still, Margaret C.  Office Secretary  Swanson, Inez  Sec. Dean of School
Tremain, Mildred E.  Sec. Dean of Women  Twenty-one

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Marquis Hammitt Erickson Sundquist Rosene  Sophomore Class  The Class of
1929 has reached the end  of its two year Normal career.  In its Freshman
year the class, under the leadership of a capable group of officers and
committees, won a laudable recognition. Every class  function was a marked
success. This year the officers have been the same for the three quarters, 
with one exception. They are: CHARLES ERICKSON , . . . . President  ALICE
SUNDQUIST Vice-President  .JEAN MARQUIS Secretary  KELLIE HAMMITT
(replacing Jean Marquis) Secretary  The class has been well directed, with
Miss Hilda Rosene as class  adviser.  The two outstanding class functions
of the year were the fall quar- ter  dance, featuring the "Jingle Bell"
Idea, and the spring quarter dance,  with a "Sea-Going" motif. The dances
were held December and April  respectively.  Now, as the class looks
forward to new fields of endeavor, it looks  back with fond memories upon
two years of co-operation and accom-plishment. Twenty-five

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Virginia Adams  Olympia  Lavenia Alexander  Seattle  Burton Adkinson 
Bellingham  Alice Anderson Bellingham  Cecil Anderson  Chambers Prairie 
Gudrun Anderson  Everett  Judith Anderson  Bellingham Esther Anson 
Ferndale  Daisy Acher  Chinook, Mont.  Irene Annabelle  Tacoma  Freda
Arbuckle  Blaine  Aileen Arland  Aberdeen  Twenty-six

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Norma Arnett  Ash Grove, Mo.  Lucile Austin  Mt. Vernon  Ruth Avey  Renton 
Clarence Axelson Bellingham  Evelyn Axelson  Bellingham  Inez Bannister 
Arlington  May Barbo  Bellingham  Margaret Barnett  Haines, Alaska  Agnes
Barton  Bellingham  Nina Barton  Seattle  Eldred Bechtel  Seattle  Letha
Belcher  Mossyrock  Twenty-seven  i

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Dorothy Bennett  Knappton  George Benson  Benton City  Margaret Bennett 
Port Angeles  Harry Benson   Benton City  Viola Betts  Vancouver  Freida
Blandeau  Puyallup  Aphra Blumenroth  Chehalis  Elwood Bond  Bellingham 
Ruth Bradley  Mount Vernon  Arthur Bogen  Bellingham  Winifred Bowles  Port
Angeles  Viola Bradley  Seattle  Twenty-eight

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Julia Brand  Bellingham  Norman Bright  Chehalis  Helen Britton  Everett 
Elizabeth Brodt  Centralia  Rose  Brooks  Tacoma  Wanda Brooks  Lyle 
Kenneth Brotnov  Bellingham  Doris Brown  Yakima  Dorothy Brown  Bellingham
 Rose Brown  Bellingham  Esther Ruth Brown  Tacoma  Helen L. Brunson 
Ferndale Twenty-nine

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Erma L. Burgen  Maryhill  John Byrnes  Chehalis  Anna B. Caley  Everson 
Avan Card  Port Gamble Irene Cavalero  Everett  Hamilton Church  Burton 
Ethel Burton  Radio  Eltina Calderhead  Bellingham Garnet Caples  vancouver
 Annie Carlson  Altoona  Naomi Chase  Bellingham  Thomas Clark  Bellingham 
Thirty

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Florence Cole  Bellingham  Alice Conitz  New Salem, N. D.  Verna Couch 
Elma  Eveline Cowan  Virginia,  Minn.  Evelyn Craw  Everett  Vincent Crouch
 Bellingham  Ethel Dahlman  Castle Rock  Ouida Davidson Blaine  Gladys
Davidson  Chehalis  Ruth Davis  Seattle  Marie Day  Kennewick  Helen
DeGeest  Lynden Thirty-one

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Mildred Denny  Bellingham  Lydia Doell  Lind  Violet Dingerson  Toledo 
Mary Ann Dolish  Dayton  Mary Donner  Alberta  Louise Dunn  Arlington 
Maxine Ebert  Everett  Joy Efteland  Portland, Ore.  Hazel Ednie   Big Lake
 Charles Erickson  Marysville  Ella Eyre  Port Angeles  Glen Fairbanks 
Bellingham  Thirty-two

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Edith Falkner  Centralia  Evelyn Faller  Milltown  Ann Fillinger  Portage 
Kathryn Foster  Port Angeles Katherine Franett  Bellingham  Christine 
Frederickson  Bellingham  Margaret Freeborg  Milwaukie, Ore. Elsie Fralick 
Portland, Ore  Elizabeth Gable  Everett  Margaret Galley  Vancouver 
Owatana George Hood River, Ore.  Frank Geri  Bellingham  Thirty-three

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Mary Louise Gilmer  Bellingham  Vera Ginnette  Bellingham  Grace Goermer 
Okanogan  Dorothy Goldberg  Everett  Ethel Gordon  Mansfield  Maybelle
Graham  Seattle  Lena Greenbaum  Seattle Audrey Gwinnett  Bellingham 
Dorothy Halbert  Tacoma  Chauncey Griffith  Bellingham  Francis Haight
Seattle  Selma Hall  Concrete  Thirty-four

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Jennie Hofman  Lynden  Gladys Holmes  Marysville  Alice Holt  Seattle 
Florence Horswill  Centralia Carol Howe  Snoqualmie  Paul Howell 
Bellingham  Lyn Hughes  Bellingham  Bertha Hundt  Bellingham Edwin
Hunnicutt  Anacortes  Helja Impola  Cathlamet  Bessie James  Prosser 
Audrey Jensen  Friday Harbor  Thirty-five

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Gertrude Jensen  Bellingham  Arlene Johanson  Ahoria, Ore.  Edwin Johnson 
Ferndale  Fern Johnson Vancouver  Lenora Johnson  Onalaska  Mildred Johnson
 Silverlake  Earl Johnston  Tacoma  Carlyle Jones  Hoquiam  Alice G. Jones 
Nooksack  Gladys Jones  Manette  Hannah Jones  Winthrop  Iona Jones 
Stanwood  Thirty-six  A

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Louise Jonas  Aberdeen  Luella Jones  Ferndale  Lura Jones  Snohomish  Ann
Jordan  Kalispell, Mont. Elina Keltanen  Marysville  Florence Kern 
Vancouver  Levia Kinsey  Custer  Sara Knibbs  Bellingham Rita Knutson  La
Center  Lempi Koli  Aberdeen  Katherine  Korthauer  Bellingham  Inga
Kristianson Redmond  Tl:irty-seven

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Martha Laitinen  Battle Ground  Irene Larsen  Tacoma  Lillian Larson 
Tacoma  Lily Lead  Raymond Genevieve Lee  Fairmount, N. D.  Dorothy Legg 
Seattle  Lucille Laraway  Anacortes  Julia Larson Portage  Arlene Latton 
Everett  Mary Leahy  Wenatchee  Gordon Leen  Bellingham  i  Glen Legoe
Ferndale  Thirty-eight

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Estella Lesh  Seattle  Jane L'Eveque  Chauteau, Mont.  Dorothy Lewis  Port
Angeles  Harold Lindley Bellingham  Inez Lindseth  Great Falls, Mont. 
Myrtle Linne  Seattle  Helen Lockhart  Bellingham  Sigrid Lokken  Seattle 
Raye O. Louden  Lebam  Debbie Lowry  Seattle  Frances Lunstead  Bellingham 
Grayce  Lytle  Joyce  Thirty-nine

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James McCartin  Ferndale  Alfred McClurken  Richmond Beach  Ethel McClellan
 Centralia  Lois McColm   Snohomish  John McCormick  Port Angeles  Mary
McCush  Bellingham  Geraldine McKee  Everett Beverly McKinnen  Seattle 
Mary Ballard McKee  Auburn  Mabel McNair  Bellingham  Lloyd Mabon
Bellingham  Katherine Maki  Chehalis  Forty

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Margaret Malloy  Mt. Vernon  Anna Martinson  Tolt  Velma Mason  Bellingham 
Frieda Massey  Tacoma Genevieve Metcalf  Los Angeles, Calif.  Bill Mock 
Bellingham  Reba Moore  Mt. Vernon  Mary Morrow Bellingham  Catherine Morse
 Bellingham  Agnes Murphy  Los Angeles, Calif.  Eva Nelson  Brownsville
Marion Netter  Vader  Forty-one

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Agnes Nicol  East Sound  Arlene Nixon  Seattle  Helen Nielsen  Seattle 
Margaret Norwood  Port Townsend  Alice Oakley  Anacortes  Reinhold Oberlatz
 Bellingham  Kathryn Olander  Mt. Vernon  Tinka Oksendahl  Stanwood  Jennie
Ongendahl  Chinook  Bernice Orwig  Clatskanie, Ore.  Rosa Ott  Port Angeles
 Lucille Palmer  Junction City, Kans.  Forty-two

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Manley Parker  Ferndale  Beth Patchin  Castle Rock  Martin Pedersen  East
Stanwood  Helen Pellervo Astoria, Ore.  Mildred Petersen  Seattle  Ruth
Plank  Bellingham  Mable Post  Tacoma  Margaret Pullar Everett  Josephine 
Quackenbush  Redmcnd  Clarence Ragen  Bellingham  Gladys Query  Morton
Frances Ragge  Seattle  Forty-three

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Muriel Ralph  Tacoma  Evelyn Randrup  Bellingham  Elsie Rapier  Chehalis 
Gladys Read  Everson Katherine Reedy  Seattle  Chester Reese  Silvana 
Wilfred Reeves  Vashon  Kathleen Reff  Snohomish Marion Richardson  Yakima 
Ruby Richardson  Lake Stevens  Lillian Roberts  Bellingham  Gunborg
Rockstad  Anacortes  Forty-four

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Gertrude Rolph  Prosser  Katherine Rood  Seattle  Agnes Rotschy  Vancouver 
Keith Rumery  Lyman Harold Rush  Malaga  Dorothy A.  Rutherford  Seattle 
Dorothy J.  Rutherford  Tacoma Mable Ryen Poulsbo  Lola Sanders  Bellingham
 Leslie Sanford  Sumner  Harriette Sather  Bellingham  Barbara Schmitt 
Waitsburg  Forty-five

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Virginia Schmitt  Waitsburg  Evelyn Severson  Poulsbo  Jessie Shaw  Pateros
 Helen Schekels  Seattle Leona Sheldon  Elbe  Viola Simmons  Everett 
Margaret Simpson  Sedro-Woolley  Marjorie Sloan  Lyman   Helen Smith 
Bellingham  Ardis Slaven  Bellingham  LaVeta Smart  Tacoma  Jo C. Smith 
Ryderwood Forty-six

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Myrtle Smith  Bellingham  Ora Smith  Littlerock  Marian Snyder  Seattle 
Jennie Soboleski  Aberdeen Palma Solberg  Tolt  Dorothy Sollie  Mt. Verncn 
Mary L. Sommer  Winlock  Guy Springsteel  St. Paul des Metis,  Canada  Ruth
Steele  Walla Walla  Vivian Sterling  Wenatchee  Helen Stine  Seattle 
Karin Strom  Cosmopolis  Forty-seven

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Helen Sullivan  Bellingham  Alice Sundquist  Mt. Vernon  Rhoda Sumey 
Anacortes  Florence  Sutherland   Lynden  Dorothy Swanson  Marysville 
Earle Swanson  Ferndale  Edna P. Swanson  Sumas  Rowena Tarbox  Bellingham 
Grace Thompson  Olympia  Oren Tarbox  Bellingham  Doris Thompson 
Bellingham Kristine  Thordarson  Blaine  Forty-eight

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Margaret Torpey  Anacortes  David Turnbull  Puyallup  Henry Turner  Sumas 
Verna Urmey  Cascade Locks, Ore.  Nellie Vander Meer  Lynden  Gean
Vanderpool  Mt. Vernon  Rosa Van Ess  Montesano Meryl Van Iderstine 
Arlington  Vernon Vine  Bellingham  Elna Virta  Everett  Sophie Walen 
Issaquah Anna Walsh  Malin, Ore.  Forty-nine

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Geraldine Warren  Arlington  Karl Weber  Burlington  Dorothy L.  Williams 
Everson  Lois Wilson  La Center  Marie Wold  Everett  Edna Working 
Wenatchee  Alma Weber  Ferndale  Dorothy A.  Williams Sedro-Woolley  Alma
Willison  Bellingham  Claire Wise  Bellingham  Aileen Wolfe  Bellingham 
Olive Wunderlich  Prosser  Fifty

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DeLoyce Young  Kelso  Esther Young  Vancouver  Francis Young  Bellingham 
Irene Young  Burton Ortha Young  Randle  Guinevere Stanton  Everett  Beulah
Burns  Bend, Ore.  Margaret Wyant  Silver Lake  Sidney Thal  Bellingham 
Ethel Hendricks  Bellingham  Helene Appleton  Ferndale  Arthur Linrud
Ferndale  Fifty-one

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Beatrice Halverson  Vancouver  Kellie Hammitt  Tacoma  Merle Hanson 
Aberdeen  Jane Harries  Renton  Daisy Harris  Yakima  Helen Helland 
Everett  Vera Hembury  Hoodsport  Mdrgaret Hill  Seattle  Joe Hermsen 
Bellingham  Roberta Hindley  Racine, Wis.  Julia Hoff  Everett  Kathryn
Hinkley  Ethel  Fifty-two

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Hattie Dye  Castle Rock  Elva Ringler  Pt. Stanley  Annie Johnson  Dabob 
Elizabeth Taylor  Bellingham Jessie Dunckley  Centralia  Richard Louis 
Seattle  James Prendergast  Bellingham  Ruth Davenport Bow  Eugenia
Hefferman  Kelso  Mildred Stoll  Vancouver  Fifty-three

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Third Year Students  Robert Anderson  Tacoma  Roy Arnett  Ash Grove, Mo. 
Myrtle Bergh  Republic Julia Bouck  Silver Beach  Winifred Dunham 
Bellingham  Frances Gladwin  Belfair  Harry Appleton Ferndale  Howard
Beighle  Kalama  Virginia Bever  Bellingham  Ve Ta C. Cassidy  Bellingham 
W. D. Edmundson  Coupeville  Christine Grimson  Seattle  Fifty-four

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John Gudmundson  Bellingham  Ben Hamilton  Mt. Vernon  Evelyn Harno 
Bellingham  Earl Hemmi Bellingham  Kenneth Keveren  Pocatello, Idaho  Will
Lanphere  Greenbank  Viola Poyhonen  Winlock Irene Schagel  Bellingham 
Elton Korsborn  Bellingham  Ethel Markham  Montesano  Ward Prigg  Vashon  
Don Stickney  Bothell  Fifty-five

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Mabel Steinbrink  Doty  Dorothy Strong  Camby, Ore.  Myra Teets  Everett 
Hazel Vedani  Bellingham Oscar Wellman  Seattle  Arthur Cram  Portland,
Ore.  Phoebe Tuttle  Bellingham  Fifty-six

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Platt Philippi Gnagey Fowler Craft  The Freshman Class  STANLEY CRAFT
President  BERNICE GNAGEY . . . . Vice-President  JEAN PHILIPPI Secretary 
MARY ELIZABETH FOWLER . . . . . . Treasurer  LEONARD RODLAND Frosh
Representative  The Freshman class, under the leadership of the Executive
Commit-tee,  comprising the class officers, was very prominent in school
activities.  The first function for which the Freshmen were responsible was
the  bonfire for the Pep Rally, which was the beginning of the Home Coming 
Celebration. Tradition has it that it shall be the duty and privilege of
representatives of the Frosh class to build and keep intact from outside 
invasions, the Home Coming Bonfire. This class did well to keep up this 
old tradition and the right spirit was shown when called upon to help. 
Each quarter a party was given to which all Freshmen, and Sopho-more  men
were invited. For each party there was a general chairman,  under whom was
a committee that worked with the aid of the Executive  Committee.  In all
the activities the responsibility was divided among those who  were
believed capable to carry out the work.  Fifty-seven

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page [58]

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page [59]

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page [60]


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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page 61

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Publications  Sixty-one

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1929 Klipsun  Klipsun Staff  GLEN FAIRBANKS  Manager  NAOMI CHASE  GLEN
FAIRBANKS BERNICE GNAGEY  MARGARET MORRISON  ELSIE RAPIER  DOROTHY SASSE 
LENORE HANDRAHAN  HELEN SMITH  RAYMOND GREENE  CLAIRE WILSON  IRENE LARSEN 
ROY ARNETT   EVELYN CRAW  BEN HAMILTON  JOHN FINNEGAN  MR. HERBERT FOWLER 
MISS HAZEL BREAKEY  . .Editor  Business Manager  Assistant Editor 
Assistant Editor  Sophomore Editor Freshman and Society Editor  Art Editor 
Organization Editor  Editor Fine Arts  . . Administration Editor School
Life Editor  Snapshot Editor  Editor Women's Sports  Editor Men's Sports 
Photo-Engraving Editor   Editorial Adviser  Art Adviser  NAOMI CHASE 
Editor  Sixty-two

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Gnagey Morrison Craw  Rapier Larsen Sasse  Breakey Hamilton Finnegan 
Wilson Smith  Fowler Greene  Handrahan  Arnett  Sixty-three

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Chiclester Appleton Anderson Fowler  The Northwest Viking  Formerly The
Weekly Messenger-Founded 1899  Publisl ed weekly by Students' Association
of State Normal School, Bellingham, Wash.  Entered in  the Postoffice at
Bellingham, Washington, as second class matter.  MILLER   SUTHERLEN
PRINTING CO., Printers  Bellingham National Bank Bldg., Bellingham, Wash. 
Subscription rate by mail, $1.50 per year, in advance; single copies 5
cents  Advertising Rates on Application  Address all communications, other
than news items, to The Business Manager of the  Northwest Viking,
Bellingham, Washington EDITORIAL STAFF  DOLLY ANDERSON....... ..
............................... .... Editor  GORDON LEEN-----....-
................. ............A ssociate Editor  BEN
HAMILTON................. ....... ................ Sports Editor HELEN
SULLIVAN........................................Society Editor  BETH
CALEY......................----------- ...................... Copy Reader 
HERBERT E. FOWLER .............................. Faculty Adviser  BARNEY
CHICHESTER ............... .....B.u.s iness Manager  BOB WATERS
................................. Assistant Manager  Telephone-Private
Branch 3180  SPECIAL STAFF WRITERS  Beth Caley Dorothy Sasse Paul Howell
Sid Thal  Myrtle Bergh Edna B. Finley Mark Jarret Irene Schagel  Catherine
Morse Joe Hermsen Mary Elizabeth Fowler  REPORTERS  Bert Cole Rose Brooks
Glen Goddard John Finnegan  Ed Cox Ray  Craft John Greaves  Lloyd Beckes
Robert Cox  Sixty-four

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The Northwest Viking  The Northwest Viking, founded in 1900 under the name
of the  "Weekly Messenger," is essentially a student activity, in full
charge of  the students, with the active interest of the entire student
body following  its columns weekly. There was a change of management at the
end of  the winter quarter when Barney Chichester succeeded Harry Appleton
as  business manager, Dolly Anderson  then taking Barney's place as editor.
 This year a much sought-for honor was accorded the Viking, when  it
received recognition in a nation-wide contest for school papers. The 
editors may be justly proud of their  work, and the school proud of both. 
Sixty-five

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Red Arrow  The Red Arrow is a literary magazine published quarterly by the 
Scribes' Club and outside contributors. It gives the students an
oppor-tunity  for criticism of one another's work, and, for those who
write, the  chance for expression of those fleeting thoughts that may only
be caught  now and then, and are so seldom found on paper.  This year the
"Whoopee" number, published in the winter quarter,  was very popular with
the students. The material in the magazine is of  several types-prose and
poetry, serious  and humorous, of varying ex-cellence,  but of interest to
all fellow-students.  FALL QUARTER  JANE L'EVEQUE .  DOROTHY STRONG, MARION
SNYDER  WINTER QUARTER  BERNARD CHICHESTER LLOYD BECKES, KRISTINE
THORDARSON  Editor  Managers  Editor  Managers  Contributors to the fall 
and winter publications were: W. A. Cram,  Marion Snyder, Phil Davis, Irene
Schagel, Arthur Kolstad, Jane L'Eveque,  Mary Elizabeth Fowler, Norman
Burchette, Pelagius Williams, Victor H.  Hoppe, Barney Chichester, Leonard
Keppler, Bennett Howard, Joy Efte-land,  Mark Jarret, J. G., Paul Booth,
Frances Gladwin, George Sherman,  C. D. E., Margaret Sheppard.  Sixty-six

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Self-Starter  The "Self-Starter" is a booklet published by the Standards
Commit-tee  of the Women's League, and distributed to the entering women
each  fall. It is to the women what the "Blue Book" is to the entire
school.  It tells them about the League, it gives suggestive wardrobes and
ex-pense  accounts, it explains the house rules, and it lists the social
activi-ties.  So, by telling the girls about the League and its work, it
helps  them to become accustomed to Normal life.  Directory  The "Student
and Faculty Directory," with its refill, is an effort to  keep the students
identified as nearly as possible, with their respective  addresses and
telephone numbers, which is sometimes a rather difficult  task, as some
students seem to change their residences every quarter.  The Directory
lists the faculty, the women, and the men of the school  separately, thus
giving greater facility in looking up the person desired.  Blue Book   The
"Blue Book" is a necessary part of our school equipment, in-deed,  many of
us would be literally lost without it. It is published during  the fall
quarter, and contains information on practically every subject  that could
come under the head of a normal school, from the Faculty  through the
Student's Association, down to songs and yells. It contains  information
that every student should read and know, for it is of value   during the
entire year, and to everyone. The foreword says, "Consult  this volume
first, ask questions afterward," for, if you read intelligently,  you may
answer most of your questions for yourself.  Sixty-seven

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THE MERCHANT OF VENICE  Drama  A most successful dramatic season at the
Bellingham State Normal  School was presented by Victor H. Hoppe, chairman
of the department  of speech. Four outstanding productions, illustrating a
great variety of  situations, were presented during the year by the Normal
Drama Club,  under Mr. Hoppe's direction.  A greater interest in dramatics
than has ever before been shown was  indicated this year by the increased
activity of the Drama Club and by  the many students who turned out for the
quarterly drama productions.  All of this year's dramatic achievements are 
examples of outstanding  plays, enviably acted and excellently staged and
directed.  "The Merchant of Venice"  "The Merchant of Venice" was  given in
the summer quarter on Au-gust  8 and 9. The leading role of  Shylock was an
unforgetable por-trayal  as interpreted by Mr. Hoppe.  Carrie Ann Tucker as
Portia, the  heiress, played her role exceptional-ly  well. The setting was
a stylized  suggestion of the Elizabethan stage  and costumed in the stage
style of  Shakespeare's Globe Theatre.  Sixty-eight

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SUN UP  "Sun Up"  The 1928-29 dramatic season at the Bellingham Normal was
opened  with the presentation of "Sun Up," by Lula Vollmer, in December. 
The action occurs in the interior of Widow Cagle's rude and isolated  cabin
in the North Carolina Mountains. To these mountaineers the only  known
justice is found in "A life for a life," the law of the feud.
Circum-stances  under which Widow Cagle receives news of her son's death
over-seas  bring a new outlook to these mountain folk. "Sun Up" is a
serious  drama, which displays an unusual characterization of life in North
Caro-lina  mountains.  "Seven Keys to Baldpate"  The winter quarter
presentation of the Drama Club was "Seven Keys  to Baldpate," a
melodramatic farce, by George M. Cohan. The winter  solitude of lonely
Baldpate Inn was weirdly interrupted many times, as  one by one the
possessors of the seven keys disclosed themselves. Frank- lin  Lock, Joy
Efteland, and Florence Kern in the leading roles were sup-ported  by a
clever cast. Mr. Hoppe's direction of the melodrama was  highly appreciated
by the many who attended the productions. Sixty-nine

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SEVEN KEYS TO BALDPATE  Outside Drama  This season the Normal School has
presented five dramas by three  excellent outside companies of players. 
The Moroni Olsen Players presented "Expressing Willie," a comedy  by Rachel
Crothers; "What Every Woman Knows," by James M. Barrie, and "Autumn Fire,"
an Irish folk tragedy by T. C. Murray. Moroni Olsen  was seen at his best
in the role of  Owen Keegan in "Autumn Fire."  The Ongawa Japanese Players
presented an unusual and varied pro- gram  from a repertoire of Japanese
folk lore. The program included  songs and dances of old Japan as well as a
quaint playlet.  The Charles Rann Kennedy Players produced the drama, "Old 
Nobody," by Charles Rann Kennedy. "Old Nobody" is a play for male-factors. 
The setting and action made it a very unusual type of drama.  Seventy

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ICEBOUND  CAST  Left to right: Wanamaker, Irwin, Sasse, Berg, Philippi,
Swalling, Morse, Edmondson, Rich, Kern, Chichester  Icebound  The last
offering of the dramatic season was "Icebound," by Owen Davis. In an
isolated New England farmhouse both the selfish and kind  motives within
the Jordan family are developed. A strange and surpris-ing  turn of events
leads Jane Crashy to pull Ben, the son, out of his for-mer  self and force
the rest of the family to release their selfish thoughts.  Florence Kern as
Jane Crashy, and Barney Chichester in the role of Ben  Jordan, made the
play an unusually fine piece of drama.  Seventy-pne

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NORMAL WOMEN'S CHORUS  Visiting Musical Artists  Presenting varied programs
of the finest types of  musical art, the  Bellingham State Normal School
annually brings many famous artists  to its students. Katheryn Meisle,
contralto, presented the first concert of the year.  As one of the most
outstanding contraltos of the present day, Miss Meisle  enchantingly held
the admiration of her audience throughout her entire  program. The mastery
of interpretations and her colorful tones were  completely perfected. The
ability of Miss Meisle as a singer and the  quality of her beautiful
program set a standard that will be difficult for  any contralto to
surpass.  As the second concert artist of the season, Louis Graveure
appeared  on his first concert tour singing from a new repertoire in the
tenor range.  Renowned as a recital  baritone, he abandoned his position
last year and  immediately became a leading tenor. With a well rounded
voice of con-centration  and quality Mr. Graveure gave a concert which will
be long  remembered by the school.  Outstanding among the concerts of this
season was the delightful  recital of Guy Maier and Lee Pattison, pianists.
Words cannot truly ex-press  the quality of their playing. The two pianos
played not as if they  were separate but rather as one immortal instrument.
Possessing every  noble quality of artist and actor, Mr. Maier and Mr.
Pattison held their  audience spellbound with their interpretations.
Responding with many  encores, the duo was accorded an ovation that is
never to be forgotten.  The London String Quartet, among the finest in
existence, appeared  on the next program. The four instruments perfectly
portrayed each  human voice and in the hands of their masters produced
marvelous har-mony.  The listener could not be but enthralled and charmed
while hear-  Seventy-two

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ing the beautiful "Andante Cantabile" movement from Tschaikowsky's  Quartet
in D. The entire program was one of exquisite art, and the  praise which
was accorded the quartet distinguishes it as the finest that   has ever
appeared before the school.  Quite in contrast to the preceding
presentation was the program of   the Kedroff Quartet. Singing many Russian
folk songs and selections by  Russian composers, all in their native
language, the Kedroffs gave a  program of rare quality. Their
interpretations were as realistic as could  be possible for human voice to
portray. Perfectly matched and blended  tones came not from individuals but
from a matchless ensemble.  Florence Austral, soprano, who gave such a
superb performance a  year ago, returned as the last number of this year's
Musical Artists  Course. Mme. Austral  has a dramatic soprano voice of
exquisite power  and quality. In the same manner that she put her soul into
each selec-tion  her personality extended throughout the audience. Mme.
Austral  was accompanied by John Amadio, flutist, who, with the piano,
formed  a rich background for the brilliant soprano voice. This  program
was  most fitting as the closing number of the season.  Lectures  Many
interesting lectures are given before the student body during  the year.
Although many subjects are presented, generally the ones  of  the greatest
interest have been those from foreign lands.  Joan London, daughter of the
famous writer, while speaking on the  subject, "Thru the Looking Glass of
Literature," offered a thorough  explanation and  criticism of our modern
literature. Miss London's clear  insight into the works by contemporary
writers was greatly appreciated  by the student body.  The Orient
contributed two of this season's speakers. From Japan  came Dr. Roy H.
Akagi, who explained in a most interesting manner the  social advancement
of his country during recent years. Dr. W. T. Locke,  for many years a
missionary in China, spoke not only of China and her  national conditions
but more of the greater subject of world brotherhood.  Contessa Marie
Loschi, during her brief tour of the United States,  gave a most
interesting lecture to the students of the Normal School.  The theme of her
address was the rapid change and improvement of the Italian people since
the World War.  Two men came to the school as representatives of the great
conti- nent  to the south of us. Edward Tomlinson revealed many of the
great  future possibilities of South America. Harold O. Fish brought to the
 student body a lecture, "Experiences Near a Jungle Laboratory," which  was
accompanied by many beautiful picture slides.  Among the most enthusiastic
of speakers was John Langdon-Davies,  from England, who spoke on "The New
Age of Faith." Many interesting student questions followed the lecture and
Mr. Davies answered each in  a most brilliant manner. Seventy-three

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WOMEN'S TEAM  Brown Massey Hendricks H. Fitzwater  Debate  Early in the
fall quarter a schoolwide interest in debate was reawak-ened  by the
intramural debate series. All of the leading clubs and a num- ber  of
independent groups organized debate teams to represent them in  the
elimination tournament. Thru the partial replacement of the customary style
of debate by  the no-decision and cross-examination type, the participants
must be  unusually familiar with the subject in order to refute direct
questions.  The cross-examination method of refutation has gained the
increased  approval an dpopularity of the student body as, by this method
only, the  true cleverness and wit of the debaters are shown.  The men of
the school participated in five debates, winning three,  while the other
two were no-decision contests. The women debated three  times and lost but
one decision.  MEN'S TEAM  Cram Summers Bell S. Craft Seventy-four

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Cup Winner, Joy Efteland, and Stanley Craft, Runner-Up  Extemporaneous
Speaking  The extemporaneous contest, in the third year of its existence,
has  continued to gain an increasingly stronger place among school
activities.  With but a short time to prepare, the contestants are allowed
to speak  for five minutes before the student assembly upon any of many
topics of  current interest. Each quarter two contestants are chosen to
compete  in the finals which are held near the middle of the spring
quarter. The  increased popularity of the extemporaneous contest is
indicated by the  large numbers of students who have turned out each
quarter for the  activity.  The greatest number of students entered the
contest in the fall quar-ter,  making the competition keen. Edith Dyer and
Stanley Craft were  chosen as the two successful aspirants. A great spirit
of enthusiasm  which was also shown in the winter quarter resulting in the
selection of  Arthur Cram and Ray Craft by the judges for later
competition. In the  spring quarter preliminaries Joy Efteland and Maurine
Lind -were chosen  to compete in the finals. In the final contest, held on
the twenty-sixth  of April, all of the aspirants gave excellent speeches on
subjects of uni- versal  interest. Joy Efteland was selected as the
guardian of the beauti-ful  extempore loving cup, while Stanley Craft was
adjudged the winner  of second place.  The extemporaneous contest has
served to secure a new spirit in the  school towards public speaking which
has resulted in a valuable type of educational development for many
students.  Seventy-five

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DON STICKNEY I LYLE SUMMERS DEAN EDMUNDSON  Winter President Spring
President Fall President  Student Government  The Board of Control has
entire charge of all student affairs, both business and social. There were
seven members-two faculty representa-tives  and five students-who discuss
and take action upon questions  of much interest to the students, which
upon occasion may arouse some  lively comment in the school.  BOARD OF
CONTROL  SPRINGSTEEL PHILIPPI BYRNES MORSE BOYNTON WINTHER  Representative
Representative Representative Vice-President Vice- President Adviser 
ARNETT MARQUIS CHURCH BECHTEL RUCKMICK  Secretary Representative
Representative Representative Adviser  Seventy-six

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Front Row: Hill, Massey, Chase, Hughes  Second Row: Taylor, Thordarson,
Morse, Schmitt  Third Row: Campbell, A. Anderson, L. Johnson, Springsteel 
Inter Club Council  FALL AND WINTER  HENRY TURNER  FRIEDA MASSEY  NAOMI
CHASE  FRIEDA MASSEY  NAOMI CHASE  SPRING  President Vice President 
Secretary  President  Secretary  The Inter Club Council, as its name
implies, is made up of elected  representatives from all active Normal
clubs and organizations. The  purposes of this group is to promote the
interests and activities of all  student clubs, and to act, as mediator
among the organizations.  Seventy-seven

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Sundquist Chase' Working Van Ess  Campus Organizations  WOMEN'S LEAGUE 
NAOMI CHASE President  ALICE SUNDQUIST . . . . Vice President  EDNA WORKING
Secretary  ROSA VAN Ess . . . . . Treasurer  The Women's League works for
the welfare or all women students.  The work is carried on by nine
committees, who in their various capaci-ties  give service to others. The
standing committees and their chairmen  are:  Social-Catherine Morse;
Fellowship-Rowena Tarbox, Mary Elizabeth Fowler; Pro- gram-  Elsie Rapier;
Publicity-Alice Sundquist; Social Service-Beth Caley; Stan-dards-  Helen
Smith; Election-Viola Poyhonen; Leadership-Audrey Gwinette; Schol-arship- 
Helen Sullivan.  Seventy-eight COMMISSION AND JUDICIAL BOARD  Front Row:
Stevenson, Working, Chase, Sundquist, Morse Second Row: Anson, Hill,
Boynton, Gilmer  Third Row: Austin, Caley

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AT EDENS HALL  Edens Hall  Edens Hall, the women's dormitory,-what it means
to a girl who  has been there, cannot be measured. There are the parties,
the interest-ing  goings-on, and above all, the association with so many
girls who are  all studying, working, and playing together.  Each quarter
the girls of the organized houses compete for two ban-ners,  the
Scholarship and the Achievement. The house awarded a banner  for three
consecutive quarters is allowed to keep it permanently, but as  the amount
of play is not considered in making the awards, the banners  change hands
frequently.  SOME ORGANIZED HOUSES NEAR THE CAMPUS  Seventy-nine

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Appleton Turner Clark Geri  Men's Club  FRANK GERI President  HARRY
APPLETON . . . . . . Vice President  HENRY TURNER Secretary-Treasurer  TED
CLARK Past Vice-President  The Men's Club, including all the men enrolled
in the school, is one  of the youngest organizations of the Normal. It
holds meetings twice  quarterly, as does the Women's League, to carry on
business and enjoy  programs. Among the Club's accomplishments during the
school year are its  Informal, and the Summer Fashion Show given at the
close of the  spring quarter in cooperation with the Women's League. 
Eighty

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Scholarship Society  FALL AND WINTER OFFICERS  JEAN MARQUIS  MILDRED EARLEY
 VIRGINIA BEVER  MISS EMMA ERICKSON  Virginia Bever  Viola Bradley  Julia
Brand  Naomi Chase  Mildred Earley  Joy Efteland  Margaret Hill  Bessie
Hitchcock  Mary  President  V'ice President  Secretary- Treasurer  Adviser 
SOCIETY ROLL  Bennett Howard  Paul Howell  Lyn Hughes  Jean Marquis 
Catherine Morse  Viola Poyhonen  Clarence Ragan  Lillian Roberts  Louise
Sommer  The Scholarship Society is the  only scholastic honorary
organiza-tion  in the school, existing not only to commend scholarly
achievement  but to promote an interest in other similar high ideals of
accomplishment.  Eighty-one

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Front Row: Jones, Cowan, Larson, Bowles, B bco'k  Second Row: Darnielle,
Atwood, Maki S!oan, Troll Third Row: Stoll, Johnson, Johanson, Reff, Young 
Fourth Row: Johnson, Hill, Hunt, Schekels, Galley, Moffat  Alkisiah Club 
1899  FALL AND WINTER OFFICERS  MARGARET HILL  EVELINE COWAN ARLENE
JOHANSON  MISS MILDRED MOFFAT  President  Vice-President 
Secretary-Treasurer Adviser  SPRING OFFICERS  KATHERINE HUNT  PHYLLIS CAIN 
ALICE BABCOCK  President  Vice President  Secretary-Treasurer  These girls
promote fellowship and camaraderie among all women students. They carry on
the club work by literary programs and social  activities. Their name is an
Indian word signifying "in the near fature."  Eighty-two

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Front Row: Lyle, Miss Sperry, Huntamer, Wallum, Sutherland, Burton, Troll,
Mrs. Scherer  Second Row: G. Anderson, Ebert, E. Smith, Plank, Jacobsen,
Ellis, Brand, Canfield, J. Anderson  Third Row: Korth, J. Hill, Thomas,
Larson, Thompson, G. Hunt, Malm, Blomberg, Warner  Fourth Row: Boynton,
Miss Mead, F. Johnson, Paul, Coffman, Graham, De Vries  Y. W. C. A.  1900 
FALL AND WINTER OFFICERS FLORENCE SUTHERLAND President  FRANCES RAGGE .
Vice President  JULIA BRAND Secretary ROWENA TARBOX . . . Treasurer  VERA
HEMBURY Women's League Representative  EDITH FALKNER .. Publicity Chairman 
MISS M. BELLE SPERRY . . . . . . Adviser  BESSIE HUNTAMER BETTY TROLL 
EUNICE BLOMBERG  GRACE HUNT  BEATRICE SMITH  DELILA KORTH  SPRING OFFICERS 
President  .Vic. e President  Secretary  S . . . Treasurer  Women's League
Representative SPublicity Chairman  'Thle Y. W. C. A. as a branch of the
national association, carries on  its work by means of lectures, Bible
classes, and social activities. This  year they celebrated the 20th
birthday of the national organization.  Eighty-three

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Front Row: Perry, Helland, Sammons, Hindley. Grimson, Bradley, Chase,
Philippi, Korthauer  Second Row: M. Bergeron, Sasee, Hawley, A. Jordan,
Belcher, Mrs. Summers, Kent, Boynton  Third Row: Working, Nesheim, Friese,
Slater, Fowler, Cooper  Fourth Row: Linrud, Morrison, Warren  Fifth Row:
Arnett, Goddard, R. Craft, S. Craft  Philomathean Society  1909  FALL AND
WINTER OFFICERS LOUISE DUNN  SIDNEY THAL  PEGGY PULLAR  MARY ELIZABETH
FOWLER  MR. H. C. PHILIPPI President  SV .ice-President 
Secretary-Treasurer  Reporter  Adviser  SPRING OFFICERS  JEAN PHILIPPI 
LILLIAN NESHEIM  MARIETTE BERGERON  DOROTHY SASSE  President 
Fice-President Secretary-Treasurer  Reporter  The Philomathean group gives
much time to various activities, with  the improvement of its members in
literary, musical, and social attain-ments  as its aim.  Eighty-four

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Front Row: Pederson, Barton, Burgen, Stanley, Arland, Van Ess, Parkhurst,
Springsteel  Second Row: Fillinger, E. Randrup, Ellis, Duell, Atkinson,
Korsborn, Anderson, Bogen  Third Row: Lindley, Jones, Jensen, Taylor,
Rajala, Howard  Fourth Row: Summers, Beasley, Gruell, Mather, Osborne,
Reese Vanadis Bragi  1915  FALL AND WINTER OFFICERS  ARTHUR BOGEN  AUDREY
JENSEN  ROSA VAN ESS  AMIE SYRE  HAROLD LINDLEY  MISS EMMA ERICKSON 
President  Vice-President Secretary  Treasurer  Sergeant-at-Arms  Adviser 
SPRING OFFICERS  VIOLA POYHONEN  WILLIAM OSBORNE  AUDREY JENSEN  BURTON
ADKINSON  CHESTER REESE  President  SV .ice-President  Secretary  Treasurer
 Sergeant-at-Arms  The Vanadis Bragi group, originally organized under the
name of  lRural Life, provides opportunity for a study of the activities,
such as  social and out-of-door interests which will be of use to its
members  in their community work as teachers.  Eighty-five

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Front Row: Jones, L. Young, Sullivan, Schagel, I. Young, Gibson, Bechtel 
Second Row: Miss Kinsman, R. Sheppard, Gable, Stine, N. Smith  Third Row:
Chichester, McKee, Turnbull, Larson, Evernden, Rodland  Thespian Club  1921
 FALL OFFICERS  BERNARD CHICHESTER  CELESTE KIENAST HELEN SULLIVAN  CARLYLE
JONES  REINHOLD OBERLATZ  MISS PRISCILLA KINSMAN  President Sice-President 
Secretary  Treasurer  Sergeant-at-Arms  .Adviser  WINTER OFFICERS  ELDRED
BECHTEL  ROSALIE STRONG  DOROTHY STRONG  BENNIE CROUCH  DAVID TURNBULL 
IRENE LARSEN  FRANK EVERNDEN  BENNIE CROUCH  REINHOLD OBERLATZ  President 
S Vice-President   Secretary  Treasurer  SPRING OFFICERS  SPresident 
Sice-President  Secretary  Treasurer  Sergeant- at-Arms  The Thespians, a
dramatic club, take up the study of plays and play-wrights,  thus
furthering the  interest and appreciation of literature among  their
members.  Eighty-six

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Front Row: Weber, Stickney, Thorlakson, Korsborn, McClurken, Benson, Arnett
 Second Row: Edmundson, Clark, Hamilton, Prigg, Bechtel, Dixon, Wanamaker 
Third Row: Carver, Geri, Anderson, Benson, Hunnicutt, Erickson, Jewell 
Fourth Row: Hemmi, McLaughlin, Reeves  "W" Club  1922  ALVIN ANDERSON  EARL
HEMMI  HENRY TURNER  MR. SAM CARVER  President  S Vice-President
Secretary-Treasurer  Adviser  Membership in the "W" Club is limited to men
who have earned a  letter in one of the major sports. The purpose of the
organization is the  promoting of a higher type of athletics and  higher
scholastic standards,  as well as good sportsmanship.  Ei nty-seven

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Front Row: C. Wilson, Stine, Gable, Philippi, Morrison, Kern, Schagel 
Second Row: Lind, R. Brown, V. Schmitt, Hughes, Fowler, Boynton,
Richardson, I. Young  Third Row: Peterson, Swalling, Jordan, Caldwell,
Thorpe, Moen  Fourth Row: M. Wilson, M. Sheppard, Graham, Lesh, Jenson,
Goddard, Rogers  Fifth Row: Sullivan, Burchette, Hoppe, Crouch, Kibble,
Rodland, Hemmi  Sixth Row: Stickney, Chichester, Sanford, Howell, Arnett,
Evernden  Drama Club  1923  FALL, WINTER AND SPRING OFFICERS  REINHOLD
OBERLATZ  BENNIE CROUCH  JEAN PHILIPPI  GERALDINE MCKEE  MARY ELIZABETH
FOWLER  MR. V. H. HOPPE .  President  Vice-President  Secretary  Treasurer 
Reporter Adviser  The study and interpretation of the drama is the declared
purpose  of this organization, and to this end they produce a quarterly
play, under  the able direction of Mr. Hoppe. (A banquet for the cast is
given after  each play, but that is only of interest to club members and
members-to-  be.)  Eighty-eight

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SOCIAL SCIENCE CLUB  Front Row: Sasse, Gnagey, Nesheim, Morrison, Fowler,
Chase  Second Row: Bever, Swalling, Dyer, S. Craft  Third Row: Hughes,
Philippi, R. Craft, Clark  Fourth Row: Ellis, Keppler, Finnegan, Sanford,
Swanson, Ludwig  Social Science Club  1924  NAOMI CHASE  TOM CLARk  LYN
HUGHES  MR. PELAGIUS WILLIAMS  President  SV ice-President  Secretary 
Adviser  This group was organized for the students interested in the field
of  social science. They discuss current problems and take trips to places
of  interest, thus gaining an understanding of many conditions which they 
will meet as teachers.  Eighty-nine

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Front Row: V. Schmitt. Philpott, Horswill, Pullar, Brodt, Patcham  Second
Row: F. Hait, G. Brown, Martin, Dyer, Working  Third Row: Caples, B. Brown,
Frederickson, F. Young  ELIZABETH BRODT PEGGY PULLAR  BETTY MARTIN  MR. H.
B. SMITH  ELIZABETH BRODT  PEGGY PULLAR  VIRGINIA  BEVER  FRANCES HAIGHT 
PEGGY PULLAR  BETTY STOKES  McDowell Club  1924  FALL OFFICERS  President 
SV . ic.e-.President  Secretary-Treasurer  Adviser  WINTER OFFICERS
President  SV .ce. -.President  Secretary-Treasurer  SPRING OFFICERS  .S .
. President  SVice- President  Secretary-Treasurer  To those interested in
music the McDowell Club offers special oppor- tunity  for the study of
composers and their works. This group was also  active in the interests of
the song  contest held at the Normal this spring.  Ninety

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Front Row: Burton, F. Johnson, N. Barton, Blumenroth, Reed, Whitford 
Second Row: Miss McPherson, Zander, Hunt, L. Jones, Taylor, Sollie,
Vanderpool, E. Randrup, F. Hall  Third Row: Frederickson, Blomberg,
Steinbrink, Malm, Passey, Dyal, Pellervo, McColm  NINA BARTON  MABEL
STEINBRINK MARGARET FRIBLEY  Miss ORPHA MCPHERSON  Tri C Club  1925  FALL
OFFICERS  President  SV.  ice-President  Secretary  Adviser  WINTER
OFFICERS  MABEL STEINBRINK  ETHEL BARTON LUELLA JONES  President 
Vice-President  Secretary  SPRING OFFICERS  CHRISTINE FREDERICKSON  NINA
BARTON  APHRA BLUMENROTH  President  Vice-President  Secretary Students
registered in the rural curriculum are eligible for member-ship  in this
club, which takes up the study of conditions in rural com-munities, 
thereby forwarding the interests of rural education.  Ninety-one

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Front Row: Snyder, Alexander, Metcalf, Legg, Jensen, Lesh  Second Row:
Jones, M. Lee, Fowler, D. Anderson  Third Row: Burchette, Keppler, Jarrett,
Prendergast  Fourth Row: Gudmundson, Davis, Cram, Chichester  Scribes Club 
1926  FALL OFFICERS  IRENE SCHAGEL  DOROTHY STRONG  KRISTINE THORDARSON 
MR. HERBERT FOWLER  President  Vice-President  Secretary  Adviser  WINTER
OFFICERS  NORMAN BURCHETTE  DOLLY ANDERSON  KRISTINE THORDARSON  SPRING
OFFICERS  MARK JARRETT  IRENE SCHAGEL  PHIL DAVIS  President  SV
.ice-President  Secretary- Treasurer  President  Vice-President  Secretary 
The Scribes Club encourages creative writing among the students.  The best
compositions are published in the quarterly magazine, thus giv-ing  those
outside the club a taste of the interesting work going on in the  group. 
Ninety-two

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Front Row: R. Brown, Nixon, Miss Cummins, Franett, V. Bever  Second Row:
Springsteel, Lind, Keppler, Hendricks, Prendergast, Davis  International
Relations Club  1927  FALL OFFICERS  HENRY TURNER GUY SPRINGSTEEL  AILEEN
NIXON  VIRGINIA BEVER  MISS NORA CUMMINS  WINTER AND SPRING OFFICERS  GuY
SPRINGSTEEL  HAMILTON CHURCH  ROSE BROWN  KATHERINE FRANETT  PHIL DAVIS 
President  Vice-President  Secretary  Reporter  Adviser  President  Vice-
President  Secretary  Treasurer  Reporter  The International Relations Club
is interested in the current happen-ings,  the international events, and
the efforts now being put forth for a  future of peaceful, progressive
civilizations.  Ninety-three

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Front Row: Johanson, Gwinette, Hendricks, Hill, Madden  Second Row: Cram,
Dyer, S. Craft, Lyle, Cooper  Gavel and Pulpit Club  1926  FALL OFFICERS 
EDWIN BENEDICT President  AUDREY GWINETT Vice-President  ARLENE JOHANSON
Secretary-Treasurer  MISS ALMA MADDEN Adviser WINTER AND SPRING OFFICERS 
STANLEY CRAFT  AUDREY GWINETT  EDITH DYER  President Vice-President 
Secretary-Treasurer  The Gavel and Pulpit is a debate club, which carries
on its activities  under the direction of Miss Alma Madden, debate coach. 
Ninety-four

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Front Row: Lakow, Jenkins, Mason, Davis  Second Row: Hendricks, McMillan,
Miss Ullin  Third Row: Swanson, Springsteel, Owens  Le Cercle Francaise 
1929  WINTER OFFICERS  PHIL DAVIS  ETHEL HENDRICKS  LAVINIA ALEXANDER 
HELEN SULLIVAN  LILLIAN ROBERTS  MISS ANNA ULLIN  PHIL DAVIS  ETHEL
HENDRICKS  MARJORIE JENKINS  HELEN SULLIVAN  LILLIAN ROBERTS  SPRING
OFFICERS  President  Vice-President  Secretary  Treasurer  Sergeant-at-Arms
 SA dviser  President  SV  .ice-President  . . Secretary  Treasurer 
Sergeant-at-Arms  Le Cercle Francaise, the French Club, has the distinction
of being  the only group engaged in the study of a foreign language; also
it is the  most recently organized group on the campus. Their activities
consist  mainly of discussions and lectures. Ninety-five

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page [96]

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I - '

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page [97]

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page [98]


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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page 99

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The Normal Elementary School  The Normal Elementary School, locally known
as "the Training  School," is but one of the number of fields in Bellingham
for practice  training. During the past year there have been  eight grades,
the kinder-garten,  and the ninth grade in session, averaging about thirty
pupils  in each grade.  On the next few pages are some chapters from the
actual daily  work and play of the various grades in "the Training School."
 Ninety-nine  I

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page 100

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One Hundred  nt-

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page 101

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Ninth Grade  Algebra  Fourth Grade Plays  "Peter Pan"  Before School with
the  Fifth Grade  Pre-Primary and Their  Rabbits  One Hundred One

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page 102


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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page [104]

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i  Si

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page 105

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For Meditative Tho'ts  June Commencement Procession  One Hundred Five

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page 106

     ----------

Home-Coming  Edward's Effigy  One Hundred Six

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page 107

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Home-Coming  First Prize After  One Hundred Seven

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page 108

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Campus Crumbs  Kitchen Crew Coquetry  One Hundred Eight  I

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page 109

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During Winters' Reign  More Fun!  Night and Snow  anow ISis  To the Highest
 Bidder  5" Uown Through the Trees  One Hundred Nine

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page 110

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Outdoor Sports  The Old Gang  Puff! Puff!  Camp Life Kulshan Cabin  At the
Summit  One Hundred Ten

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page 111

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What's This?  .ioonervllie  ."Queenie"  Frosh Dance  One Hundred Eleven  r

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page [112]


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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page [113]

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page [114]


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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page 115

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CARVER JEWELL HUNNICUT  Coach Assistant Coach Manager  Men's Athletics 
With a number of veterans back  in school to fill their old positions,  the
Normal football squad held  great promise of being one of the  best of
Viking grid machines in  several years. The new material  also showed to
good advantage,  and prospects were  1928 season.  OPPONENTS  W. S. A. C. 
Ellensburg  Cheney .  St. Martins  U. of W. Supers  U. of W. Frosh  bright
for the  AT  Bellingham  Ellensburg  Bellingham Bellingham  Seattle 
Bellingham  Though the Vikings won only  one of the six games played, they 
came through the season heroic-ally  and the Normal is proud of  the way in
which the fellows took  their defeats and won their lone  victory. 
Following are the schedule and  scores of the season's games. DATE  Oct. 13
 Oct. 19  Oct. 27  Nov. 3  Nov. 10  Nov. 117  VIKINGS  Vikings  Vikings 
Vikings  Vikings  Vikings  Vikings  Hamilton Erickson Anderson  One Hundred
Fifteen

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Eastwood Cox ' Stickney  Ellensburg Game  In the first Tri-Normal tilt of 
the season, the Viking grid mach-ine  was defeated at Ellensburg on 
October 19.  The weather, unlike that on the  western side of the
mountains,  was hot and dry, with a chilling  dry wind blowing across the
field.  All through the first three quar-ters  of the game the Vikings 
played a defensive brand of ball,  and it was not until in the 'latter  
part of the fourth quarter that  there was any chance for the Bell-ingham 
team to cut loose with anything besides straight football.  When they did
it was too late to  do more than threaten the Ellens- burg  goal, but this
was accom-plished,  for had there been a few  more seconds to play it is
quite probable that Bellingham would  have returned home with at least  a
score to her credit. They had  lost all but their fighting spirit  and
their desire to win, and these  two qualities they clung to until  they at
last relieved their pent up  feelings on the unsuspecting St.  Martin's
eleven.  VIKING-RANGER MIX-UP  One Hundred Sixteen

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Geri Moe McLaughlin  Cheney Game  "Home-Coming"  For one to invite a man
into his  home to help him  celebrate the re-newal  of old time
friendships, is  a very highly commendable thing  to do. But for that man
to leave  one's home after the celebration,  taking with him all the glory
of  the occasion, while his friends all  stand around and wonder what is 
the matter with their host, is quite  another thing.  Yet such was the case
when the  Cheney Savages were invited to  participate in the annual
home-coming  event at Bellingham Nor-mal.  The Savages, casting aside  all
consideration for their host,  proceeded to beat him at his own  game in
his own home, and make  him like it.  The game was so close that at  almost
any minute the score  might have been changed into a  Viking victory
instead of a defeat.  The Savages had not forgotten the  six to nothing
defeat that the Vi-kings  handed them the season be-fore  at Cheney, and 
they were only  "getting even."  FROSH TANGLE  One Hundred Seventeen

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Williams Gunn Weber  St. Martin's Game  Of Viking victories we long to 
read, more than anything else. Here is the story of the only Vi-king 
victory in the 1928 football  season.  The Norsemen invited the St.
Martin's College football team to  play in the Viking backyard, again  this
season and they accepted the invitation. The rangers came all  the way from
Lacey to play a nice  little game of football, and the Vi- kings  didn't
seem to care a bit. The  Normalites tramped on the boys  from Lacey so much
that the vis- itors  began to think that the  home town boys did not play
fair.  The Vikings teased the visitors  along for a whole quarter and a 
half before they made a score.  Then in the closing minutes of the  second
period of play, Odell ran  wild to make a 55 yard gain before  he was
forced out of bounds on  St. Martin's four- yard line. "Red"  Williams then
took the ball for  two plays and put it on the one-yard  line, and Chuck
Erickson put  it across on a hard line smash, for  the only score of the
game.  A SAVAGE PILE  One Hundred Eighteen

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Haeske O'Dell Dickey  Super Varsity Game  Sand is often one of the prime 
requisites of a football player,  but  the game at Seattle with the U. of 
W. Super Varsity eleven was the  "sandiest" game this writer has  
witnessed. It was on a wind-bleached,  rain-swept field of sand  that the
Normal Vikings went  down to defeat to the tune of 6  to 0.  The first few
minutes of the  game saw the loss of two star men,  Erickson and Moe. But
despite  the loss of these two men, the  Norsemen fought on and were 
glorious even in defeat. The Vi-king  spirit was as undefeated as  ever. 
Frosh Game  On the seventeenth of Novem-ber, the U. of W. Frosh invaded 
the Viking home and walked off  with the Norsemen's goat to the  unpleasant
score of 13 to 0. The  locals were out-weighed and out-played  in every
department of the  game. When the Norsemen had  the ball, they could not
penetrate  the Frosh defense. Line smash  and end run alike were turned 
back repeatedly for no gain. The  Viking aerial attack was as a kite 
before a .March wind. Only once  did the Norsemen come within  scoring
distance of the goal and  then the Frosh line was akin to  the rock of
Gibraltar.  Reeves Gravrock Bechtel Cole  One Hundred Nineteen

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Dixon Lundberg McClurken Clark  Varsity Basketball Resume  Beginning the
twelfth of Janu-ary,  1929, the Viking Varsity cag-ers  opened one of the
most suc-cessful  hoop seasons that they  have had for several years.  The
first game was with St.  Martin's College, when the Norse-men  trounced the
Rangers with a  41 to 15 score. Then the Roths-child's  team from Seattle
visited  the Normalites and nearly walked  away with the contest. However, 
in the closing minutes of the game  the Normal boys came to the front  and
took the mix from the visit-ors,  33 to 30. The game was one  of the
fastest ever seen on a Bel-lingham  floor.  The first of the Tri-Normal
ser-ies  came with Ellensburg at the  home of the Wildcats. They tram-pled 
all over the Norsemen and  won the fray by a large score.  On the following
night the Vi- kings  invaded the town of Yakima  and left a defeated
quintet of Gen-erals.  The Norsemen outpointed the Generals by ten
counters, and  went on their way across the state  and tackled the Cheney
Savages in  the second Tri-Normal contest.  This was another victory for
the  fast Viking cagers.  From their victory  over the  Savages the Vikings
went into  Spokane and walked all over the  quintet of the Spokane College.
 Thence the Norsemen, from a suc-cessful  trip, returned to the home 
courts where they met a hard de-feat  at the hands of the University  of
Washington Freshmen.  The week following the Frosh game was one of victory
and de-feat  for the Vikings. The Cheney  Savages visited in the early part
 of the week and were sent home a  beaten bunch. Later in the week,  the
Ellensburg Wildcats invaded Bellingham and marched triumph-antly  away with
the Viking goat.  Then in Seattle the next week the Vikings lost another
hard game  to the Frosh. After this they  traveled to Lacey and won from 
the St. Martin's quint. The next  week they closed the season with  a win
over the Spokane College  quintet. Thus closed a successful  season.  One
Hundred Twenty

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Benson O'Dell McLaughlin Anderson  Varsity Basketball Schedule  BELLINGHAM
AT:  Home  Home Ellensburg  Yakima  Cheney  Spokane  Home  Home  Home 
Seattle  Lacey  Home  SCORE  41  33  15  36  36  36  31  30  19  25  33  50
 OPPONENTS  St. Martin's  Rothschilds  Ellensburg  Generals Cheney. 
Spokane College  U. of W. Frosh  Cheney  Ellensburg  U. of W. Frosh  St.
Martin's  Spokane College  DATE  Jan. 12  Jan. 18  Jan. 23  Jan. 24  Jan.
25  Jan. 26  Jan. 31  Feb. 1  Feb. 9  Feb. 15 Feb. 16  Feb. 21  SCOIRE  15 
30  37  26  24  25  34  20  22  35  23  14  One Hundred Twenty-one

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Front Row: Thorlakson, Dixon, Hobbs  Second Row: Lundberg, Geri, Benson G.,
McLaughlin  Super Varsity Basketball  Riding rough-shod over nearly  all
competition in the City Class  A Basketball League for the sea-son  of
1928-29, The Normal Super  Varsity Basketball Team came out  on the top of
the scramble for the  Class A cup.  In the final contest, the Supers 
trounced the Roland Wreckers, 47  to 38,  and were in a position to  claim
the trophy for their own.  The Supers were up against as  hard a schedule
as any team would  want to face at any time, and all  of their games were
hard fought  and close. Not only did the Supers  have a tough schedule to
buck, but  they had to give up the best of  their players to the Viking
Varsity  squad, when it started out in the  collegiate race. Thus weakened,
 the Supers did honor to them-selves  and to the school by coming  out
ahead in the race for the cup.  In winning this year's cup, the  Super
quintet set a precedent for  the teams of the future seasons to  follow,
that will tax the fortitude  of many a hard working lad.  The Supers had a
hard path to  cut in the wilderness of competi-tion  and they did their job
as only  Supers could do it.  One Hundred Twenty-two

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Front Row: Command, Cole, Weber, Leatha  Second Row: Legoe, Rodland,
Rodosovich, Erickson, Bay Junior Varsity Basketball  The Normal Junior
Varsity Bas-ketball  Team finished its third  successful season in the
Class B  League of the City of Bellingham.  The Juniors started the season 
with a win over the Junior Me-chanics  on November twentieth.  The game was
an easy victory for  the Normalites, being won by a  score of 65 to 17. The
next game  the Junior quint did not fare so  well, for they dropped their
con-test  to the Independents by a nar-row  margin.  Followed a series of
Jayvee  wins that carried them through to  a tie with the Y. M. C. A.
quintet  for the first half of the split sea-son.  The Jayvee squad was a
team of  all forwards, and every man on the  squad had to be a good shot. 
While the Junior team won most  of its games by a large margin  and big
scores, it is singular to  note that the players from the Normal were not
listed in the  ranks of the high score men of  the season. The fact that
all of  the Jayvee players were good  shots probably accounts for their 
staying right up in front most of  the time.  After coming out in a tie for
 the first half honors, the Jayvees  went out and grabbed off all of the 
first honors in  the second half of  the season, and refused to share  them
with anybody else.  One Hundred Twenty- three

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Cox, Keplinger, Erickson, Thal, Fairbanks  Varsity Tennis  BELLINGHAM VS.
U. OF W. FROSH AT SEATTLE, MAY 4TH  TRI-NORMAL MEET-BELLINGHAM, ELLENSBURG,
CHENEY, AT CHENEY MAY 25THI  FROSH MATCH  On Saturday, May 4, Coach Carver
took a four-man squad, consisting  of Thal, Erickson, Keplinger, and
Church, down to Seattle to meet the  strong University of Washington
freshman team.  Four singles, and two doubles matches were played, with the
fresh-men  holding the edge over the  Normalites.  TRI-NORMAL MATCH  May
25th, the Viking's three-man team will journey to Cheney, scene  of the
Tri-Normal meet, with high hopes of bringing back the Tri-Normal 
championship which they lost to Cheney last year. Two singles and one 
doubles match form the schedule.  Although this year's squad, at the date
of writing, does not appear  as flashy as last year's team, it is believed
that they will take a stronger  combination to Cheney than the one which
represented Bellingham at  the Tri-Normal meet of 1928, which was held at
Ellensburg.  One Hundred Twenty-four

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Front Row: Hughes, Mascot; Hobbs, Miller. Hamilton, Stiger, McClurken 
Second Row: Clark, Bailey, Dixon, Williams, Rodland, Thorsen  Third Row:
Thorlakson, Gaither, Lundberg, Coach Jewell, Hunnicut, O'Dell, Moaad 
Varsity Baseball  Wet weather was one of the greatest of the features of
the 1929 baseball season for the Viking pastimers.  Rain hindered the early
season practice, just when the early work  would be of the most benefit.
Rain caused the Viking coaches to post-pone  the first game of the season
with St. Martin's College on April 13.  On April 20, the game with the
University of Washington Varsity had to  be dropped because of the crying
tendencies of Old Jupe Pluvius.  During the following week, good weather
prevailed until Saturday,  April the twenty-seventh, when the weather again
threatened to stop the  game between the Norsemen and the Freshman team
from the U. of W. Following the Frosh game, the Viking schedule was all
shot to pieces  due to the cancelling of two games  with Centralia Junior
College, and  the games with Cheney Normal.  With the Freshmen out of the
way, St. Martin's was next on the list.  After disposing of the Rangers,
the Vikings journeyed to Ellensburg  to tangle with the Wildcats. Then
remained only the return games with  the Frosh and St. Martin's diamond
aggregations.  One Hundred Twenty-five

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Front Row: Carboneau, Howell, Rajala, Bright, Axelson, Cole  Second Row:
Beckes, Brinkman, Oberlatz,  Hemmi, Davis  Third Row: Eagan, Chichester,
Cox, Bey, Kaas, Erickson  Track  Four meets were scheduled for  the Viking
cinder artists during  the season of 1929. The first of  these meets was at
Seattle on May  4, when Coach Carver sent a med-ley  relay team to
participate in the  Washington Relay  Carnival.  The second meet came on
Wed-nesday,  May eighth, also at Se-attle,  where the Viking team met  the
University of Washington  Freshmen.  Following the Freshman meet,  the
College of Puget Sound sent a  team to Bellingham to attempt  another
defeat of the Vikings. The  meet with C. P. S. was expected  to be a hard
and close one, with  the visitors as the favorites.  With the first three
meets out  of the way, the fourth came along  on the twenty-fourth of May.
This  time the Norsemen traveled all the way across the state to Cheney, 
where they entered the Tri-Nor-mal  meet.  At the very first of the season,
 track prospects were good for a  well-balanced squad. It looked  as if
there were plenty of weight   men in school to go along with the  runners.
Later it developed that  the weight men were falling far short of early
expectations.  Outstanding in their track and  field work are: Erickson,
who is  getting his javelin out over 180  feet, and is doing a little over 
One Hundred Twenty-six

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Arnett Axelson Bey Bright Brinkman  nineteen feet in the broad-jump; 
Carboneau, who is doing the mile in about 4'40"2; Bey, in the pole-vault 
is getting right up in the air;  and the sprinters are led by vet-eran Earl
Hemmi. Bright, who  is last year's record holder of the  mile event, is
still in champion-ship  form, and  promises to make  things for any
competition.  In the middle distances, Howell,  Axelson, and Eagan are  the
lead-ing  contenders, while Brinkman is  going strong in the two-mile 
event.  Looking ahead into the latter  part 'of the season, it might be 
safe to say that Viking hopes for  championship are brighter than they have
been for several sea-sons.  Carboneau Cox Erickson Howell Hemmi  One
Hundred Twenty- seven

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Massey Ott Sollie Goodman Bever  Women's Athletics  Women's athletics has
contin-ued  to be one of the major acti-vities  of this school through a
very  busy and interesting year. The  goal, "A sport for every girl," is 
indeed being realized. To Miss  Kathleen Skalley, Miss Helen Do-zier,  and
Miss Grace Sullivan,  much credit is due for their en-thusiastic 
leadership and skillful  coaching.  New sports which may prove  popular are
introduced each sea-son.  This year serve-us ball, bad-minton  and
speedball were added  to the sports program.  To provide for the most
effec-tive  practice, the girls turning out  for each sport are divided
into in-tramural  teams which play off a  series of games. From this group,
 class teams are selected. At the  end of the season, those girls who  have
been outstanding in skill, ac-  W. A. A.  Front Row: Howe, Solberg,
Quackenbush, Johanson, G. Evatt, Harler, Parkhurst, Ott, Sammons  Second
Row:  L. Bergeron, Helland, Ginnette, M. Bergeron, Foster, Brooks, Massey,
A. Hall, Babcock  Third Row: Neeley, McNeil, Amunds, Moore, Welke,
Keltanen, Norwood, Goodman  Fourth Row: Graham, Swanson,  Sumey, F. Hall,
Norwood, Slater, E. Evatt, Austin, Marz  One Hundred Twenty-eight

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION DIRECTORS  Sullivan Dozier Skalley  curacy and
sportsmanship are  given places on the all star team.  The Women's Athletic
Associa-tion,  which is the center of the  activities, was very efficiently
di-rected  by Dot Sollie and her crew.  Banquets at the end of each sport 
season, a kid party, masquerade,  carnival are some of the activi-ties 
which will be remembered  with pleasure. Viqueen Lodge, the camp site  on
Sinclair Island, which is owned  by the Women's Athletic Associa-tion,  was
inhabited by many jolly  groups during every season of the  year. When the
spring days ar-  George  rived, the girls wore their working  clothes and
prepared for days of  landscaping and general improve- ment  around their
cabin.  A campaign to earn money for  the Lodge was heartily entered  into
by the girls. The did every  kind of job from shining shoes  and tutoring
to staging a very  successful student- faculty pro-gram.  An International
Play Day was  sponsored June 1 by the Normal  school,when women from the
Uni-versity  of British Columbia and  the University of Washington  were
our guests.  Viqueen Lodge  One Hundred Twenty-nine

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E. EVATT A FAST DRIBBLE  Head of Sport  Hockey  Armed with shin guards,
hock-ey  sticks and much  determination,  about thirty aspirants prepared
to  master the art of dribbling a  hockey ball down the field, of  passing
successfully before being  attacked, of backing up the for-ward  line.  The
group was divided into two  intramural teams, the Bumps and  Smashers. In
the three games  which were played, the Bumps  won the series with scores
of 2-1,  1-4, 3-2.  With everyone in good form  from practice, the
interclass ser-ies  were initiated by a scoreless,  hard fought battle on a
frozen  field.  The second game ended with a  5-1 victory over the
Sophomores.  This game gave the champion-ship  to the freshmen for the
final  game was again a tie.  SOPHOMORES FRESHMEN  Norwood, Moore, Craw,
Johanson Norwood, Goodman, Slater, Swanson, Evatt, Arnold  Johnson, Bever
Gnagey, Hall, Babcock  One Hundred Thirty

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MOORE ON THE FLOOR  Head of Sport  Basketball  Cries of "Slick shot,"
"Pretty  pass," "Good guarding" could be  heard from the basketball side 
lines after the teams had gone  through carefully coached practice 
turnouts for accuracy.  Before securing a coveted place  on the class
teams, each member  was required to pass a rigid test  with a grade of B or
better.  The Freshmen, backed by the stellar playing of Sue McMillan  and
Berdette Harter at center,  won the interclass championship.  The games
were 30-25 and 21-19  at the close of the contest.  SOPHOMORES FRESHMEN 
Front Row: Keltanen, Davis, Johnson, Norwood front Row: McMillan, Hall,
Coventon  Second Row: Moore, Makie, Rutherford, Foster, Johnson Secona Row:
Arnold, Harler, L. Bergeron, Babcock,  E. Evatt, Williams  One Hundred
Thirty-one  FOSTER  Head of Sport

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NET PLAY  Volleyball  "Don't let it land"-the old cry  of the volleyball
player as she  knocks the ball back and forth  across the net with speed
and ac-curacy,  issued from the gym with  unusual emphasis this season. 
The intramural series was  played off between the Servites,  Stretchers,
Parameciums, and Net Nymphs. Although the competi-tion  was fired and keen,
the Net  Nymphs won the series undefeated.  In the interclass games, a
series  of six games was played. The  Sophomores won all the honors of  the
volleyball court, taking every  interclass game on the season's  schedule. 
AUSTIN FRESHMEN  Head of Sport L. Bergeron, F. Hall, Harler, M. Bergeron,
K. Fleek  One Hundred Thirty-two

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AUSTIN FAST PLAY ON THE SOCCER FIELD  Head of Sport  Soccer  Although
besmeared with mud and water, the soccer enthusiasts  would never stop
lauding this pop-ular  sport. Hard fought games, most of them ending
scoreless, or  in a tie, were evidences of the  whole-hearted competition
in the games. The entire turnout gained  effective practice during the
intra-mural  series.  SOPHOMORES  Front  Row: Norwood, Johnson, Bever 
Second Row: Keltanen, Foster, G. Evatt, Austin,  Johanson  The Freshmen,
although ham-pered  by the exceptional playing  of Dot Sollie, sophomore,
won the  first interclass game by a 2-1  score. In the two remaining  games
of the series, the teams had  to leave the battlefield because of 
darkness, with a 1-1, 0-0 tie, thus  giving the championship to the 
Freshmen. FRESHMEN  Front Row: Norwood, Goodman, Slater, F. Hall, A. Hall, 
Babcock, Gnagey  Second Row: Marz, M. Bergeron, Arnold, L. Bergeron,
Harler,  E. Evatt, Swanson  One Hundred Thirty-three

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COWAN Front Row: Cowan, Coventon  Head of Sport Second Row: Neely,
Williams, Dahlman  Third Row: Massey, Parkhurst, Swanson  Fourth Row:
Smith, Howe  Swimming  Speed, good form, and correct  methods of life
saving were dis-played  at the swimming meet  which was the grand finale of
a successful swimming season.  The Sophomores, by winning  the exciting
relay races, took the championship.  The Life Saving team demon-strated 
their work in carries and  holds.  March second, many of the girls  went to
the U. of W. to a Play Day  for the Normal school and U. of  British
Columbia. They had a very  interesting and delightful time.  Front Row:
I'arkhurst, Smith, Coventon, Massey, Brooks,  Cowan, Arland  Second Row:
Dow, Williams, Wilke, Howe, Sullivan, Dahlman, Gable, Swanson, Shepard  One
Hundred Thirty-four

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SPEEDBALL IN THE AIR  Speed Ball  Speedball, a combination of  soccer and
basketball, was intro- duced  into the sports activities  Spring quarter.
The great deal of  enthusiasm with which the girls  turn out for this sport
verifies its  popularity. The game is based on  speed. The girls learned
rapidly  the tactics of getting the ball down  the field in the least
amount of  time.  Baseball  "Batter up!" Thus were many  exciting games
started during the  baseball season. Many of the or-ganized  houses formed
teams  and  a series of games were played off.  This gave many more girls
the op-portunity  to play than is afforded  by the regular turnout. The 
classes were tied for honors when  the yearbook went to press. SOLLIE A
PRACTICE GAME  Head of Sport  One Hundred Thirty-five

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Dancing at Fairhaven Park  Natural Dancing  One of the most popular
recrea-tional  activities as well as a regu-lar  Physical Education subject
is  Natural Dancing.  The aims are to develop grace-ful  movements and body
poise  through a natural, enjoyable  means.  Each spring the girls exhibit 
the work they have done in Natur-al  Dancing in a dance program.  Miss
Dozier has done much to  help develop a keen appreciation  of natural
beauty in dancing.  Hiking  "There's a long, long trail a-winding  Into the
land of my  dreams..."  Our hiker sings these lines and  smiles
contentedly, as memory  brings back pictures ever filled  with fascination.
Once again, with  happy comrades, she follows Miss  George over the trail,
(winding  through mid-Autumn's warm, sun-lit  forest, while leaves of
russet,  burnt-orange, and gold are rust-ling  and dancing around her feet.
 In winter, the trail leads  through fairy wonders untold, for  Jack Frost
has draped trees, bush-es,  and ferns in fluffy, white lace,  glittering
and sparkling where the sunlight reaches. How quiet the  woodland seems
now!  With spring, comes the thought  of Mt. Constitution. When once  on
its summit, the hiker imagines  the Sound, dotted with number-less 
islands,  truly tilted on edge,  all for her to behold.  Wherever she be,
on Mt. Baker's  still snows, or by windswept  Puget Sound with its waves
dash-ing  high, the hiker learns to know  Nature. She scarcely needs think
of the All-Star Hiking Team as  an incentive when Saturday  comes. She is
heartily glad that  these wonderful hikes are for ev-ery  girl in school! 
One Hundred Thirty-six

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Badminton  One Hundred Thirty-seven

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page [138]

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page [139]

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     Klipsun, 1929 - Page [140]

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j

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Class Affairs  A "Dance of the Nations" was  given by the Frosh, November
10th.  Effective decorations of the flags of  different nations were a
feature of  the party. During the intermission  a program of representative
folk  dances further carried out the Na-tions  idea.  Cupid crowned Louise
Griffin,  Queen of Hearts of the Freshman  Party February 15. Joyce Arnold 
and Rosalie Strong were the Maids  of Honor, and Mildred Kent, Norma 
Freeman, Mary Clearwater and Ruth  Irwin, her other attendants. Bobby  i
:Kessler was the charming Cupid.  Queen Louise  The Sophomore " Jingle -
Bells "  dance on Friday, December 14, was  a decided success. The holiday
spirit  prevailed and the gym was decked  with holly greens and Christmas 
trees. During the intermission Santa  passed out gifts to the guests.  The
gymnasium was transformed  into a floating palace with port  holes, fog
horns, a twelve mile limit  and a bar, for the Sophomore "Sea  Going" party
on April 5. A deck was  equipped with card tables for those who did not
dance, and a gypsy for-tune  teller entertained the curious.  Soph Tars 
One Hundred FQtty- one

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Women's League Quarterly Informals  A  ,t' r"  8  L r C  One Hundred
Forty-two  This year six informals were giv-en,  two each quarter, one by
the  Women's League and one by the  Dormitory girls. These dances were 
very cleverly planned and the effects  were most attractive. The dances 
carried out distinctive ideas for the  different seasons. Catherine Morse, 
Social Chairman of the Women's  League, deserves much credit for  these
succesful functions.  An Indian Summer Frolic, the fall  informal of the
Women's League,  was given November 2nd in the Edens  Hall dining room.
Amidst relics and  some of the symbols of American  Indians, a hundred and
twenty cou-ples  enjoyed a most delightful even-ing.  A cunning wigwam in
one cor-ner  was the well concealed punch  booth. The appropriate
decorations  were duie to the efforts of Ouida Da-vidson  and her
committee.  A modernistic dance with gor-geously  colored  octagonal lamp 
shades gave a weird and unusual  glow to the Edens Hall dining-room  when
the Outside  Girls had their In-formal,  March 9th. Jay Curtis and  his
Melody Makers played behind a  cream curtain and the red lights and 
vividly painted panels gave much  modernistic atmosphere.  The "Dance of
Dreams" was the  theme of the Women's League Infor-mal  given May 3rd in
the Edens Hall  dining-room, which was transformed  into a dream room with
balloons,  wisteria and billowy affairs-depic-tive  of growing  things.
Lattice work  and wisteria formed the punch booth  from which girls in
natural dancing  costumes served refreshments.  ~

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Edens Hall Quarterly Imformals  "Wintertime" was the atmosphere  in which
the "dorm" girls enjoyed their first informal of the year, De-cember  8th.
Decorations of icicles,  snow and evergreens were cleverly  arranged by
Virginia Schmitt and  her committee. The Melody Makers  furnished the music
which lent much  pleasure to the occasion.  In a typically Irish setting
with  lights of a medieval castle shining  from the background, the girls
at  Edens Hall gave a Blarney Dance,  March 2nd in the Blue Room. Punch was
served from a rustic well by two  Irish girls in their green costumes. 
Irish dances were printed in the green pigs, the programs. This
in-teresting  and enjoyable Irish Wake  was in charge of Virginia Schmitt,
Edens Hall Social Chairman.  A huge likeness of the Oriental  Buddah looked
down upon the Edens  Hall Spring Informal. Garlands of  wisteria and
lighted Japanese lan-terns  festooned the hall, transform-ing  it into an
Oriental summer gar-den.  Colorful panels picturing man-darins  and
fire-expelling dragons  gazed at the party from behind the  wisteria.  Jane
L'Eveque, social chairman  of Edens Hall, was commended high-ly  for the
success of this informal.  There were two informals last  summer, one for
the Edens Hall girls  and one planned by the Women's  League. The former
featured a Jap-anese  theme, and the latter trans-formed  the hall into a
summer day  in Hawaii.  One Hundred Forty-three

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Kid Party  The Women's League annual  Kid Party in honor of the incom-ing 
freshmen girls took place in  the "Big Gym," October 5th.  Decorations of
pink and blue  were effective and the "kid" cos-tumes  added  much gayety
to the  scene. The evening's diversion  was dancing; the music was
furn-ished  by a girls' orchestra.  Catherine Morse, Social Chair-man  of
the Women's League, was  in charge of the affair.  W. A. A. Dance  The W.
A. A. Dance December  7th, under the direction of Rose  Brooks was a clever
affair at  which part of the girls were  dressed as boys. Prizes were 
awarded the three best imperson-ators. Dancing was the chief di-version  of
the evening and music  was furnished by a girls' orches-tra.  A program of
folk dances, a  pianologue, natural dancing and  piano solos were also
enjoyed by  the girls. During the Spring quar-ter  the W. A. A. presented a
novel  all-girls' carnival dance.  "Rec" Hour  The students gather together
 every Friday afternoon for an  hour of Recreational Dancing in  the Big
Gym. The  music is furn-ished  by Jay Curtis and his Music  Makers.  One
Hundred Forty-four

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Fifth Annual Home-Coming  The fifth annual Home-Coming was an enjoyable
week-end of renew-ing  old friendships and making new ones. The success of
the affair was  largely due to Joe Hermsen, the general chairman, who was
assisted by  Glen Goddard, bonfire chairman; Eleanore Brown, luncheon
chairman, and Dorothy Sasse, dance chairman.  The celebration started with
a huge bonfire and Pep Rally, Friday night, October 26. Luncheon was served
at Edens Hall and the Cafeteria,  after which was the football struggle
between Bellingham and Cheney.  The grand climax was the dance at the
armory Saturday evening,  where Grads gathered together beneath banners for
their own classes.  The music was furnished by Ralph Hennes' orchestra. 
Men's Club Dance  The men of the school entertained in the Eden's Hall
dining room  on February 8th. Under the soft glow of shaded lights and
greenery, one hundred couples danced to the music of the "Washington
Ramblers."  Joe Hermsen, social chairman, was in charge of the enjoyable
affair.  Winter Tea  The All-school Tea, sponsored by the Women's League,
was given at  Edens Hall, Thursday, January 3rd, from 4:00 to 5:30.  An
interesting musical program was presented by talented students  of the
school. Miss Leona Sundquist, Miss Kathleen Skally, Miss Hazel  Plympton
and Miss Ruth Platt, faculty members, poured.  The tea is the annual custom
for the all-school mixers in the Winter  quarter.  One Hundred Forty-five

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Autographs  One Hundred Forty-six  ___

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Autographs  One Hundred Forty-seven

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Autographs  One Hundred Forty-eight

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BELLI GHAM  is proud of  The Normal-by-the-sea  Lroud of the splendid
reputation  it holds among educators  the country over.  Proud of the
finely equipped  recruits it adds yearly to the  teaching professsion of
the  q rowinq west.  And Bellinqham bids godspeed  and good luc to the
depart-inq students and extends a  heartl welcome to those  who come. 
UNION PIINTING COMPANV BELLINGHAM'S LEADING PPINTING  AND PUBLISHING HOUSE 
One Hundred Forty-nine  __ _ __

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JUhotog Iraphers  'Photographers  LIVEt FD1RLVLLRS  One Hundred Fifty  _ _
__ __

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One Hundred Fifty-one

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ay an ideal of success  lead you to give the  world your best, and  may you
receive the compensation that comes to one who earnestly  follows the trail
left by an ideal  that beckons from ahead.  IIU

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