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1932

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     Klipsun, 1932


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     Klipsun, 1932 - Cover


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     Klipsun, 1932 - Page [2] of cover


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     Klipsun, 1932 - Endpaper


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     Klipsun, 1932 - Endpaper


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     Klipsun, 1932 - Page [1]

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Ex Libris

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Cathleen Hill ... Editor Charles Dowell ... Business manager ... Eilene
Morrison ... Art editor COPYRIGHT  May, Nineteen Thirty-Two

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Klipsun Published by Associated Student Body Washington State Normal School
Bellingham, Washington May, 1932

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President C. H. Fisher President's Message The coming and going of students
each year brings joy and regret to the faculty. Joy at the opportunity of
getting acquainted and working with a new group of students. Regret that
students after a few years of happy associations are to leave the school to
assume responsibility in the world of affairs. The satisfaction of seeing
students grow in intellectual attainments, social responsibility and
technical knowledge and skill is further enhanced by seeing students leave
the school to undertake responsible positions for which they are prepared.
The Klipsun is regarded as an indispensible record of happy days spent
together in living, learning and growing. May this record so well set forth
by graduates of the class of 1932, be a never failing source of beautiful
and inspiring memories. C. H. Fisher

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Foreword  As sunset paints beautiful memories of a day across the dreaming
horizon, may this Klipsun imprint upon our minds the memory of all
precious, past things of our Normal days; as foaming, emerald, mountain
waters roar the story of the great icefields from which they spring, may
this book embody a bit of the strength of ideals, the invigorating power
and inspiration, that comes from working together, day by day, toward a
common goal; as the gentle murmur of spring rains sings the prophecy of all
the sweet summer to come, may these pages suggest the hope and trust, the
joy, its anticipation and the spirit of adventure with which we face the
wilderness of years ahead.

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Dedication  To sun and skies and winging birds, to winds and trees and all
the creatures of the woods, to honeyed flowers and breeze-bent grass, to
dreaming lakes and rushing streams, to brooding, bouldered hills and ferny
deeps, to jagged ranges of sparkling, icy crags, to all the manifestations
of nature in which we live, as one glad day succeeds another -- to that
great, throbbing spirt of the infinite outdoors, we dedicate this
northwestern edition of the Klipsun.

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Table of Contents Administration Classes Activities Organizations Athletics
Training School School Life

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Classic walls and classic trees -- the garden of intellect

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Among cool shadows and green knolls students stroll and dream.

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This is the Home of Color and of Light.

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The wide skies, broad hills and tide-moved waters of our bay.

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Far above the bay's blue waters Stands our own Sehome.

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Guarded all around my mountains Crowned by Baker's dome.

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ADMINISTRATION  Through the lens of the ranger's field glass, vast  and
mighty forests wind-whipped, rain-swept,   sun-scorched--man guarding
Nature.  Before the efficient eyes of the school administrator, multitudes
of eager youth--searching, longing, hoping--  man guarding Humanity.

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Jones Bever Marquis  Deans  DEAN OF THE SCHOOL  James Bever, dean of the
school, has held this position since 1924,  having been with the school
since 1909, at which time he was made head  of the Department of Social
Science.  Mr. Bever received his B. Ped., B. A. and M. A. degrees from
Drake University. He has done graduate work at the Universities of Chicago,
 Washington and California.  During the winter quarter, Miss Nora B.
Cummins assumed the du-ties  of this office in the absence of Dean Bever,
who was taking graduate  work at the University of California.  The event
of chief interest, in this office, during the past year was  the revision
of curricula due to new requirements for diplomas.  DEAN OF  WOMEN  Miss
Adele M. Jones received her B. S. and M. A. degrees from  Teacher's
College, Columbia University. In 1923 she became a member  of the faculty
and assumed the duties of Dean of Women. While on a leave of absence during
the winter quarter, the respon-sibilities  of the office were placed in the
 hands of Miss Mildred Tremain,  secretary to Miss Jones.  This office
takes care of all social functions and gives help to any  woman student
needing assistance on school or personal matters.  DEAN OF MEN  W. J.
Marquis, Dean of Men, became a member of the faculty in  1923, being
associated with the Department of Education. In 1925 he  was appointed to
the position which he now holds.  To Dean Marquis, the men students may go
with their problems.  Seventeen

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Swanson Buchanan Buchanan Banner Hughes  Office Force  INEZ SWANSON MRS.
PHYLLIS BUCHANAN S. J. BUCHANAN  Recorder Assistant Accountant Accountant 
MRS. EDITH R. BANNER EVELYN HUGHES  Assistant Accountant Assistant
Accountant  Library Staff  The head librarian, Miss Mabel Zoe Wilson, has
assisting her, Miss  Beatrice Doty, children's librarian; Miss Pearl Reese,
reserve librarian;  Miss La Verne Farlowe, charging desk; Mrs. E. P.
Spearin, reference li-brarian,  and Miss Lillian George, cataloguer. 
Working under these staff members are a number of student libra-rians.  On
the first floor is located the children's library, current periodicals, 
and reserve book room.  The main reading room, closed stacks, card
catalogue, and charging  desk are on the second floor.  Farlow Doty Reese
George Spearin Wilson  Eighteen

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Bouck Tremain Hayes Jones  Fitcha Brigham Pershon O'Mal:ey  Administrative
Assistants  Because of the large amount of work carried on in each
administra-tive  office, a secretary to each officer is necessary.  Each
secretary renders a valuable and efficient service in the office  she
represents.  The assistant administrative officers are:  JULIA BOUCK . . .
. Secretary to the Dean  KATHERINE HAYES Secretary to Director of Training
School  MILDRED TREMAIN . . Secretary to the Dean of Women CHARLOTTE
BRIGHAM . . . Secretary, Research Bureau  KATHLEEN O'MALLEY, t. N. . .
Assistant to School Nurse  ALLEGRA JONES . . . Assistant in Service
Department  BERNICE PERSHON Assistant in Service Department  ORLEANE FITCHA
. . . . Main Office Secretary  Nineteen

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ARNTZEN, EDWARD J.  Social Science  A. B., A. M., University of Washington 
Graduate Student Columbia University  ASKEW, MABEL B.  Elementary School,
Seventh Grade  A. B., Oberlin College  A.  M., Teachers College, Columbia
University  BEISWENGER, ANNA J.  Technique of Teaching  Ph. B., University
of Chicago  M. A., Teachers College, Columbia University  BEVER, JAMES 
Dean, Social Science  B. Ped., B. A., M. A., Drake University  University
of Chicago  University of Washington  BOND,  E. A.  Mathematics  A. B.,
Pacific University  Ph. D., Teachers College, Columbia University 
University of Washington  University of Chicago  BOYACK, TEOJEAN  Training
Teacher, Tl ird Grade  Ph. B., The University of Chicago  BREAKEY, HAZEL 
Art  School of Arts and Crafts, Berkeley, California Bellingham State
Normal School  BURNET, RUTH A.  A. B., University of Washington  CARVER, S.
E. Physical Education  B. A., Stanford University  University of California
 Bellingham State Normal School CHURCH, ETHEL G.  Secretary to the
President  Drexel Institute, Philadelphia  Columbia University COUNTRYMAN,
LINDA  B. S., Milwaukee Downer College  M. A., Teachers College, Columbia
University   CRAWFORD, BERTHA  Training Teacher, Eigl.th Grade  B. S.,
Teachers College, Columbia University University of Washington  Bellingham
State Normal School  Twenty

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CUMMINS, NORA B.  Social Science  A. B., Minnesota State University  A. M.,
Columbia University Graduate Student, Columbia University  Northern Normal
and Industrial School,  Aberdeen, South Dakota  DAWSON, MARJORIE L. 
Primary Supervisor in City Schools  B. S., M. A., Teachers College,
Columbia  University  State Normal School, Newark, N. J.  DOTY, BEATRICE I.
 Librarian of Children's Literature University of California  Western
Reserve University  DRUSE, MARIE C.  Art  Boston, School of Drawing Museum
of Fine Arts, Boston  Erie Pape School of Art, Boston  Harvard University 
State Teachers College, Winona, Minnesota  DUNNING, LILLIAN M.  Training
Teacher, Sixth Grade  B. S., A. M., University of Missouri  ELLIOTT, IRENE 
Training Teacher, First Grade  B. S., M. A., Teachers College, Columbia
University  ERICKSON, EMMA S.  Teacher of Technique  B. S., M. A.,
University of Minnesota  State Teachers College, Moorhead, Minnesota 
FITZGERALD, SADIE  Training Teacher, Fourth Grade M. A., Teachers College,
Columbia University  GRAGG, GEORGIE P.  Penmanship  Bellingham State Normal
School  A. N., Palmer School of Penmanship  HOPPE, VICTOR H.  B. A.,
Denison University  M.  A., Northwestern University  Curry School of
Expression  University of Chicago  HOPPER, ELIZABETH M.  Appointment
Secretary  B. A., Smith College  M. A., University of California  HORTON,
MARGERY Physical Education  B. S., M. S., Oregon University  Twenty-one

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HUNT, THOMAS F.  Social Science  B. A., University of Minnesota  M. A.,
Clark University  University of Chicago  University of California  JEWELL,
MILDRED R.  Physical Education  A. B., University of Washington  JOHNSON,
FLORENCE E.  Hygiene  B. S., University of Washington  A. M., Mills College
JONES, ADELE M.  Dean of Women  B. S., A. M., Teachers College, Columbia
University  KANGLEY, LUCY  English  A. B., A. M., University of Washington 
Graduate Student, Columbia University  KEELER,  DELIA L.  Education  B. S.,
Salina Normal University  A. B., Washington State College  A. M., Teachers 
College, Columbia University  University of Washington  University of
Minnesota  University of California KIBBE, L. A.  Education  B. S.,
McMinnville College  B. A., M. A., University of Washington  M. A.,
Columbia University  Bellingham State Normal School  KINSMAN, PRISCILLA M. 
Training Teacher, Pre- primary  Ph. B., University of Chicago  KROUS, GRACE
MOORE  Public School Music  B. A., Washington State College  M. A.,
Teachers College, Columbia University  University of Washington Lewiston
State Normal  LONGLEY, GERTRUDE  Home Economics  B. S., M. A., Columbia
University LOVEGREN, MAY G.  Typewriting  Vashon College  Washington State
College  Western State Teachers  College  MARQUIS, V. J.  Education, Dean
of Men  B. A., M. A., University of Washington  State Teachers College, St.
Cloud, Minnesota  Twenty-two

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MASTERS, HARRY V.  Research and Education  B. A., Western Union College  M.
A., Ph. D., University of Iowa  MEAD, MAY  School Nurse  R. N.,
Northwestern Sanitarium, Port Townsend, Washington  University of
Washington  MILLER, IRVING E.  Education  B. A., University of Rochester 
M.  A., Ph. D., University of Chicago  MOFFATT, MILDRED  Training Teacher,
Second Grade  University of Chicago  University of California  Columbia
University  OSBORNE, ELEANOR  Training Teacher, Fifth Grade  B. S.,
Teachers College, Columbia University  M. A., Stanford University 
PHILIPPI, H. C. Science  B. S., M. A., University of Missouri  University
of Waslhington  University of Chicago  PLATT, RUTH E.  Science  B. S., M.
S., University of Washington  PLYMPTON, HAZEL J.  Art  Ph. B., University
of Chicago  Reed College, Portland, Oregon  Art Museum, Portland, Oregon 
Summer School with Arthur W. Dow  PRAGST, AUGUSTA  Teacher of Technique  B.
A., A. M., State Teachers College, Greeley,  Colorado  Teachers College,
Columbia University  RAYMOND, HARRISON  Voice  Seven Years' Study in New
York  Bellingham State Normal School  RICH, IMARY E.  Director of Training
School   M. S., M. A., Teachers College, Columbia University  RICHARDSON,
CHARLOTTE B.  Industrial Arts B. S., Columbia University  Westfield State
Normal School  Twenty-three

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ROTH, GERALDINE  Music  B. M., Northwestern University  RUCKMICK, HERBERT
C.  Inlustrial Arts B. S., Teachers College, Columbia University  Pratt
Institute, Brooklyn, New York  University of Illinois RULE, PAUL H. 
Industrial Arts  B. A., College of Puget Sound  Bellingham State Normal
School SHUMWAY, RUTH  Science  B. S., University of Washington  M. S.,
Columbia University  University of California  SMITH, HAROLD B.  Public
School Music  B. A., Music B,. Missouri Valley College Northwestern
University  Student of Karl Busch, Conductor of Kansas City  Symphony
Orchestra SPEARIN, RUTH E.  A. B., Carleton College  New York Library
School  SPERRY, M. BELLE  English Ph. B., University of Michigan  M. S.,
Wesleyan University  STRANGE, EDITH R.  Piano  Graduate of Whitworth
Conservatory,  Tacoma, Washington  Oberlin College  Cornish School,
Chautauqua, New York  STROUD, CLARA H.  Supervisor of Teaching in Rural
School  B. A., Yankton College, S. D.  Ph. B., University of Chicago 
University of California  SUNDQUIST, LEONA  Science  B. A., M. S.,
University of Washington  Graduate Student, Teachers College, Columbia 
University  TRENT, WILMA E.  Intermediate  Supervisor in City Schools  B.
A., University of Iowa  University of Chicago  Teachers College, Cedar
Falls, Iowa  University of California  ULLIN, ANNA  French and English  B.
A., University of Washington Certificate, Sorbonne, Paris  M. A., Teachers
College, Columbia University  Twenty-four

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UPSHALL, C. C.  Research and Education  B. A., University of British
Columbia  Ph. D., Teachers College, Columbia University  Provincial Normal
School, Victoria, B. C.  WENDLING, ELSIE  Supervisor in City Schools  B.
S., M. A., Teachers College, Columbia University  Teachers College, DeKalb,
Illinois WEYTHMAN, RUTH  Physical Education  B. S., University of
Washington  M. A., Columbia University University of California  WILLIAMS,
PELAGIUS  Social Science  B. S., Teachers College, Emporia, Kansas  M. A.,
University of Chicago  Columbia University  WILLIAMS, JOHN ROY  Violin 
University of California  University of Michigan  American Conservatory of
Music, Chicago  WILSON, MABEL ZOE Librarian  Ohio University  New York
State Library School  WILSON, ROY D.  Printing  Practical Experience in
Printing  Twenty-five

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CLASSES Past fragrant fir woods on needle-padded trails with happy
companions higher, ever higher. Here within our walls we are trail comrades
striving toward the last broad bend, beyond which towers the goal--great
icy peaks that glisten, sharply-cut agains the wide, clear skies.

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Leatha Elliot Smith Duyff Williams  Junior-Senior College  ERWIN LEATHA .
President  STANLEY SMITH  Vice-President  EVELYN ELLIOTT Secretary  EDDIE
DUYFF Treasurer  GUY BUSHBY .. I. C. C. Representative  MR. PELAGIUS
WILLIAMS Adviser  With the largest enrollment in the history of the
organization,  the Junior-Senior College was reorganized for the purpose of
electing  class officers and planning activities for the year.  Any student
who has completed the requirements of the two year  course is a member of
the organization.  During the winter quarter, an informal meeting was held
in the  Blue Room of Eden's Hall, for the purpose of getting acquainted,
and  discussing plans for future activities. Guy  Bushby was general
chair-man  of the affair. On February 23, an assembly program was
spon-sored, and in celebration of the Washington Bicentennial, a
Washing-ton  Memorial Tree was planted on the campus. The outstanding event
 of the spring quarter was the participation in the Inter-Class Picnic,
which was in charge of the Junior-Senior division.  Twenty-seven

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ALLEN, BERTHA L.  Bellingham  AMES, BASIL H.  Olympia  ANSON, PAUL A. 
Ferndale  APPLE, REBECCA C.  Marysville  BALDREY, CLAYTON H.  Bellingham 
BARBER, DOROTHY T.  Buckley BENITEZ, PABLO M.  Pangesioan, Philippines 
BICKFORD, ROBERT C.  Bellingham  BOSWORTH, SAMUEL E.  Sumner  BUSHBY, GUY
L.  Sumas  BUTTLES, WILLIAM W.  Wenatchee  CAMPBELL, GLENN A.  Willapa 
Twenty-eight

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CHARLESWORTH, ELIZABETH A.  Chehalis  CHRISTENSEN, FLORENCE  Enumclaw 
COLLIER, EDWARD V.  Bellingham  DAVIS, PHILLIP H.  Burlington  DECKER,
ANNIE R.  Ferndale  DOWELL, CHARLES H.  Seattle  DUYFF, EDDIE A.  Friday
Harbor  ECKERT, ANNE L.  Grapeview  ELLIOT, EVELYN L.  Seattle  ERICKSEN,
EDNA A.  Seattle  FAULKNER, JACK W.  Ferndale  FERGUSON, JEANNE A. 
Snohomish  Twenty-nine

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FLOWERS, NOEL J.  Mount Vernon  GISSBERG, ROLAND J.  Bellingham  FOREST,
EVELYN C. Auburn  GRICE, VIOLET E.  Carlton  GROSS, ANTHONY M.  Bellingham 
HALL, MARJORIE I. Kalamazoo, Mich.  HOTT, MARIE L.  Kalama  JONES, LUELLA 
Ferndale  KLAUS, WINNIFRED A. Granite Falls  IVERSON, INGWALD  O:alla  J
ONES, ROBERTA O.  Kent  LASCO, NORMA L.  Seattle Thirty

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LEATHA, ERVIN L.  Bellingham  LONG, ETHEL M.  Bellingham  LOVEGREN, HUGH A.
 Bellingham LUNDQUIST, ELLEN M.  Raymond  Lux, LILLIAN E.  Wenatchee 
MCFADDEN, AUDREY E.  Seattle MCMEEN, GEORGE H.  Bellingham  MERCER, AGNES 
Bremerton  MOLLARD, ERNA  Sumas MORROW, 1MARY E.  Bellingham  MONTGOMERY,
EVELYN  Bellingham  MOUNTER, KATHERINE M.  Bellingham  Thirty-one

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RASMUSSEN, LLOYD W.  Bellingham  ROCK, ESTELLA C.  Seattle  RORK, JAMES B. 
Bellingham ROYSTON, RACHEL H.  Redfield, Kansas  RYAN, ORVIN M.  Lynden 
SCHAEFFER, JACK E. Bellingham  SHELTON, HAROLD  Ferndale  SHRADER, Lois E. 
Fcrndale  SMITH, STANLEY A. Bellingham  STEVENSON, MARIE  Lafayette,
Indiana  STEARNS, RICHARD W.  Bellingham WALTE;RS, ROBERT E.  Astoria,
Oregon  Thirty-two

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WATTS, HELEN S.  Portland, Oregon  WESLEY, DELOS  Lynden  WINTERBURN, VIOLA
M. Bellingham  WOLD, MAE  Everett  WRIGHT, PRESTON A.  Bellingham  Thirty
-three

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Leatha Comfort Morse Jones Bond  Sophomore Class  VERNON LEATHA President 
SIDNEY COMFORT . . . . Vice-President  JEAN MORSE Secretary-Treasurer 
EMLYN JONES . . . . . . C. C. Representative  E. A. BOND Faculty Advisor 
Another year goes by and another class is preparing to lay its posses-sions
 under the marble tile in the "walk of memories." Not every member  of the
class of '32 will go down on record as a leader, but every follower  has
shown his democratic ability to give and take suggestions with a  ready
cheer, and to back their leaders in installing a new system of nomi-nating 
and voting in school elections. Another new precedent which will  probably
be left for the following classes is that of electing the most 
representative co-ed of the school.  Class activities began in the Fall
quarter with the party with the  novel idea "Superstitions." Each following
activity attained equal suc-cess, climaxed only by the school picnic. Under
the capable advisorship  of Dr. E. A. Bond, the latter part of Spring
quarter was a time of great  activity with Class day, Class day assembly,
Baccalaureate and Gradu-ation.  Though the marble square in the lane of
memories may grow worn  and faded, the class of '32 will always hope that
its new achievements  will be remembered.  Thirty-four

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ABBOT, RoY R.  Ashland, Oregon  ABEL, CLARICE E.  Bellingham  ABRAHAMSON,
CECELIA  Lake Stevens  ALLEN, MARJORIE F.  Seattle  ALLISON, CLARYS L. 
Vancouver  ALTMAN, LORETTA Bellingham  AMBROSE, DOROTHY L.  Issaquah 
ANDERSON, LILLIAN M.  Juneau, Alaska ANDERSON, EDITH K.  Carnation  BAILA,
MARION L.  Aberdeen  ARMSTRONG, E. ALLENE Bellingham  BAKER, CULLEN Y. 
Long Beach  Thirty-five

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BAKER, ZILDA F.  Centerville  BARRON, DORIS B.  Bellingham  BASCOM,
MARGARET E.  Monroe BASSETT, EDDIE W.  Bellingham  BEERS, MILDRED C. 
Tacoma  BENSON, EUGENIA F.  Prescott BISHOP, LELAND T.  Fruitland, Idaho 
BLOMEEN, LELA C.  Auburn  BLAIR, ARDIS M.  Bellingham BORGES, JANET 
Anchorage, Alaska  BOWEN, E. H.  Bellingham  BOWERS, MARGARET A. Bellingham
 Thirty-six

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BRANDT, MARGERY E.  Seattle  BRAVARD, ADRIS I.  Sumas  BREWER, NELSON E. 
Chehalis BRIGHT, SARAH M.  Chehalis  BUSELDEN, JEWEL E.  Elma  BROOKS,
EVELYN B.  Ferndale BUTLER, JAMES  Buckley  BIGGAR, NORMA I.  Kent 
CAMPBELL, COLIN A.  Kent  CARTER, GORDON L.  Friday Harbor  CARMICHAEL,
GRACEY  Seattle  CHANDLER, EVELYN E.  Bellingham Thirty-seven

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CHANDLER, MYRAN  Bellingham  CHAPMAN, ROGER W.  Vancouver  CHASE, MAMIE E. 
Port Townsend  CLEARY, HOWARD R.  Bellingham  CLIFT, RAYMOND  Belingham 
CLYDE, MAXINE Onalaska  COHEN, ROSE  Seattle  COLE, ELIZABETH  Bellingham 
COLLIER, PANSY  Puyallup COMFORT, SIDNEY E.  Montesano  COLMAN, MARY L. 
Enumclaw  Cox, NELLIE H.  Bellingham Thirty-eight

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CROCKER, CHARLOTTE  Seattle  CRONIN, KATHLEEN  Kent  CRYER, HELEN D. 
Seattle DAVENPORT, BLANCHE  Bellingham  DAVIS, JAMES W.  Burlington  DAVIS,
MARGARET  Bellingham   DEAL, MADELINE R.  Deming  DEETS, LORETTA L. 
Bellingham  DE VINE, DOROTHY  Port Angeles  DEWEY, FRANCES  Okanogan  DE
WITT, WINIFRED  Seattle  DILLABOUGH, DOROTHY  Bellingham  Thirty-nine

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DOBBS, FLORENCE M.  Port Townsend  DONAWAY, DOROTHY  Bellingham  DOTSON,
VIRGINIA Oakville  DOWNEY, MARGARET K.  Kent  DUFF, W. GERALDINE  Longview 
EACRETT, FRANCIS A. Port Angeles  EDGAR, HELEN H.  Portland, Oregon 
ELSNER, MELANIE G.  Zenith  ESELBY, VERA E.   Seattle  EVERS, KATHERINE E. 
San Diego, Calif.  EVANS, ESTHER E.  Hoquiam  FAWCETT, MAXINE A.  Tacoma 
Forty

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FIELD, OLIVER  Bellingham  FLADEBO, EMMA A.  Mount Vernon  FORD, ALICE E. 
Bellingham FORREST, PEGGY E.  San Diego, Calif.  Fox, DURY A.  Glacier 
FRANZ, MILDRED A.  Carlisle FRIESE, MARY L.  Bellingham  FROST, KATHERINE
L.  Bellingham  FULLER, MARGARET  Battle Ground  GALLANGER, HERBERT  Port
Stanley  GAASLAND, HAROLD A.  Bellingham  GALVIN, GARNET M.  Carnation 
Forty-on

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GARSIDE, VIRGINIA H.  Greshman, Oregon  GIGERSON, HELEN F.  Montesano 
GERBER, MILDRED L.  Monroe  GILL, DONNA E.  Lebanon, Oregon  Goss, IVA LEE 
Bellingham  GRIEVE, MARIAN E.  Port  Orchard  GRUE, IOLA E.  Bellingham 
GUERNSEY, IVAH O.  Clear Lake  GUNDERSON, WILFRED Ferndale  HANKAMP,
GERTRUDE  Lynden  HAMMETT, RICHARD  Tacoma  HARRIS, FRANCES J. Bellingham 
Forty-two

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HATTON, VIRGINIA M.  Bellingham  HENDERSON, ROMA  Vancouver  HENKER, MARTHA
A.  Seattle HIBBS, MARY L.  Seattle  HICKLIN, Lois  Mabton  HOAG, CHARLOTTE
L.  Olympia  HOWELL, HELEN V.  Bellingham  HENNINGS, WYONA T.  Vancouver 
HIBNER, JEAN  Bellingham  HILL, CATHLEEN C. Bellingham  HOGILE, MARTON S. 
Ilwaco  HUHTALA, HELEN K.  Astoria, Oregon  Forty-three

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HUNTINGTON, LUCILE  Kelso  HUTCHINS, EARL L.  Astoria, Oregon  JACKSON,
DOROTHY S.  Walla Walla  IDDINS, ALICE M.  Bellingham  JACOBSON, ETHEL M. 
Bellingham  JACKSON, PAUL M. Kingston  JENKINS, EDITH P.  Bellingham 
JENSEN, BEATRICE M.  Ferndale  JENSEN, GERDA P. Enumclaw  OHANSON, NINA K. 
Seattle  JENSEN, LAURA C.  Sedro-Woolley  JOHNSON, ARNELL I. Mukilteo 
Forty-four

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JOHNSON, MARJORIE C.  Seattle  JONES, CHARLOTTE C.  Brush Prairie  JONES,
EMLYN D.  Selleck   JORDAN, MARY L.  Kalispell, Montana  KASPERSON,
BORGHILD  Everett  KEISKI, MARTHA M. Ilwaco  KELLY, MARION H.  Seattle 
KELLY, MILDRED F.  Seattle  KELLSTROM, HAZEL M.  Auburn KEPPLER, MARIE L. 
Bellingham  KLINSKI, FRIEDA A.  Vancouver  KONOPSKI, JENNIE R. Bellingham 
Forty-five

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KORTHAUER, ELIZABETH  Bellingham  LAMOREAUX, PHYLLIS  Bellingham  LARSON,
EINAR' M. Bellingham  LEATHA, VERNON R.  Bellingham  LINDH, MARGARET 
Vancouver  ILIVESEY, ALICE Bellingham  LOGAN, KATHERINE I.  Everett 
LOMSDALE, SARAH E.  Richmond Beach  LONSETH, ARVID T.  Bellingham  ILOWE,
HENRY T.  Snohomish  LUND, AGNES M.  Auburn  LUNDBERG, AUBREY L.  Parker 
Forty-six

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LUNDBERG, HELEN T.  Seattle  LUNDQUIST, MARIE C.  Long Beach  MACPHERSON,
MARGERY Bellingham  MAHNCHE, JULIA A.  Winlock  MCALLISTER, RUBY L. 
Longview  MCBAIN, GRACE I. Bryn Mawr  MCCAw, KATHERINE  Aberdeen  MCCLEARY,
BERNADET'  Rochester  McLEOD, WRAY B.  Everett  MCFARLAND,, JOSEPH 
Bellingham  MCLEAN, VIRGINIA M.  Bellingham  MCNEIL, WILMA   Port Lud'ow 
Forty-seven

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MALLAHAN, JACK C.  Bellingham  MALTERNER, GLADYS  Seattle  MARKUSEN,
HARRIET  Tacoma MARTINSON, EDITH M.  Hoquiam  MEREDITH, HELENE E. 
Bellingham  MICKELSON, MARTIN Arlington  MILNE, G. MILDRED  Port Orchard 
MOE, IVER L.  Bellingham  MOLLER, ALFREDA E. Bellingham  MOORE, MARTHA J. 
Seattle  MbORE, JEANEVA A.  Chehalis  MORFORD, ADA I. Carnation 
Forty-eight

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MORRISON, EILENE M.  Bellingham  MOULTRAY, WILLIAM G.  Bellingham  MORSE,
DOROTHY J. Seattle  MURRAY, JEAN  Tono  MYRE, DOROTHY C.  Seattle  NAIRN,
MILDRED  Mukilteo  NEAL, RUTH A.  Seattle  NELSON, MARGARET A.  Tacoma 
NELSON, ALICE M.  Bellingham  NELSON, CAMILLA G.  Ferndale  NELSON, THELMA
A.  Toledo  NELSON, THOMAS W.  Olympia  Forty-nine

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NEWQUIST, LEONARD E.  Orchards  NOSTRANT, CAROLINE  Grandview  NICHOLS,
MARY R.  Mount Vernon  OATES, DONALD D.  Fall City  O'CONNOR, KATHERINE 
Naselle  O'DONNELL, ELSIE J. Anacortes  ORLANDER, ELSIE V  Mount Vernon 
ORDAL, DOROTHY G.  Bellingham  PALMER, SHIRLEY B.  Rochester  PAULING, ANNE
E.  Astoria, Oregon  PEARSON, MARTHA B.  Shelton PETERSEN, ESTHER E. 
Vancouver  Fifty  I _

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PETERSON, MILFORD A.  Ferndale  PILQUIST, ELVA I.  Seattle  PORTER, HARRIET
F.  Van Zandt PORTREY, THELMA  Bellingham  PRICE, DOROTHY L.  Seattle 
PRICE, GERTA L.  Lynden  RANKIN, H. ELOISE  Bellingham  RASMUS, ENID O. 
Astoria, Oregon  RAUCH, EDNA M.  Port Angeles ROBBIN, FRANCES H.  Seattle 
ROBERTS, KATHLEEN  Bellingham  ROSE, KATHERINE V.  Lynden Fifty-one

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ROSENQUIST, CATHRYN  Windham, Montana  ROSENZWEIG, JEWEL J.  Longview 
ROSSER, MARJORY G.  Stanwood  RUTHERFORD, ROSE M.  Tacoma  SABLOCKI,
JOSEPHINE  Chehalis SAMUELSON, ANNE M.  Bellingham  SARFF, CLARENCE W. 
Clear Lake  SCHENKING, ANNE M. Bellingham  SCHUBERT, FROEDA C.  Silverdale 
SHARNBROICH, CAROLIN  Port Angeles SETTERMAN, SELMA C.  Seattle  E 
SHIPLEY, HELEN F.  Rochester  Fifty-two

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SHUDSHIFT, MARGARET  Arlington  SKOTHEIM, SIVERT O.  Seattle  SLY, LUCILLE
M.  Naselle SMITH, EVELYN M.  Seattle  SQUIRE, M. ELIZABETH  Bellingham 
STEWART, LOGAN H.  Everett STODDARD, HOLLIS J.  Coupeville  STORME, ELETHA
M.  Mount Vernon  STROEBEL, ELIZABETH Mount Vernon  SUTTON, JESS C. 
Bellingham  SWALLING, ALICE  Poulsbo  SWANSON, OLAF E. Arlington 
Fifty-three

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SYBRANT, EARL K.  Bellingham  TARBOX, BESSIE K.  Seattle  TARBOX, MARY I. 
Sumner TEGENFELDT, HERMAN  Bellingham  THOMPSON, ALICE S.  Hoquiam 
THOMPSON, MARIE P. Snoqualmie  TOP, DOROTHY H.  Everson  TORRANCE, ESTHER
E.  Viola, Idaho  WADE CATHERINE S.  Cordova, Alaska  WARD, HARRIET E. 
Pinehurst  WALLACE, JACKIE  Bellingham  WELLS, HELEN M.  Ferndale 
Fifty-four

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VOORHIES, LEILA R.  Porter  WESSLER, MARIE M.  Clallam Bay  WHIPPLE,
WILBURN J.  Mount Vernon  WICKER, MARJORIE L.  Renton  WILLIAMS, BESSIE M. 
Renton  WINGARD, FRANCES M. Tacoma  WIRSING, NORMA A.  Burlington 
Fifty-five

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Lowe Bennerstrom Rickerson Armstrong Hoppe  Freshman Class  HENRY LOWE
President  LILLIAN BENNERSTROM . . . . Vice-President  HARRIET RICKERSON
Secretary-Treasurer  LOUISE ARMSTRONG Inter-Club Council Representative 
MR. HOPPE Faculty Adviser  Figuring prominently-as always-in the school
affairs, the fresh-men  have shown marked ability in everything they have
undertaken.   The class party, under the direction of Lillian Bennerstrom,
was consid-ered  by everyone as a great success. A deep-sea idea was well
carried out  in the decorative scheme. Vaughn Howell, outstanding frosh
student,  managed the Spring Mixer with originality and remarkable ability.
 The big bonfire for the Homecoming celebration was built and su-pervised 
by the freshmen. They spent much time and effort to make it  one of the
largest and hottest of Homecoming bonfires.  With so many talented members,
the class is sure to fill very ade-quately  the place left by the
sophomores.  Fifty-six  I

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Calendar of Class Events  JUNIOR-SENIOR COLLEGE  Junior-Senior Assembly . .
. November 11 Junior-Senior Party . . . Edens Hall  SOPHOMORES  Sophomore
"Bad Luck" Party  Alumni Day . . . . . Class Day  Baccalaureate 
Commencement . . . . . .  Freshmen "Deep  November 13  June 4  June 8 June
5  June 9  FRESHMEN  Sea" Party January 29  Fifty-seven

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ACTIVITIES Bent trees and scudding clouds--dancing sun and shadow--bird on
the wing--the white- capped waters of the bay--these we see from our our
windows day by day--a panarama of activity. Busy grouops, quick steps and
happy voices, up and down our corridors, remind us that the activities of
our Normal days are among the most delightful of our lives.

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Associated Students  The Board of Control is the executive organ of the
student body. It  is made up of seven members-two faculty, and five student
representa-tives.  The Board has served the best interest of the students,
especially  this year in the inauguration of a new system of nominating and
electing  the school officers.  FALL AND) WINTER QUARTER  COLIN CAMPBELL
President  NELLIE COX .ice- President  INGWALD IVERSON . . . . Secretary 
SPRING QUARTER  JAMES BUTLER . . . . President THEONA FLICK . . . .
Vice-President  INGWALD IVERSON . . . . Secretary  Cox O'Donnell Skotheim
Stoddard Iverson  Bond Leatha Flick Ruckmick  Fifty-nine  Colin Campbell
James Butler

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Klipsun Editorial and Business Staff  Dowell  Morrison  Sixty

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Yearbook National Scholastic Press Association Member   Klipsun Staff 
CATHLEEN HILL  CHARLES DOWELL  ANNETTE AUSTIN  MONFORD ORLOFF  EILENE
MORRISON  ROSANNE YOUNG DOROTHY TOP  IONE SHREVE  PHYLLIS LAMOREAUX  NADINE
MATTSON  EVELYN CHANDLER VIRGINIA CARVER  JIMMIE STODDARD  VIDA GOHEEN 
EVELYN ELLIOT  VERA ESELBY  JEAN MCMILLIN  MISS Lucy KANGLEY  Miss HAZEL
BREAKEY  Editor-in-Chief  Business Manager Associate Editor  Associate
Editor  Art Editor  Associate Art Editors  Organization Editor 
Administration Editor  Fine Arts Editor  School Life Editor  Women's Sports
Editor  Men's Sports Editor and Typist  S Photo-engraving Editor 
Junior-Senior Editor  Sophomore Editor  Freshman Editor  Faculty Adviser 
Art Adviser  Sixty-one

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Viking Editorial and Business Staff  Sixty-two

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ROGER CHAPMAN  JIMMIE STODDARD  VIRGINIA CARVER  BOB WATERS  BOB WALTERS
WILLIAM FISHER  DAVID MORSE  JUNE WELCH  EVELYN ALTMAN  DOROTHY FIALA 
HELEN NORTHEN  JANET MCARTHUR  Northwest Viking  EDITORIAL STAFF  Editor 
Associate Editor Assistant Editor  . . Business Manager  . .Business
Manager  Circulation Manager  Advertising Manager DEPARTMENT WRITERS  .
Copy Editor  Desk Editor  Society Editor  SWomen's Sports  Literary Editor 
IRENE SCHAGEL  DEBBY ALTOSE  VIRGINIA GEORGE  GORDON LEEN  BOB WALTERS 
TERRY COOK  NADINE MATTSON  ARCHIE FOX  BILL SELLS  COLIN CAMPBELL  SUMNER
WARD ROBERT SCHIER  MARJORIE HALL  SPECIAL STAFF WRITERS  EINAR LARSON 
MARYDEL CONRAD  NAOMI WATSON  ARVID GRIFFEN  JEAN MURRAY  REPORTERS  HELEN
NORTHEN JACK SEARS  GRACE GODDARD  BRUCE SPRINGFORD  HARRIET RICKERSON 
BERRIDGE MARSH  IVER MOE  ALICE WAMPLER  ELAINE SUTHERLEN  BRUCE KIBBLE 
JANET MCARTHUR GERDA JENSEN  LUCILLE JORDAN  DOLLY ANDERSON  KATHRYN
BERKELEY  HUSTON Dow JACK KNUPPENBERG  LORRAINE RISDALL  LORINDA WARD 
GLADYCE KAPPERDAHL  JULIUS DORNBLUT  ERVIN LEATHA  The Northwest Viking 
The Northwest Viking, the official weekly publication  of the Belling-ham 
State Normal, was founded in 1899 and has evolved from that time  into one
of the outstanding publications of its class in the entire United  States. 
In the Columbia Press Association Contest, held yearly in New York  City,
the Viking, for the second consecutive year, won first place rating  in a
field of 1,200 contestants. The fall quarter editions were judged,  Roger
Chapman, the newly appointed editor, deserving much credit for  their
efficient direction. The position of business manager was  held dur-ing 
the fall and winter quarters by Bob Walters and in the spring quarter  by
Bob Waters.  Mrs. Ruth Burnet returned after an absence of several years to
take  her former position as instructor of Journalism and faculty adviser
of the  publication.  The Viking was chiefly instrumental in carrying out
the Health  Service Reform in the school fall quarter. The Representative
Co-ed  Contest was also sponsored by the Viking.  Another feature was the
special homecoming publication. Unique  in its scope was the tabloid issue
of the Viking fall quarter.  The staff has been especially competent and
with the co-operation   of the student body a very successful year has been
concluded.  Sixty-three

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Student Publications  SELF-STARTER  Each fall the entering women  are
presented with a small  booklet  known as the "Self-  Starter." This
efficient little  pamphlet contains a great deal  of information that is of
im-portance  to freshman girls. It  is a miniature, code of conduct, 
combined with a directory of  what will be of use during the  year. The
book is published by  the Standards Committee of the  Women's League. 
DIRECTORY  Another aid to the student is  the directory, distributed each 
year at the beginning of the fall  quarter. This contains the name,  home,
residence address, and  phone number of every student  and  faculty member
of the  school. Supplementary lists are  also published at the beginning 
of each quarter. The directories  are distributed to the students  without
charge through the  Co-Op.  Sixty-four  I I - I ' -

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Student Publications  FOOTBALL PROGRAM  At this year's Homecoming  game
with Ellensburg, football  programs, similar to last year's,  were sold.
The pamphlet con-tained  pictures of each player,  a technical score card,
and num-erous  advertisements to attract  the eye of the alumnus. This 
booklet is sponsored by the  Board of Control, and the con-tract  is
offered to the students.  Charles Dowell held the con-tract  for the
publication of this  year's booklet.  BLUE BOOK  The students of the Normal
 School receive a Blue Book each  year. This small booklet is a  necessity
to every student. It  contains all information that  will enable entering
students to  become familiar with the school.  The information listed is of
 value to everyone. The book is  prepared and distributed under  student
direction at the begin-ning of the fall quarter.  I' I  Sixty-five

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Chandler Skotheim Lundberg Grieve  Informals  OUTSIDE INFORMALS  Outside
informals for the past year were held in the Crystal Ball  Room of the
Leopold Hotel as in former years. The Fall dance had for its theme a
"Japanese Ball," including bright-colored lanterns, white  cherry blossoms,
and golden chrysanthemums.  Red hearts and Dan Cupid predominated at the
Winter informal in  February, when the  Valentine idea was carried out.  In
the Spring the ballroom took on the dress of a May Day festival  with
beautiful gowns and pretty flowers.  Much credit is due Miss Evelyn
Chandler, who had charge of these outside informals.  INSIDE INFORMALS  For
the Fall informal the Blue Room of Edens Hall had a festive being air,
decorated with mysterious looking packages, snowy Christmas  trees, and
silvery stars.  In the latter part of February the Winter informal was
held. A  lighthouse idea was used very effectively.  The Spring informal
was given in the latter weeks of May.  Miss Marion Grieve is to be
congratulated for the success of these  outstanding social events.  MEN'S
CLUB INFORMAL  In the early part of February the Men's Club held their
annual in-formal  at the Chuckanut Shell. The collegiate theme was used,
pennants  and football trophies being very much in evidence.  Mr. Aubrey
Lundberg had charge of this affair.  "W" CLUB INFORMAL  In the middle of
the Fall quarter the "W" Club informal was held  at the Chuckanut Shell.
The Club used the football idea throughout.  White and blue were the
outstanding colors.  Mr. Sivert  Skotheim deserves a great deal of credit
for the success  of this dance.  Sixty-six

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Hutchison O'Donnell Howell Skotheim  Socials  The social calendar for the
past year shows a large number of club-sponsored  and all-school affairs
providing for intra-school associations.  The initial event of  the fall
quarter was the all-school mixer at the  State Armory on September 29. The
decorations lent an autumn at-mosphere  to the occasion, and the evening
was given over to games and  dancing.  A "Leap Year" mixer was featured in
the winter quarter. This was  a dance party carrying out the "leap year"
idea in its program.  Carrousels and clowns prevailed at the "Circus" mixer
given in the  spring quarter. The party furnished much amusement through
the clever  decorative scheme.  The annual homecoming celebration,
beginning Friday, October 30,  furnished a round of activities for Normal
students and alumni. A ser-pentine  through the city streets Friday evening
was followed by a bon-fire-  pep rally and a "rec" hour in the gymnasium.
The football game  with Ellensburg was the main event Saturday afternoon,
and the festivi-ties  were brought to a close after the Homecoming dance
Saturday even-ing.  This was in the form of a "Skeleton Skip," and
atmosphere was lent  by black and white figures, graveyard effects, and
weird shadows.  Superstition predominated at the Sophomore party given
during fall  quarter. Open umbrelllas, number thirteens, ladders, black
cats and an  occasional four leaf clover "just for luck" made up the
decorations.  The Freshmen gave a unique type of affair during winter
quarter.  It carried out the "deep sea" theme in every detail.  Campus Day,
an annual affair, was set for May 10. Majors and lieu- tenants  were
appointed to have charge of the various committees and  carry out the plans
in a military fashion. The Drama Club, Thespians,  and W. A. A. furnished
entertainment, while the "W" club handled all  field events. Much work was
accomplished, both on the Campus and at  Normalstad, accompanied by  a
great deal of play.  "Rec" hours, which provide for dancing, were conducted
in the big  gymnasium every Friday afternoon. This year the time for
recreation  was lengthened to one hour and a half.  Sixty- seven

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To The Ladies  The American business man was portrayed in satire in the
summer  presentation of the Drama Club, "To The Ladies," a comedy by George
 Kaufman and Marc Connelly. In the absence of Mr. V. H. Hoppe, the  play
was under the direction of Miss Jennie Waugh.  Leonard Beebe and his wife,
Elsie, a wise little girl from Mobile,  are the central figures in the
drama. Leonard typifies the average American clerk striving toward success.
Elsie is determined to aid him  in achieving his aim and does it in  a
surprisingly clever manner.  The characters were represented by the
following cast:  ELSIE BEEBE Cornell Wiese  LEONARD BEEBE Franklin Lock 
JOHN KINCAID .Dewey Bowman  MRS. KINCAID Mrs. Caroline Conner  CHESTER
MULLIN Phil Sisk  TOM BAKER . . . . Charles Gerald  TRUCKMAN Karl Decker 
ANOTHER TRUCKMAN Jack Falkner  HENRICI Bill Bowen  MISS FLETCHER . . . .
Evelyn Swalling  CASSIDY . . . . Lyle Summers  A SPEAKER Colin Campbell 
BARBER Thomas Large  Sixty- eight

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Camille In Roaring Camp  The Drama Club presentation of "Camille in Roaring
Camp," by  Thomas Wood Stevens, during the fall quarter involved an unusual
set-ting  and series of events. The production had a double theme; that of 
Roaring Camp, typical of Bret Harte's creation, and the Camille theme. 
JAKE . . . .  . Marshall Bacon  AH SIN . . . . Bert West  AN ORNERY CUss .
. . . Hugh Lovegren  THE DUCHESS . . . . Virginia George  CHEROKEE SAL . .
. . Eileen Taylor  COLONEL STARBOTTLE . . . . Ed Meyer JOHN OAKHURST . . .
. Lew Lovegren  JACK HAMLIN . . . . Charles Anderson  STUMPY . . D. A. Fox
THE JUDGE BB. ill Button  DUNGAREE JOE . . . . Frank Allyn  THE SHERIFF . .
. Jack Mallahan YUBA BILL . . . . Lloyd Rasmussen  AL . . Howard Cleary 
PETE . . . Milford Anderson  JANE . . . . Lucia  Fryer  SUE. . . - Mary
Gordon  CAMILLE (MISS MORNINGSTROKE) Deborah Altose  ARMAND (MR. KEEN) Bill
Bowen  MONSIEUR DUVAL (MR. CLIFFORD) Preston Wright  MADAME PRUDENCE
Gertrude Hankamp  OLIMPE . . . . Dorothy Ritchie  GASTON . . . Paul Jackson
 NANINE . . . Vaughn Howell  NICHETTE . . . . Christine Albers  GUSTAVE . .
. . . George McMeen  THE COUNT DE VARVILLE .James Butler  A MESSENGER
(PROPS) . . . . Vernon Leatha  Sixty-nine

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Liliom  Eminent in Normal school dramatic productions was "Liliom," a  play
given during the winter quarter by the Drama Club.  The drama was of an
unusual type, turning from reality to fantasy.  The plot concerned
"Liliom," an independent and overbearing character,  who is an amusement
park barker, and his harrassed but very loyal wife,  Julie. The story shows
the downfall of the hero, abetted by evil associ- ates,  his suicide, and
final punishment by divine justice while the faith  of Julie goes
unrewarded. Liliom returns to earth to do a good deed for  his wife and
daughter, Louise, before he returns to final judgment. His  sullen traits
overcome his purpose and he fails in his attempt.  Those who took part in 
LILIOM JULIE .  MARIE  MRS. MUSKAT  MOTHER HOLLUNDER  FISCUR  WOLF BEILFIEL
 POLICEMEN HEAVENLY POLICE  YOUNG HOLLUNDER  LINZMAN  DOCTOR  CARPENTER 
RICHLY DRESSED MAN  POORLY DRESSED MAN  OLD GUARD  MAGISTRATE  LOUISE 
SUBURBAN POLICEMAN  the  play were:  Preston Wright  Dorothy Fiala  Martha
Shudshift  Naomi Watson  Eilene Morrison  Bill Button   Anthony Gross  Jack
Knuppenberg, A. E. Charlesworth  Don Stuart, Richard Stearns  John Lensrud
Bob Roberts  Clinton Gross  Delos Wesley  Paul Jackson  Stanley Smith 
Vernon Leatha  James Butler Katherine Mounter  Erwin Turner  Seventy

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James Butler Howard Gunderson  Extemporaneous Contest  In 1931, James
Butler was adjudged winner of the extemporaneous  contest, with the subject
"Racial Tolerance." He was awarded the hon-or  of having his name engraved
upon the extemporaneous cup. All the  winners' names since the contest
originated in 1926-1927, are engraved  upon it.  This contest aims to
encourage public speaking and the development  of an appreciation on the
part of the students, for clear and interesting  talking before groups.
Each contestant may choose his own topic from  an approved list, and from
this topic he prepares a five-minute talk.  Other contestants were: Charles
Gerald, Bessie Taylor, Lois Thomp-son, William Button.  Scholarship Award 
As their bequest to the school in 1930-1931, the Sophomore class left a
twenty-five-year scholarship cup. The freshman highest in scho-lastic 
attainment at the end of each spring quarter is presented with this  cup.
His name is engraved on it and he is allowed to keep it for a year, at  the
end of which he must relinquish it to the next successive winner of  the
award.  In the spring of 1931 this cup was awarded to Wilfred Gunderson, 
whose scholastic attainment was 130 points. Honorable mention went to  the
following students: Nellie Cox, Paul Williams, Enid Rasmus, and  Dorothy 
Top.  Seventy-one

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The Musical Artists' Course  The 1931-32 concert series of the Musical
Artists' course has offered  an attractive program for the music lovers of
the city and a special op-portunity  for Normal students to hear renowned
artists. This season's  musical attractions were the sixteenth annual
concert series which are under the auspices of the Bellingham Women's Music
Club and the Nor-mal  school.  The season was opened on October 15th with
the presentation of  Marie Montana, celebrated soprano. Miss Montana has
won interna-tional  fame as an operatic star.  Outstanding in the recital
events was the appearance of E. Robert  Schmitz on the evening of February
2. His playing was vivid and dis-played  excellent technique. The artist
has conducted a number of or-chestras  on various occasions in his career. 
The presentation of  a world famed personnel, the Kedroff quartet,  on
February 17th, gave pleasant variety to the series of concerts. The 
artists, Professor N. N. Kedroff, M. M. I. K. Denissoff, C. M. Kedroff and 
T. F. Kasakroff, are all natives of Russia. In three seasons before the 
American public, the Kedroff quartet has won a triumph which rivals  their
conquest of the music world in Europe.  Paul Kochanski, Polish violinist,
appeared in concert March 14.  The remarkable tone quality in Mr.
Kochanski's playing was admirable. He appeared abroad before coming to the
United States, and at present,  he is the most constantly sought after of
all major artists.  The artist appearing in the final concert of the
season, April 7, was  the famous baritone, John Charles Thomas, who has
obtained recogni-tion  in three different fields of musical art-opera
comique, grand opera,  and concert. He has won fame through his style and
interpretative power. He is one of the few American artists who is accepted
unre-servedly  abroad.  Seventy-two

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Little Symphony Orchestra  For four seasons since its organization the
Little Symphony Orches-tra  has appeared in concert under the direction of
Harold B. Smith, head  of the Music Department. The orchestra  consists of
approximately forty-five  members, both professional and amateur. Fourteen
are members of the Seattle Symphony Orchestra, the others being musicians
of Belling-ham  and of the Normal school. Assemblies  Artists appearing in
the musical programs were: Almada Biery Jones,  noted violinist; Kolia
Levienne, Russian-American cellist; the Wood-wind  Quintet of Seattle; the
Kraus String Quartet of the Cornish School;  Isabelle Burnada, contralto;
August Werner, a Norwegian vocalist; Mrs.  Nan Dybdahl Wiik, a Norwegian
opera singer; Dorothy Hopper Jackson  and John Hopper in a two piano
ensemble program; Bernice Wahl, so-prano;  and Chauncey Griffith, pianist. 
Lecturers were Lewis Browne, writer and lecturer, who spoke on  "Present
Day Authors"; A. M. Stephen, Canadian poet, novelist and dra- matist;  Herr
Fischer, who spoke on the "Economic and Cultural Life of  Hungary; Ebba
Dahlin, speaking on "The Disunited States of Europe";  Wesley F. Rennie, a
Seattle Y. M. C. A. worker expressed his "European  Impressions"; Lennox
Robinson, Irish dramatist and director of the Ab-bey  Theater at Dublin;
Sir Hubert Wilkins, author and explorer; Dr. Wil-liam  T. Foster, "Economic
Conditions," and Jehan Warliker, Prince Wee-sodia,  of India.  Several
novel programs were given: A Scottish Quartet; Ruth Van Valey in Oriental
and novelty dances; Dorothy Crawford, in character  monologues; and Sarah
Truax Albert, who read "The Barretts of Win-pole  Street."  A program of
student talent was presented in which Emily Bentley  Dow, violinist;
Preston Wright, reader; and Christine Albers, pianist,  took part. Miss Dow
reappeared in a later assembly and was accompa-nied  by Ethel Page. A play
was given by members of the Drama Club.  Seventy-three

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ORGANIZATIONS Far up against an autumn sky, wild geese in swift and ordered
flight, proceeding with a common aim together, following their sure, lone
leader. Club life at school where youth organizes itself into congenial
groups under capable and representative leadership, for the enrichment of
social life.

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Stoddard, Dowell  Armstrong, Nelson, Top, Duyff, Pfeuller  Inter-Club
Council  CHARLES DOWELL . . President  JIMMIE STODDARD . Vice-President 
DOROTHY TOP Secretary  THOMAS NELSON Recording Secretary  FLORENCE JOHNSON
. . . . Adviser  The Inter-Club Council promotes interests and activities
of all stu-dent  clubs and sees that the clubs conform to the standards
laid down  by the constitution of the school and the Inter-Club Council. 
The Inter-Club Council recognizes two delegates from each orga-nization  to
be a member of the nominating convention and recognizes  one member from
each club as a representative to the Inter-Club Council.  In order to be
represented at the nominating convention, a club must be  recognized by
this group.  Seventy-five

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Frost Hill Jenkins Squire Jones  Women's League  KATHERYN FROST President 
CATHLEEN HILL Vice-President  EDITH JENKINS Secretary  ELIZABETH SQUIRE
Treasurer  MISS JONES AND MISS PLATT . . . . Advisers  The Women's League
is composed of all the women of the school.  There is a commission, the
governing body, composed of committees to  better the conditions for the
women of the school. A meeting is held  once a month for the purpose of
acting on business, and a very interest-ing program is prepared for the
occasion. Fall and winter quarter pro-grams  were a series of interesting
travelogues of foreign countries, along  with musical selections by
talented students.  Cryer, McArthur, Taylor, Clyde, Goss  Gerfen, Chandler,
Lux, Jordan, Shreve, Evers  Albers, Squire, Frost, Hill, Platt, Dickinson 
Seventy-six

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Abbott Comfort Gissberg Stoddard Marquis  Men's Club  RoY ABBOTT President 
SIDNEY COMFORT . .  . . Vice-President  ROLAND GISSBERG Secretary-Treasurer
 JIMMIE STODDARD . I. C. C.  MR. MARQUIs Adviser  All men of the school are
privileged to membership in the Men's  Club. There are two meetings a
quarter for discussion and program.  Committees carry out various
activities of the club.  The Club sponsors an Informal and various other
entertainments  during the year. The proceeds of the club go toward the
upkeep of the  men's club room.  MEN'S CLUB COMMITTEE  Stoddard, Brewer 
Duyff, Lundberg, Dowell, Abbott  Seventy-seven

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Stoddard, Dowell, Cleary, Lovegren, Stearns, Charlesworth  Button, Wright,
Knuppenberg, V. Leatha, Jackson, Roberts  Bacon, Christenson, Smith,
Lensrud, D. Stuart, Rickerson, Gross, Rhoades, Mallahan   Taylor,
Rutherford, Benson, Dickinson, Finley, Albers, Altose, Watson, Taylor 
Conrad, Klaus, Squire, Shudshift; O'Donnell, Robin, Shreve, Morrison, Hoppe
 The Drama Club  JAMES BUTLER  LEW LOVEGREN  ALLENE ARMSTRONG  DEBBY ALTOSE
 MR. HOPPE, MISs GEORGE, AND MISS RICHARDSON  SP resident  Vice-President 
Secretary  Treasurer  Advisers  The Drama Club has as its aim the study of
drama, ancient, medieval,  and modern. Each quarter the members of the club
present a play under  the direction of Mr. Hoppe.  Seventy-eight

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Tegenfeldt, Bowers, Voorhies, Allinson, Hubler, Gunn  Gunderson, Wessler,
Brandt, Altman, Royston, Duyff  Scholarship Society  RETA ALLISON  MARIE
WESSLER  LEILA VOORHIES  EDDIE DTJYFF MR. ARNTZEN AND MISS ERICKSON 
President  S . ce-President  Secretary-Treasurer  .I. . C. C. SAdvisers 
The Scholarship Society is an honorary scholastic club and members  are
elected to it quarterly. It is devoted to the promotion of higher ideals 
and accomplishment in scholastic standing.  The  society is very active and
has interest in fields other than that  of scholastic achievement. 
Seventy-nine

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McCormick, Gunderson, Dornblut, Knapp  Fralick, Schubert, Dewey, Ward 
McFarland, Jackson, Larson,  Mickelson, Nelson  International Relations 
FALL AND WINTER QUARTER  EINAR LARSON  HOWARD  MICKELSON  JOSEPH MCFARLAND 
FRANCES DEWEY  THOMAS NELSON  MISS CUMMINS HOWARD MICKELSON  GILMORE REESE 
DOROTHY CHRISTENSON  LORINDA WARD  THOMAS NELSON  MISS CUMMINS  President 
SVice-President  Secretary  Treasurer  I. C. C. Representative Adviser 
SPRING QUARTER  President  Vice-President  Secretary  Treasurer  I. C. C.
Representative Adviser  The International Relations club has been organized
to study prob-lems  of the day. Through their  program, the members learn
to interpret  current events, and have more knowledge of the world and the
problems  facing it today.  Eighty

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Stoddard, Jones, Meyers, Lovegren, Brock, Hutchins, Lundberg  Kinsman,
Ward, McElmon, Pauling, Richardson, Albers, Altose, Crocker  Howell,
Armstrong, Evers, Squire, Pearson, Lux, Gaither  Thespians   FALL AND
WINTER QUARTER  EARL HUTCHINS  HELEN SULLIVAN  KATHERINE MOUNTER  EARL 
BROCK  WILLIAM COLLIER  JIMMIE STODDARD  President  Vice-President 
Secretary  Treasurer Sergeant-at-Arms  I C. C. Representative  SPRING AND
SUMMER QUARTER  LEW LOVEGREN LOUISE ARMSTRONG  VAUGHN HOWELL  EARL HUTCHINS
 WILLIAM COLLIER  JIMMIE STODDARD  President  Vice-President  Secretary 
Treasurer  Sergeant-at-Arms  I C. C. Representative The aim of the
Thespians is to gain a greater appreciation and  knowledge in the field of
dramatic expression, music, and literature.  Each year it holds an annual
banquet when Thespians, both alumni and  present members, hold a homecoming
reunion.  Eighty-one

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Johnson, Hibbs, Dobbs, Minter, Storey  Neal, Baila, McLeod, Christenson,
Jackson  Conrad, Peters, Kelly, Rasmus, McAllister, Rosenzweig, Duff  GERDA
JENSEN  HELEN EDGAR  MARY HIBBS  HELEN  SHIPLEY  MISS MOFFATT  Alkisiah 
President  . ic.e-President  Secretary  Treasurer  . a.culty Adviser  The
Alkisiah is a girls' organization. Each year an annual banquet  is held.
Girls are invited to join this club. Their meetings are of in-terest, 
because they discuss problems of the day, which are of interest  to all. 
Eighty-two

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Bowers, Sharnbroich, Anderson, Sperry, Dickinson, Keppler  Rosenzweig,
Ford, Reynolds, Nelson, Gommel, Mead, Buckinsham  Y. W. C. A.  THELMA
NELSON  Lois REYNOLDS  ALICE FORD  ALICE SWALLING  HELEN SHIPLEY  EVELYN
CHANDLER  Miss SPERRY AND MIISS  Women's League  I. C. C.  MEAD  President 
Vice-President  Secretary  Treasurer  Representative  Representative 
Advisers The Y. W. C. A. members receive work in Bible study. Their
ex-periences  develop leadership, and a Christian spirit. Their program
in-cludes  a school reception in the fall. quarter, a Bible Institute, and
a part   in the annual Easter Sunrise Service on Sehome Hill. 
Eighty-three

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Grue, Hall, Royston, Jackson, Howell, Top, Conrad, DeWitt  Richardson,
Rock, Morrissey, Hott, Jacobson, Rankin, Grieve  Porter, Seaver, McLeod,
Christenson, Taylor, Charlesworth, Rosenquist, Lundquist, Hennings,
Weythman  Peters, Lawrence, Borges, Haney, Neal, Pearson, O'Donnell,
Malterner, Nelson  Williams, Strandberg, McDonald, Jensen, Croxton,
Johnson, Samuelson, Petersen, Moller  Women's Athletic Association  IOLA
GRUE  DOROTHY PRICE . .  MARY TARBOX  NORMA WIRSING  PEGGY SHUDSHIFT
Recordi  DOROTHY TOP I. C. C. I  ELOISE RANKIN Loc  RUTH WEYTHMAN, MILDRED
JEWELL, MARJORY HORTON  AND LILLIAN GEORGE  President  Tice- President 
Secretary  Treasurer  ing Secretary  Representative  Ige Chairman  Advisers
 The Women's Athletic Association is an organization for all girls 
interested in sports. Its aim is "A sport for every girl, and every girl
out  for a sport." Each sport has intra-mural games, and after these, class
 teams are chosen. The girls showing the best sportsmanship, skill, and 
accuracy during the season, are chosen for  the all-star team. 
Eighty-four

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Leatha, Sybrant, Iverson, Duyff  Comfort, Cox, Falkner, Gunn, Gaasland 
Abbott, Flowers, Gillespie, Brewer, Carver  Shelton, Williams, Campbell,
Skotheim, Davis, Eacrett  RoY ABBOTT  NOEL FLOWERS   SIVERT SKOTHEIM 
ROLAND GISSBERG  MR. S. E. CARVER  "W" Club  President  Vice-President
Secretary-Treasurer  I. C. C. Representative  SA. d.viser  The "W" Club is
the men's athletic club. It has as its ideal, the  qualities of good
sportsmanship, upright character, and manliness. Its  aim is to have at all
times, teams in sports of which the student body,  faculty, and all
interested people, may be proud. Eighty-five  r II I I

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Watson, McMillin, Knuppenberg, Young, Morrison, M., Morrison, E.  Mattson,
Fitzgerald, Jevning, Rickerson, Works, Rock  McElmon, Armstrong, Perkins,
Austin  Jacobs, Hoggart, Fiala, Pfeuller, Jensen, Mautz, Mallory, Pearson,
Huston  Cyr, Gilfilen, Hibbs, Rosenzweig, Johnson, Christensen, Hollis,
Tucker  Charlesworth, Altose, Klaus, Reynolds, O'Donnell, Hott, Rose,
Bennerstrom  ELSIE O'DONNELL  NAOMI WATSON  JEAN MCMILLIN  JOYCE PFUELLER 
HARRIET RICKERSON  Valkyrie   President  .Vice. -President 
Secretary-Treasurer  I. C. C. Representative  I. C. C. Representative  The
Valkyrie is a girls' organization to stimulate interest in school 
activities, and promote school spirit. The club was organized this year, 
and is one of the most active groups in school. They have chosen a blue
sweater, white blouse, blue skirt, and insigna as their uniform. 
Eighty-six  _ _ I_ __

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Dowell, Nyberg, McMeen, Stearns, Johnson, Knapp  Lowe, Royston, Rosser,
Peters, Schubert, McDonald, Perkins  Shipley, Malterner, Neal, Rogers,
Jackson  Rock, Jacob, Klaus, Conrad, McAllister, Thompson, Elliot, Watts 
Vanadis Bragi  FALL AND WINTER QUARTER  MARGARET JACOB RICHARD HAMMETT 
WINIFRED KLAUS  CLAIRE DELEAU  CHARLES, DOWELL  HOWARD MICKELSON  MISS
ERICKSON  President  Vice-President  Secretary  Treasurer  I. C.
C.Representative  Sergeant-at-Arms  Faculty Adviser  SPRING AND SUMMER
QUARTER  HENRY LOWE . . * President RACHEL ROYSTON . . . . Vice-President 
CATHERINE MCDONALD . . . . Secretary  RUBY McALLISTER Treasurer  CHARLES
DOWELL . . . . I. C. .Representative  HOWARD MICKELSON . . . .
Sergeant-at-Arms  MISS ERICKSON . . . . Faculty Adviser  The aim of the
Vanadis Bragi is to enjoy literary, social, dramatic,  and "out-of-door"
activities. In other words, they are a good all-round  club, and an asset
to the school. Among the activities of the year was an  annual banquet held
at the Chuckanut Shell. An intensive study of  Parliamentary law was their
main objective this year.  Eighty-seven

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Brown, Anderson, L. Taylor, Cryer, Rock, Wilkins, Collier  Nelson,
Anderson, I. McLeod, Deal, Gass, Galvin, Davenport, Wessler, Hoag, Johnson 
Price, Hennings, Ward, Henderson, Mortinson, Peterson, Bright, Swanson,
Bravaard  McDonald, Willard, Mairn, Golden, Perkins, Abbot, Westhoff,
Eckert  Barron, Gaither, McDonald, Watkins, Buckingham, Rosenzweig, Johnson
 Organized Houses  Surrounding the Campus are numerous organized houses for
girls  of the school. The houses elect officers and have house rules
regulated  through the Dean of Women's office. It has been the custom for a
number  of years  for the Women's League to present to the organized houses
a  banner of achievement for the best record obtained in scholarship and  a
banner for accomplishment. The presidents of the various houses are:
Bartons, Mildred Milne; Barrett, Caroline Rohweder; Beverly Hall, Cla-rys 
Allison; Cooper, Florence Christenson; Collett Court, Margaret Pet-erson; 
Downs, Ada Morford; Edwards, Kathleen Kendall; Enger,  Nita  Delher;
McCormick, Ella Brieland; Melvin, Betty Pearson; Moller, Ma-rie  Wessler;
Nichols, Jean Morse; Ragan, Navarra Hennings; Reynolds,  Roma Henderson;
Squire, Alexine Westhoff; Helen Edgar, Edens Hall.  Less numerous but very
conspicuous because of their activities are  the organized men's houses on
the Campus. Although but few of the  houses are organized they are very
outstanding with their intramural  athletic activities and social events
during the quarters. The presidents  of the houses are: Mullins, Marvin
Dickson; Viking Manor, Cullin Baker;  Ananias Club, Jim Davis; Fire Hall,
John Lensrud, and the White House,  Aubrey Lundberg.  Eighty-eight

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Rice, Pauling, Finely, Miss Johnson, Dodge, J. Davis, M. Davis, McBain,
Borges, Dobbs, Minter, Anderson,  Storey, Strom, Nord  Morrison, Clyde,
Todd, Hendricks, McLeod, Rogers, Mahnke, Jurgenson, Bolshanin, Porter,
Johnson, Fuller  Williams, Palmer, Dow, Page, Reynolds, Buckingham,
Sablocki, Riendeau, Luigg, Morrissey, Rasmus, McAllister  Huhtahla,
Fawcett, Richardson, Huntington, Grieve, Macintosh, Tarbox, Johansen, Hany,
Schuele, Howell  Buehler  Jorgensen, Moore, Klumb, Watts,  Croxton,
Maltener, Myhre, Keiski, Christiansen, Kasperson, Schubert, Pilquist 
Shipley, Baker, Evers, McElhaney, Carmichael, Conrad, Cronin, Hutchinson,
DeWitt, Jordan, Edgar  Edens Hall  Edens Hall is the Girls' Dormitory,
which is located at the North end  of the Campus. It is named after, and
dedicated to Olive Eden, one of the  Normal's early faculty members. Helen
Edgar, President; Helen Lund-berg,  Vice- President; and Lucille Jordan,
Fire Chief, served their term  of office fall, winter, and spring quarters.
Borghild Kasperson, Virginia  Hunt, being secretary and treasurer,
respectively; Marydel Conrad and Marjory Allen served as house reporters,
while Ann Pauling, Marion  Grieve, and Virginia Hunt held the positions of
social chairman for the  Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters, respectively. 
Eighty-nine  I I

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Carter, Skotheim, Hammett, Lowe  Campbell, West, Davis, Bishop, Duyff 
Dowell, Abbott, Keiski, McLeod, Lawrence  Stoddard, DeWitt, Mahnche, Neal,
Shipley, Dotson  Jacob, I. Williams, McAllister, Fuller, Evans, Wingaard,
Williams, Palmer  Royal Order of the "K. Ks.' "  Out where people are
always working  Where no one ever thinks of shirking,  That's the Kitchen. 
Out where the talk and laughter gay, Prevades the air throughout the day, 
That's the Kitchen.  Out where the boys wash dishes daily,  Where the gang
that dangles, laughs a bit more gaily,  That's the Kitchen.  Out where the
meals are in the making,  Where jolly cooks do delicious baking,  That's
the Kitchen.  Out where four little dainty ladies, Dish out spuds, and
meats, and gravies,  That's the Kitchen.  Out where our boss, so precise
and neat, Plans the food we so love to eat,  That's the Kitchen.  Out where
people are always working,  That's the Kitchen.  "OASIs" 1931.  Ninety

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Williams, Lundberg, Becken  Duyff, Brewer, Nyberg, Lowe  Fire Squad  EDDIE
DUYFF Fire Chief  This year, at the request of President Fisher, a fire
squad of students  was organized by the Men's Club to aid in conducting
fire drills during  school hours. The squad helps in fire drills by seeing
that the building is efficiently and quickly emptied. A careful program has
been mapped  out to empty the building during assembly. This group has been
needed  for some time, and it is a valuable and necessary addition to the
Normal's  quota of organizations.  Ninety-one

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ATHLETICS Power, alertness, activity--defiant leaps from rocky cliff to icy
ledge on sure, firm hoofs-- struggle and wrenching of clinched horns--the
Mountain Goat--the symbol of the strenous life.

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Bond Kibbe  Dedication  Through many years the athletics of the Bellingham
State Normal  have been associated with the personalities of Dr. E. A. Bond
and Mr.  L. A. Kibbe. Their untiring efforts, intense interest and willing
co-op-eration  have boosted Viking stock to a level unattainable without
their traditional appearances and hearty backing in all athletic contests
and  endeavors.  Just as Lord Siegfried, great Northland hero of ancient
days, or-iginated  that first Viking spirit, so has that spirit been passed
down to  us for the past many years through these two-staunch Vikings. 
Their appreciation of all things athletic has become an indispensible 
symbol of spirit and support to anyone connected with Normal Viking 
sports.  Their names have been made synonomous with loyalty, spirit,
faith-fulness  and duty-they show all of these qualities in the support of 
Norsemen who go forth to uphold the standards of the Blue and White.  It is
indeed with pleasure and appreciation that we dedicate this  sports section
to Dr. Bond and Mr. Kibbe.  Ninety-three

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Carver Abbot Gunn  Football Captain  Viking Coaching Staff  The foundation
of the successful athletic program at the Bellingham  State Normal is based
on the plan of competition for all in order that a  larger field may be
possible from which to select teams for intercollegiate  competition. And
in order that this program might be carried out to its  full extent the
Normal school has had on its staff for the past several years two directors
of unusual efficiency.  Heading the athletic department is Coach Sam E.
Carver, a former  student of physical education at the Universities of
Oregon, California  and Stanford, and a very capable leader and director of
men in all lines  of sports. Coach Carver is well versed in the art of
physical development  and expresses this art very capably on the football
gridiron, basketball  court, cinder track and tennis courts.  His assistant
in the physical education field and head coach of base-ball,  Coach Royal
E. Gunn, has aided greatly in producing many out-standing  athletic
aggregations. A driving, forceful personality, Coach  Gunn is very capable
in bringing out the best in a man and in securing unanimous co-operation
among the participants.  True Viking leaders, these two coaches, and worthy
and  deserving  of all support given them by Viking backers and athletes. 
Allen Carter, Hammett Cavanaugh, Shaffer Albert  N inety-four

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Falkner Cox Berg  Football Sports Introduction  The 1931 edition of the
Viking football machine was built around a  nucleus of eight lettermen and
a large group of willing but rather inex-perienced  men. Iverson, Abbott,
Cox, Flowers, Shelton, Comfort, Sut-ton  and Faulkner were the lettermen
who were back to fill their posts.  New men who proved themselves
outstanding during the season were  Donovan, Berg, Williams, Gissberg,
Smith, Brewer, Sybrant, Gillispie,  and VanOver.  Injuries handicapped the
Viking team throughout the season, and  not once during the season were the
Viking coaches able to swing their  team into action at full strength. A
tough schedule was experienced by  the Vikings, but each man gave a good
account of himself.  Vikings In Action  Ninety-five

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Iverson Smith Donovan  1931 Football Schedule  October 3---Bellingham
Buttercups  October 10-Coast Guard  October 16-Pacific Lutheran  October
24-Cheney Normal  October 31-Ellensburg Normal November 7-College of Puget
Sound  November 14-St. Martin's College  Vikings vs. Buttercups  Swinging
back the curtains of the 1931 football season in an impres-sive  manner,
Coach Sam Carver's grid aces cut down a heavy Belling-ham  Buttercup eleven
to their own size and then proceeded to ad-minister  a 19-0 defeat. 
Playing against a beefy aggregation, the Vikings were unable to  get
anywhere in the first half except via the air route. A long heave  from
Harris to Flint started the scoring end of the game for the Vik-ings  in
the second quarter.  Coach Carver tested the strength of several backfields
during the  course  of the battle and gradually wore down the Cup's until
the final  period a quartet of Viking backfield stars stormed over for two
touch-downs  and a top-heavy victory.  Some excellent performances were
delivered in this fracas and  everything pointed to a successful season. 
Ninety-six

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Flowers Gillespie Harris  Vikings vs. Navy  Bombarding the Port Townsend
Coast Guard with a great display  of offensive football, the Viking grid
machine ground out a 6-0 victory  in their second start of the season.  The
ball was in Navy territory virtually the entire game but the  determined
offensive thrusts of the  Vikings were hurled back many  times during the
game by the husky Navy eleven. Although advancing the ball several times
within the ten yard line, the Vikings were unable  to score until late in
the third period when Sinko, headed by perfect in-terference,  took the
oval over on a long end run.  Conversion failed and thus ended the scoring
for the day. It was  very obvious in this game that the Vikings lacked the 
punch in the ter-ritory  where "touchdowns are made."  Bellingham Vikings
vs. Pacific Lutheran College Interception of three of their passes proved
too much for Coach Sam  Carver's gridsmen and consequently  they dropped a
heart-breaking  melee 27-7 to Pacific Lutheran College at Tacoma.  The
Vikings started fast, outplayed their opponents the first quar-ter,  pushed
over a touchdown and converted to give them the lead. Im-mediately 
following this score the Gladiators opened their bag of tricks  and pushed
down the field to score. Then with less than three minutes  to play in the
initial half, "Red" Carlson, tiny Tacoma  halfback inter-cepted  two
consecutive passes, dashed for touchdowns, and put the  southern team far
in  the lead.  He scored again in the final quarter, while the Vikings were
held  scoreless by his teammates. This game was a heart-breaker to drop and
 seemed to start a losing streak that the Vikings were unable to shake 
during the entire schedule of games.  Ninety-seven

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Shelton Williams Sinko  Bellingham Vikings vs. Cheney Savages  Assaulting
their Western opponents with a bewildering attack in  the second half, the
Cheney Normal copped their first Tri-Normal tilt  40-0 from the Bellingham
Vikings.  The Vikings were placed on the defensive from the opening
kick-off  but held their conference enemy to one touchdown in the first
half.  The Savage eleven outweighed the local squad, and used their added 
poundage to a good advantage.  Great work by Captain Abbott, Berg, and
Donovan prevented the  Cheneyites from working into a scoring position in
the first period and  a half. Late  in the second quarter a long pass was
completed and put  the Savages in the lead.  The Savages seemed to warm to
their game as it progressed and  rolled up scores with monotonous
regularity in the second and third  periods.  The Bellingham team fought
like Vikings of old but it was impos-sible  to stop the horde of
touchdown-crazy Savages in the final half.  Ninety-eight

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Christy Brewer Baxter  Bellingham Normal vs. Ellensburg Normal  Surprising
even their staunchest supporters, the little band of Vik-ing  gridsmen,
stormed to new heights in their annual Homecoming game with Ellensburg
Normal by holding their ancient rivals to a one  touchdown victory.  The
highly touted running attack of the Wildcats was slowed down,  stopped, and
put into reverse in the first half by the victory-seeking Vik-ings.  But it
was all for naught, for the fight-weary Normal men faltered  once in the 
third quarter and the then thoroughly surprised but aroused  Wildcats
pushed over the goal line and converted for the margin of vic-tory.  Again
as in past games Abbott, Berg and Donovan were the out- standing  Vikings
on the field.  The score fails to tell the complete story as the Carverites
actually  out- played their heavier visitors the first half and nosed
within the ten  yard line twice during the second quarter.  Ninety-nine

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Sybrant Comfort Turner  Vikings vs. College of Puget Sound  Running up
three touchdowns in the last half, after being out-played  and held
scoreless in the first half, the College of Puget Sound  grid warriors
administered the Normal Vikings' fourth defeat of the  season, 21-7.  In
the first half, the Vikings completely outclassed their rivals and  were
leading 7-0 at the half.  Line smashes, passes, reverses and terrific
drives by the Vikings  completely baffled the visiting Loggers and stood
them back on their  heels for two quarters. Passes proved to be the main
force of the local  eleven and Flowers punched the oval over after three
completed passes  had worked the ball inside the ten yard line.  In the
second period Captain Abbott snared three consecutive passes  and worked to
the two yard line where the Vikings' magnificent eighty-yard  drive was
terminated. The Loggers stiffened and held the losers  for downs. Weakened
by injuries, the Viking line was unable to withstand the  assault of the
Loggers in the last half, and no less than three times  did the visitors
cross over into magic territory.  One Hundred

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Flint Hogile Sutton  Bellingham Vikings vs. St. Martin's College  To ring
down the curtain on 1931 football,  the Vikings were buried  deep in Waldo
mud and water by the St. Martins Rangers. When the Southerners finally quit
"Notre Dame shifting" they had piled up an  impressive 26-0 victory. 
During the entire fracas there was little question of the Rangers' 
superiority. The Vikings put up a stubborn defense at all times but  were
unable to cope with the power plays of the husky visiting eleven. 
Outstanding on the Bellingham eleven, in spite of their top-heavy  defeat,
were Abbot, Berg, and Christy. Donovan and Iverson played fine  defensive
ball in their stand against Bufkin, Sibellia and Muszynski,  high-striding
Ranger backs.  This game spelled finis for several wearers of the Blue and
White.  Included in the group were Flowers, Iverson and Shelton, backs;
Sut-ton,  Falkner, Captain Roy Abbott, and Cox, linesmen. One Hundred One

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McNeill Rork Kienast McBeath  Basketball Season Resume  Coach Sam Carver's
initial call for the 1932 basketball season was  answered by a large squad
of super-varsity material out of which the  Viking mentor selected the
nucleus of this year's team. Veterans Rork,  Sherman and Campbell were the
group around which Carver built his  hopes for a successful schedule. Clint
McBeath, a W. S. C. transfer, im- mediately  stepped into a forward break
to pair up with Irving Wahl,  former Everett Hi flash.  Jimmy Rork and John
Kienast, a first year man, handled the pivot  position with Archie Sherman
and Erling Johannson, another newcomer,  at the back posts. Cecil Johannes
joined the squad late in the season. With this squad in fine fettle and
improving rapidly, the Vikings  took their first two games with victories
over the Pacific Lutheran Col-lege  and the Rangers from St. Martins. Then
came the most disas-terous and untimely slump the Vikings bumped into
during the entire  season. A flying trip over the mountains with three
games in four even-ings  was much too great a task for the Carverites and
losses to Ellens- burg,  Cheney, and Yakima Junior College sent Viking
stock out of sight.  The Ellensburg quintet was much the most impressive on
the trip with  the Vikings dropping the other two tussles in ragged form.
Rork, Kienast, Sherman, McBeath, Wahl, Johannson, Campbell, Carver  One
Hundred Two

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Campbell Johannson Wahl Sherman  The Bellingham squad returned home only to
swing southward to do battle with the College of Puget Sound. Here again
the Vikings failed  to hit their stride and dropped a fast game.  The
following week the Vikings played host to the Savages from  Cheney and for
their hospitality lost a hair-raising thriller by one point  to the Eastern
team. This put the Vikings definitely out of Tri-Normal  championship
aspirations. And again the following week the Viking  hosts were taken by
storm, and dropped a hard game to the high strid-ing  Ellensburg Wildcats. 
Seeking a change of climate,  the Vikings pointed the prow of their  ship
southward to tangle with the Pacific Lutheran and St. Martins Col-leges  on
their courts. And the change paid good returns as the Carver  squad came
home with two hard-fought for victory flags waving from  their mast.  And
as in previous years the Vikings closed the season on the local  floor with
their traditional enemies, the rough and ready Loggers from  the College of
Puget Sound. And as in the previous season the Blue and  White aggregation
were forced to admit defeat  in the final minute of  play.  The 1932
basketball season, although not as successful as some in  the past have
been, was outstanding in the development of flashy, clever  basket-tossers
who will undoubtedly next year form one of the strongest  quintets
developed at the Normal school.  Varsity vs. Junior Varsity  One Hundred
Three

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JUNIOR VARSITY  Zoet, Van Over, Leatha, Chandler, Eacrett, Gunn 
Super-Varsity Basketball  Playing in a class "A" City League that embraced
several teams of  unusual calibre, the Normal Super Varsity was unable to
climb any high-er  in their short season schedule. This outfit was groomed
by Coach Carver, and, from the material developed in this division of
players, he  was able to greatly strengthen his Varsity after the Super
season had  closed. It was on this team that the foundation for the speed
and aggres-siveness  of the Varsity was laid.  Junior Varsity Basketball 
Playing superlative ball and without an equal in the class "B" City 
League, Coach "Pop" Gunn's Junior Varsity stormed to heights that have not
been reached in many years by a Normaml team by bringing up on  the hill
the division championship pennant. Twelve out of thirteen  games was their
record for the season. Zoet, Comfort, Eacrett, Cook, Chandler, Malmquist,
Bond, Leatha, VanOver and Gissberg formed the  nucleus of this great little
championship team.  One Hundred, FmQi

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INTRA MURAL  Sells Gross Ford Abbot  Harris Smith Halbert  Intramural
Basketball  Proving themselves of a calibre much superior to the Normal
intra-mural  basketball league, the Co-Op Thugs breezed through  a fourteen
 game schedule without a single defeat. An unusual offensive attack was 
the Thugs' main forte, and they toppled their opponents at will with the 
exception of the Viking Manor's second place quintet, who threw a scare 
into the Co-Op camp each time they tangled.  In several post-season games
the Thugs continued their winning  ways by dropping a number of city league
outfits and downing the highly-touted  Everett Baptists.  Intra-mural
sports is a phase of athletic activity coming much to the foreground in
physical education and is being encouraged by the Normal  coaching staff.
Intra-mural athletics gives more contestants a chance to  compete and makes
it possible to choose an inter- collegiate team from a  larger field of
trained athletes.  One Hundred Five

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Rockey Flint Smith Loomis  Baseball Write-Up  Opening their season with an
impressive win over the College of  Puget Sound 9-4, Coach "Pop" Gunn's
squad of baseball aces showed  great possibilities for the remainder of the
season. Little was known of  the Viking ball team's strength until a
considerable time  after the first  turnout, late in March. But with the
hurlers smoothing the kinks out of  their arms and the fielders and batters
getting their eye on the ball, the  Viking mentor has been very optimistic
for the spring  season.  Greeted by Iverson and Leatha, veteran hurlers,
and Abbott, Com-fort,  Campbell and Eacrett, husky letter winners, plus a
plentiful sprink-ling  of new men and members of last season's squad, Coach
Gunn began  grooming his proteges for a big season.  Cook  One Hundred Six 
Gallanger Dobler Eacrett

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Brewer Leatha Macomber Abbot  With exceptional strength on the mound, the
Vikings were not ex- pected  to encounter much trouble, but in spite of
their strength, they met  their first reversal against St. Martins, who
slammed three of the Bel-lingham  hurlers for a 12-4 victory. The number
one Viking twirler, "Buck" Loomis, worked the Puget Sound game and turned
the Loggers  back with ease in a sterling exhibition.  Other Viking players
who will see plenty of service during the re-mainder  of the season are:
Bert Gallanger, Al Francisco, and Terry Cook,  outfielders; Art Smith,
Eddie Macomber and Milton Flint, infielders;  Nelson Brewer and Lloyd
Loomis, pitchers.  Games yet to be played this season include return
tussles with St.  Martins and the College of Puget Sound. Also a two-game
series with  the University of Washington Frosh has been scheduled.  The
Vikings automatically cop the Tri-Normal crown  as neither El-lensburg  or
Cheney have shown any intentions of entering teams.  Stiger Campbell
Iverson Francisco  One Hundred Seven

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Christie Stiger Johanson Lovegren  Track  Although not showing as much
early season strength as last season's  championship squad, Coach Sam
Carver is bringing along a fine, bal-anced  track outfit. Seven letter
winners are back to garner points in  their favorite events.  Graduation
depleted the Viking squad in the distances and middle  distance jaunts, and
it is here that the local squad is weakest. Strong in  the sprints, with
Chuck Thomas, veteran, and Walt Schlilaty, former  state prep champ,
turning in remarkable time for the century and fur-long,  little is to be
feared in the dashes.  Becken  One Hundred Eight Falkner Schlilaty Thomas 
__

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Jones Williams Gable Shelton  John Gable, Tri-Normal champion, has been
leaping high, wide and handsome in pre-season tilts and exceeded the
present record by nearly  a foot in the Ellensburg Normal meet. Davey
Jones, pole vaulter, is also  back to try for new records this year.  Jim
Davis, without an equal among Tri-Normal competitors, is back  again this
year to do his jumping act over the high and low hurdles and  also take a
few points in the high jump.  Shelton, Moe, and VanOver, a new man, will
back up the weights in  an outstanding fashion with Kemphaus working the
javelin.  Lew Lovegren, letter winner in the distances, is back to step the
 two-mile. He will be supported by Duyff, veteran miler, and Johannson,  a
new man.  In an early season meet the Vikings downed the Ellensburg Normal"
 by a forty point margin with some exceptionally fine marks being set. 
Davis Duyff Hall Mickelson  One Hundred Nine

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Stearns, Wahl, Irby, Bond, Fisher, Wiedman  Tennis  With one veteran back
and a great deal of promising material out for  the Viking tennis team,
Coach Sam Carver is anticipating an excep-tionally strong and successful
season. Willie Houghton, the lone one-striper  back, will uphold his
singles crown against the attacks of both  Normal players and minor college
racket weilders.  At this writing but one match had been played with the
Vikings  .toppling their ancient rivals, the College of Puget Sound, five
to two.  The local players played superb ball against the Loggers and
rallied  time and again to take their matches. Houghton, Lahtonen, and Carr
 garnered victories in this tussle with Houghton and Carr and Fisher  and
Lahtonen copping the two doubles matches.  The team will represent the
Normal school at the Tri-Normal meet  this spring at Cheney. The local
racket swingers packed away both the  singles and doubles crowns last year
and left a big mark for this year's  squad to shoot at. A return match with
the Loggers and two matches  with the U. of W. Frosh will conclude the
season.  One Hundred Ten

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Viqueen Lodge  Viqueen Lodge  Just imagine having thirteen acres on
Sinclair Island, harboring a  five- room house with a fireplace, and two
beaches. Two acres of it are  already cleared and the rest of it is
primitive looking timber! Such is  Viqueen Lodge, the girls' paradise on
Sinclair Island.  When it was first begun, it was termed a venture in real
estate. The  girls paid five hundred dollars as the first payment on a  two
hundred  dollar investment and received in return, a playground overlooking
other  of the San Juan Islands and being in reality a scenic wonderland.
That  was the venture in a nutshell, and the girls have certainly benefited
 from it.  Miss Weythman uses it as a place to take her camp craft class
for a  week- end of work and play. It is also used as a general outing
place, a  camp site, an old swimming hole, and a  place for hikes and
games. From  the very beginning of the scheme to recent date, the project
has afforded  a real adventure for the Women's Athletic Association.  One
Hundred Eleven

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Women's Sports  Miss Weythman, who is head  of the Women's Physical
educa-tion  department, has a great  deal to do with the repeated  success
of girls' sports. She at-tended,  with two students, the National W. A. A.
convention in  Los Angeles, where she acquired  many new ideas on teaching 
girls' sports.  Mildred Jewell, who handles  dancing in the school, also 
coaches various sports.  Miss Margery Horton special-izes  in swimming. She
is also  a coach of different sports.  Miss Lillian George, always
interested in the girls, accom-panied  them on their hikes  whenever
weather permitted.  Dancing  One, two, three, tap! One,  two, three, tap!
And so on, us-ing  the staid expression, far, far  into the afternoon! The
fall  dancing class, for those wishing  to learn to tap was popular and 
crowded, and although none of  the girls learned to be full  fledged
Pavlovas, a good time  was had by all. Lota Lawrence,  Minnie Peterson, and
Dolly  Malterner from the Frosh, and  Clarice Abel, Charlotte Hoag,  Marie
Lundquist, Peggy Shud-shift,  Lucile Sly, and Evelyn  Smith from the Sophs,
com-posed  the dance teams selected  by Miss Horton, who had charge  of the
turnouts.  Basketball  Basketball-that ever-old,  ever-popular sport,
enjoyed a  large turnout this year. It seems  that the fact that basketball
is  the oldest girl's sport in  the  school, does not decrease its 
popularity. The organization of  intra-mural teams gave every  girl a
chance to participate in  the sport.  One Hundred Twelve

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Volleyball  It seems that "keep it going,  keep it going-that's it-Oh!"  is
the exclamation characteris-tic  of volleyball. Volleyball has  had an
active turnout for sever-al  years at the Normal and it  seems that "a
never say die"  spirit pervades all the games.  The Sophomores took an easy
 championship, winning three  out of five games.  Handball  Handball is
played with a  small rubber ball, the object be-ing  to hit it against the
wall.  The ball reacts in various ways,  landing anywhere within a ra-dius 
of 150 feet. Handball  tour-naments  include singles and  doubles. The
little courts at the  rear of the grandstand are used  for this game. 
Archery  "I shot an arrow into the air  -it fell to earth, I know not 
where" is true of the archery contestants, for the arrows may  be found
anywhere from the  grandstand to the heart of Se-home. Archery reached the 
height of its popularity this  spring, and is a feature of Field  Day. 
Tennis  Tennis is a game illustrating  Darwin's theory of "survival of  the
fittest," for the tournaments  deftly find the "fittest," if she  is to be
found. Tennis tourna-ments  were started about 1917,  and since then there
has been a class tournament each spring.  The courts on High Street are 
always busy.  One Hundred Thirteen

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Soccer  Girls who play soccer must be  fully prepared for kicked shins  and
soggy shoes. In spite of this fact, however, soccer is one of  the most
popular of the outdoor  sports.  The first class game of the soccer season
just past was a tie,  the second a frosh victory, and  the last one, after
an overtime  period,  showed the sophs to be  ahead. Points totaled six in
all.  Hockey  Whistling winds and chat-tering teeth, accompanied by  woolly
tams and swetters, ush-ered  in another successful hock-ey  season ending
in a one point  victory for the second year  classmen.  An exciting tie
ended the first  tussle and the final whistle  brought the last one to a
close  with the sophs boasting three  markers and the frosh two.  Speedball
 Speedball, being an outdoor  sport, was enjoyed immensely  by the girls.
The game is a com-bination  of soccer and basket-ball  and is played on the
field.  It is a very speedy game, includ-ing numerous quick plays and  much
passing and kicking.  Lovers of the game only grin at  the bruised feet and
kicked  shins which result.  Badminton  Badminton, an English game  similar
to tennis, is a sport in which contestants are greatly  intrigued by the
tricky, little  leather shuttle cock which  seems, at times, almost
bird-like  in its activities-and many  a mad dash and a reach high,  wide
and forceful, with the long  handled rackets is necessary be-fore  victory
can be attained.  One Hundred Fourteen

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Baseball  Baseball, the good old Ameri-can  sport of all youth, is always 
assured of its share of fans. It is   one of the many spring sports 
offered and a large number of  girls turn out. As in other  sports, intra-
mural games are  played, class teams are chosen  and final games are played
on  field day. It may be an  old sport  -but each year it creates new 
interests.  Here out on Waldo, the Vi-queens  are enjoying some  real 
baseball. Every night of regular  turnout the girls in black and  white
with here and there a  flash of color, may be seen bat-ting  Ruthies, hard
and fast, for  the W. A. A.-and there are sev-eral  home runs in  an
evening,  too.  Hiking  Organized hikes were started  by Miss George about
seven  years ago, and since that time,  have enjoyed good followings.  It
seems that a small sign say-ing,  "All girls going on the  hike  Saturday
sign below. Bring tin  cup and own lunch" posted on  the bulletin board,
insures a  large feminine crowd.  Swimming  With the ruination of many  of
fifty-cent hair waves, the gay,  young hopefuls in drab, gray  suits,
passed another swimming  season. Swimming took place as  usual at the Y: W.
C. A. pool,  with Miss Horton blowing the  proverbial whistle as the
offi-cial  head. Freshman and Sopho-more   teams were chosen.  One Hundred
Fifteen

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Shudshift, Jacobson, Meredith, Top, Harris, Grieve  Sweater Girls  Have you
noticed the girls about the halls who wear white wool  sweaters with a
single service stripe and a blue "W"? These girls are  to be complimented
on their athletic ability. They are the "cream of the  crop" so to speak,
and have been members of eight first teams and have  200 additional points,
totaling 1,000 points in all. No woman is eligible  who cannot make a "B"
grade in posture.  The girls who won the sweaters this year are: Marion
Grieve, Iola  Grue, Frances Harris, Wyona Hennings, Ethel Jacobsen, Helene
Mere-dith,  Elva Pilquist, Margaret Shudshift, and Dorothy Top. These girls
 won their sweaters through the old requirements.  New requirements have
been formulated and put into use for future  years. They demand eleven
first class team awards and four all star  team awards. The applicant for
the sweater must also be accepted by  the W. A. A. council with a majority
vote, upon the basis of several per-sonal  standards including: regular
sleep, food and. drink habits, suffi-cient  exercise, no tobacco, drugs, or
intoxicating liquor, cleanliness, and  social relationship. The girls who
receive sweaters are highly worthy  of the honor.  One Hundred Sicteen

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Flick Grue  Representatives to Conference  This year an unusual privilege
was granted two girls of the W. A. A.  Iola Grue, club president, and
Theona Flick, Freshman representative,  accompanied by Miss Ruth Weythman,
head of the Women's Physical  Education department, attended the Western
division of the Athletic  conference of American College Women at Los
Angeles. The conference  took place April eighth  and ninth.  The trip down
proved to be an interesting part of the adventure.  The girls wrote back to
the school and told of their many new experi-ences,  which, by the way,
included close enough contact with a  bear to  take his picture. During the
banquet on the last night, five schools were  asked to respond to toasts.
Iola Grue was among the five representa-tives.  This is an honor not to be
forgotten.  The girls not only benefited personally while attending the
confer-ence  meetings, lectures and luncheons, but coming in contact with
other  representatives afforded excellent opportunities for the exchange of
 ideas. More such trips should be arranged, for they prove valuable to the 
school in that new ideas can be put into action. This is the first time in 
recent years that Bellingham has been represented at this conference, but  
it is hoped that it will not be the last.  One Hundred Seventeen

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TRAINING SCHOOL The lure of wild life--the little hidden trails -- tiny
curious eyes, the snap of twigs and scurry-ing, furry feet--the child's
delight in Nature. Trees and grassy knolls, bay and mountains and far-
reaching skies--where childhood lives and thrives and adventures.

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MARY E. RICH  Director of the Training School  Training School  The
Training School includes the city schools of Bellingham, some  of the rural
schools, and the Campus School in the Normal Building. All  of these are
under the direction of a capable leader, Miss Mary E. Rich,  who is
responsible for much of the success of the organization. The  many schools
have one objective in view, providing an opportunity for student teachers
to apply theory to practical class room work, to become  good teachers of
children. Methods of teaching here get constructive  criticism, criticism
from a corps of competent teachers and supervisors  who make their students
adept teachers in their many fields of work.  One Hundred Nineteen

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STUDENT TEACHERS OF THE PRIMARY CURRICULUM  Cryer, Frost, Christiansen,
Rosenzweig, Voorhies, Myers  Taylor, Anderson, Galvin, Smith, McLeod,
Jensen, Palmer  Goss, Deal, Abel, Johnson, Rosenzweig, Hoag  The Primary
Curriculum includes the kindergarten, the first, second  and third grades
of elementary schools. This year eighty-three teach-ers  have been trained
especially for that field. The Intermediate Cur-riculum,  fourth, fifth and
sixth grades, was chosen by seventy-five stu-dents.  This differentiation
of curricula is important for it means that  the preparatory work of those
students will be chosen for its influence  on their ultimate goals. Not
only the required but the elective subjects  are chosen for additional
benefit in practice, and practical teaching.  They should also increase the
efficiency for teaching special subjects,  such as art, music or physical
education.  STUDENT TEACHERS OF THE  INTERMEDIATE CURRICULUM  Henderson,
Kaeski, Dobbs, Peterson, Rock, Jacobson, Top, Apple Schubert, Frost,
Garside, Logan, Johnson, Deets, Samuelson, Bright  Neilson, Rasmuss, Morse,
Kasperson, Davenport, Westhoff  One Hundred Twenty

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STUDENT TEACHERS OF THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUM  Moultray, Anderson,
Swanson, Kasperson, Top, Johnson, Hill, Brandt, Schoeffer, Jones  Smith
Lamoreaux, Chandler, Nyberg, Allen, Nelson, McBain  Kelly, Shudshift,
Price, Davis, Bowers, Watts, Barron.  Another important Curriculum, that of
the Junior High, which pre-pares  for the seventh, eighth, or ninth grades,
claimed one hundred thir- teen  students this year.  The Junior High School
Curriculum is intended to make efficient  teachers in a typical Junior High
School or in the grammar grades.  Electives here largely increase ability
for departmental work. The -stu-dents  taking Rural practice do it in
representative rural schools, of one,  two,  three, or four rooms, and in
this division also, electives are chosen  to better equip the teachers, in
this particular work.  STUDENT TEACHERS OF THE RURAL SCHOOLS  Abrahamson,
Nelson, Borges, Nairn, Price  Stroebel, Portrey, Cole, Porter  One Hundred
Twenty-one

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Kindergarten  First Grade Rhythms  In the upper picture the kindergarten of
the Campus School shows an excellent piece of work for development of
social understanding. The  children are playing, working, and living
together, learning to think of  others. They are planning and looking ahead
in the common trend of  everyday life where children are at home and others
are marketing, or  out for a stroll. Clearly, through actual experiences,
the contacts and in-terdependences  of the social world are being keenly
impressed upon them.  In the lower picture we find these first grade
children of the Campus  School giving their individual interpretations of a
song, "Johnny at the  Fair." This provides an excellent opportunity for
child imagination and  so we find one child out hunting, another a rocking
horse and still an-other,  a tree. This period is a regular class, but
often, and with interest-ing  results, the ideas are carried over into a
rhythmic  interpretation of  the story hour.  One Hundred Twenty-two

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Indian Assembly Third Grade  Laurel School Garden Unit  The above picture
is of an Indian Assembly given by the third grade  of the Campus School.
The first scene was of the Plains Indians, and  the last, of  Northwest
Indians; this one is of those of the Southwest.  The different scenes,
here, a Hopi Indian home of adobe were painted  by the children. They made
the costumes and rug looms and the rugs  for which they carded and spun the
wool. They experimented with dying  cloth with roots and bark. The girls
made papooses and cradles, and all  made tom-toms and rain rattles, so,
with the reading of many Indian books and weekly councils, the project,
which culminated in this assem-bly,  was of a very definite educational
value.  The picture below is of second grade children in the Laurel School 
of the Meridian District. They were interested in knowing how plants  grow
and so tried a number of experiments with seeds, tubers and plants.  They
then wished they might have a real garden, and it offered so many
possibilities in science, number, art, music, conversation, work, play, 
and outdoor fun, that the teacher was glad to follow their suggestion.  In
this picture they are measuring the ground which is to be spaded by the
eighth grade boys when it is in the right condition.  One Hundred
Twenty-three

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Fourth Grade Campus School Spelling  Fifth Grade Assembly-Campus School  In
the above picture, fourth grade students of the Campus School  demonstrate
the correct writing position for speed and legibility as well  as beauty of
form. Position is adjusted to meet individual needs and dif-ferences,  and
the ultimamte goal is not a stiff copy of an original, but the  optimum of
the individual child. Each child has  proper lighting and  therefore
uniform advantage in his work. The children here are writing  words of the
spelling lesson which are being dictated to them by a stu-dent  teacher. 
In the picture below we see a colonial assembly which was the out-come  of
a study of our American Colonial life by the fifth grade of the  Campus
School. The assembly took the form of a museum, in which  articles made or
collected by the children were placed.  They made the benches and pictures
and decorated also with the  four lovely coverlids, the spinning wheels and
pots and pans representa-tive  of those times. The action consisted of
children going through the  museum, some for the first time, and so through
questions and conver-sation the story was brought out for the audience. 
One Hundred Twenty-four

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Seventh Grade Boys-Campus School  Sixth Grade Assembly  Above we see
seventh grade boys of the Campus School making Japa-nese  houses, gardens,
boats and temples. This activity was an outgrowth of a social science
project in Japan. Some articles were produced from  clay; others were
carved from bars of soap. The boys were intensely  interested and
completely absorbed in their individual problems and the  result of this
study was a collection of many outstanding pieces of ama-teur  sculpture. 
The sixth grade of the training school in the picture below presents  the
play "Gabriel and the Hour Book" which grew out of their study of  the
Middle Ages of European History in their social science class. This scene
is in a scriptorium of a monastery of the fifteenth century where  the hour
book is being done in manuscript writing. The window was  made in their art
work and the pictures and desks, and designs on the  desks as well. The
dialogue of the play also was original and was com-posed  by the children
in their class periods.  One Hundred Twenty-five

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Eighth Grade Math Students  Eighth Grade Industrial Arts Class  In the cut
above, the Campus School geometry class is shown meas-uring  a point which,
for their purpose, they have called inacessible. This is an indirect
measurement problem and is based on their knowledge of  congruent angles.
The instruments used were made by the children  themselves and, in spite of
their crudeness, the results of their labor were  very gratifying, as they
later found ,by actual measurement of the sup-posedly inaccessible point, a
mistake of only one foot.  The eighth grade class in Industrial Arts,
below, learns photography  in the Campus School. They have learned to
develop films, to print their  own pictures, and to make enlargements of
them. The work serves as a  means of studying the photographic industries,
the wide commercial  uses of photography. One of their activities was
making a photographic  study of Bellingham industries, but here they are
seen compounding their  own solutions for their work, which is certainly
prolific.  One Hundred Twenty-six

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Seventh Grade-Roosevelt School  First Grade-Washington School  In the upper
picture the seventh grade of the Roosevelt School has  gone to Alabama
Ridge on the Whatcom River for a better appreciation  of the nature poems
which they have been studying in an English class.  The poems were about
flowers, birds, water and trees, and after the trip,  on which this picture
was taken, more poems were studied and then some  were read in an assembly.
Later the poems about trees led the children  to a tree planting ceremony. 
In the lower picture the first grade of the Washington School is  shown
working at a variety of things, though the main activity of this  room is
the group reading which is for the time, under direct guidance  of the
teacher. Some children are choosing books for themselves, others  are
already reading and two girls are putting names on a flower chart;  at the
easel they are illustrating stories and at the blackboards are draw-ing 
what they like. This is an ideal situation where children can work
independently and individual differences care for.  One Hundred
Twenty-seven

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School Life Light steps and glad "hellos"-- the joy of companionship on the
tree-bordered walks of our campus, this year as in times past and as
always, -- through sun and shower--laughter with now and then  a tear --
the happy friendships and joyous activities of today -- school day memories
for tomorrow.

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     Klipsun, 1932 - Page 129

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Elsie O'Donne:l  "Most Representative Co-ed" Contest  Elsie O'Donnell, by
popular selection, was voted the most repre-sentative  co-ed of the
Bellingham Normal school. This contest, the first  of its kind, was
sponsored by the Northwest Viking, and has created wide  interest
throughout the school.  Miss O'Donnell may well carry such a title, being
representative of  the best in all phases of activities in the school, and
possessing high  qualities of personality, non-curricular interests, and
popularity.  Miss O'Donnell has shown fine initiative and leadership in
every-thing  she has chosen to do. She has held a number of responsible
posi-tions  since her entrance in the school. She was elected
vice-president  of the  Associated Students spring quarter last year, but
resigned that  position, as she was unable to remain in  school during the
summer term,  and upon returning to school in the fall, she was elected
four quarter rep-resentative  to the Board of Control. She is president of
the Valkyrie,  Girls' Pep club, a member of the  Philos, W. A. A., and the
Drama Club,  doing excellent work in dramatic productions.  Contributing to
a close competitive contest were four other favorites  for the final
election, Nellie Cox, Helen Edgar, Dorothy Fiala, and  Vaughn Howell. 
Undoubtedly, in accordance with the qualifications set by the com-mittee 
of the faculty and students in charge, the contestants are all out-standing
 examples of a truly "Representative Co-ed."  One Hundred Twenty-nine

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One Hundred Thirty

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One Hundred Thirty-one

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One Hundred Thirty-two

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One Hundred Thirty-three

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()ne Hundred Thirty-four

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One Hundred Thirty-five

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One Hundred Thirty-six

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One Hundred Thirty-seven

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One hundred thirty-eight

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One Hundred Thirty-nine

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THE KLIPSUN STAFF  wishes to take this opportunity of showing  its
appreciation for the willing co- operation  and splendid assistance given
it by the fol-lowing:  C. S. BEARD  W. S. STANLEY  Union Printing Company 
RICHARD LEA  Western Engraving and Colortype  Company  H. H. VINSON  Jukes
Incorporated, Photography  HERBERT C. RUCKMICK  Photography  One Hundred
Forty  a  I

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     Klipsun, 1932 - Endpaper


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     Klipsun, 1932 - Endpaper


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