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1940

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     Klipsun, 1940


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     Klipsun, 1940 - Cover


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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page [2] of cover


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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page [i]

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Louisa Stoddard   Jean Crawford

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page [ii]


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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page [iii]

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The  KLIPSUN  1940

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page [iv]

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k

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 2

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The Klipsun 1940 Published by Western Washington College of   Education
Bellingham, Washington E. Douglas Lince, editor Frances Daley, business
manager Page 2

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Edens Hall, "The House of Color  and Light", stands cool under a  summer
sky. 116 WWC co-eds live here.  Page 3

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Looking ahead are Betty Moser and Rolf Jensen. Behind them lie the Art and
Science Wing of Main Hall and three years' study of teaching technique.
FOREWORD A year, and the earth whirls thru her orbit unchanged; time sweeps
on and only man changes. Changes in administration, in personnel, and in
the student body bring only a small ripple to the smooth surface of the
field of teaching and progressive education. Emergence of Western
Washington College in 1937 from the status of a normal school to the rank
of a four year college brought a larger curriculum to non-diploma students,
to prospective teachers a degree of Bachelor of Arts in Education. With
this expansion came new ideas, new policies, and new plans. These we have
tried to evaluate kindly, if candidly. To give clearer perspective, the
1940 Klipsun has discarded superfluous theme and stereotyped sections to
better present vivid personalities, your work  and play, your year in
college. Page 4

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Dr. Merle S. Kuder Dedication Rare indeed is the diplomat who always
reamins sincere; the busy man who takes the time to help another discover
in trouble that hearty good humor is its own reward; the guide  who can
forget he is the source of inspiration. To that man whose truly exceptional
professional traianing in personnel work, added to a sensitive interest in
other people, culminates in a keen skill in guiding and motivating
collegians in their studies and personal problems; who inspired the
organization of campus- integrating clubs and who early advocated the 
student activity building; whose urbanity and tactfulness are as natural as
a wise man's hearty chuckle; To that good mixer, the biggest towdy at
informal faculty parties, to the registrar, Dr. Merle S. Kuder, the 1940
Klipsun is dedicated. Page 5

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Aglow with light is the  PE building as the Vik-ings  spank UBC.  Shirlee
Cratsenberg and  Wayne Weber  take off  on the tennis courts  near the PE
Building.  Page 6

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Through a winter eve-ning's  mist the library  shines.  Mildred Aust and
Ialeen  Allison, senior class president, skip down  the library steps on a 
sunny June morn.  Page 7

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Mount Baker from Baker Lake  In Memoriam  Julius Dornblut  Vene Fisher 
Maynard Howatt   Alice Beulah Lindberg   Hope Weitman   July 22, 1939  
Helen V. Little   March 29, 1940  " . . And you will be forever climbing
upward now, the long splendid climb:   Weariness can never hold you back,
nor the world,  nor Time."  .... Charles E. Butler   Page 8

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CONTENTS  ALBUM 19   faculty 20   classes 24  ACTIVITIES 53  ORGANIZATIONS 
 81 ATHLETICS 95  INDEX   113   Below, ivy covered Main Hall

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By Hal Booth AN appreciable increase in enroll-ment  made the opening in
the fall  at Western Washington College an  auspicious one. Hopes for a new
training  school are on their way to a speedy real-ization.  The dream of a
student activity  building was but a hallucination . . . the  year has been
a curious admixture of lofty  aspiration, disappointment, and decided 
advancement.  Dismissal  One quiet day, almost seventeen years  ago,
Charles H. Fisher walked quickly up  High Street and there, looming
suddenly  out of the mist, stood the institution of  which he was to be
president for 16 years.  During the administration of Mr. Fisher,  WWC came
to be recognized as one of  the best of its kind in the nation. Last June
the Board of Trustees of  WWC asked for the resignation of Mr.  Fisher, and
despite student opinion and  resolutions from other groups, his ser-vices 
terminated at the end of summer  quarter. Austere, always sincere,
impatient with  delay, Mr. Fisher was to the students a  respected
executive and  a valued friend.  Appointment  To succeed Mr. Fisher the
board elected  Dr. William Wade Haggard. Diplomatic,  genial, erudite,
exceptionally well-quali-fied,  Dr. Haggard's tenure of the presi-dency 
here can only be successful and  progressive.  Tragedy  Last July 22, a
party of twenty-five col-lege  students struggled slowly along the  Roman
Wall of Mt. Baker. An ominous  rumble preceded the horribly beautiful 
sight of mountains of cascading snow;  and instant, silent death came to
Alice  James, Hope Weitman, Beulah Lindberg,  Vene Fisher, Julius Dornblut,
and May-nard  Howatt.  An out-door memorial made with basalt columns,
living trees and flowers,  reflecting the youthful and vigorous  spirits of
these students, is to be erected  and dedicated.  Additions  New this year
on the faculty of WWC  are Lyle Brewer, Science;  Albert Van  Events of
Nine  Aver, English; Madelon Powers, Art;  Henry Coleman, Library staff;
and Dor- othy  Rundle, Nursing staff.  Student Activity Building  Decidedly
optimistic are they who  someday in the near future anticipate  seeing the
campus of WWC graced by a  student activity building. A committee composed
of student and faculty mem-bers,  selected in the fall, investigated the 
feasibility and the possibilities of financ-ing  the construction of such a
building.  The committee, whose work has been exhaustive and thorough, also
considered  various possible sites for the building as  well as possible
plans for defraying the  cost. The plans considered were first, to  fatten
the student body fees and second,   to solicit alumni contributions.  As
impossibly difficult problems pre-sented  themselves in the pursuit of both
 plans, and as the administration had as-sured  them that little or no
financial aid  could be expected  from it or from the  state, the committee
dissolved.  A student activity building would not  only be practicable in
providing for mis-cellaneous  student and faculty organiza-tions,  whose
present housing facilities in  the main building are of a most inade-quate 
nature, but would stimulate a new  and greater interest in student affairs.
 Integration  Initiated this year was the Publications  Board, organized to
facilitate a fair and  judicious selection of editors and business 
managers for The Collegian, The Klip-sun,   and other student publications
and to  integrate the control of these publications  under a board selected
 for their journal-istic  experience.  Expansion  Further expansion is
seen, too, in the  erection of a new training school next  fall on the
present site of the grandstand  on Waldo Field.  The new building, designed
by the  Seattle firm of Bebb and Jones, is to be  of modified Romanesque
architecture, corresponding with the style of the  library and the Physical
Education build-ing.  It will be constructed of reinforced  concrete and
brick, with tiled roof.  Page 10

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teen Hundred Forty in Review  Character-Building  Not so great as the
championship 1938  team, which was unbeaten and untied,  but almost, seems
to adequately charac-terize  last season's football squad. They  fought
hard; they gave the students many  thrilling hours; they finished in a tie
for  third. That's all. Drawing heavily upon the intramural  teams for
material, Coach Charles  "Chuck" Lappenbusch, produced an er-ratic,  but
entirely satisfactory basketball  team. They were a thrilling team to 
watch; they were the only team in the  conference to beat the Championship
El-lensburg  "Wildcats" twice on foreign  soil; they  finished third. 
Student Affairs  In conjunction with the recreational  program of WWC,
enterprising club lead-ers  early in fall quarter keynoted the new  and
vital spirit, which the more penetrat-ing  of school observers hail as
being on  the upgrade, with "The Club Crescendo"  designed to interest
students, new and  old, in extra-curricular activities.  Although only
partially successful in  its initiatory try, "Club Crescendo" is be-ing 
polished and reconditioned for a per-manent  niche in the fall quarter
schedule. School spirit as typified by "Club Cres-cendo"  is new in that it
places the em-phasis  on the more cultural  aspects of  college life. It is
evidenced in growing  club membership; in interest in the pro-jected
Bookstore improvements and in  patronage of those things which are
con-structive  and positive rather than those  which militate against
self-cultivation  and stimulating, healthy recreation.  Seemingly, too,
there is a significant at-titude  gaining impetus among the stu-dents  of
WWC, indicating a growing, vital student association and a more complete 
participation in student government.  Nearly 50% more students polled votes
 as the book went to press.  In a year we have matured intellectu-ally;  we
have grown younger in spirit;  we have adapted ourselves to a changed 
administration; we have known tragedy  and disappointment and are not
disheart-ened.  That is progress.  The hill separating library (right) and
PE build-ing  will be leveled, the road changed to pass back  of the gym,
telephone poles removed, ground  landscaped to harmonize with campus. The
new  training school will be built at the right of the  bit  of track
showing in right corner.  Page 11

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A typical student teacher, Marian  Jones (center), and Charlotte  Facey
confer with their super-visor.  New  teaching techniques  that might solve
classroom prob-lems  are discussed and clarified.  Wet feet and sniffles
from insuf-ficient  covering may be all right  when she is not student
teaching,  but Jonesie knows the value of  an umbrella and rubbers in
keep-ing  her performance up to par.  Beauty sleep becomes doubly
nec-essary  when the nerve strain of  teaching takes its toll. Every time 
she burns the candle at both ends,  her lessened efficiency is reflect-ed 
in the children's behavior.  Klipsun Learns to Teach Classes of today
extend be-yond  the four walls of the  schoolroom. To learn the part 
lumbering has played in Bell-ingham's  development, the  campus school
fourth grade,  under supervisor Miss Merri-man   and student teachers,
in-spect  a lumber mill.  A classroom project at What-com  Junior High
School utilized English, history, art  and bookbinding when the  seventh
grade in their Eng-lish  class wrote diaries of a  colonial boy and girl,
illus-trated  and bound them.  Page 12

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Ski, snow, sun: with only ski-turn  techniques to consider,  Jonesie is
completely happy and  returns to Monday classes fresh  as a mountain
breeze.  "Look both ways for cars and  stay in a group" is the command  as
she takes her young charges  to the bus. It is a good chance  to teach some
safety rules and  to get better acquainted.  Jonesie acquires a fresh slant
on  nature, as seen thru the eyes of  the children. The classroom ex-tends 
far beyond the four walls  today.  ITH a tight throat and shaking  knees
the student teacher squares  her shoulders, smiles, and con-fronts  her
first class.  That class is to be guided by her for  three months in a
series of school exper-iences  designed to develop in each child  a
definite growth in attitudes and abili-ties:  social, moral, emotional and
mental.  (That, in a nutshell, is the ultimate aim  of what modern
educators call "progres-sive  education.")  Keenly she realizes that she
must make  adjustments in her own attitudes and per-sonality  if she is to
accomplish those  aims. She must develop the children's  freedom of
expression without undue dis-cipline  problems, develop emotional 
sta-bility  without sacrificing spontaneity,  and, imbued with the
principle that live-wire  children are living right now and  learn thru
doing, she must integrate the  three R's into the day's program without 
allowing drill-work to become boresome.  Reading, writing and arithmetic
still  are taught in definite classes, but modern  educators try, as far as
possible, to work  them into natural life situations.  This the teacher
plans to accomplish  with the activity program, which is a  series of
school experiences designed to promote the most growth in children.  This
does not mean intellectual growth  alone. The child should have an
oppor-tunity  to move freely, to develop an effi-cient  body, to
investigate things of inter-est  to him, to try out his own ideas in  work
and in play, to think things out for  himself and to carry responsibility. 
With all this in mind, and after con-ferences  with her supervisor, she
selects,  Page 13 within the limits of the curriculum, a  problem that is
real and vital to the chil-dren,  the solution of which will integrate  and
utilize as many of the daily subjects  as possible and that will evolve
exper-iences upon which other abilities and  skills can be built.  But how
is she going to keep them in-terested? handle discipline problems?  help
them attain that feeling, so neces-sary  for best learning, of security and
 confidence in themselves and those about  them? gain self-confidence in
teaching  herself? Techniques of teaching can be learned  only thru months
of study and actual  teaching.  The teacher gains her greatest goal in 
teaching techniques during this period of  practice teaching, when she
learns to  make the personal adjustments, large and  small, necessary to
guide and teach chil-dren.  These adjustments involve an inte-gration  of
the student's previously ac-quired  general knowledge and the prin- ciples 
of educational psychology.  Every child has a background that  formed a
mobile personality, retiring, an-tagonistic,  or happily normal. The
stu-dent  teacher studies it, secures the confi-dence  of the child by a
sincere effort to  solve his problem, secures the best teach-ing  situation
when she becomes well-liked  by the child; studies her own per-sonality  to
make those adjustments nec-essary.  At the end of three months the student 
teacher realizes that "progressive educa-tion"  is not a method or theory
of teach-ing  but an attitude that remains free to  make continual
adjustments to meet  changing conditions.

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Klipsun Teaches  Painting pictures is as natural  as breathing to the
kinder-garten  children after they be- come  familiar with the tools 
needed. Boats and houses nat-urally  predominate as they do  in the
environment.  "Read with your eyes" (top  right) is the positive way of 
saying that lipmoving is bad. However, these first graders  are encouraged
to get the  thrill of getting meaning from  the printed page first, with 
drill secondary.  Helping one another to finish  their work is one way that
co-operation  develops  in the ac-tivity  period in the first grade  at
Washington School.  Sewing because the pioneers  did, the fifth grade at
Roeder  School (second, right) each  made a block of a quilt which  they
finished and presented  to a welfare agency. Corn-grinding  was another
pioneer  activity which they followed  in becoming familiar with  their
ancestors' problems.  Batting is not the only thing  taught on the
playground.   Group opinion and teacher-guidance  result in a higher 
standard of sportsmanship.  The spirit of competition is  minimized, with
every child  encouraged to have and do  his share.  Here Vaughn Weber shows
 better batting technique to the  Junior High boys.  "Let's go to press."
Divided  into committees, the Campus  Junior High School writes and  edits
the Junior Beacon. Not  only do they learn to combine words in real life
situations,  but they learn the importance  of accuracy.  The changing face
of Europe  is a source of keen interest to  the Campus Junior High so-cial 
science classes which keep  abreast of events with a black-board 
frequently altered.  Page 14

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Steve Saunders left,  greets chairman W. D.  Kirkpatrick and sec-retary  of
the Board of  Trustees Verne Brani-gin.  This Board helps  to formulate
major po-licies  of WWC.  This is How it is Done  T HEEd uWcaetisotenr ni
sW aa sshtainteg totena cChoelrlse'g ec ool-f  lege, accredited by the
American Association of Teachers' Colleges and the  Northwest Association
of Secondary and  Higher Schools. It is  one of three state  teachers'
colleges in Washington. The  governing body is the board of three trus-tees
composed of Dr. W. D. Kirkpatrick,  chairman, Verne Branigin, and Steve 
Saunders. This board, appointed by the  governor, formulates and appraises
de-tails  of finance, building, and general  policy.  To  the President of
WWC, Dr. W. W.  Haggard, the Board of Trustees has dele-gated  all powers
of immediate govern-ment.  Through him and the department  instructors the
college clicks.  The curriculum of the school is divided  into three major
parts; the Elementary,  which prepares teachers for kindergarten  and first
to sixth grade; the Junior High,  which prepares teachers for grades seven 
to nine; and Pre- Nursing. There is also  a modified curriculum for
teacher-librar-ians.  What the curriculum shall consist  of is decided by a
Curriculum Committee  with Dr. Irving E. Miller as chairman.  All changes
made in curriculum are in-augurated  by this committee, and re-ferred  to
the faculty for adoption. The  committee meets every week to discuss 
problems in the various courses of study.  Its function is not dictatorial
but rather  directive.  An integral part of the college is the  Training
School in which many of the  students do practice teaching. It consists  of
two campus schools, the Elementary  and the Junior High, under the
direction  of Miss Mary E. Rich.  Periods of study have been divided into 
quarters: fall, winter, spring and sum-mer.  In addition, the school
provides an  extension service and correspondence  study.  Page 15

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Faculty Message from  The President  Cultural and Professional   THE most
significant aspects of an educational instution are its purposes and the
extent to which the institution carries out its purposes. The purposes of
Western  Washington College of Education include   the provision for both
liberal   and professional training. A clear   definition of liberal and
professional  education is appropriate here. The  late  W. H. P. Faunce,
President of  Brown University for many years,  Administrators once defined
liberal and  professional  18 training in an address before a stu-dent 
group in the following manner:  Interesting Instructors "A liberal
education is, of course,  20 one that liberates, one that releases  the
mind from ignorance, prejudice,  Faculty partisanship or superstition, one 
22 that emancipates the will, stimulates the imagination, broadens the sym-
 Seniors pathies, and makes the student a cit-  24 izen of the world.
Vocational educa-tion  is that which focuses the mind  Juniors on the
particular trade, business, or  30 profession which the student expects  to
pursue in later years, and it  Underclassmen teaches him how to perform his
fut-  46  ure task with intelligence, skill, and  competence."  There is no
conflict between the  two foregoing points of emphasis  since both are
needed for the well-rounded  development of the indiv-idual.  The faculty
is providing suc-cessfully  the experiences through  which students may
become socially  competent and professionally effi-cient.  There is need
for more teach-ers  of broad culture and superior  ability. The College
will regard its  work well done this year if it adds  measurably to its
thousands of grad-uates  already serving society so well  in all parts of
the country.  It is our hope that this book will  always recall to the
graduates and  other students of 1939-40 memories  of profitable
experiences in Western  Washington College of Education.  Also it is our
hope that each succeed-ing Klipsun will record a story of  progress.  W. W.
HAGGARD  President  Page 16

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Dr.   W. W. Haggard President of Western Washington College Dr. Haggard,
prominent educator of Joliet,  Illinois, assumed his duties at WWC
September 1, 1939. He was superintendent of Juliet Union High School and
Junior College, which has an enrollment of 4,400 students, at the time of
his appointment.

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MERLE S. KUDER FLORENCE E. JOHNSON LOYE A. McGEE  Registrar Dean of Women
Dean of Men   Administrators  You've Known   D ESIRING only to be an
adviser, considered too often in the un-friendly  light of disciplinarian,
DEAN FLORENCE E. JOHN-SON  accepts her duties with a keen concern, believes
her posi-tion  to be that of an interpreter.  During five of her fourteen
years at WWC, she has been dean of  women. She enjoys her social and
advisory positions, is social direc-tor  of 120 girls each quarter at Edens
Hall. In addition, she instructs  in Hygiene.  To be busy is to be happy-so
feels DEAN LOYE A. McGEE, the  youngest in the history of the school, and
one of the most capable.  Completing his first year as dean of men, he has
accepted countless  responsibilities, successfully supervised many
activities and com-mittees.  Organized Men's Odd-Job Association for the
"workin'-my-way-  thru-College"  lads.  Because he obtains his major
satisfactions from working with  people instead of subject matter or
things, DR. MERLE KUDER,  registrar, is deservedly successful in his
position. Student account-ing  of admission credentials and graduation
requirements, plus gen-eral  student personnel work, including orientation
and vocational  guidance, are under his supervision. He has worked with
people  from cradle to  college, prefers either kindergarten or college. 
MYRTLE BURNHAM . . . you've seen her often-her friendly  eyes and gracious
smile; no doubt she has cheerfully helped you plan  your program, only one
of  her many executive duties in the regis-trar's  office. She has held the
position of Recorder at WWC for five  years. Drawing house plans and
studying modern home architecture  are her hobbies.  Page 18

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Off the Record  A sunny smile greets frosh and  senior as Myrtle Burnham
recorder  (top left), straightens out class  schedules.  At her desk in the
President's  Office (left, below) secretary Ethel  Church relieves Dr.
Haggard of  many, many details.  Stooges (top right) Lyle Brewer  and Dr.
Haggard hold the sack for magician and mind-reader Harlan  Tarbell.  Part
of the office staff (center)  do some checking: Margaret Mc-  Kinnon,
accountant; Sam Buchan-an,  financial secretary; Lyn Hughes,  Wilhemina
Docherty, Eleanor El-liott.  "Yah. Yah. We just come over,"  grins Miss
Sundquist (at right, bot-tom),  and Miss Elliott hugs a bas-ket  of bread
at a faculty party.  Page 19

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ERICKSON  E. A. BOND, while he spends most of his  time writing math.
books, is known to us as a friend, an enthusiastic participant in school 
affairs, notably the salmon bake at the Rocks.  Is one of 10 members of the
National Commit-tee  on the Teaching of Arithmetic, author of  eight books.
 EMMA S. ERICKSON, supervisor of stu-dent  teachers in the Training School
Junior  High, has charge of the remedial instruction.  She prefers
listening to talking, and likes to  study people. Has large art and
biography  library in her home.  Scientifically alert, and possessing
superior  ability in making others so, rosy-cheeked RUTH  PLATT is
interested in every living thing, gets  the very most out of living. Her
greatest re-laxation  is just to be outdoors, among the birds,  rocks,
trees, and flowers.  VICTOR H. HOPPE, head of the WWC  Department of Drama,
has won approval with  his Shakespearean and intimate penthouse
pro-ductions.  An actor, playwright, director, and  instructor, he favors
his classes with  a straight-forward  humor sometimes unappreciated. He 
has charge of debate, and directs plays for the Theatre Guild.  Interesting
 DONALD G. BUSHELL, organizer and  director of the WWC band and orchestra,
is  responsible for making WWC symphony-con-scious.  His ready smile,
sincerity, and spon- taneous,  razor-edged wit have made him a fav-orite 
among students.  NORA B. CUMMINS, adviser to the Inter-national  Relations
Club is extremely interested  in current affairs. All students know her as 
the instructor who "sure knows her history!"  Devotes time outside to
women's clubs, garden-ing,  and travel. HERBERT RUCKMICK is forceful,
vigor-ous  head of the Industrial Arts. Most notable  expression, "I'm-
busy-see-me-later" best de-scribes  his unusual energy and versatility.
Trav-els  and takes many pictures,  teaches photo-raphy,  and likes to talk
about world affairs.  Page 20  BUSHELL  BOND PLATT HOPPE CUMMINS RUCKMICK

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LAPPENBUSCH  Instructors  CHARLES F. LAPPENBUSCH, football,  basketball,
and tennis coach, likes fishing and  hunting. Those who know him best
confirm the  report that he is liable to sit down at any  time  and work
out a new football play.  MABEL ZOE WILSON lives in the present,  but since
1925 has traveled extensively here  and abroad delving into past cultures
for in-terpretations  of the future. In directing the  library her
administration has had cultural de-velopment  and advantages for students
as its  chief purpose.  LYNUS A. KIBBE, one of the oldest grads  of WWC,
teacher of psychology and education,  remembers and recognizes all his
students.  Keeps track of them through his card catalogue  and complete set
of KLIPSUNS. He is a great  hiker, mountain climber, and a gracious host. 
FRANK SHAVER, printer and printing in-structor,  in his spare time composes
secular  music. He is adviser to the College Christian  Fellowship. Likes
to hunt, fish, travel, and is  a sports enthusiast.  MOYLE F. CEDERSTROM,
friendly,frank,  ardent conversationalist, says Robinson Jeffers  is his
favorite poet. Teaches the freshies the  etiquette of English. Has spent
vacations work-ing  in the woods; plays a banjo.  Everything  in his home
has some special meaning.  PAUL R. GRIM came here in 1937 to help  organize
 the Training School Junior High, and  is now in charge of social science
there. Writes  for educational magazines, and is a supporter  of
Progressive Education. Adviser to the Norse-men  and Schusskens, he  likes
to travel, ski, and  do movie-photography. Leaves us for this sum-mer  to
teach at Syracuse University.  JACK C. COTTON, youthful director of the 
speech clinic, devised methods for diagnosing speech impediments, invented
gadgets for ex-amining  the source of accent, and published  articles which
explain it all. Returning last fall  from a month's speech research in
Washing-ton,  D. C., he organized a speech clinic for  elementary school
children.  Page 21  CEDERSTROM  WILSON KIBBE SHAVER  GRIM COTTON

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EDWARD J. ARNTZEN, with his inimit-able  "Well, Y-e-s and n-o" answer to
student  queries, is philosophic, speculative. An indif-ferent  golfer, he
likes talking, traveling, explor-  S.ing, and picturing. He is a member of
four  ARNTZEN honorary societies, and is at present working  on a history
of the Northwest.  Informality, Simplicity, and Democratic  Page 22

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ARTHUR C. HICKS, president of the Bell-ingham  Theatre Guild, is an
accomplished pian-ist.  Quiet, earnest, sincere, the guiding hand  of the
English Department, he likes anything  literary, philosophical, historic.
Reads as he  walks, adviser to Vanadis Bragi. Acted in, as  well as
presented, the American premier of  Shelley's "The Cenci."  Spirit
Distinguish WWC Faculty  Page 23

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 24

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After Four  T HIS year, for the second  time in its history, WWC  acclaims
its senior class.  Led by president Ialeen Allison,  vice-president Leonard
New-quist,  secretary Marion Chap-pel,  and adviser Moyle F. Ceder-strom, 
the seniors finish four  successful years, culminating in  Baccalaureate -
Classday -  and finally Commencement.  Distinguished from the three-year 
students by a year's ad- vanced  work and that distinc-tive  angle of the
tassel on the  cap, the seniors leave behind  the years, experiences, and
asso-ciations  of undergraduate days.  Time moves its counters  and classes
graduate, students  change; the school but little.  To its heritage each
class leaves  its own peculiar mark. And so the Senior Class of 1940. 
Smiling on the way up are senior  officers Marian Chappel, secretary; 
Leonard Newquist, vice-president, and  Ialeen Allison, president.  Page 24

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 25

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Senior President: Goddess  They must like her as much as she likes them, 
for the children of the Campus school elected  dusky-haired IALEEN ALLISON
their Goddess of  the Festival for Thanksgiving, 1939. Capably ex-ecutive, 
demure and dark-eyed, Ialeen was pres-ident  of her senior class and
president of Blue  Triangle. She likes to cook--but not to sew. Fish-ing 
is her favorite sport, and she plies a rod en-thusiastically.  But better
than anything, she likes  children, and welcomes her vocation of primary 
teaching.  Years---or More---Seniors at Last!  ADAMS, BETTIE, Bellingham; 
WWA, Usher Chairman, AWS  Commission  ALEXANDER, ALMA, Everson;  Minot
State Teachers' College  Transfer, Kappi Chi Kappa,  International
Relations  Collegian Staff, Alkisiah  ALLEN, PAULINE R., Mount Vernon; 
Whitman College Transfer, WAA,  Blue Triangle  Adams  Allison  ALLEN,
BERTHA L., Bellingham ALLISON, IALEEN, Seattle;  Senior Class President,
Blue  Triangle, President Interclub  Council Secretary, WAA  ANDERSON,
ALBERT, Issaquah;  WSC Transfer, Track  Alexander  Anderson ARMSTRONG,
BEATRICE, Seattle;  WAA Outing Chairman, Badminton  Club, Folk Dancing
Club, Alkisiah,  Blue Triangle  BEATTY, FRANCIS, Seattle;  WAA, Paletteers 
Allen  Armstrong  Allen  Beatty Page 25

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 26

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Politicians serious in their endeavors toward school  improvement are DALE
COURTNEY and WAYNE WEBER. Dale was president of his junior class,  a member
of Board of Control, International Rela-tions Club. He likes to act, reads
plays as a hobby,  buys loud socks, but really is conservative. Wayne  was
a  member of the Board of Control, Inter-club  Council, co-chairman of rec
hours. He is a track  star, enjoys symphony music. Both men were selected 
to represent WWC in "Who's Who Among College  Students for 1939."  Boys 
Carver  Seniors  BELL, DON, Bellingham;  Football, W Club  BOYS, CLAIR L.,
Bellingham;  UW Transfer, Kl.ipsun Staff  CARR, ADABELLE E., Bellingham; 
Music Club, International Relations Club  CARVER, MRS. JESSIE, Bellingham; 
ScLolarship Society  CHAPPELL, MARIAN JANE,  Cashmere;  Blue Triangle,
Alkisiah, Senior  Class Secretary, Edens Hall  Secretary-Treasurer
COURTNEY, DALE, Port Ludlow;  Board of Control, Junior Class  President,
International Relations  Club,  "Hamlet," "Julius Caesar,"  Collegian Staff
 COWLES, EDNA M., Issaquah;  Kappa Chi Kappa, Scholarship  Society, YWCA 
CRANDALL, FLORENCE A.,  Woodburn, Ore.  CHICON, MARY, Buckley;  Blue
Triangle, Klipsun Staff,  Play Cast  ELLIS, JOHN, Bellingham;  Board of
Control, W Club, Schussken Club  FACEY, CHARLOTTE, Seattle;  Klipsun Staff,
Alkisiah  FRAZIER, EVELYN, Bellingham  Chappell Chicon Courtney Cowles 
Crandall Ellis Facey Frazier Page 26

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 27

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Harlow  Holberg  HARLOW, ELSIE, Seattle;  Alkisiah, Blue Triangle, 
Schussken, WAA  HARVEY, KENNETH, Everson;  Intramural Basketball,  Norsemen
 HAUSER, MARGARET, Salem, Ore.;  WAA HIGGINBOTTOM, LESLIE,  Bellingham; 
Sophomore Class President, General  Chairman Campus Day, Division  of Drama
Production, Campus  Radio Broadcasts  HOLBERG, ESTHER J.,  Fairfield,
Mont.; Board of Control Secretary, Blue  Triangle, WAA, Folk Dancing Club 
Harvey  Hudson  Hauser  Jones HUDSON, VIVIAN, Everett;  Music Education
Club  JONES, MARJORIE ANITA,  Vancouver;  WAA, Blue  Triangle, Usher  KEMP,
JAMES, Port Orchard  KULJIS, WINIFRED, Bellingham;  YWCA  LANDRUM, RHODA,
Astoria, Ore.  LAUX, MARGARET, Lewiston, Mont.  LONG, MRS. DELL, Portland,
Ore.;  Acorn House Housemother  Higginbottom  Kemp  MAGALLON, ANNA ELY,
Seattle;  Music Education Club, WAA,  International Relations,  Beverly
Hall Housemother,  House President  MILLER, ARNOLD G., Klaber;  WSC
Transfer, Norsemen, Intra-mural  Sports, Nominating  Convention  MILLER,
BETTIE, Seattle;  University of Oregon Transfer  MOLENKAMP, ALICE, Seattle;
 Board of Control Secretary, Klipsun Staff, Summer Recreation  Chairman,
House President  Kuljis Landrum Laux Long  Page 27 Magallon Miller, A.
Miller, B. Molenkamp

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 28

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You can't pull the wool over his eyes-straight-foward  JAMES KEMP,
universally known as Pat,  speaks his mind on all subjects in which he is
con-cerned.  Slender, hazel-eyed, with impressive gray  hair, Pat comes
from Port Orchard, graduates this  June with his degree. Photography and
radio con-struction  are only two of his many interests. Has  a wistful
desire to travel-and, among other things,  an emphatic dislike for
spaghetti and macaroni.  Morton  Newquist  MORTON, MIRIAM, Everett 
NEWQUIST, LEONARD, Camas;  Senior Class Vice-President  Munkres  Page 
MUNKRES, AL, Bellingham;  ASB President, Football,  W Club  PAGE, JOYCE,
Bellingham  Seniors  PARISI, JAMES V., Clayville, N. Y.; UW Transfer, Tau
Kappa Epsilon,  Junior Statesman of America  RICHARDS, JEANNE, Seattle; 
Vanadis  Bragi Treasurer,  Vanadis Bragi Vice-President  PETERSON, ALMER,
Bellingham;  Norsemen STEPHENS, MARY A., Bremerton;  Blue Barnacle, WAA,
ACE,  Three Flats Trio  PETERSON, MARIAN  V., Tacoma;  Chorus, Collegian
Staff  TROTTER, WOODROW, Bellingham;  PHELPS, MYRA L., Seattle   WEBER,
VAUGHN, Burlington;  Football, Track, W Club Vice-  President,
International  Relations Club Peterson Peterson, N.  Stephens Trotter 
Parisi  Richards  Page 28  Phelps  Weber, V.

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 29

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Seniors  WEBER, WAYNE EARL, Burlington;  ASB Vice-President, W. Club, 
Track, Klipsun Staff, Interclub  Council  WHEELER, MARTHA, Vancouver; 
Band, Orchestra, WAA  WILLIAMS, BETTYLOU, Warrentown, Ore.;  Oregon Normal
Transfer, WAA, Blue  Triangle, ACE Vice-President  DEBRULER, RALPH,
Montesano;  Choir  KLUMB, HELEN, Olympia;  Klipsun Staff  LINRUD, ARTHUR,
Ferndale; NEWQUIST, PRISCILLA P.  Carnation;  Kappa Chi Kappa President 
RITTENBERG, WINIFRED, Bellingham;  Designer  Salty is the conversation,
pungent is the humor  dispensed by cosmopolitan RHODA LANDRUM of  the art
department. Uniquely both student and in-structor,  Rhoda is as popular
with her pupils as she  is with her friends. Artistically-gifted, educated
in  New York, witty Mrs. Landrum likes outboard mot-ors,  golf, and walking
in the rain. Infinite pride of  her versatile life is her son Paul (Nibby)
to whom  she writes picture letters. Characteristically, she  would rather
write poetry than study, and wants,  with all her heart, to build a house.
She is especially  interested in designing clothes, and likes people  more
than painting.  Page 29  Weber, W.  Klumb  Wheeler  Linrud  Williams 
Newquist Debruler  Rittenberg

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 30

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Juniors Today; Teachers Tomorrow  'Tis a well-filled week-end  (right) for
the WWC junior,  with a Friday rec hour, Sat-urday  afternoon library cram 
and Sunday skiing on Mount  Baker's deep slopes.  Junior President: 
Independent  Friendly BILL SCHWEIN-GRUBER  has smiled his way  through
several tough accom-plishments.  As president of  his junior class,
vice-presi-dent  of the up-and-coming  Norsemen's club, and chair-man  of
many, many commit-tees,  he has shouldered re-sponsible  authority.
Easy-go- ing  Bill likes to play intra-mural  basketball, hike, fish,  and
to study if it's interesting.  He despises knee socks, double  features,
and bossy girls.  Likes to consider himself in-dependent.  He was selected 
as worthy of representation  in "Who's Who Among Col-lege  Students for
1939."  They guided the Juniors: Shirley Shannon, vice-presi-dent;  Betty
Lucid, secretary,  and Bill Schweingruber, pres-ident.  FROthMeir  thsee
vteimnteh thqauta trhteery ruengtiislt ert hfeoyr  round the knoll on
graduation day,  the juniors know it will be their most im-portant  year at
Western Washington Col-lege,  for during the year they become stu-dent 
teachers.  Holding their first class meeting in Oc-tober  to elect the
officers who would lead  them during the year, they were called  together
at other times to nominate  queens, elect representatives to nominat-ing 
conventions, sponsor candidates.  The junior party during winter quarter
was a social highlight of the year, al-though  graduation activities always
com-mand  the most attention. Technique classes, practice teaching,  major
subjects, and leading student ac-tivities  all demand much time from the 
third-year students. Most receive diplo-mas  which qualify them to teach
kinder-garten, primary, or junior high.  With their third year completed
and  teaching certificates within reach, some  of the juniors enroll for
another year of  classes and a degree before starting out  in their chosen
profession; the majority  seek to join the ranks of employed  teachers. 
Page 30

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 31

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These are juniors, for whom time flies  ALLEY, WINIFRED, Nehalem, Ore.; 
Oregon State College of Education  ALVORD, ROBERT, Centralia;  UW Transfer 
ANDERSON, FRANK, Malone;  ANDERSON, PEGGY, Longview;  Vanadis Bragi,
Alkisiah,  Blue Triangle  ANGEL, ELDORIS, Seattle;  UW Transfer ARMFIELD,
VIRGINIA, Forest Grove, Ore.;  Vanadis Bragi  BAKER, LOIS, Marietta;  WAA,
Vanadis Bragi, Alkisiah  BAKER, MICHAEL G., Everett;  Sophomore Class
President,  Campus Day Chairman, Interclub Council,  Intramural Sports 
BARRETT, KEITH L., Mt. Vernon;  Norsemen, Paletteers  BECK, MARJORIE,
Vancouver:  Vanadis Bragi  BECKER, DOROTHY, Seattle;  WAA, Alkisiah,
Valkyrie, Vanadis Bragi, Klipsun Staff  BECKIM, ELOISE, Centralia; 
Centralia Junior College,  WAA  BEEBE, MARIE, Poulsbo;  Northern Montana
College  Transfer, Vanadis Bragi, ACE  BEIDLEMAN, JEAN, Camasl  BENN,
ALICE, Sanish, N. D.;  UW and Macalester College,  St. Paul, Transfer,
"Hamlet"  Page 31

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 32

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time crawls, or time races; they are the  BENNETT, METTJE, Glacier;  WAA,
Women's League BIGELOW, FRANCES, Edmonds;  Blue Triangle, Folk Dancing 
Club  BINKIE, NINA, Port Angeles; Valkyrie, Collegian Staff,  Alkisiah 
BISSELL, JANE, Seattle;  Edens Hall Officer  BLAKESLEE, BERTON, Ferndale; 
Music Education Club Vice-  President, Orchestra  BLICK, ELLEN, Ferndale; 
Blue Triangle  BOLLERUD, MARION, Nooksack;  WAA  BOLMAN, KATHERINE,
Seattle;  YWOA President, WAA  BOONE, ELSIE, Olympia;  WAA  BORN, MAXINE,
Centralia;  Vanadis Bragi, Art Club, ACE BOWDISH, BARBARA, Bellingham; 
Band, Klipsun Staff,  Collegian Staff  BOWMAN, ALBERT, Bellingham;  Choir,
Norsemen  BOYER, LUCILLE A., Oak Harbor;  Kappa Chi Kappa  BRODAHL,
HERBERT, Ferndale;  Art Club, Klipsun Staff  BROUWER, MARY, Everson;  WAA 
BRUCE, VIRGINIA, Bellevue;  Blue Barnacles, Badminton Club,  Riding Club,
Folk Dancing,  Ski Club  BRYDGES, RUTH, Seattle;  BURBIDGE, OLIVE,
Bremerton;  Vanadis Bragi, ACE  BURNHAM, NANCY, Everett;  "You Can't  Take
It With You," WAA  CALL, PATRICIA, Bellingham;  WAA, Alkisiah, Vanadis
Bragi  Collegian Newscast  CAMPBELL, CARROLL, Seattle;  Folk Dancing  Page
32

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 33

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student teachers, who eat, teach, who  CARR, ALVIN, Renton;  Band,
Orchestra, A Cappella Choir, Basketball, Music Education Club  CARROLL,
LOUIE, Ferndale;  CARVER, MARIE, Arlington;  Vanadis Bragi  CHELLIS,
MARTHA, Kennewick;  WAA, Blue Triangle  CHRISTENSEN, VIRGINIA, Enumclaw;
CHURCH, HELEN M., Mount Vernon;  Mount Vernon Junior College Transfer 
CLARKE, MARIAN, Bellingham;  N'ewcomers' Mixer Chairman,  Valkyrie Club
Cabinet,  Collegian Staff, Blue Triangle, Cabinet, Kappa Chi Kappa
Secretary  COLE, JULIA ROSE, Seattle;  WAA Volleyball Manager, WAA
Treasurer, Blue Barnacles  COLLINGS, EILEEN, Bellingham;  Collegian Staff,
Dramatics CRATSENBERG, SHIRLEE, Ferndale;  Collegian Staff, Homecoming 
ollegian Newscast  CRAWFORD, JEAN, Bremerton;  Valkyrie, WAA  DALEY,
FRANCES, Everett;  ASB Vice-President, Klipsun Editor and Manager, Alkisiah
President,  Collegian Staff  DAVIS, ARTHUR, Anacortes;  Track  DAVIS,
RUSSELL, Mount Vernon;  Football, W Club, Intramural  Basketball  DAY,
DOROTHY, Ferndale; Queenly Co-ed  Looking like a queen, with gracious smile
 and regal height, quiet JEAN MORGAN of Edens Hall is a leader in anything
she under-takes.  She likes to walk, dance, play the piano.  Animals, from
dogs and cats to elephants, find  a soft spot in her heart. Her activities
range  from Valkyrie membership to the vice-presi-dency  of her sophomore
class. Interested in  library, Jean has taken advanced study in chil-dren's
 library work. She was one of the Home-coming  Queen attendants and was
candidate  for Princess of Publications Prom.  Page 33

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 34

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plan their hour by the exact click of the  DE BRULER, CARL, Montesano; 
CWCE Transfer, Intramural Sports, Band  DOLAN, BOB, Bellingham;  Intramural
Basketball  DOMBROSKI, RICHARD L., Aberdeen;  Football, Track  DORCY, JOHN,
Bellingham;  Norsemen. Intramural  Basketball  DORCY, LAURA, Bellingham; 
WAA, ACE, Kappa Chi Kappa  DU VAL, EVA, Hoquiam;  WAA  DWYER, AGNES,
Tonasket;  EASTMAN, ROBERT, Chehalis;  EASTMAN, WILLIAM, Chehalis;  EATON,
REDA, Prosser; ENGMAN, RUTH M., Stanwood;  Kappa Chi Kappa  ERICKSON, RUTH,
Oakdale, N. D.;  Dickinson, N. D., Transfer  EVICH, MITCHELL D.,
Bellingham;  Collegian Staff, Intramural  Basketball  FLANAGAN, JAY,
Seattle;  Football, Intramural Basketball,  W Club  FOLEY, BETTE,
Vancouver;  Blue Triangle, WAA, Clark Junior  College Transfer  FOWLER,
RICHARD, Bellingham;  W Club Collegian Pin  Collegian Feature Editor  FOX,
DOROTHY, Kent;  WAA, Edens Hall Choir, Blue  Triangle  FOX, MARIE, Juneau,
Alaska;  FRANCIS, HENRY, Greenacres;  Collegian Staff  FREDERICKS, DALE,
Kent; FREDERICKSON, BEVERLY, Bellingham;  Valkyrie, Blue Triangle, Tennis, 
Dancing, Collegian Staff  S. Page 34

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 35

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clock; who teach and reach in despair  FRY, EILEEN, Seattle;  Alkisiah,
Collegian  Newscast FRYKHOLM, RUTH, Centralia;  Centralia Junior College 
Transfer, WAA  FULLER, ANITA, Battle Ground;   WAA, Blue Triangle, A
Cappella  Choir  FULLER, MARGARET, Chehalis;  Edens Hall Secretary-
Treasurer,  Valkyrie, WAA, Homecoming Queen  GERI, LOUIS, Bellingham; 
Intramural Backetball GERMAIN, WALT, Bellingham;  Ski Club President,
"Hamlet",  Campus Day Assembly Committee, Collegian Staff, Norsemen  GERRY,
ROSS, Bellingham;  Norsemen Secretary, Campus Day  Committee Chairman,
Intramural  Basketball  GILDERSLEEVE, GERALDINE, Bellingham;  GORMAN,
MARGARET, Seattle;  Alkisiah, WAA, Vanadis Bragi,  House President  GRAHAM,
PATRICIA,  GREELEY, RUTH MARIE, Puyallup;  Alkisiah, Blue Triangle 
GRONHOLDT, MARIE A., Sand Point, Alaska;  WAA, Riding GUNDERSON, EDITH,
Ferndale;  YWCA, Scholarship Society,  Orchestra  HALL, ADRIANNE, Mount
Vernon;  Mount Vernon Junior College  Transfer  HALL, WALTER, Hoquiam;  W
Club, Collegian Staff, House  President, Track  Librarian  Collecting
achievements like beads on a string,  shrewd FRANCES DALEY has crammed her
college  career with objectives successfully attained. Jolly is  the word
for Frances and enviable is her record. Se-lected  to represent WWC in
"Who's Who Among Col-lege Students for 1939," Frances counts among her 
souvenirs Alkisiah presidency, editorship of 1939 Klip- sun,  and business
managership of 1940 Klipsun. For  two years she has worked in a position
demanding  effi-cient  competence, behind the Circulation desk in the 
library, and her supervisors comment upon her  sunny  disposition, extreme
accuracy, good poise, and coopera-tive  attitude.  Page 35

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 36

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for time to plan a different major---  HARMELING, PHYLLIS, Rockport; 
HARRIS, CORAL, Snohomish; AWS President, Valkyrie, AWS  Social Chairman,
ICC Vice-  President  HART, LILA, Seattle;  AWS Vice-President, WAA 
Treasurer, Hockey Manager  HASLAM, CHRISTINE, Bellingham;  Music  HASTIE,
PATRICIA, Mount Vernon;  HAYS, NAOMI, Chehalis;  HEALY, MURRAY C., Everett;
 Homecoming Chairman, Intramural  Sports, Norsemen  HEIMDAHL, LOIS, Mount
Vernon;  Kappa Chi Kappa  HELM, BENTON, Bothell;  HENSELL, HELEN, Auburn; 
HOLSTON, IRENE, Spokane;  EWCE Transfer, A Cappella  Choir  HOLTZHEIMER,
ELAINE, Custer;  WAA, Blue Triangle, Alkisiah,  Women's League Fastion Show
 Committee  HOTCHKIN, LAINCHA, Vashon;  Folkdancing  HUBLER, RUTH,
Longview; Lower Columbia Junior College  and UW Transfer  HUNT, DOROTHY,
Bellingham;  HURST, MRS. HILDA H., Ferndale;  HUSFLOEN, KENNETH, Lynden; 
Band, Orchestra, Music Education  Club, Norsemen, Intramural Basket-ball 
and Baseball  IYALL, MARY, Olympia;  Alkisiah  JAADAN, RUTH, Kingston;
JACKSON, RUSSELL, Bellingham;  Norsemen, Scholarship Society  JAMES,
RICHARD L., Bellingham;  Intramural Soft Ball, Collegian Staff  at Page 36

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 37

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digging ditches. But they are the teach  JEFFERS, GENEVA C., Seattle;  UW
Transfer  JEFFERS, JO, Olympia;  Edens Hall Treasurer, AWS  Secretary, Ski
Club, Valkyrie,  WAA  JENKINS, VERNA, Monroe;   JENSEN, ROLF, Seattle; 
JOHANSEN, MONITA, Bellingham;  JOHNSON, EILEEN, Burlington;  Blue
Barnacles, Valkyrie,  WAA  JOHNSON, GLENYS, Monroe;  WAA  JONES, MARIAN,
Everett;  Valkyrie President, Collegian  Staff, WAA, Choir  JULIUS,
MARGARET, Aberdeen;  Blue Triangle  KAUFMAN, LELA, Riverside;  Scholarship
Society, Board of  Control, AWS Commission, Col-legian  Staff, YWC'A
KINSEY, EVALYN, Custer;  WAA, Alkisiah, ACE  KONNERUP, YVONNE, Granite
Falls;  Vanadis Bragi,  Art Club  KUHN, CAROLYN, Bellingham;  "You Can't
Take It With You",  "Our Town"  KRAUSE, MARIE,  Dayton;  WAA  KORDICH,
FRANCES, Tacoma;  Twinkle Toes  Always busy, always sought, seldom
obtainable-tire-less  KATHRYN NEWELL deserved and received  mention from
WWC in "Who's Who Among College  Students for 1939." Temperamental "Tinky"
with the  spun-copper hair, counts among her  activities presidency  of
Blue Triangle, election to the Board of Control, en-thusiastic  membership
in Alkisiah, WAA, AWS, and  Folk Dancing. Fleet of foot and smooth of step,
Tinl  li es best of all to dance. She likes children, is artis  ti ally
inclined, and, quite incidentally, works for 4  li ing.  Page 37

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 38

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ers, who help to place in their respective  KUHN, CLARENCE, Raymond; 
LANDON, ED., Aloha; Norsemen, Intramural Basket-ball,  Homecoming Committee
 LAPINSKI, STANLEY, Raymond; Norsemen President and Vice-  President,
Interclub Council,  Men's Party Chairman, Intra-mural Basketball  LINCE,
DOUGLAS, Elliston, Mont.;  1940 KLIPSUN Editor, Collegian  Staff, Norsemen
Social  Chairman,  "Openers" Editor, "You Can't  Take It With You" 
LINDSTROM, HELEN, Sedro-Woolley; Valkyrie, Collegian Staff,  Alkisiah, Ski
Club  LOMSDALE, DON, Richmond Beach;  LUCID, BETTY ANN,  Seattle; 
Valkyrie, WAA, Collegian Staff,  Alkisiah  MARCH, LEOLEON, East Stanwood; 
Mount Vernon Junior College  Athletics  MAUS, MYRA, Port Orchard;  Kappa
Chi Kappa, Ski Club,  Alkisiah McAULAY, KENNETH, Bellingham;  Norsemen,
Intramural Basketball  McCABE, JIM, Seattle;  "Our Town"  McDOUGALL, MARY,
Bethel, Alaska;  YWCA  McGREGOR, JEAN, Bellingham;  AWS Teas, Swimming,
YWCA Vice-  President  McHENRY, FRED, Bellingham;  International Relations
Club, "Hamlet," Interclub Council  McKINNEY, LILLIAN, Seattle;  UW
Transfer, Klipsun Staff,  Badminton Club, WAA,  House Secretary  MacLEOD,
KENNETH, SEATTLE;  McNAMEE, PHYLLIS, Seattle;  Junior Class Vice-President,
 Assistant Director "You Can't Take  It With You," Women's League
Leadership Chairman, Valkyrie  MEENK, EDITH E., Lynden;  WAA President,
Interclub Council,  WAA Secretary MEHLUM, CLARA, Ferndale;  Minot, N. D.
Teachers' College  MILES, GLADYS, Issaquah;  UW, Zeta Tau Alpha, Klipsun
Staff,  Band, House President  MILLER, DONNA, Edmonds;  WAA, House
President  Page 38

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 39

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niches those chips off the old block that  MONTEITH, MARGARET, Seattle; 
Blue Triangle, WAA MOORE, HOWARD A., Atchison, Kan.;  MORGAN, JEAN,
Snoqualmie Falls;  Blue Triangle Social Chairman,  Sophomore
Vice-President, AWS  Social Chairman, High School  Girls' Conference
Chairman,  Collegian Staff  MOSER, BETTY, Tenino;  Blue Triangle, Vanadis
Bragi  MOSES, ED, Castle Rock;  W Club, Sports  MOSES, JOE, Longview; 
Board of Control, W Club,  Basketball, "Most Popular Man"  MOXLEY,
VIRGINIA, Hoquiam;  WAA, Music Club, Vanadis Bragi  NEWELL, KATHRYN,
Tenino; Board of Control, Blue Triangle  President, Alkisiah, AWS Informal 
Co-Chairman, "You Can't Take It With You"  NICHOLS, RUTH S., Wenatchee 
NICKEL, MARION, Monroe;  PARBERRY, LORRAINE, Bellingham  NILSEN, BEATRICE,
Bellingham;  Valkyrie, Collegian Society Editor,  Blue Triangle Cabinet,  A
Cappella  Choir, Schussken  PATMORE, CHARLENE C., Coupeville;  Alkisiah,
Klipsun Staff, WAA, Paletteers  PERKINS, RUTH, Portland, Ore.;  Blue
Triangle Secretary  PHELPS, POLLY, Seattle;  Edens  Hall President,
Valkyrie,  UW Transfer  Pioneer  Daughter of a pioneer who was the daughter
of a pioneer-this is the heritage keen LELA KAUFMAN  has for personal
inspiration. Rosy-cheeked and coun- try-  bred, spicy Lela did her own
pioneering as the first  president of the Association for Childhood
Education,  newly formed organization at WWC. She has been  vice-president
of IRC, vice-president of Alkisiah; in-dustrious  in the Scholarship
Society, AWS Commission,  Board of Control; member of the Publications
Board.  Liked for her humor, besought for her energy, and with  a canny
wisdom, she was selected from WWC for  "Who's Who Among College Students
for 1939." Pos-sessing  among other talents a prodigious and tangy 
literary ability, she writes for college publications.  Page 39

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the butcher and baker send to continue  PIERRON, MARION C., Bellingham  WAA
 PURDY, NORMA, Seattle;  UW Transfer  PURNELL, BETTY, Bellingham; 
Paletteers  QUINN, LEONARD, Barnum, Minn.; Norsemen, Play Production, 
Literary Club, Men's Club,  Duluth State Teachers' College  Transfer  RABB,
 MARGARET, Seattle;  Alkisiah, Blue Barnacles,  WAA, "Our Town"  REID,
LOIS, Bellingham;  Alkisiah President, Valkyrie,  Fashion Show Chairman,
AWS  Commission, AWS Informal Chairman  RENSING, EMILY, Woodland;  Kappa
Chi Kappa, WAA  RIDDER, WILLIAM, Bellingham;  Collegian Editor and Business
 Manager, Scholarship Society  President, Orchestra, Band  RIDGWAY,
PATRICIA, Sedro- Woolley;  YWCA, Mount Vernon Jr. College  Transfer 
RUMSEY, ROBERT, Bellingham  Band, Orchestra   RUNDEN, CORA A., East
Bremerton  SCHAUS, DOROTHY, Snohomish;  Interclub Council President,
Vanadis Bragi Secretary and  President, Sophomore Class Secretary,  AWS
Commission, WAA Cabinet  SCHWEINGRUBER, GERTRUDE, North Bend;  House
President  SCHWEINGRUBER, WILLIAM R., North Bend;  UW Transfer, N'orsemen
Vice-President,  Junior Class President, Intramural  Basketball, Varsity
Track  SHANNON, SHIRLEY, Tacoma;  WAA Vice-President, AWS Secretary, 
Orchestra, Junior  Class Vice-President  SHEPARD, EVELYN, Longview;  WAA,
Kappa Chi Kappa  SHERK, PHOEBE, Olympia;  Valkyrie  SHULL, MRS. L. N.,
Bellingham  SHUMAN, RUTH, Seattle;  Valkyrie  SIMONSON, EDWARD, Ferndale 
SIMUKKA, ELSIE, Naselle;  WAA, Kappa Chi Kappa  Page 40

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the race. They are the juniors. Then  SMITH, FRANCELIA, Bellingham; 
Collegian Newscast  SMITH, GLEN N., Vancouver, B. C.;  Football,
Basketball, W Club  SOOTER, KATIE, Bellingham  SPENCER, LAURA, Bellingham 
STEBERG, A. BORGNY, Seattle;  International Relations Club  STEVENSON,
HAROLD, East Stanwood  Intramural Sports  STODDARD, LOUISE, Bellingham; 
Paletteers STROEBEL, JOSEPHINE, Anacortes;  Vanadis Bragi, Scholarship
Society  STUART, GAEL, Bellingham;  "Hamlet," Boxing, "Julius Caesar" 
SULLIVAN, MARK M., Chehalis;  Norsemen  TASONI, FRANCES, Kent;  WAA,
Collegian Staff  TAYLOR, JAMES, Bellingham;  Track, Ski Club, Collegian
Staff,   Intramural Sports  TELENGA, MAXINE, Washburn, N. D.;  Blue
Triangle, Regional Chairman  of the Young Christian Organization  THIEL,
VIRGINIA, Bellingham;  Blue Barnacles, Collegian Staff,  WAA Norsemen
Commission, Kitchen Krew,  IRC Vice-President, Collegian  Newscast  Three
of a Kind  This campus triple threat, three good friends and  thick, are Jo
Jeffers, Aileen Whetstone, and Bill Schweingruber. Brown-eyed Jo with the
long fluttering  lashes, laughs at everything, is a good mixer, and keeps 
the trio in stitches. Cute-as-a-bug's ear 'Squeak' has  scheming brown eyes
and freckles, likes to giggle, nav-igates  the trio. Agreeable Bill laughs
at them both, gets  teased unmercifully.  "Squeak" was Valkyrie
vice-president; Jo was sec-retary  of AWS and member of the Board of
Control.  Bill was junior class president, was elected to "Who's  Who Among
College Students for 1939."  Page 41

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there are these who came too late to  TISDALE, ROBERT, Menlo;  W Club,
Football, Basketball,  Track TONN, JULIA, Poulsbo  TRICKEY, HELEN,
Bellingham;  Assistant Art Editor Klipsun,  Blue Barnacles, Fashion Show 
TRIPP, BETTY, Sumas;  WAA, Kappa Chi Kappa, Alkisiah  TUDOR, REBECCA, Port
Angeles;  Blue Triangle  TURNER, LINCOLN, Juneau, Alaska;  Collegian Staff 
TURNER, WILMA, Seattle;  UW Transfer, WAA  UNDERWOOD, MRS. MARION,
Grandview;  International Relations Club VALLENTGOED, ELIZABETH, Sumner; 
WAA Cabinet, YWCA, Badminton  Club, Volleyball, Basketball VILWOCK, JEAN,
Chehalis;  Volleyball, Badminton, Swimming,  Vanadis Bragi  VON SCHEELE,
CHARLOTTE, Afognak, Alaska;  Blue Triangle  VON SCHEELE, EUNICE, Afognak,
Alaska  WAGNESS, KENNETH, Stanwood;  UW Transfer  WAHRGREN, ELSIE, Olympia;
 WAA, Kappa Chi Kappa, Tennis WEEKS, DON, Shelton;  Tennis, "You Can't Take
It With You"  WEIHE, FRED, Bellingham WHETSTONE, AILEEN, Seattle;  Valkyrie
Vice-President, Ski Club  Vice-President, WAA  WHITE, HENRY C., Bellingham;
 Norsemen, Sports  WHITTEN, FLEDA, Skamokawa  WICKER, SARA, Seattle; UW
Transfer, Klipsun Staff, Vanadis Bragi.  "You Can't Take It With You," 
"Our Town"  WILEY, VIOLET, Mount Vernon;  Mount Vernon Junior College 
Transfer  Page 42

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classify, too busy to pose .. , and some  WEEKS, NAOMI, Kelso;  WAA, Ski
Club  WILLAND, HAZEL, Ferndale.  WHEELER, WINFERD, Bellingham  WILKINSON,
ARTHUR, Bellingham;  A Cappella Choir WILLISON, ELEANOR, Bellingham;  Edens
Hall Secretary-Treasurer,  Kappa Chi Kappa, ACE WOLLAN, KATHERINE,
Bellingham;  Vanadis Bragi Secretary  WOODBRIDGE, ISABELLE, Portland, Ore.;
 Reed College, Portland, Oregon Transfer  ZAREMBA, ELENA K., Bellingham 
ANDERSON, ROSE  MARIE, High Point;  Alkisiah  BARCI, WANDA, Ferndale; 
Collegian Staff, Klipsun Staff, WAA BREMER, GENE, Seattle;  Norsemen,
Intramural Basketball,  Yell Squad, Collegian Staff, "You  Can't Take It
With You"  CANTERBURY, ELIZABETH, Vancouver;  Organized House President 
HERRIN, CHESTER, Weatherford, Texas'  ISSLER, MARY, Brush Prairie, Wn.; 
ACE, Sports  KURTZ, KATHERINE, Bellingham  President Polly  Matter-of-fact
POLLY PHELPS, serious and silent,  with big brown eyes, was selected by the
108 girls re-siding  in Edens Hall as their president for 1939-40.  She has
a deep low voice, and occasionally a delightful  husky chuckle reveals an
irresponsible sense of humor.  Athletically inclined, she drives a tennis
ball smoothly,  and dunks herself willingly for Blue Barnacles.  Page 43

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snubbed the cameraman... .  BACON, CLAIRE H., Kelso  HORN, GAIL, Bellingham
 Badminton Club, Ski  Club,  Blue Barnacles  LOBE, CAROLYN, Bellingham  Ski
Club, Golf Club  McLEOD, STEWART, Bellingham  Board of Control, Collegian 
Business Manager, Bookstore  Committee Chairman, Manager C'o-op No. 2,
Assistant Editor  1939 Klipsun  NIELSON, KATHRYN, Ontario, Ore."  Transfer
from Oregon State College,  ACE  SAXON, WINSTON, Bellingham  Norsemen, Ski
Club  SCHWARTZ, ETHEL, Seattle  WAA, Vanadis Bragi, House President 
TEMPLIN, GEORGINA, East Sound  WAA, Schussken WEIHE, ROBERT, Bellingham 
COWIE, JEAN, Seattle;  Alkisiah, Paletteers, ACE,  Graduate Student  ,
SMITH, DOROTHY, Seattle  Alkisiah, ACE, Graduate Student  BARNARD, LOIS,
Everson  CAMPBELL, GLENN, Raymond  COATES, ALVIN, Longview*  Lower Columbia
Junior College  Transfer  ELLIS, JOHN, Bellingham  Board of Control, Ski
Club,  W Club  Executive  Executively gifted, earnest Dorothy Schaus has to
 her hard-earned credit, the offices of treasurer of her  sophomore class,
president of I'nterclub Council, pres-ident  of Vanadis Bragi, and
membership in Scholar-ship  Society, thus warranting mention in "Who's Who 
Among College Students for 1939." A student superior  in scholastics,
Dorothy takes happily to a tennis court  in the spring time. Chairman of
the Student Activities  Building Committee, she likes to talk and does a
lot of it.  Page 44

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 45

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CLARK, BUFORD, Cashmere  GATES, DOROTHY, Seattle  MILLER, JIM, Albany, Ore.
 ORR, DEAN, Ferndale  IRVIN, AL, Willapa  MORTON, GORDON, Everett;  "Our
Town," "You Can't  Take It With You" RUSSELL, GEORGE, Bellingham  MOLLAN,
VICTOR, Bellingham  Camera Shy Seniors  BARRETT, KEITH, Mt. Vernon 
CALLIHAN, FRANCIS, Bellingham  DAUGHERTY, ADAH, Tacoma  DENNISTON, FRANCES,
Bellingham  FORD, PEARLE, Crossville, Tenn.  GRIFFIN, CLYDE, Bellingham 
HUDSON, JOHN, Yakima  JOHNSON, AURORA, Bellingham  JOHNSON, KEN, Bellingham
 JONES, HOWARD, Bellingham  JUST, EVANGELINE, Portland, Ore.  KINGSLEY,
HOPE, Long Beach, Cal.  LOMSDALE, DON, Richmond Beach  PETERSON, MYRTLE,
Mt. Vernon  PORTER, ED, Raymond  PRATHER, VONNE, Longview  RICE, EVYRELL,
Bellingham  TOMS, WARN, Bellingham  WAYLETT, WILSON, Bellingham  WILLEY,
DON, Bellingham  Camera Shy Juniors  AUBERT, JOHN, Bellingham  BENEDICT,
LAWRENCE, Bellingham  BOOTHE, HELEN, Bellingham  BRALEY, VIRGINIA, Seattle 
BURNET, MABELLE, Bellingham  CANTERBURY, ROBERT, Quilcene  COX, RUBY,
Bellingham  ERICKSON, RUTH, Oakdale, N. D.  FARRAND, ELEANOR, Mt. Vernon 
FLOTRE, SADIE, Ferndale  HANBLOOM, CHARLOTTE, Bellingham  HAZELTON, MARIAN,
Seattle  HOAG, ALBERT, Mt. Vernon  HOAG, GILBERT, Mt. Vernon  IMPERO,
LUCILE, Maple Falls  JOHNSON, RICHARD, Bellingham  McCLELLAN, MAURICE,
Edmonds  NORDQUIST, ANNE, Bellingham  RAMSTEAD, BLAIR, Seattle  RICE,
ROWENA, Walla Walla  SARLES, ROBERT, Bellingham  SHANNON, ELSIE, Anacortes 
SHULL, LORETTA, Bellingham  SHUMAN, RUTH, Seattle  SIMONSON, EDWARD,
Ferndale  SIMUKKA, ELSIE, Naselle SORENSON, ROBERT, Kent  TURNER, ANABEL,
Portland, Ore.  WHALEN, ELLEN, Sedro-Woolley WILTSE, BESSIE, Bellingham 
Page 45

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 46

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These Are Underclassmen  THEphYyl usmee-mth etsoe bFerleosnhgm eton atnhde
Ssoapmhe-omores. They look much the same.  An impartial observer couldn't
even tell  them apart, although, of course, the Sophs  never admit that.
Not till suddenly one  day your friends walk stiffly down the  hall in
their best suits or, if gals, discard  their ankle socks for more dignified
foot-wear,  do you realize that they've entered   into that mystical realm
of student teach-ing,  open only to upper classmen. By the  time the
entering Frosh can sling around  the college terminology of cuts, S. P.'s, 
the Co-op, to the libe, "they're in the swim" and well in the midst of
college  life.  They are the underclassmen.  Underclass Prexies  Hailing
from the Lynden com-munity  of tulips and wooden shoes,  quiet, unassuming
BILL O'NEILL,  president of  the freshman class of  1939-40, has shouldered
responsi-bility  since his position as student  body president in high
school.  Bill is dignified among strangers,  carefully studious, and
popular  among the feminine contingent.  No sissy is smiling JIMMIE  HALL,
proud son of Sequim, who  capably carried the executive end  of the
Sophomore Class during  1939-40. Brown-eyed and mis-chievous,  a stalwart
end on  the  WWC football team, he is sports-minded,  with the immediate
ob-jective  of coaching in junior high school.  Frosh and sophomore
officers glance thru  the 1939 Klipsun to find plans of last year's  class
activities: above, frosh vice-president  "Red" McGuire, secretary Betty
Bird, and  president Bill O'Neil; below, sophomore  vice-president Jim
Junkin, president Jim  Hall, secretary Alec Mitchell.  "Welcome Frosh!"
Sophomore class and  underclassmen are hosts to the frosh at an  early fall
rec hour.  Page 46

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 47

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Frosh Scholarship  Presented every spring by the Jun-ior-  Senior class to
the freshman stu-dent  most outstanding in scholarship,  the Scholarship
Cup remains the prop-erty  of the honored freshman for one year. Lela
Kaufman, honored last year,  presented the cup this spring to Jessie  Bell,
third-quarter freshman from Sno-homish.  Engraved with the names of  each
year's winners, the cup now bears  nine names.  TOP ROW: Goodrich, C.
Brown, Amey, D. Erickson, Barlow  THIRD ROW: Winters, G. Franzke,  Busch,
Gee, Burke, Friese  SECOND ROW: Hammingh, Bruseth, Barbee, Eide, Byrnes 
BOTTOM ROW: Bloomfield, Bode, Axelson, Grubb, Gillim,  J. Carlson  TOP ROW:
Selen, Deitsch, Brodniak, Bennett, Aubert  THIRD ROW: Nims, M. Cook,
Cormier, Benedict, Butz, Feather-kile  SECOND ROW: De Vries, Dybdahl, I.
Anderson, Bright, Denton  BOTTOM ROW: Beyer, Engels, Christensen, Allert,
Bullock,  W. Dahl  Freshmen smile; upperclassmen greet last  year's
acquaintances at the faculty reception  in Edens Hall Blue Room during fall
open-ing  week.  Page 47  TOP ROW: Baker, Bowen, Austin, W. Wright, A.
Hansen  THIRD ROW: F. Balch, Forsberg, Enos, Hamilton, Damon  SECOND ROW:
Owings, M. Engelhart, Age, K. Alvord, V. Cook  BOTTOM ROW: Tauscher,
Cummings, Helland, Baughman,  Brinton  TOP ROW: Dunn, Ebert, Cornwell, De
Jong, Emerick  THIRD ROW: G. Elliott, Elken, M. Davis, Cure, Cory  SECOND
ROW: Dudek, Byram, Daniels, Collier, E. Engelhart  BOTTOM ROW: Dodd,
Easton, Crowley, Easley, Dodge  TOP ROW: E. Hall. Haines, Hatch, J. Hall,
Harrington THIRD ROW: Fullner, D. Harris, Hatfield, R. Hart, Henry,  Harman
 SECOND ROW: Fitzgerald, Hammond, Fortier, F. Fowler,  L. Fowler  BOTTOM
ROW: M. Harrison, Farrar, Monson, L. Hilby, R. Grif- fith,  Haven

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Who is Joe College2  Who is the average student in Western  Washington
College? What are his am- bitions,  his activities? What does he do  for a
living? Joe College comes from a  town of over 15,000 where his father 
earns the living in a trade, such as that  of electrician, plumber, or
printer. Joe  knew when he entered college that he  wanted to train for the
teaching profes-sion,  although he found when he arrived  TOP ROW: Hawley,
Allinson, V. Snider, Hansey, H. Hjartarson  THIRD ROW: Hughes, Hoard,
Howard, Hays, Hunter, Jennings  SECOND ROW: C. Johnson, Hill, Gershak, L.
Johnson, Hurd  BOTTOM  ROW: E. Harmon, M. E. Hilton, Huot, M. Jenkins,  M.
A. Hilton, Howat  TOP ROW: J. Moore, Sansregret, Kotula, G. Larsen, R.
Jensen  THIRD ROW: Lahti, Prince, W. Junkin, Leach, A. Weddle,  G. Johnson 
SECOND ROW: Dorlese Miller, Doris Johnson, E. Johnson,  Jellesma, B. Jones 
BOTTOM ROW: McMillen, A. Jensen, D. Johnson, Kauffman,  Kilander, A. Dorcy 
TOP ROW: Likely, Davy, Wellman, Sievi, V. Jensen  THIRD ROW: Woodard,
Westmoreland, M. Balch, J. M. Olsen,  Willey SECOND ROW: Christopher,
Rauch, Buizer, Frank, B. Brown  BOTTOM ROW: O'Meara, Westerman, Oril,
Dutka, Wellington  that over one-third of the students were  enrolled in
non-diploma courses. Joe is financing his own way through college,  as are
54 per cent of the student body,  Joe, however, does not work at the same 
time he attends school, although 49 per  cent of his classmates do.
Three-fifths of  the students are active in extra-curricular  activities
with an average participation  in at least two activities. TOP ROW:
Mitchell, M. Jones, G. Hjartarson, Handy, Groth  THIRD ROW: Holbrook,
Montes, Holcomb, M. Kuljis, Worthen  SECOND ROW: P. Krieg, Fillinger,
Jorgenson, Gault, Feldt  BOTTOM ROW: Hampton, Hansvold, Hartung, MacGregor,
 M. Elliott  TOP ROW: D. King, Loney, Thommasen, Levin, M. Anderson  THIRD
ROW: Rostad, Zylstra, Bates, G. Anderson, Benson,  Twedt  SECOND ROW: Wood,
D. Stevenson, Lindgren, J. Griffith,  Heaton  BOTTOM ROW: Jarvis, Winkel,
Wardum, Machemer, Jewell, Beal  TOP ROW: Lindsay, Lyon, Luecker, H. Kvam,
McCullough  THIRD ROW: Laube, McInnes, Klann, Lowrey, LeCompte, Karsh 
SECOND ROW: London, Kottke, Lagerlund, Leinter, Loomis  BOTTOM ROW: 
Fisher, Kludt, Lee, Knibbs, Kluth, Lemen  Page 48

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 49

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Sophomore Sabotage  Putting out the flames after a definitely un-scheduled 
burning of the freshman bonfire,  fire-eating freshmen felt mighty
squelched.  When dawn and the Sophs found them weak-ened, the fire blazed
brightly. After devoting  the day before to gathering material for the 
fire, the frosh are plenty  lucky if during their  night's watch the
bonfire burns but once.  TOP ROW: Molby, Mercer, Montgomery, Miner, C.
Peterson  THIRD ROW: E. Peterson, Culbertson, Fyhn, Nix, McNutt, Morrison 
SECOND ROW: Lewis, Mead, Manuel, Matzke, R. Morgan  BOTTOM ROW: Scott,
Meeker, Modin, Bird, Cannon, Stangle  TOP ROW: Beahan, Ross, Roberts,
Sawina, G. Reynolds  THIRD ROW: Simonds, Mueller, Volk, Rohlfing,
Pickering, T. Glenn  SECOND ROW: Schulz, Rutledge, Sandstrom, Marillyn
Anderson, Mock  BOTTOM ROW: Rantanen, Rusher, Rusing, Vanderwerff, Schilke,
Park  TOP ROW: J. Nelson, Stewart, D. Williams, V. Clark, Rivord  THIRD
ROW: Nurmi, Wehmeyer, Goheen, Reasoner, White, H. Snider  SECOND ROW:
Peters, Gilbert, G. Wilson, Gooch, Shiers  BOTTOM ROW: Strom, J. Anderson, 
Bayley, Reilly, Koch, Walton  Page 49  TOP ROW: N. Murray, R. Adams, W.
Olson, Phillips, Mullen THIRD ROW: G. Olson, B. Newell, Pinneo, Dean, M.
Nelson, Partlow  SECOND ROW: Pontius, Ossewarde, Peters, D. Olson, Orton 
BOTTOM ROW: Needham, R. Krause, M. Pearson, Parrish, O. Olson, Pratt  TOP
ROW: Melville Smith, N. Rice, M. Smith, Weigel, J. Simonson  THIRD ROW:
Rundquist, Simmonds, Routledge, McCaddon, A. Biggs, Funk  SECOND ROW:
Sundback, L. Smith, Siskar, Blodgett, Crossett, Swalling  BOTTOM ROW:
Lennart, K. Olson, Siegrist, M. Biggs, Beasley, P. Smith  TOP ROW: Weedman,
Stenson, Watkins, C. Weddle, R. Olson  THIRD ROW: Thal, A. Weddle, B.
Thiel, Svorinich, Thompson, J. Junkin  SECOND ROW: Walsh, Waterbury, V.
Turner, Warner, Vidmore   BOTTOM ROW: Wallace, Stirling, Wall, Walker,
Cannon, Tedford

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ASB Gov't  56  Publications  58  Music  63  Drama  66  Student Work  70 
Camera  Highlights  73  Page 50

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page [51]

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ACTIVITIES Queenly personality and poise, lovely dark eyes a wee bit
wistful, and radiant complexion, made Ruth Hill judges' unanimous choice
for princess of the Publications Prom, outstanding social event of the
year. An Artist, a newpaperman, and a portrait specialist selected her from
eleven Klipsun- sponsored, club-nominated, queenly candidates.

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page [52]

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Dontese Miller, Frances Heevel, Bernice Monson,  Queenly, Jackie Griffith,
Betty Bird.

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page [53]

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ACTIVITIES Jean Christiansen, Mary Barran, co-eds, Jean Morgan, Eileen
Collings, Wanda Barci, photos  by Bruno.

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page [54]

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Journalists' Promenade   SPARKLING innovation of winter quarter was the
first Publications Prom, sponsored by the combined  staffs of the
WWCollegian and Klipsun.  Seventy-five senior journalism students  from the
eight high schools in Whatcom  county were special guests.  First' free
informal in the history of  the school, approximately 1000 students  and
guests danced for the first time in  the large college gymnasium located on
 the campus, to the strains of Chuck Sud-duth's  music. So successful was
this in-itiatory  use of the gym that deans of the  school are now
considering holding all  large school dances in the same place.  Weeks of
previous preparation by care-fully  selected committees under the com-bined
 supervision of editors Bill Ridder  and Douglas Lince, directed by the
Pub-lications  adviser, Mrs. Ruth Burnet, con-tributed  to the success of
the affair. Prom-inent  newspaper and radio men in What-com  county, high
school officials, and  school trustees and their wives were pat-rons  and
patronesses.  Climax to the evening was the revela-tion  of the co-ed who
had been selected  Publications  Prom Princess from eleven  of the
prettiest WWC feminine students.  The judges were Mrs. L. A. Nyquist,
ar-tist;  Ben Sefrit, newspaperman; and M.  Keith Davis, portrait
specialist.  Princess Ruth Hill (left) dimples a smile as President 
Haggard presents her the Scepter of the Press. Master of Ceremonies Bill
Tiffany waits.  At the receiving line special guests met faculty and hosts.
 At left, below, the adviser of Meridian High School "Tro-jan",  Don
Roberts, and his guest joke with Klipsun Editor Douglas Lince and
WWCollegian editor Bill Ridder.  The Grand March was led by Princess Ruth
and Walt   Sutherlen, "G. O. P. (Great Old Printer)."

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You've Met Them!  Personality people, not in College  Who's Who, but you've
known and  liked them!  He lives to ski-and harboring such enthusiasm, he 
was elected president of the Mount Baker District Ski Patrol, a tough job
involving responsibility for the lives  of others. Friendly "HANK" REASONER
(1) is a man whose activities range from forest to the sea.  Business
manager for the WWCollegian (2), blonde, efficient STEWART McLEOD is as
thrifty as the posi-tion  requires. Executive abilities were shown as an 
energetic chairman of the Co-op committee, member of  the Board of Control,
and an alert member of the  Stu-dent  Activity Building Committee. Makes
the most of  every opportunity.  Girl athlete (3) is EDITH MEENK, and as a
hard-working  and popular one, won the position of president  of the
Women's Athletic Association. A good sport and  well-liked, "Prex" is a
blonde and blue-eyed Dutch girl  from Lynden, Washington.  The man most
likely to succeed (4) is the honor  usually acclaimed for those such as
industrious STAN  LAPINSKI'. A member of the Board of Control, chair-man 
of many important committees, president of his  sophomore class, president
of the Norsemen, Stan cap-ably  manages all under his supervision.  With a
twinkle in his eye (5) and friendly greeting  for everyone, few unkind
thoughts follow busy MUR-RAY  HEALY. Diplomacy is his art. His excellence 
in management was exhibited in his position as Home-coming  chairman;
intramural basketball refereeing  proved his diplomacy.  Tanned from the
wind, browned by the sun, hardy  MELBA MAYHEW (6) is no city-softy. Her 
canoe  and her horse occupy much of her time when she isn't  studying or
attending folk dancing, badminton club,  and WAA Cabinet meetings. She
works in the school  co-op, writes for the Klipsun and WWCollegian.  Of all
the athletes who have played for WWC, two of  the finest (7) are HOWARD
JONES and JOE MOSES.  Howard, captain of the football team, is genuinely
well-liked,  has played a square game with the school, and  emerged a
teacher, well-equipped for the future. Little  Joe was voted the most 
popular man in 1938-39. Rec-ognition  of their skill, good sportsmanship,
and athletic  prowess has been statewide.  Two hard-working members (8) of
the WWCollegian  staff, sports editor AL BIGGS and columnist JIM  GOODRICH
hail from the side-by-side hamlets of  South Colby and Manchester. "Little
Alfie" makes up  for his size in energy, has capably lead his famous  White
Mice in exploits from basketball to swimming.  Jim, better known as J. G.,
leads organized pep, writes  a screwball column, is a conservative
jitterbug.  Page 55

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 56

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Student  Integrating Prexy  President of the student body Al Munkres 
played football and tore the Ellensburg line  apart; held the Board of
Control together. Not  talkative, but soft-spoken and sure, with a keen 
sense of fair play and with opinion impartial,  Al supervised Board of
Control business.  Controlling the discipline, social activi-ties,  and
enthusiasm of almost 1,000 stu-dents  is the Board of Control, governing 
agent of the Associated Students. Com-prised  of eleven members, the
Board's  personnel partially changes quarterly  with election of two or
more new mem-bers.  Recognition of three quarters' serv-ice  was awarded
with the official pin to  the retiring members.  As budgeters of the
activity ticket funds, they apportioned money for ath-letics,  drama,
music, WWCollegian, and  ASB-sponsored social events. Appoint-ment  of
Homecoming and Campus Day  chairmen came from the Board, as well  as the
authorization of a dancing class  which carried through two quarters with 
student instructors at its head. They hon-ored  payment for almost the
entire cost  of an electric scoreboard for use at var-sity  basketball 
games. A new RCA sound  system, made available for all student ac-tivities,
 was purchased.  With members selected from the Board  of Control, the
Co-op Board was created  spring quarter, 1939, to find methods to  solve
the problems of the Book Store.  Page 56

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 57

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Government  Progressive, they conducted an inventory  in December, secured
a $5,000 bond for  the manager, adopted a co-operative plan  whereby
students will be paid dividends  on basis of purchases, re- organized floor
 plan of the store, and instituted a new  bookkeeping system.  As the book
went to press, the student  body was voting on: (1) whether or not  the
present system of selection of faculty representatives to the Board
(whereby  one is selected yearly by student vote and  two are appointed for
indefinite terms by  the president of the college), shall be  changed to
one which will call for ap-pointment  by the president of one faculty 
member each year to serve a term of  three years; (2) on the list, at the
polls,  for Associated Student Body president for  next year were Johnny
Thommasen,  Frank Shiers, and  Harold Booth.  Board neophytes (insert)
spring quarter,  Harold Booth and Betty Jean Bayley take  notes  on
procedures for meetings. They  are presidents-elect, respectively, of the 
junior class and the Associated Women  Students.  John Ellis (right), rec
hour chairman for  two quarters, adjusts the sound system  for one of the
weekly dances.  Genially chatting (below) while they  await the opening of
a weekly  session of  the Board of Control are, left to right:  Jim Junkin,
Lela Kaufman, Loye McGee,  Jo Jeffers, Jean Christopher and Miss  Elizabeth
Hopper.  Co-op Board chairman Stewart McLeod  looks on while Dr. E. A. Bond
points out  to Frances Daley, left, and Miss Charlotte  Richardson, right,
other Co-op Board  members, the financial standing of the  Book Store for
the year. President Hag-gard  is an ex- officio member of the com-mittee 
which is the policy-forming organ  of the book store.  Page 57

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page [58]

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Klipsun   Klipsun is an Indian word meaning  "setting sun." All that this
conveys,  the staff adopted as the  only  theme and guiding policy: to see 
the college day complete and impar-tially,  to leave it with a feeling of 
warmth.  To paint a vivid picture of all  phases of college life, to record
the  sparkling moments and vibrant per-sonalities  that made 1940 a full
sea-son  of college activity ... those are  the aims of the 1940 Klipsun. 
DOUGLAS LINCE,  Editor  THtEhe l1a9s4t0 sKheliepts uwnh iissk csu tth, rsue
wtehde, pgrleusesd;,  bound and delivered ... an intrigu-ing  process, yet
presswork is the shortest  bit of work in the whole annual.  Back of the
final run (a "run" is the  printer's term for eight pages "ready to  go" on
the press) is 12 months intensive  work by editor and staff, artists,
printers  Production Figures  Material - spools, yards, and  gallons of
material - to say  nothing of the hundreds of  hours spent by the staff,
are poured into an annual. Frances  Daley, 1040 Klipsun business  manager,
bent an eagle eye on  the 1613 snapshots, 100 flash  bulbs, 5 gallons of
developer, 8  gallons hypo, 7565 square in-ches  printing paper, 22,040 
square inches enlarging paper,  2 gallons rubber cement and 127  square
feet of rubber cement used by the staff.  and engravers. Collectively, the
staff  worked 2000 hours. Material for the book  has seen 12 states and
three countries.  Paper was pulped in New England and  Canada, inks came
from eastern states  and the Orient; the cover came from Mis-souri;  the
cuts were engraved in Seattle;  the book was printed and bound in
Bell-ingham.  Phoning late at night (below) to check facts  and figures
kept  Manager Daley busy.

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 59

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of 1940 Goes to Press  Klipsun planned, motivated; dug out  facts and
figures, interpreted; sponsored and formulated plans for election of 
Homecoming Queen candidates; conduct-ed  questionnaires, polls and
research;  supervised Publications assembly; orig-  The Staff  Left column:
 Herb Brodahl super-vised  art and faculty  pictures; Sara Wicker  dug out
facts.  inated and helped make Publications  Prom the largest informal
dance in his-tory  of WWC; conducted Publications  Prom Princess contest;
awarded snap-shot  contestants; lobbied for dark-room  equipment and a
photography club.  Cleon Butz wrote; sports  photographer Bob "Ter-mite" 
Haugen flashed  the best basketball ac-tion;  Melba Mayhew ed-ited  
women's sports.  Haugen's back-lighting  and syncho-flash catches  the
humorous gleam in  Bill Tiffany's eye (be-low)  Bill clicked most  of the
1940 Klipsun  pictures; he was also  WWCollegian radio ed-itor.  Right
column:  Pictures for the opening  section are criticized by  staff
members. Stand-ing  are Lilliian McKin-ney,  secretary; Char-lotte  Facey,
group pic-tures;  seated are assist-ants  Vivian Benson,  Dorothy Becker,
Kay  Cooper, and Gladys  Miles, art co-editor.  Audrene Feldt was art 
co-editor; Al Biggs ed-ited  men's sports; Jean  Crawford (right) vis-ioned
 the end-sheet.  Writers Hal Booth, Shir-lee Cratsenberg and De-  Layne
Walton gather  campus statistics.  Page 59

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 60

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With feet on desk, editor-  in-chief Bill Ridder  stops reading ACP
crit-icism  long enough to  tell the Klipsun photo-grapher  where to go.  M
OTIVATING force of the  body, the WWCollegian i  lished by the students for
t  dents, in an attempt to be of real  to the student body. Edited by Bi 
der, managed by Stewart McLe(  1939-40 WWCollegian has been a  in all
fields, excelling particularly  modernization of its make-up. F  the
ability and work of the staff  average, the WWCollegian capt  much-coveted
first-class rating  Associated Collegiate Press conte  order to present a
better-illustrate(  Big Business  Laying the groundwork for  a
self-supporting sheet in-stead  of a student-fee sup-ported  paper,
WWCollegian business managers during  fall quarter sold 1,862
record-breaking  inches of advertis-space.  Protest to the tax col-lector 
resulted in refund of  $200 back sales tax from the  State of Washington. 
Plans for an economic sur-vey  for next year will try to  measure the
financial contri-butions  of WWC to the com- munity.  Modernized  Medicine
Man  Always doing two things at  once, and doing both of them  well . . .
this is the pre-medical  student with the flair for jour-nalism  who edited
the WWCol-legian  during the year  1939-40;  his newswriting experience may
 have been casual, but his edi-torship  was overwhelmingly successful.
Maintaining a 3.75  point grade average and presi-dency  of the Scholarship
so-ciety,  Bill proved his worth  when he passed his entrance  examinations
to Harvard Medi-cal  college this spring with   flying colors.  student
more cuts were used this year than ever  s pub- before. A few of the
accomplishments of  he stu- the WWCollegian throughout the year in-service 
elude helping sponsor the biggest infor-ill  Rid- mal the college has ever
held, the Publica-  )d, the tions Prom ... helping put Homecoming  leader
over with a bang and "Hello, Joe, what  in the do you know? Homecoming's
here!" ...   'roving abolition of column rules on the pages,  above
contributing to their streamlining and  ured a modernization . . . a
six-page issue for  in the distribution to the high schools of the  :st. In
state, a Campus Day special and a gigan-  I sheet, tic eight-page final. 
Business is pressing; "Red" McGuire (left),  spring advertising manager,
and winter ad-man  Frank Holbrook rush thru bills with .  Stewart McLeod,
business manager.  Page 60

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page [61]

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WWCollegian Motivated  Sweating beneath the green-shaded  lights of Miller 
 Sutherlen's print shop, with the roll of the presses and continu-  Writing
headlines and setting them up in  type usually takes place on Thursday
after-noon  at the print shop. Left to right: Rid-der,  Biggs, Miller,
Jensen, Walton.  The linotype operator converts the copy into  metal type.
Sutherlen, Simonds, Goodrich,  Miner, Cratsenberg.  After the material for
the story has been  obtained, it is organized, written, and cor-rected. 
Machemer, Phillips, Hatch, Targus.  Galley proofs are pulled and corrected
after  the linotype operator has set the stories in  type: Holcomb, Fyhn,
Matzke, Davy, Good-ing;  then (bottom) the page is made up by  setting
heads and stories in place on the  form. Stangle, Thal, Hilby, Monson.  ous
noise of the linotype music to  their  ears, journalism students at WWC
learn  the tricks of the trade by actual participa-tion  in the mechanical
construction of the  newspaper itself. Students write the  news, correct
the copy, set type, make up  the pages; every phase of the intricate 
process of publishing a newspaper is  learned by direct experience.

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 62

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The Publications Board selects editors and business managers, formulates 
policies. Left to right: Albert Van Aver, faculty representative;  Mrs.
Burnet, director; Henry Francis and Lela Kaufman, student members; Dr.
Kuder, registrar.  Publications Board Integrates  TENlaTteA TinI VspEri ngp
lqaunas rtwere roef 1d9r3a9w nfo ru pa  publications board of five members 
to authorize and control the activitiies of  all student publications. 
Plans as outlined by Dr. Arthur C.  Hicks, Mrs. Ruth A. Burnet, Ralph Neil,
 and Clarence Soukup were adopted by the  faculty and by the Board of
Control dur-ing  the summer.  Minor Publications  1939-1940 miscellaneous
publications  consisted of the Blue Book, Self-Starter,  and Openers. The
Blue Book, edited by  Betty Solibakke, carried information re-garding 
activities, house rules, songs; while the Self- Miscellaneou  Starter
consisted of matters laugh at st  of most vital interest to the Doug Lince 
Dorothy Hr  women, and the Openers to Starter; an  the men. Dorothy Hubert
Kilbourne, e  was editor of the Self-Starter, Navigator,  and Douglas Lince
supervised placing Opi Openers. The three booklets Starter and  have been
combined for 1940- Solibakke,  1941 into one publication. editor. 
According to the present set-up, the  board has complete jurisdiction over
all  student publications. Duties are to select  editors and managers of
student publica-tions  of the college, to confer with the  editors and
managers of the publications  concerning policy, and to take the
respon-sibility  for maintaining all student publi-cations  on a sound
financial basis.  Is editors  udent life;  e, Openers;  ibert,  Self-d 
Charles  ditor of The  booklet re-eners,  Self-  Blue Book.  ture, Betty 
Blue Book  Page 62

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 63

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The men's chorus, under direction of Nils Boson, sang at business men's
luncheon. The clear golden tenor voice at business men's luncheon. of
Ernest Featherkile came  over KVOS.  Inusic for the Masses OMBINING
concertizing with  a flair for showmanship, the  Pep Band kept school
spirit  burning at fever heat throughout  the fall and winter. Music for
the  masses is the theme of this band  within a band. Musical education
reached a  new low in the performances of  the Collegian Corn Fritters, a 
group of classique entertainers  who performed at basketball  games and
stunned student as-sembly  audiences. Groups similar  to this unique combo
are typical  of those found in organized houses,  clubs, and other
organizations  around the campus. Put a com-pany  of men together under one
 roof and what else can you get but  a quartette?  The string ensemble, at
Everett,  played the world premiere of an  instrumental suite by George Mc-
 Kay, professor of Composition at  the University of Washington.  Salon
music played by ensemble  Marion Peters, Lesley Hampton,  Frances Wood, and
Shirley Shan-non  (above) was applauded at Pub-lications  assembly,
dinners, teas.  Ridder's Corn Fritters (Walt Ger-main,  left, Bill  Ridder,
Frank Hol-brook)  rolled 'em in the aisle with  novel arrangements of new
swing.  Page 63

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page [64]

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Massed Bands Initiated  A CPRaOrkS Sr othllee ds utnhlei t fbiaesldss ooff
aB amttearsssbeyd  band of over 300 instruments on  May 24, part of an
annual pageant spon-sored  at the Spring Festival by the Eagles.  Bands
from WWC, six high schools, and  the Eagles combined their forces.  Proudly
displaying a more complete  instrumentation and an increased repor-toire, 
the band dominated the musical  horizon fall quarter. One of the troupe's 
highlights was the annual assembly con-cert.  At football and basketball
games  they did their stunt; they presented a  unique program at Lynden
High School,  a concert at Sedro-Woolley.  A traditional concert,
inaugurated last  year, again swelled thru Larrabee Park  May 19 when the
band played there in  the afternoon.  Initiation of a new procedure in
massed bands (right) technique brought  together for the first time high
school and the college bands at Homecoming  Game. Left to right: Carr,
Rusher, O'Neil, Lahti, Tauscher, Friese, Holcomb, Prince, Anderson, Rizzi, 
McMillen, Wheeler, Hart, Constant, Huot, Rostad, Elliott, Stewart, C.
DeBruler, Kale, Kotula,  DONALD BUSHELL Goninan, Harman, Gilday, Ramstead,
Lindstrom; Donald Bushell directing.

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 65

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THE CHOIR (Top) AT CHRISTMAS IN LIBRARY LOBBY  Left to right; FRONT ROW: R.
Krause, Jeffers, Manuel, Baughman, Hurd, Jones, Nilsen, Jorgenson, Feldt, 
Little, Bright, Phelps. SECOND ROW: Bolman, Carlson, Wiltse, B. Bird,
Hamilton, V. Cook, K. Alvord,  Hartung, Gardiner, Anderson, B. Newell, 
Haug, A. Fuller. THIRD ROW: Johnson, McGuire, Wolfe, D. Bird,  Butz,
McMillen, Gilday. FIRST ROW: G. Hjartarson, Fackler, Clark, H. Hjartarson,
Ramstead, Larsen, Carr.  Not in Picture: Conlee, Pratt, Goninan, Tiffany,
Culbertson, R. DeBruler, Hansen.  THE ORCHESTRA IN ASSEMBLY  Left to right:
York, Lich, Blakeslee, Nelson, Klann, Sorensen, Angel, Ruckmick, Bateman,
Poplack, McMillen, Hatfield, Peters, O'Neil, Hampton, Ridder, Gilbert,
Armstrong, Carr, Shannon, Huot, Elliott, Mrs. Bushell, Kale, V. Cook, B.
Bird, Willis, Hart, V. Kauffman, Harman, Zylstra, Walton, Gilday,
Gunderson, Barnard, 1 Heinemann.  Masters of Melody  ONEse notaft iothnes
iomf ptrheses ivyee arm uwsaicsa lt hper eA- Cappella  Choir's Christmas
concert  in the vaulted, cathedral-like halls of the  library. This year's
choir was the first  to have an equal number of men and  women singing.
With such a set-up, Nils  Boson, music instructor, arranged a more 
complete program for the group, which  sang at Baccelaureate Service, at
WEA  District Convention, at Mount Vernon,  and at Sedro-Woolley.  NILS
BOSON  Major presentation of the orchestra  was the joint concert with the
University  of Washington Symphony Orchestra. A  March assembly concert
featured Dr. Ar-thur  C. Hicks, pianist. For the first time  at the
college, the orchestra and Edith R.  Strange's piano prodigies gave the
tenth  annual concerto recital May  28.  Students heard superlative musical
tal-ent  presented by the Civic Music Associa-tion.  Featured entertainers
were Anne  Jamison, soprano; Arthur Rubinstein,  pianist; Fritz Kreisler,
violin virtuoso.  Page  65

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 66

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You Can't Take  OPENING the WWC drama season, di-rector  Victor H. Hoppe
presented  You Can't Take It With You", in the  Edens Hall Blue Room,
penthouse style. He  was aided by Phyllis McNamee, assistant  director;
Derry Conlee, lights and sound  effects; and Jean Scott, properties.  This
Kaufman and Hart comedy, humor-ous  as it is, contains a wholesome and
gen-uine  outlook on life. As the name suggests,  the Sycamore family and
old Grandpa Van-derhof  have given up the mad struggle to  get ahead, and
have ceased to worry about  money, for as they say, "You Can't Take It 
With You."  Tryouts drew an unusually large number  of enthusiastic amateur
dramatists. Finally  Tony Kirby (Cleon Butz) invites his parents  (Douglas
Lince and Mrs. Dell Long) to the  Sycamore residence for dinner just one
day  too soon. Grandpa Vanderhof (Henry Reas-oner)  isn't bothered a bit. 
Grandpa complacently  throws  darts; Kolenkov (Mar-shall  Bacon) shows
Essie  (Kathryn Newell) a new step.  Mr. DePinna (Gordon Mor-ton)  poses as
Mrs. Sycamore  (Patricia Donovan) paints.  Gene Bremer and Paul Glenn  look
on. Penthouse Style Popular  Proving most popular of all, "You Can't  Take
It With You" was the seventh mod-ern  comedy to be presented here in the 
penthouse style. (Three Cornered Moon,  Fall, 1936; The Late Christopher
Bean,  Summer, 1937; Personal Appearance,  Fall, 1937; Petticoat Fever,
Summer, 1938; Spring Dance, Fall, 1938).  The penthouse theater idea
originated  with Glenn Hughes of the University of  Washington Drama
Department, who ten  years ago in the penthouse atop the Ed-ward Meany
Hotel in Seattle, made the  revolutionary departure of discarding the 
formal stage and seated the audience  around and on a level with the
perform-ers  thus creating a more intimate con-tact  between audience and
cast. Mr.  Hughes was a WWC instructor before go-ing  to Washington.  Page
6G

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page [67]

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It With You"  cast were Henry Reasoner as Grandpa Van-derhof,  the
philosophical old gentleman  whose  idealogy forms the central theme of 
the show; Patricia Donovan and Donald  Weeks, Mother and Father Sycamore;
Alice,  their younger daughter, was played by Sara  Wicker. The older and
married daughter, Essie, was played by Kathryn Newell; and  Ed Carmichael,
her husband, by Vincent  McMillen. Tony Kirby, the successful young 
business man who falls in love with Alice,  was portrayed by Cleon Butz;
his  Wall-street  father, by Douglas Lince. Others cast  were: J. Marshall
Bacon, Carolyn Kuhn,  Gordon Morton, Mrs. Dell Long, Clayton  Ross, Nancy
Burnham, Gene Bremer, and  Paul Glenn.  Offstage Camera Learns "Four i 
Tony wisecracks; Alice "Oh, Ton  is doubtful. a fool!"  Offstage, director
Victor H. Hoppe and  assistant director Phyllis McNamee compare  notes on
the cast.  The Sycamore family, their  old friends, and their new-found 
friends, Grand Duchess  Olga and the Kirbys, bow  their heads as Grandma
Van-derhof  asks the blessing.  Grandpa's home-spun philos-ophy  is the
dominant note in  the play.  Easy Lessons"  y, you're such "You Can't Take
It With  You."  "It's no use, Tony," says  Alice.

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 68

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A radiant bride and happy groom walking away from the  church ... Emily
(Carolyn Kuhn) poignantly remembers  her wedding . .  . . and remembers the
village choir (top), with  Simon (Jim Goodrich) tipsily directing . . . and
 "how terrible was the moonlight" (below) while  she and George talked from
their windows . . .  "Our Town"  DIRECTOR Hoppe's winter quarter  offering
was Thornton Wilder's  "Our Town."  This very popular  play, Pulitzer Prize
winner for 1938, por-trays  the life of the typical eastern small town. The
expression of the simple joys  of childhood, the intense happiness of a 
beautiful marriage, and the tragedy of  an early death combine to make this
one  of the most emotion-stirring plays ever presented at WWC.  During the
first act, the only stage  properties are tables and chairs located  to
represent two separate homes. The  actors must show considerable ingenuity 
to pantomime their actions  accurately,  while sound effects from off-stage
aid in  the portrayal. The orchestral and choral accompaniment during some
scenes added  depth and beauty to the performance, and  the extremely
difficult third act was done  with professional skill. The production  was
so well received that Mr. Hoppe plans  to present it again during summer
quar-ter,  using as nearly as possible the same  cast.  Page 68

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 69

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THE CAST  Stage Manager ......------....... Gordon Morton  Dr.
Gibbs-----............. ............ Clayton Ross Joe
Crowell-............-............ Lloyd Rostad  Howie Newsome .......---
.........---C--l eon Butz  Mrs. Gibbs ....... ..........---M---a--r-g- aret
Rabb  Mrs. Webb .......... ........---D--o--r is Stevenson  George Gibbs
...................------.-.. Paul Glenn  Rebecca Gibbs
-......---.......--B everly Walker  W ally W ebb--..-
.......................... W ill Hatch  Emily
Webb..........................Carolyn Kuhn  Prof. Willard ... .. J.-
--M---a-- r shall Bacon  Mr. Webb
......................---------------....... Warren Toms  Woman in the
Balcony....... Helen  Boothe  Man in the Auditorium..Vincent McMillen 
Simon Stimson-.................... Jim Goodrich  Mrs.
Soames....--.....--..-Betty Lou Williams  Constable Warren -.......N orbert
Cormier  Village Organist .... ....- C---a-r-o- l Skidmore  Si Crowell
----.............-...... Lloyd Rostad  Sam
Craig----.....--....-.............James McCabe  Joe Stoddard,_. ........
......--D--o--n- ald Weeks  First Dead Woman.....-.........-Helen Boothe
Second Dead Woman..............Sara Wicker  First Dead Man-
...----K--enneth McAulay  Second Dead Man......... Vincent McMillen  Farmer
McCarthy..........John Thommasen  People of the Town: Maxine Carroll, 
Julia Cole, Marguerite Goninan, Jean  Wiltse, Geraldine Olsen, Mary Jane 
S. . then Emily remembered Prof. Willard (Marshall  Bacon, at left, below) 
From her grave (at right, below) Emily reviews the  past; all the dead look
upward and are sorry for  George, who kneels at Emily's new grave. George's
mother (Margaret Rabb) is beside her.  Rauch, Carol Skidmore, Justin
Simon-son,  Wilma Wright, Ross Gerry, Ken-neth  McAulay.  Management for
OUR TOWN:  Director---------------......................Victor Hoppe 
Assistant ..................---- -.... Derry Conlee  Publicity
......................-------- Irene Fyhn  Ushers-
..........................-. Barbara Beyer  Stage manager Gordon Morton
smokes a pipe, wears  a hat, and calmly introduces each character to the 
audience. No scenery or props are used with the ex-ception  of lighting
effects.  Page 69

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 70

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I'm Working  Punching a time clock for eight hours a week  as assistant
night watchman, Hank Francis earned money for college expenses. His beat 
included Edens Hall and Main building.  Durward Saxon, sound car operator,
told Bell-ingham  shoppers via oral advertising, where to  buy their goods.
He spent many hours cruis-ing  downtown streets in the Pioneer Sound 
System" car.  "The College" was the greeting of Lola Bates,  NYA student
switchboard operator, when any-one  called WWC. She was one of seven girls 
who each worked 371/. hours per month.  Genial salesman of the Bookstore,
Melba May- hew,  left, and Bob McAbee, right, pause in  the "Ski Shack"
with Bob's sister, Margaret.  Ten college fellows working for their board 
comprised the Edens Hall Kitchen Krew. Day  Williams helped clean up as 
one of the regu-larly  assigned beats.  Page 70

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 71

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My Way Thru College"  SHOthUruL Dc ollsetgued?e ntsD ow ogrrka detsh eidr
ecwlinaye  when Joe works for his room and  board? Do working students push
for-ward  in campus activity?  Research conducted by Dr. Upshall of  WWC
and Klipsun questionnaires dis-closed  that 44% or nearly half of the 1070 
students registered during fall and win-ter  quarter were employed while
shoul-dering  a reduced academic load. Twenty-one  kinds of jobs demanded
two to fifty-nine  hours work per week. Maximum scholastic load is 16 hours
(an "hour"  curricularly is a regular class period and  must be reduced, by
rule,  in proportion to  the number of hours the student works).  Hard work
may be required by their  outside jobs . . . but nevertheless, Joe  and
Betty do not let their studies slide.  A mean grade point average of 2.41
for  the women, 2.26 for the men, places them  well above the C average. 
In contrast to the mere 21.5% of the  non-working students who find time or
 interest for outside activities, 29.7% of  the working students are
actively en-gaged  in extra-curricular effort.  Jack Cody, Bellingham lad, 
rendered top-notch service as  a Herald carrier and helped  to pay his way
through col-lege.  He delivered papers six  days a week.  Shelving books
was one of  the routine jobs Brian Rob-son,  Library NYA student,  found to
keep his two work-ing  hours per day full. He  was one of two regularly em 
ployed shelf workers.  "Service with a smile"  Dick Fowler filled gas 
tanks and checked oil  gauges as a service sta-tion  attendant.  "How far
down, please?"  Dorlese Miller, theater  usher, adds charm to  her question
with a  pleasant smile. Most of  her evenings were spent  in seating
Bellingham  theater-goers.  Page 71

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 72

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In the control room (insert) they rule  with the flick of a finger. Len
New-quist  listens with headphones; Dr.   Jack Cotton signals with two
fingers.  Into the ether goes another Collegian  newscast (above right) by
Francelia  Smith, Jim Goodrich, Pat Call and  Ross Tibbles; below Shirlee
Cratsen-berg,  Clair Boys and Eileen Fry await  tensely for the "on the
air" signal.  Rewrite staff revises all Collegian stor-ies  Thursday
morning for radio aud.  ience ("mental age of audience is  14"). At
typewriters are DeLayne Wal-ton, Lavina Meyer.  We're On the Air  O No
wthne satuird ifoo rl othcaet efdir sot nt itmhee fcroommp uitss, the
college-on-the-hill -by-the-sea  presented a weekly newscast by the 
WWCollegian, the "Well, I didn't know  that" program featuring talks by
instruc-tors,  and musical programs under the di-rection  of Donald
Bushell. Harried script  pioneers a year ago, now a large staff of 
Collegian writers organizes the news pro-grams  quickly, efficiently. 
Properly soundproofed and equipped  with the latest and finest in
broadcasting  apparatus, the studio offers students an  excellent
opportunity to obtain broad-casting  and script-writing experience.  Page
72

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page [73]

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Camera Highlights  Dancing in Edens Hall (1) under glowing  lanterns, the
frosh meet for the first time  fall  quarter as hosts of ASB. Facing the 
flash camera are "Tinky" Newell and Dr.  Kuder.  Under the trees on  the
sun-flecked campus  at WWC (3) is no place to discuss politics,  yet the
underclassmen like there to meet  their favorite candid-dates.  At the feet
of their Goddess of the Festival (2),  laleen Allison, the campus school
children place  fruits and flowers, a traditional pageant and tribute.  The
chidren at Thanksgiving elect their favorite stu-dent  teacher for this
honor.  Studies in repose (4), facial expression and student  interest were
more intriguing to the cameraman than  the bi-weekly assemblies themselves.
 Best football action shot of the year (5) caught Wild  Bill Harrington,
Viking quarterback, as he plunged seven yards through the center of the
Wildcat line.

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 74

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Camera Highlights .... Winter Comes to WWC  The spirit of winter glides to
the campus-but not  the snow. One goes to Mount Baker for that.  John
Nelson and Vic Hanson (3) rest in a snow-bank;  a credulous camp-robber
perches on Vic's  ski.  Edens Hall Carollers sing (1) at the traditional 
Christmas Eve tea.  Frank Holbrook and Stewart McLeod (2) sell a  "fine
piece of goods" at co-op No. 2 during re- vamp  of co-op system.  Dancing
at the "Swish Chalet" (4) was a winter  informal dance thrill at Edens
Hall.  Liv Bruseth hits the bulls-eye (5) at the WAA  Carnival; Walt
German, Lucille Allert, Don Bell,  Bob Tisdale lose bet.  Page 74

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Camera Highlights .... Screwball Parties  All thru the Campus, every
creature was stirring- Mary Esther Gault, Justin Simonson, Pat Mead and 
except the night watchman (right). Screw-ball Bill Strickfadden. parties
begin. Reg, a proud papa, is surprised with Kitchen Krew  Washboard Blues
Band (3) initiate girls at Edens stag party (4, 5.) Krew whisked
mother-in-law to  Hall. the neighbors. Singing "Oh, Baby!" they march 
"Have you any cakes, 'bout so big?" phones Presi- in, dressed in diapers.
Reg tries to spank the dent of ASB Munkres (1) as he 'helps' sophomore
smallest "baby," passes the cigars; tells a bedtime dance committee Lois
Heaton and Jim Hall. At the story. Leaving, they present gifts: 144 safety
pins. party (2) Klipsun picked best hill-billy costumes:

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Camera Highlights .... What the Well Dressed Student Wears  Joe College (1)
wore slacks, sweater, open shirt.  Bill Ridder portrays Spirit of
WWCollegian (corn,  razzberries, bad weather forecasts.)  Betty Co-ed (2)
wore chenille robe, cotton paja-mas,  fur mules for 8 o'clock class cuts.
Typical  roommates are  Jane Hamilton, Frences Daley.  The bookworm
(cramming at 3 a. m. for a test)  wore robe of white and pink polka-dots:
Bill  Junkin.  Co-eds (4) wore every-day campus and sport cos-tumes  at
fashion shows at Edens Hall. Sweaters  and skirts (insert) are all around
favorites.

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Campus Day: 54 Whiskers or Clink  Whisker - pie eating - boy friend calling
contests  filled Campus Day,  annual spring holiday at  WWC's Lakewood. At
left, Polly Phelps jack-knife's  into icy waters.  Two unknowns lurge,
thrust and fence, at right.  Traditional game of the day is the softball
game  between faculty and men students.  Woosh! Over he goes (bottom) in
the canoe-tilt.  Crew races, one boat sunk: "I  didn't fall in. Just  sat
there; water came up around my ears!"  Rolf Jensen (insert), general
chairman, was aided  by six chairmen, supervised Lakewood sports, and 
contests, hilarious evening assembly and dance.  Page 77

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Critical  Observation  No WWVC Greek Rows  AN imposing array of clubs,
fra-ternities,  and sororities flank  the campi of most colleges and 
universities which place importance  to a measurable degree on activities 
outside of the curriculum.  Extra-curricular activities at  WWC have no
Pan-Hellenic support, and fraternities and sororities are  definitely
discouraged. Class and club  advisers, the temperament and fin-ances  of
the student body itself, de-note  that clubs with definite objec-tives, 
whether social, recreational,  or educational, have more value and  are
more democratic-democratic in  that they mean participation to more 
students at less cost.  But spiritless interest, low mem-bership,  and lack
of any integrating  force caused some discerning critics  to observe
something was wrong.  The Club Crescendo in fall quarter  was a fairly
successful effort to rem-edy  the lack of general interest. In  one evening
all campus clubs cooper-ated  as dance hosts and presented  programs
demonstrating their ob-jectives, enabling students to acquire  a better
basis for judgment in choos-ing  the clubs they might join.  With keen
interest in young peo-ple  and a genuine belief in the con-structive 
values of extra-curricular activities, Dr. Merle Kuder, in his  two years
of work in this college, has  built up the number and membership  of clubs,
helping to establish a real-ization  of the significance of such  activity
for ambitious collegians.  Research under Dr. Upshall's guid-ance 
disclosed the fact that 35.9%  of all men students are engaged in 
extra-curricular activities. The wo-men  far surpass them, in compari-son, 
with 64.1% active in clubs and  student body offices.  But this activity of
the women at  WWC denotes no superiority of the  sex, but only that the
co-eds surpass  the men in numbers. Most clubs are  organized around
interests appealing  more to co-eds and those desiring  backgrounds that
will aid their ver-satility  when they enter strange com-munities  as
neophyte teachers.  Page 78  Club Highlights  80  Clubs  82

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Go get 'em, Vikings! The beauty section of the stands yodels for brute
force as the cheer leaders take them into a screaming locomotive yell for
the Vikings, WWC basketball squad.  Prominent in the 1940 cheering stands
was the WWV and the "mums" emblems of the Valkyries, energetic women's
clubs.  A Norseman in upper left corner bites nails as he loses a bet.

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ON the campus: the Student Activity Building Committee  listened intently
while Dorothy Schaus, chairman, extreme  right, read minutes to student
members Dale Courtney, Coral  Harris, Stan Lapinski, Bill Ridder, Stewart
McLeod and faculty ad-viser  Loye McGee, They lobbied for a building to
house extra- cur-ricular  activities. Other members were Frances Daley and
adviser  Merle Kuder. Representatives of campus activity groups, these 
people are among many who were untiring in efforts to plan worth-while club
programs.  Off the campus: A lone Schussken silhouetted against the winter 
sky, Don Randell, stands poised for a downhill plunge.  Page 80

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Club  Highlights  Freshmen smile and  sway at the Club Cres-cendo  dance.
Club Cres-cendo  was in early fall  to initiate frosh into col-lege 
extra-curricular  life.  Singing sweetly, the  Norsemen and W Club quartet
harmonize at  the Norsemen party  which was held during  opening week as a
get-acquainted mixer for all  college men.  Violins sob and wail
ac-companiment  for Edens  Hall upperclassmen ay  they  carol through early
 morning streets. Candles  in cans keep frosty paws  warm. A traditional
cus-tom, it's one of the  highlights of the pre-holiday  season for the 
dormitory girls.  Lesley Hampton and  Berton Blakeslee look  over a musical
score  while waiting for the  opening time of the Mu-sic  Education club
ex- hibit  at the Club Cres-cendo.  All clubs' mem-bership  increased after
 the Crescendo drive.  Page 81

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INTERCLUB COUNCIL  Top row: E. McClurg, Ger.  main, Allison, Mitchell,
Lapin-ski.  Bottom row: Meenl,  Schaus, pres., Kaufman, Pat-more. 
(Officers not in pic-ture:  Harris, v.-pres., Newell,  cor. sec., Reid,
rec. sec.)  W CLUB  Top row: Sarles, Paglia, Mun-kres,  Chamberlain, Smith,
 White, Carver, Lappenbusch.  Second row: Nurmi, Mitchell,  Thommasen, W.
Weber, W.  Hall, Bell, sec., Jones, pres. Bottom row: Targus, J. Hall, 
Davis, Cornwell, Franko, Ellis,  Fowler. (Officer not in pic-ture: 
Tisdale, v. pres.)  ICC: Supervision  One of the administrative
organizations  of the student body, the Interclub Council,  composed of
presidents of all clubs on the  campus, found most of its duties in three
directions: supervision of extra-curricu-lar  activities, orientation of
new students  in the extra-curricular program, and sup-erintendence  of
student-body nominating  conventions. The Council sponsored and
dramatically presented the Club Crescen-do,  a 1940 innovation designed to
show  students of the college  a cross-section  of each club's work.
Members Dr. A. C.  Hicks, Frances Daley, and Dale Courtney were speakers at
an ICC-conducted club  assembly illustrating the value of club  and
extra-curricular activities. The Stu-dent  Activities Building Committee is
an  active branch of the ICC. Dorothy Schaus was president.  W Club: A-1
Musclemen  With football captain Howard Jones  heading the executive board
as president,  "W" club members, typified by navy  sweaters carrying WWC's
blue and white  W, had as one of their major aims the  keeping of athletics
on a high level. Mem-bers  are those men who have proven their  merit in
the major sports of football, bas-ketball,  track, tennis, and golf.
Features  on their social calendar were banquets  and a dance.  Jane
Hamilton sets  the voting tabs for her  favored candidates at a  student
election. ICC in-vestigates  eligibility of  nominees, conducts stu-dent 
body nominations,  maintains activity regu-lations  for clubs.  Page 82

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MUSIC EDUCATION CLUB  Top row: S. Shannon, Rusher,  Blakeslee, v.-pres.,
Schwein-gruber,  Booth, Magallon. Bot-tom  row: Lyman, Barbara  Thiel,
Peters, sec., Beidleman,  Wood, Hampton, pres. PALETTEERS  Top row:
Whetstone, Becker,  Walker, Stroebel, sec., Purnell.  Second row: Konnerup,
Pat-more,  pres., Vilwock, v.-pres.,  Schuster, Born. Bottom row:  Small,
Hamilton, Miller, Dean, Stoddard.  MEC: "We Got Rhythm"  Interested in all
phases of music were  the members of the Music Education Club.  They
exhibited materials for music edu-cation  at the Club Crescendo. Fall
quar-ter meetings were devoted to the discus-sion  of instruments and
instrumental  music; the remaining two quarters of the  year, to programs
of choral music, music  theory and appreciation. Now in its sec-ond year,
the club was headed by Lesley  Hampton.  Three Palett L sketch a campus 
from the roof of  art wing while an  watches their tech  Note 1940 sock 
The art club was oi  ized during the  Crescendo. Paletteers Plotted  A
neophyte club, the Paletteers, with a  charter membership of forty, had
their constitution accepted by the ICC fall  quarter. To promote a fuller
understand-ing  of art, to provide opportunity for cre-ative  achievement,
and to sponsor art  interest in the college and community are  the purposes
of this organization. Its  members were divided into four groups,  each
person choosing that group which  interested him most. General topics
un-der  study in the group gatherings were:  sketching, child art study,
contemporary  art study, and block-printing. Club mem-bers  assisted with
the formal open-ing  display of etchings by Prom-eers  inent American
Artists. They fol-scene  lowed suit with other clubs by being  the
hostesses for a Thursday afternoon  other tea hour in the AWS room. Char-
nine. style. lene Patmore was their president.  Page 83

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Coral Harris AWS  President Top row: Hubert, Countryman, Johnson, Twedt 
Second row: Bayley, treas., J. Jeffers, sec., J. Morgan, Harris, pres. 
Bottom row: Kaufman, Reid, Busch, Hart, v.-pres.  AWS: Manners, Talent,
Teas  A Kid Party sponsored during opening  week broke the ice for the
Associated Women Students and helped create a  quick spirit of friendliness
among new  and old women students of the college.  Every woman on the
campus is a mem-ber;  they are governed by the AWS Com-mission, which with
two advisers meets  early in a pre-school conference to plan  the club's
program of work for the  year,  and meets every second and fourth
Wed-nesday  thereafter. The Commission has  18 student members, four
elected by all  the women students, and the remainder  representatives of
women's clubs.  The entire club met once a month; pro-grams  ranged from
talks on travel and  manners to student talent programs. They  held an
informal each quarter; super-vised  the regular Thursday afternoon  teas.
Setting for the fall and spring fash-ion  shows was the Blue Room of Edens 
Hall (see Camera Highlights). Versatility of individual members of  this
club was indexed through talent  cards which were kept on file and
re-ferred  to when student assemblies or im-promptu  programs were on
docket. Under  the chairmanship of Shirley Shannon,  high school girls'
club officers were guests  for a one day conference during winter  quarter.
Campus tour, fashion show, and  tea ended the day.  President Coral Harris
and next year's  president-elect Betty Jean Bayley  attended a spring
quarter confer-ence  of college women executives  at Eugene, Oregon. This
confer-ence  is called every two years to  discuss and consider solution of
 problems encountered in the ad-ministration  of women students'  club
work, as well as to present  programs and new ideas.  Bottle babies,
Bernice  Monson and Jerry Olson  nibble cokes; "I- gotta-secrut"  Ruth Hill
con-fides  in Lois Hilby, at  the Kids' Party for old  and new women
stu-dents during fall open-ing  week. AWS was  host.  Page 84

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Norsemen: Service  A newcomer last year, the  Norsemen, men's service 
club, continued this year 140 strong. Under the direction  of Stan
Lapinski, president,  they organized pep at games,  obtained use of a club
room  for all college men, sponsored  an opening-week mixer and  Sworked
with the WAA on Parents' Day. Numbered  among traditional events  were a
winter quarter infor-mal  and a boat cruise in the  spring. Through
Norsemen  Club activities, the men of the  college had an added
oppor-tunity  to enter into campus  social life.  Referee Weber grunts when
wrest-lers  Jack Bromley and Dehart Erick- son  knock him off his pins at
the  Men's Party. At the fall "smoker"  Norsemen and the W Club intro- duce
 the college to new men.  NORSEMEN  Top row: Lyon, A. Dorcy,  Biggs,
Mollan, Franko, W. Junkin. Second row: L. C.  Brown, J. Junkin,
Schwein-gruber,  v.-pres., Baker, Good-rich,  Holbrook. Bottom row:  Hoard,
Hjartarson, Tibbles,  Gerry, Lapinski, pres.  Top row: C. Brown, Hatch,  G.
Hjartarson, Rivord, Austin.  Third row: Robson, P. Glenn,  Chodykin,
Goodrich, M. An-derson.  Second row: McCabe,  Arian Anderson, Mercer,
How-ard,  Parisi. Bottom row: Thal,  Kuljis, G. Johnson, Nims, McMillen.
(Officer not in pic-ture:  Montes, sec.)  Page 85

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Y. W. C. A.  Top row: Cowles, Fitzgarrald,  Bolman, pres., Ridgway,
Den-niston.  Bottom row: Meeker, Gunderson, sec., Rizzi, Church.  (Officer
not in picture: Mc-  Gregor, v.-pres.)  C. C. F.  Top row: Modin, Cowles,
Fitz-garrald,  Ridgway, Bolman,  Denniston. Second row: N.  McClurg, Klein,
v.-pres., E. McClurg, pres., Shaver. Bot-tom  row: Meeker, Haug,
Gun-derson,  Rizzi, sec., Church.  YWCA: Fellowship CCF: Firesides  With
the promotion of Christian fel-lowship  among young women of the cam- pus 
one of their aims, YWCA girls, pre-sided  over by Katherine Bolman, met
ev-ery  Thursday afternoon for song and  Bible study. Outside speakers
frequently  were guests at their meetings. Included  in the club's activity
program this year,  its fortieth year as an organized club on  this campus,
were three annual events.  College students from the University of 
Washington, University of British Colum-bia, Seattle Pacific College and
Victoria  College met with WWC students at fall  and spring conferences at
the Firs. An  open invitation was extended all students  on the campus for
the four-day Bible In-stitute held here during winter quarter.  Fireside
singing a  lowship meetings it  evening brought rel  tion and new fri  for
members of  YWCA and for the  club, College Chris  Fellowship.  Organized
to promote Christian fellow-ship  and friendship among the students  on
WWC's campus, the College Christian  Fellowship Club with a membership
total-ing  approximately thirty held its initial  meeting fall quarter.
Edward McClurg  was elected president. At noon meetings  held once a week,
Christian leaders, min-isters,  and missionaries were invited to  address
the group. Members met for oc-casional  fireside gatherings throughout  the
year.  Page 86

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Valkyrie: Pep  A blue sweater carrying a blue and  white emblem across the
front is the well-known insignia of the Valkyrie girls. Or-ganized  to
enthusiastically support school  activities, to display and encourage high 
standards of social conduct and womanli-ness,  they were responsible for
rooting sections at both football and basketball  games.  Cheer leaders
Goodrich, Simonson Vanadis Bragi: Books  and Bremer pull into a locomotive 
yell as Valkyries cheer for the Vik- Discussing books of special  interest
was  ings (see division page). Cheer the means by which the literary and
crea-leaders  competed  at Club Cres- tive interests of Vanadis Bragi
members  cendo; popular support proclaimed were stimulated. The evening
preceding  the winners. the fall assembly appearance of Erika  Mann, the
meeting was devoted to the  study of her works and those of her  father,
Thomas Mann. With a larger than   usual membership and Dorothy Schaus  as
their president, they made literary con-tributions  to the Collegian. 
VANADIS BRAGI  Top row: Thompson, Hays,  Born, Peterson, Wicker. Sec-ond 
row: Collier, Parisi, Butz,  sec., F. Smith. Bottom row:  J. Hogg, B. Hogg,
v.-pres.,  Schaus, pres., Bell, treas,  Moser.   VALKYRIE  Top row: J.
Olsen, J. Griffith,  E. Johnson, Nordquist, Fred-erickson,  Lindgren, Cory.
 Third row: Whetstone, v.-pres.  Jeffers, Frank, Bird, J. Mor-gan,  Reilly,
Harris, Gillim,  Volk, Forhan, Hill. Second  row: O'Meara, Christopher, 
Heaton, sec.-treas., Reid,  Binkie, Shuman, M. Krause.  Bottom row: P.
Smith, Mc-  Namee, Sherk, Nilsen, Becker,  Crossett, Jones, pres.  Page 87

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KAPPA CHI KAPPA  Top row: Hays, Cowles, Whit-ten,  P. Anderson. Bottom 
row: Christensen, Small, Bis-sell.  (Officers not in picture:  Hotchkin,
pres., Byrnes, v.-  pres., Clarke, sec., Davis,  treas.) ALKISIAH  Top row:
Williams, Shepard,  Rundquist, Daley, Kottke,  Facey, Davis Peters, sec.,
Burnham. Fourth row: L.  Smith, Cowie, Lindgren, Bar-low,  Gardiner, Wood,
treas.  Third row: Hopper, Wahrgren,  R. Anderson, Whitten, Frank,  Gorman.
Second row: Nilsen,  Fry, Reid, pres., Rabb, Hud- son,  Christensen. Bottom
row:  Kilander, Knibbs, Becker, A.  Jensen, Kaufman, v.-pres.,  Patmore.
Alkisiah: Fine Arts KCK: Guardians  A golden arrowhead their insignia and 
"In the near future" their motto, Alkisiah  members numbering sixty, under
the lead-ership  of Lois Reid, devoted the majority  of their bi-monthly
meetings to art. Af-filiated  with the National Federation of  Women's
Clubs, they directed some of  their activities in that channel.
Tradi-tional  social functions included a Christ-mas  party, Valentine
banquet when  alumni were invited, and spring-quarter  boat trip. Having
the dis-tinction  of being  the women's club  of earliest origin on the
campus,  Alkisiah by popular demand in-creased  its membership this year 
from fifty to sixty.  Over gleaming candles  initiates at Alkisiah
ini-tiation  pledge their  vows to robed officers  in one of the most
im-pressive  club ceremo-nies  on the campus.  Organized  from a nucleus of
last year's  Scepter and Shield group, Kappa Chi  Kappa was a new
organization among  WWC extra-curricular units. Interesting  to those who
plan to became guardians  of future Girl Scout and Campfire girl  groups
were their lectures and discus-sions.  Laincha Hotchkin was fall quarter
president.  Page 88

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SCHOLARSHIP SOCIETY  Top row: Ridder, pres., Stew-art,  Thommasen, Handy,
Kin-zer,  Jackson. Second row:  Shiers, Krieg, Dybdahl, Bui-zer,  Schaus,
Erickson. Bot-tom  row: Cowles, Gunderson, Kaufman, J. Carver, Stroebel, 
sec., Christopher.  BLUE TRIANGLE  Top row: Williams, Fyhn, Frederickson,
Sandstrom, Tay-lor,  Harlow. Third row: Hol-berg,  Allison, G. Jeffers, P. 
Allen, Buizer, Heimdahl, Tel-enga.  Second row: Tudor,  treas., Bayley,
v.-pres., C. von  Scheele, Jewell, R. Morgan, Perkins, sec. Bottom row: 
Moser, Cram, Purnell, Arm-strong,  Nilsen, K. Newell,  pres., Siegrist.
Scholarship Society:  Brains  Enjoying good fellowship and scholar-ship, 
the Scholarship Society members  also wore the gold scholar's emblem as a 
token of their high grade point average  'of not less than 3.5 for three
successive  quarters. Banquets and formal initiations  were in order. Bill
Ridder presided.  Blue Triangle: Seabeck  With traditional initiation
ceremonies,  many new girls entered Blue Triangle  Club work this year
under the leadership  of prexy Kathryn Newell. Regular bi-monthly  meetings
 of this affiliate of the  national YWCA were held in the little  club
house, with such social times as splash parties and picnicking aiding good 
fellowship. They cared for chil-dren  at the YW on Saturday after-noon, 
collected food for a Thanks-giving  basket, and sponsored the  F.E.S.S.F.
drive. All during the   year, they were alert to money-raising  means for
purposes of  sending delegates to Seabeck.  Reading your news-paper  in the
drink can  be fun providing you  don't dunk. The Deep  End kids shown here 
were  new members ini-tiated  at a Blue Barnacle  party.  Page 89

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ACE  Top row: Dawson, J. Jeffers,  treas., Williams, v.-pres. Bot-tom  row:
Kaufman, pres.,  Sherk, sec. (Officer not in  picture: Schaus, pub. rep.) 
ORGANIZED HOUSES  Top row: Farrand, Benson, Underwood, Davis,
Schwein-gruber,  Neevel. Bottom row:  Gorman, F. Smith, Hays, Mc-  Kinney,
Foley, March.  Organized Houses: ACE: Teachers  Displays  This group
represents the many houses  on the hill  where housekeeping facilities  are
furnished for girls. Most of the houses  hold quarterly elections and
sponsor soc-ial  events. They are hostesses at Thurs-day  afternoon AWS
teas. Home-coming  was made colorful by dis-plays  erected by them.  Edens
Hall: Traditions  Among the activities of Edens  Hall girls, the oldest
traditionally  is the Christmas banquet. Christ-mas  caroling, the
Christmas Break-fast, Christmas tea, May Day and  Senior breakfasts are of
more rec-ent  origin. Polly Phelps was pres-ident for the year.  Top row:
Bloomfield, Shuman,  Williams. Bottom row: Phelps,  pres., Fuller, Forhan. 
Filling the need for a professional club  on the campus was the Association
of  Childhood Education. Presided over by  Lela Kaufman, members met three
times  quarterly to discuss the education of chil-dren  to the age of ten.
Aims were to stim-ulate  members to be better teachers.  Page 90

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SCHUSSKEN  Top row: J. Nelson, Dom-broski,  J. Simonson, Cooper,  Simonds,
G. Johnson. Third  row:  McAbee, v.-pres., Tegen-feldt,  Sandstrom, Reilly,
May-hew,  Reid. Second row: G. O1-  son, Rohlfing, Horn, Mead,  Cannon,
Harrison. Bottom row:  Siegrist, E. Rutledge, P. Smith,  V. Thiel, Nilsen,
Whetstone.  Top row: Austin, V. Hansen,  Germain, pres., McAbee, Ellis, 
Goodrich. Fourth row: Hamil- ton,  J. Olsen, Fyhn, Cory,  Harlow, A.
Peterson. Third  row: G. Jeffers, Lindgren, P.  Allen, M. Anderson, R.
Krause,  Bayley, Christopher. Second  row: Bird, Hays, J. Jeffers,  Hilby,
Kluth, Beal. First row: Cannon, J. Carlson, Franzke,  Heaton, Gillim,
Jones, sec.  Schussken: Sitzmarks  Although one of the youngest clubs on 
the campus, popularity of skiing swelled  the Schussken's membership to
over sev- enty.  They sponsored trips to Mount  Baker, provided instruction
for beginners  and presented illustrated lectures. A club  insignia was
adopted. Club president was  Walt Germain.  IRC: Peace  Connected with the
Carnegie Founda-tion  for International Peace, the Interna-tional 
Relations club discussed topics of current interest. IRC units of colleges
in  Washington, Oregon, and Idaho met at  Eugene, Oregon, during winter
quarter  for round-table discussions and confer-ence.  President was Fred
McHenry. INTERNATIONAL  RELATIONS CLUB  Top row: Sullivan, Wright,  London,
Brodniak, J. Hudson,  Rivord. Third row: R. East-man,  Parisi, J. H.
Taylor,  Allinson, Courtney, W. Baker.  Second row: P. Allen, G. Jef-fers, 
Gilbert, Underwood, Jaa-den,  Campbell. Bottom row:  Magallon, sec., V.
Hudson,  Alley, Kaufman, v.-pres., Pat-more,  Cummins. (Officer not  in
picture: McHenry, pres.)  Page 91

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S o  sports Review o( 1940  JUST about the biggest news of  1940 in the
realm of sports  was the addition, in late No-vember,  of the hustling St.
Martins'  Rangers to the young and powerful  WINCO conference. This rounded
 the league to five teams and made  for more and thrilling battles for 
league leadership in the not too dis-tant  future.  The Vikings fared
passably well  in football, taking five games and  dropping but two; the
features were  a rainswept victory over the Univer-sity  Frosh and the
annual Home-coming  victory over CWC, both with  identical scores, 12-0. 
Basketball had the Norse breaking even in the conference race with a 
narrow loss to the University of  Washington and twin victories over the
champion Wildcats of Ellens-burg  as chief crowing points.  Track as the
Klipsun goes to press  has not fared so well in the win col-umn.  Two
losses of almost identi-cal  scores to the CPS Loggers and University Frosh
have been the bills  of fare to date. Scheduled for May  24 and 25 was the
WINCO meet at  Waldo field with the defending  champs of Cheney installed
as fav-orites.  Intramural sports as usual re-ceived  their strong play,
with bas-ketball  proving the most popular for  the umpteenth time. Ping
pong,  bad-minton,  swimming, volleyball, and  softball all came in for
their bow to  fame and fortune. Tennis, golf, and  other spring sports, are
going their  time-honored way again with Sam  Carver coming up with another
of  his perennial strong golf teams.  They look like the ones to beat in 
the WINCO championships on May  24. The tennis team has sunk a bit  in the
doldrums, but with favorable  breaks will probably pull out of it.  Page 92
 Football  94  Basketball  100  Golf, Tennis  104  Intramural  105 Track 
106  Women's Sports  108

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Up and Over! Gelandesprung! a WWC lad dodges a drift and swoops thru the
snow-spray of his own flashing skis.  Close proximity to Mount Baker makes
this true game of the Vikings a popular winter and early spring relaxation
for the students and faculty of Western Washington College.

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Dean of Men McGee (wearing tie) fiddles, sportswriter Biggs (No. 56),
Bradley and  Bowen pray, while Targus burns air at Homecoming.  Football of
1939  ADING back with the intended Ellensburg pass receiver, Stan  Targus,
Viking half, wrested away Neander's toss from Carr of  Ellensburg and
steamed toward the Wildcat goal in a run  which brought the rooting
section, the substitutes, and most of the  rabid  fans that filled
Battersby Field for the sixteenth annual Home-coming  game to their feet
cheering. Targus' run, under slate grey skies, marked the turning point  in
the game. The Vikings had a six point lead, but paced by a  spirited
passing attack, Ellensburg was on the move. The sixty yard  dash of Targus 
behind perfect interference broke the Wildcats'  hearts and they never
again pressed close.  It was a fitting climax to a good season, that
triumph over Ellens-burg.  It marked the third straight Homecoming victory,
and made  the Viking record stand at five wins and but two reverses. The 
initial loss to PLC when  the Norse outgained the Lutherans but  failed to
outgame the scrappy Tacoma team, was a disheartening   blow to the fans who
hoped for a repeat of the undefeated 1938 sea-son.  However, the Norse
bounded back with a vengeance, shellack-ing  Pacific University, Oregon
College, St. Martins, and the Univer-sity Frosh. Then came the Cheney
decision, which the Eastern col-lege  won after being held to a standstill
for three quarters.  Page 94

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 95

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Homecoming: football  season climax . . . plans  originated with chairman 
Healy's committee, above: Bennett, Landon, Fuller,  Healy, Countryman,
Crat-senberg,  Griffith, Gragg,  Bond, Haggard, Kibbe  . . . then the
winning  house display . . . the  freshmen built their bon-fire  Thursday
night, 35  guarded it until 3:00 A. M.  Tired, 30 went home. At  3:05 the
sophs attacked  and burned . . . rained on  serpentine . . . on Mr.  Kibbe
too at rebuilt bon-fire  pep rally . . . band  leaders met, thrilled at 
game ... Governor Mar-tin  kissed Queen Sigrid  II as he crowned her . .. 
Vikings scratched Ellens-burg  Wildcats 12-0 .  Queen Margaret Fuller  and
princesses Jo Jeffers,  Dorothy Beal, Jean Mor-gan,  and Ruth Hill
re-splendent  at Homecoming  Ball in honor of team on  Saturday night. 
Page 95

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 96

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FIRST TEAM: J. Hall, Weber, Jones, Davis,  Harrington, Miller, Munkres,
Hollingsworth,  Tisdale, Browley, Bell.  Vikings  Yards from Scrimmage
-------..... 1024  Yards from Passes_____._._._._. .. ____..  412  Total
Yardage ___-___ _______1436  Passes Attempted-------.-_ 112  Passes
Completed -___ _______- 36  First Downs_ _________ __ ___ _ 77  Points
Scored__-__-.._---__ --__ 93  PLC Punc  The jaunty Vikings trooped to the 
opening game of the 1939 season against  Pacific Lutheran College. They
were de-fending  champs with an undefeated 1938  season behind them, and
they were going  to annex another pennant. But when the  smoke cleared
away, the scrappy Gladi-ators  had eked out a thrilling 14- 13 vic-tory. 
Harrington runs into difficulty near Wildcat pay-dirt.  tured Pride 
Lappenbusch's men started in high  gear and before the first quarter had
half  ticked away, had scored on a pass from  Jones to Bell. Bell kicked
the point after  touch-down and all looked well for WWC.  But a little
fellow named Tommcruik with  a shot-gun arm and two glue-fingered
re-ceivers,  Platt and Sigurdson, rang up 14  points as they completed pass
after pass  with the regularity of dropping water.  Page 96

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THIRD TEAM: Brennan, Bowen, Fowler,  Chodykin, Dombroski.  Vikings Butch 
From Forest Grove, Oregon, came the  Badgers of Pacific University,
defending  champions of the Northwest Conference  and  highly touted, but
the Vikings routed  them and sent them back to Forest Grove  on the short
end of a 19-0 score.  This was but one of the set-backs given  to members
of the Northwest Conference  by the teams of the WINCO this past sea-son, 
which would tend to prove the su-periority  of the conference which em- 
Page 97  SECOND TEAM: Larsen, White, Wilkinson,  Nurmi, Paglia, Herrin, E.
Hall, Cornwell,  Erickson, Targus, Bean.  Opponents  Yards from
Scrimmage-------------- 629  Yards from Passes----------........._-- 485 
Total Yardage _.----------------1114  Passes Attempted-- __-------------
118 Passes Completed-----------................... 37  First
Downs------...............------------......... 61  Points Scored--
-----.............-----------......... 27  ered Badgers  braces WWC, EWC,
CWC, PLC, and SMC.  A repeat game with the Badgers next  fall will find
gone such all-conference  performers as Vaughn Weber, tackle;  Russ Davis,
guard; and Howard Jones,  back; Jim Hall and Al Munkres who  made the
second all- conference eleven;  Link Sarles, Jim Miller, Don Bell, and  Bob
Tisdale. Lappy will be hard-pressed  to fill their shoes.

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Bob Tisdale, Big Buck of the  rifle arm and fighting heart,  was voted the
Inspirational  Award by his teammates for  his spirit and ability, and
fol-lows  in the footsteps of Fritz  Chorvat, Les Lange and other WWC
football immortals of  yesteryear.  Munkres, Hollingsworth, Miller, Davis,
Weber,  Cornwell, and Hall are bullies, all ganging that  hapless Wildcat. 
Coach Lappenbusch, leader of  the host, again had a success-ful  season,
his Vikings win-ning  five games and losing  but two.  Steadiness Beat
Rangers  In their first game away from home at  sandy Stevens Field in
Olympia, the Vik-ings  bested a scrappy Ranger team by a  two-touchdown
margin. The Rangers  fielded a speedy aggregation with several  fast backs
but the superior steadiness of  the Vikings won out.  However, the thrill
of the evening was  the second touch-down. The Vikings had  the ball on
their own 44 and Jim Hall,  their quarterback, called 37-2  left and led 
thru the line with Stan Targus following  close. The slippery Stan squirted
away  from a couple of would-be tacklers and  started to dodge. Every time
a Ranger  was set up to tackle him, a slashing block  lay the green and red
SMC boy flat. Fin-ally,  Targ ducked under the last two de-fenders and
outran them to the goal line.  Not Wolves' Night  Enormous were the Wolves
of Oregon  College of Monmouth, but the Vikings ran  over, under, and
through them to register  the largest victory of the season, a 25-0 
shellacking. The line was outweighed  some fifteen pounds to the man, but
they  held the  Wolves to a net scrimmage gain  of 0 yards.  In the third
quarter the Norse started  a drive that ended with Pinky Munkres,  veteran
fullback, reeling off the final 17  yards on a reverse. Don Bell kicked the
extra point; Targus picked up the final  four yards.  Young Arnold Lahti
galloped nine yards  for the final score, but only the gun saved  a fifth
touch-down as the Viks intercepted  a pass and penetrated to the nine-yard 
line.  Page 98

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Two alert Wildcat defenders bulldog Pinky Munkres to the turf, but  not
until the Viking fulllback picked up  a score of yards. Howard  Jones (93)
is in rather an undignified pose.  Howard Jones, captain and southpawing
right half of the  Norse, was the outstanding  running back of the WINCO, 
and his accurate left flipper  notched up innumerable  scores. He'll be
missed next  fall.  Cheney Shotgunned Norse Rain Drowned U Frosh 
Disheartening was the loss to Cheney,  but yet not without a certain glory.
The Vikings lost, 13-0, but only after the suc-cessive  pounding of the
Cheney siege  guns had leveled the center of the Norse  line.  The first
half was even as the Savages  of Red Reese and the Vikings of Chuck 
Lappenbusch gave and gained ground  only after a bitter fight.  The second
half started the same way, but when one man after another was  aided to the
sidelines, Lappy began to  look around for the manager,  figuring  that he
might have to use Franko to fill  the gap. Finally, with Weber, Bromley, 
Davis, Miller, and Bell all out with leg  injuries, the Savages pounded
across their  first score and a few minutes later, just  before the final
gun, countered another.  "Chew off their ears. Back to Seattle  with the
Greenies." The most rabid group  of fans that ever attended a football game
 braved the 30-mile gale and slashing downpour to watch the Vikings
thorough-ly  whip the University Frosh. 12-0 was  the final score.  The
Norse scored first in the first quar-ter.  Jones flipped a toss to Bell for
35  yards, Tisdale shotgunned one to Jimmie  Hall, and then Jones
southpawed the  clincher to Bell.  Late in the fourth quarter Sarles faded
to pass. He was almost engulfed by Husky  defenders when Howard Jones
grabbed  the ball and hula- hipped toward the goal-line.  The Statue of
Liberty with whiskers  down to its knees, and it worked for 40 yards and a
second touchdown.  Page 99

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Dave Harris Bernie Westmoreland John Band Captain Joe Moses Harold Dodd
Coach Lappenbusch Glenn  Smith John Vaughn Hank Chamberlin Lyle Pettyjohn
Norm Dahl

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1940 Basketball  W EwSitThE bReNtt eWr tAhSaHn INanG TevOeNn bcraemaek
oifnf  the entire 1940 basketball season  and halved their games in the
WINCO.  They led off with a smashing 59-30  win over CPS and followed with
a bril-liant  54-40 loss to the University of Wash-ington  Huskies. This
engagement  saw  the rangy Seattle team eke out a victory  in the dying
moments of the game.  The conference season was heightened  by a 61-58
set-back to Pacific Lutheran  on their own floor, and double lacing to the
champion Wildcats at Ellensburg.  This was the first series the Cats had 
dropped on the home floor for some time.  Coach Lappenbusch used many
com-binations,  but probably his most effective  was the quintet of Captain
Joe Moses,  Lyle Pettyjohn, Norm Dahl, Bernie West-moreland  and Hank
Chamberlin. John  Vaughn, John Bond, Boots Harris, Budd  Dodd and Glen
Smith rounded out Lap-py's  first team. Little Joe was chosen first team
all-conference,  and Hank annexed second  spot.  Of the regulars only Glenn
Smith grad-uates,  so the Vikings are slated to be  potent medicine in
1941.  Bud Dodd, No. 81, goes high after a loose ball in the Ellensburg
game  as Moses, 51, Westmoreland, 58, and Vaughn and Pettyjohn, 21, wait 
expectantly for the rebound.  Page 101

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     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 102

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Sig Sigurdson (No. 13, top), high-scoring  PLC forward, shoulders and hips
his way  into a pile of players as Johnny Vaughn,  aided and abetted by Bud
Dodd, lets fly  at the basket. Little Joe waits--broken nose  and all. 
Another Viking bites the dust. Don Loms-dale  is gathering splinters this
time as the  PLC Gladiators mill around. Little Joe has  his head down
contemplating the situation  while Platt, 19, of the Glads prepares to  put
his foot on the victim.  PLC Peak Game  After PLC had run up the largest
score  of  the season, 75 points in beating them  on Friday night, the
Vikings came back  on Saturday night to score the same num-ber  of points,
61, and hold the Glads to  but 58. This was the peak of the Viks season and
they rode the crest of their  victory wave over Ellensburg twice the 
following week-end.  This is the time that Lyle Pettyjohn (top  right)
forgot to land on top. Three St. Mar-tin's  players and Mr. Pettyjohn ended
in a  heap on the floor. Norm Dahl and Bernie  Westmoreland prepare to
drive the back- board.  Big Smith, John Glen Dixon, doesn't go high  enough
and Don Sorenson of the champion Wildcats out-jumps him. Vaughn Harris, 
Chamberlain, and Westmoreland await re-sults.  Last Game Close  Last game
of the season. WWC needed  a victory to maintain an even keel for the 
WINCO season. Score tied 40-40. Cheney  forward fouled Boots Harris, and
the  curly haired little Viking potted the foul  and the Vikings led 41-40.
They froze  the ball for the remainder of the game  and escaped with a 
sorely needed triumph  over the Eastern Washington College.  Page 102

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1940 Basketball Scores  WWWWC C -.-.-. ......-.-..-.-...  WWC - 
WWC-_--------------  W W C-------- WWC-._. ---------- w w c ----- ----- 
WWC -------  WWC----------------  W W C--------  W W C--------  WWCw------
---------  CPS ..............  uw ............  UBC ....... ..  PLC  PLC 
SMC --. .  CWC  CW C ......... .  SMC --- -  SMC ----  WWC ------- 61  WWC
------- 61  WWC.._...------- 30  WWC ------- 34  WWC ------- 45  WWC -----
----- 41  WWC ------- 49  WWC ---------- 44  WWC ---------- 41  WWC
..------ 891  PLC ..------............ 75 PLC --------- 58  CWC
........-------.... 26  CWC - .--3-0----  EWC .------- 48  EWC ------- 47 
CPS -------- 34 EWC ------- 42  EWC -----......-- 40  Opponents ..9.0.3 
THIRD ROW: Lappenbusch, Dodd, Pettyjohn, Chamberlin, Smith, Vaughn, Franko.
SECOND ROW: Munizza,  Westmoreland, Harris, Bond, Moses, Dahl, Foster.
THIRD ROW: Lahti, Dombroski, Stenson, Olson, Nelson,  Davy, Liebbrand. 
Page 103

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Golf, Tennis Low; Intramural High

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Spring Sports Slim  Tennis chances look slim with but two  veterans, Don
Lomsdale and Vic Mollan;  and  golf hopes, minus the Big Three that 
terrorized the conference, are gone. Last  games as the book went to press
were  "character-builders."  GOLF: (top to bottom) Day Williams, Cliff
Webster, Bob  Smith, Howard Hardy, Harold Kvam, Bob Tisdale.  TENNIS:
Vaughn Weber (top right), Don Lomsdale, Vic Mollan, Frank Shelton, Paul
Glenn (bottom right).  Intramural Popular  Basketball: All-Americans and
Joe- Joes  were winners of each half in "A" League  with Joe-Joes claiming
the title. Chi-nooks  and White Mice won it fall and  winter respectively
in the "B" League;  Chinooks whipping the Mice in the play-off. Swim meet
was mediocre.  INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL: "B" League Chinooks, top:  Walt
Baker, C. Peterson, Gerry Emerick, Art Nordvedt,  Joe Hoard, Norm Muray.
"A" League Joe-Joes, bottom  right: Ken McAuley, Ed Landon, Russ Davis,
Scott Stin-nette.  All in the air are the "B" League White  Mice and
Chinooks, at left, below. Don  Lomsdale, below, was ping pong champ.  Page
105

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FEAaTt UWRWEC owfa st heth e1 94S0e ctorancdk Asenansuoanl  Western
Intercollegiate conference track and field meet which was held on  May 25. 
This meet marked the advent of the  newly formed five- team WINCO League 
into an organized track meet. Western  Washington played host to the St.
Mar-tins   Rangers, Cheney Savages, Ellens-burg  Wildcats, and Pacific
Lutheran  Gladiators.  As the Klipsun went to press the Vik-ings  had
dropped three track meets and  Page 106

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copped one, losing one to CPS, 95-36, and  another to the University,
Frosh, 91-40.  They allowed Ellensburg to capture the  same number of
points, 91, in the next  meet, but were able to garner only 39 themselves
as one Viking dropped out be-fore  the race was over.  Finally, on May 18,
the Norse came through and downed PLC and St. Martins,  73/2-63-24 .  Wayne
Weber, veteran and captain, has  been the main point-pounder, winning  the
broadjump in all four meets.  Pale 107

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MANAGERS  Nix, basketball; Vallentgoed, minor sports; Jones, base-ball; 
Burnham, archery; Armstrong, outings; Feldt, bad-minton;  Bruce, horseback
riding; Balch, volleyball; Neevel,  mixed recreation; Hart, hockey.  Edith
Meenk  WAA President  WAA: "A Spot For All"  W ITH a flourish the Women's
Ath-letic  Association started the year,  offering a get-acquainted
after-noon  of sports for all the new girls, closed  with a formal banquet
for the old and  new members of the WAA cabinet.  Something to  suit every
member was  on this year's calendar of events: ath-letic-  minded
demonstrated their skill at sport turn-outs; socially - inclined dis-played
 their graces at the initiation tea,  Seated are: (left to right) Mayhew,
general sports manager; Cole, treasu  president Blue Barnacles; Shannon,
vice-president; Miss Hawke, adviser;  tary; Beyer, usher chairman; Foley,
Folk Dancing club president. No  Twedt, AWS representative; Frank, social
chairman.  President Meenk (standing) reviews plans at a meeting  officers.
folk dancing festival, Hallowe'en and  Valentine parties; those who love to
 roam out yonder treked with the  WAA  up to Kulshan cabin at Mount Baker, 
sailed to Sinclair Island, or skiied down  the snowy slopes of Baker. 
Coming from Ohio to act as WAA ad-viser,  Miss Virginia Hawke brought with 
her new ideas and an enthusiasm that  affected the entire organization. 
rer; Johnson,  Hubert, secre-t  in picture: Initiate  Crawley signs WAA
scroll  at a candle-light tea. President  of elected Meenk calls new
members, as Sec-retary  Hubert guards scroll.

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BASKETBALL  Organized house basket-ball  teams have their eyes  on the WAA
photographer,  Bob Haugen.  BACK ROW: Elliott, Cooper, Ben-son,  McKinney,
Olson, Johnson,  Mueller. THIRD ROW: Siegrist,  Elken, Nix, Bates, Meenk,
Dyb-dahl,  Purdy. SECOND ROW:  Hubert, Bruce, Dean, Burke, Carl-son, 
Jones, Allen, Routledge.  FIRST ROW: Monson, Howatt,  Brown, Balch, Manuel,
Franzke, Neevel, Barnhart.  Outstanding turnouts of winter  quarter were
basketball, managed  by Nancy Nix; and badminton  turnout, directed by
Audrene Feldt.  After two rounds of snappy play  the Independent hoopsters
led by  Frances Neevel, and sparked by  Brower and Benson, came out on  top
of the competition. Beginning  and advanced doubles play filled  the
Wednesday afternoon badmin-ton  hour. Partners Meenk and Mc-  Kinney proved
themselves super-ior  in the advanced doubles group.  FIELD HOCKEY  Meenk
and Hubert practice field  hockey tip-offs in the gym on a  rainy
afternoon. In the background  are: (left to right) Hart, Johnson, 
Armstrong, and Byrnes.  BADMINTON TURNOUT  BACK ROW: Wright, Needham, 
Konnerup, Horton, Miller, John-son,  Tasoni, Olson, Johnson,  Meenk,
Neevel, Scheldt. SEC-OND  ROW: Neilson, Smoll, Cole,  Dybdahl, G. Elliot,
Martin, Steph-ens,  Haven, Dahl. FIRST ROW:  Siegrist, Routledge, Allen, M.
El-liot,  Bullock. Feldt. Balch.  Page 109

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Folk Dancing Popular with WAA  BLUE BARNACLES  Back row: Grubb, C. Johnson,
Jones, Busch, Pontius, Carlson. Front row: E. Johnson,  McCaddon, Needham,
Burke.  The Folk Dancing Club  meets every week to practice  dances of all
nationalities  which they present for regu-lar  assemblies, for Campus 
Day, for many of the clubs in  Bellingham, and their own  Folk Dancing
Festival. Betty  Foley was the president dur-ing  the fall and winter
quar-ter;  Frances Bigelow was  elected for spring quarter. Mermaids who
have dis-played  their skill in aquatic  sports are members of Blue 
Barnacles. Swimming parties  and practice meets culmin-ated  in the big
event of the  year, the swimming meet for  all girls. Eileen Johnson has 
been the president of the  water-maids' organization.  FOLK DANCING CLUB 
Back row: Benn, Twedt, Harlow, Lewis,  Hilton, Anderson, Dahl, Hamilton,
Byrnes,  Griffith, Hoyem. Second row: Jones, Foley,  Leitner, Bigelow,
Williams, Jacobson, Eas-ley.  Front row: Newell, Meenk, Mead, Hol- berg, 
Campbell, Swalling, Pickering.  Hopping in rhythm (left) at the  Folk
Dancing Festival presented winter quarter by the Folk Dancing  Club are
Frances Bigelow and Betty  Lou Williams, Louise Leitner and  Elsie Harlow. 
Page 110

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WAA Exchanges Ideas with Other Colleges  Two Play Days with Uni-versity  of
British Columbia  co-eds, representation at  the AFCW conference, a  huge
high school play day,  and an afternoon of college  play offered numerous
op-portunities  for friendly as-sociation  and exchange of  ideas for
Women's Athletic Association members. On  November 25, eleven WAA-  'ers
visited UBC for a day  of recreation; and early  in  February, 25 UBC
repre-sentatives  were received on  the WWC campus. Five  Stanford
delegates: Max-ine  Balch, Audrene Feldt,  Bea Armstrong, Dorothy  Hubert,
and presidentEdith  Meenk, accompanied by  Miss Hawke-attended the 
district convention of the  American Federation of  College Women at
Stan-ford,  California. Eighty  students from eight high  schools in
Whatcom Coun-ty  shipped on the "S. S.  Playday" for a Sailor's Hol-iday 
on April 27 under the  direction of Skipper Max-ine  Balch.  President
Meenk volleys off bal-ance  (top) at the WAA Playday  with UBC.  DELEGATES 
WAA Delegates to UBC pose  (center), and waiting to go (in-sert)  are the
Stanford delegates.  Back row: Meenk, Neevel, Bates, Hauser,  Hubert,
Balch. Front row: Beyer, Feldt,  Pontius, Mayhew.  Insert: Meenk, Balch,
Feldt, Hubert,  Hawke, Armstrong.  BADMINTON CLUB  Back row: Armstrong, G.
Olsen, Hubert,  Stevens. Second row: Daley, Benson,  Horn, Earley. Front
row: Weitman, May-hew,  Shannon, Hart, Cratsenberg, Bates,  president. 
Page 111

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Banshees, Bows, Boats  D OnWesNs -ath es prsitnagiryw anyo thiinn ginneksys
abtla tchke-bottom- cold, clammy hands clasp  a greeting-ghostly white
forms emerge  from the darkness, emitting unearthly  groans-shrieks of
horror from terrified  captives-suddenly the lights flicker, not  upon a
chamber of horrors,  but upon the  training school gym. The ghosts are 
laughing WAA'ers, at the Hallowe'en  party.  With such a harrowing
beginning, the  girls are carried further into the spirit of  Hallowe'en by
playing fortune- telling  An apple for the teacher floats abob in the tub 
at WAA party: Harmon, Nugent, Neevel.  games. "Will he be a tinker, a
tailor, or  bow-legged sailor?" ask the players.  Blub! Blub! Sound effects
from all the  heads in the tub of water, bobbing for  apples. A few emerge
with a mouth  around a big red apple; others get their  heads wet...  While
the spirit of fun still reigned,  the girls folk-danced and played gay,
silly  games; formed lines to receive their re-freshments;  sang WAA songs
between  mouthfuls of ice cream; sang "Alma  Mater" as the party ended. 
Anchors aweigh! The WAA sailors (bottom) sail  away across the bay to
Sinclair Island and Viqueen  lodge, the WAA'S own cabin. There they spend 
three days cooking, playing, and sleeping out in  the open.  Modern
Wilhelmina Tells hit the bull's-eye as  often  as their illustrious
forerunner: top right,  Hubert, A.r mstrong, Easley, Williams, Beyer, 
Mackey, Neevel.  "Keep your eyes on the ball!" At bottom: Beyer,  Carr,
Holberg, Hays, Morrison, Smith, of the  Golf Club.

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Topical Index  Activities ......................---------------------- 50 
Administrators .............._..._.._. .. . 18 Album -
-.----------.-.-..-.-.-..-.-..- -----1-6-  Alkisiah
---.-------------.-..-..- ----...... .... 88  Associated Women
Students....------ 84  Association for Childhood Edu-cation...  ..........
.....---------------9--0-----  Athletics ...........----------------------
92  Basketball .----.. - -__-__...100  Blue
Triangle...............----------------- 89 Camera Highlights
..........------------- 73  Campus Day-.........------------.-------- 77 
College Christian Fellowship --.... 86  Contents ... .......
.....------------9-----------  Dedication _.-. -------------------- 5 
Drama ....................------------------------ 66  Faculty ......
...... ....--------2-2---------------  Football
...--........----------------- ------ 96  Foreword ... ........
..--------------4--------  Golf, Tennis ..............-------------- - 104 
Homecoming ...... ..-------------9--4---.-  Index .......
..-------------------1--1-3--  Interclub Council-------------- 82 
Interesting Instructors....-__________ _ 20  International Relations
Club---..... 91  Juniors ------.......----------------- 30 Kappa Chi
Kappa------...........--------- 88  Klipsun
...-........------------------------ 58  Klipsun Teaches .... ..--------
--------- 12  Men's Intramural ------------- 105  Music
....................------------------------. 63  Music Education .....
-------- 83  Norsemen .........--- ---------------.. 85  Organizations
............---------------... 78  Organized Houses ..--------- - 90  "Our
Town" .......------------------ 68  Paletteers
..............------------------- --. 83 Personalities ----.......
..----------5-5----  President's Message -________ __ 16  Publications
.._-__ --_-__- ._._.. . ___ 62  Publications Prom______ 54  Queens
..................----------------------- 51  Radio and
Speech------....._____. 72  Scholarship Society _____. _____ 89  Schusskens
..--------------------- 91 Seniors
...................----------------------- 42  Student Government
...----------- 43  Student Work-......._____ __..........______ 44  Track
---------------...................-------...... 106  Underclassmen
............ _____.... 46 Valkyrie ........ _... .. _
..-------8--7-------------  Vanadis Bragi__ ..................-----------
87  W Club ----------------- ------ 82  Who is Joe
College?................._.... 48  Women's Athletics Association-......108 
"Working My Way Thru College"__70  WWCollegian
._.........------------------ 60  YWCA
........................------------------------ . 86  Year in
Review_........______________...... 10  "You Can't Take It With You" ....
66  Personal Index A  Adams, Bettie -..........................2.5....... 
Adams,
Robert.................................------------------------------- --
49  Age. Louise
...--------------------------..........................---...----------- 47
 Alexander, Alma
...................................----------------------------------- 25 
Allen. Bertha L......-----------------------------------
.............................2..5.  Allen, Pauline R-...................
... 68.9..,. ....9..1.425.  Allert, Lucille------------------
-----.................................--------47, 74  Alley,
Winifred................................-------------------------------31,
91 Allinson,
Omar.................-------------------------------...................48,
91  Allison, Icleen L -.......................7..,  ...24, 25, 73, 82, 89 
Alvord, Kati ryn ............................................ 47 65  Alvord
Robert ----------- ............................-------------------------..
31  Amey,
Eugene..............-------------------------------..................---
...-- 47  Anderson, Albert ------------------------.----------.......... 25
 Anderson, Arian.................................... 83   Anderson, Dorothy
M ................................ ...... 110  Anerson,
Frank...................... ... -- ....-----------3- 1---  Anderson, Gerry
E.................-----------------..............-------------.-..-.-....4..8....
 Anderson, Ine M-----------
--------.....................--------------............4..7...  Anderson,
Lucie M---------..------...........-----------------
...................3.1.............  Anderson,
Peggy....................-----------.......................-..-.-..-
------- 88 Anderson, Marillyn C. ..................... 44..9.............. 
Anderson, Melvin ............. 44...8...,. ....8.5............   Anderson.
Rose Marie E ......................................... 43 88  Angel,
Eldoris........................................................31, 65 
Armfield, Virginia E ................................................... 31
 Armstrong, Beatrice ........................ 25, 65, 89, 108, 111 Arntzen,
E. J................................................................ 22 
Aubert, John .......................................................... 45,
47  Aust, Mildred ---------
.............................................................. 7  Austin,
Jules ............................................ 47, 85, 91 Axelson,
Eloise B................................................ 47  B  Bacon,
Claire............. ............................................ 44  Bacon,
Marshall ................................................. 67, 69  Baker,
Lois  E.
M..................................................----------------------3-1-----------
 Baker, Michael........................................................ 31 
Baker, Walter --.. ~..........................47, 85, 91, 105, 106  Balch,
Florence
B---------------------------------.................................4.7.....
 Balch, M-xine
A......................................------------------------48 111 
Birbee, Marian------------------------------------
.................................. 47  B~rci, Wanda
L-------------------------------.......................................43,
53 Barlow, Marion Lee ----------------------------...........4..7..,.
..8..7.................  Barnard, Lois--
.................................--------------------------------44, 65 
Barrett, Keith ................................------------------------
--------- 31, 45  Barron, Mary R. F
------------------..........................-..-..-..-..-..-..- ------ 53 
Bateman, Anne ............... ..................... 65  Bates, Lola
A......................................-----------------------48, 70, 111
Baughman Anne B ............................---......-------------- 47, 65 
Boyley, Betty Jean .............................. 49, 57, 84, 89, 91 
Beahan, Leonard -------------------- -----.. ------ 49  Beal, Dorothy
.................................---- ------------------------- 48, 91, 95 
Bean, Robert... ............................... 97, 99  Beosley, Maxine
------------------ ----------------.. 49  Beatty, Francis
M---------------------------------................................2..5.....
 Beck, Marjorie A.................................................. 31 
Becker, Dorothy....---..........................----------- 31, 59, 83, 87,
88  Beckim, Eloise M.......................................................
31  Beebe, Marie A... ...................................----- 31 
Beidleman, (Helen) Jean .................................... 31, 83  Bell,
Don ............................. 26, 74, 82, 96, 97, 98, 99  B ell, Jessie
.................................................................... 87 
Benedict, Lawrence.................................................... 47 
Benn, Alice H.................................................31, 76. 110 
Bennett, Jack ........................................................ 47,
95  Bennett, Mettje L....--- ................................... 32 
Benson, Vivian..............................48, 59, 90, 110  Beyer, Barbara
J..............-- ...................... 47, 69, 111, 112  Bigelow, Francis
W.........................................--32, 110 Biggs,
Al......................................49, 55, 59, 61, 85, 94  Biggs, M
ay.................................................................. 49 
Binkie, Nina L...................------------------------------
..........................32, 87  Bird, Betty
B.....................................46, 49, 52, 65, 87  Bird, Douglas ...
..---- ............................. 63, 65  Bissell, Jane
L....................................................32, 88  Blakeslee,
Berton.....................................32, 65, 81, 83  Blick, Ellen M
............................................................ 32  Page 113

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 114

     ----------

Personal Index  B (Continued)  Blodgett, Ermine
L...........................--.--.--..4.9.....------------------------
Bloomfield, Adelaide.. --......................4.7., .9.0......--------- 
Bode, Bettie
L....................................4.7...................---------------------------------
 Bollerud, Marion
M................................32.................------------------------------..
 Bolman, S. Katherine.........................65.,.  .8.6.......32,  Bond,
Dr. E. A.............--------------2-0-, --5-7-,
..9.5...................----..  Bond,
John.....................................1.0.3.........-------------------------------101,
 Boone, Elsie ------------------
.................3.2...................--------------------.............. 
Booth, Harold...................................5.9........--------
-----------------------57,  Booth,
Mira--------------...-------------------....................--...............23,
83  Boothe, Helen-
-------------......--.............--.................----------------45, 69
 Born, Maxine....-------------------.......................------- --32,
83, 87  Boson, Nils...........................................2.3.,.
.6.3.......  Bowdish, Barbara L---------
..............-------.3.2...........................  Bowen, Jack
------------------------------.................. 7, 94, 97  Bowman, 
Albert----------.................................------------------------..
32  Boyer, Lucille A............ ----------- -------------------  32  Boys,
Clair................................-----------------------------------26,
72  Bradley,
Tom.....................................9.4..----------------------------------
 Braley, Virginia C--------- --------------......---------- ........4..5.. 
Bremer,
Eugene....---------------------------............................--43, 67 
Brennan, E...
...............................---9-7--------------------------  Brewer,
Lyle ------------------------.... ........ ..----1-9--,- --22 Bright,
Georgie
M.......------------------.......6.5......-------.................--...47, 
Brinton, Mary Frances......--.-.-.--
.-.-.--.-.--.-.-.--.-.-.--.-.-.--.-.--...47.....  Brodahl,
Herbert....---------------------------.............................--.32,
59 Brodniak,
Walter....--------------------.........9.1........................---------47,
 Bromley, Jack.........................8.5., .9.6.,. .9.8., ..9 9  Brouwer,
Mary A ------.--.-.--.-.--.-..... ........--.-.--.-.-- ----- 32 Brown,
Blanche M.................................4.8.....  Brown,
Clark....------------------------------
...............................----...47, 85  Bruce, Virginia
P................................3.2-----------------------------..........---
.  Bruseth, Liv
C....-------------------------------7.4...................................47,
 Brydges, Ruth M..- ...............................32.....  Buchanan, Sam
----------------------------------.... 19  Buizer,
Elizabeth...-------------- --------------...............................48,
89  Bullock, Ruth I----------------------------------4-7-
.......................................  Burbidge, Olive
M................................3.2.......-----------------------------31,
Burke, Patricia
Anne....................--------1-1-0----------------..........--... 
Burke, Rae C------------------------
...................4.7.................--------  Burke, Rolland
----------------------------... ------. 107  Burnet, Mabelle---------
-----.......--.-.-.-.--.-.-.--.-.-.--..4.5.............  Burnet,
Ruth...----------------------------------.................................
22,  62  Burnham, Myrtle ---.-.--.-.--.-.--.-.--.... ..-.-.-.--.-
-------------..1 9  Burnham, Nancy B.......................6.7., ..8.8.,
..1.0832,  Busch, Carolyn M........................4.7., ..8.4., .1.1.0... 
Bushell, Don------.............. ....................-.-.-.-.2-0. ,. .6.4..
 Butz, Cleon...................5.9.,. .6.3., ..6.5,4 76,7 , 69, 87  Byram,
Grace M---- -----------..-------------------.............4.7.......... 
Byrnes, Catherine...........................8.8., ..1.10..........47,   C 
Call, Patricia A...............----------------------------- 32, 72 
Callihan, Francis ..................-..-.-------------------- -
--45-.......  Campbell, Carroll G-----.............. .......3.2,. 110 
Campbell, Glenn ------------------.....---------------- ...........4..4.. 
Cannon, Neila
M.......-------.................---9.1.........--------------------49, 
Canterbury, Elizabeth Roberts ..................----43------.... 
Canterbury, Robert.....................----------------- - --------------
45  Carlson, Je-n B....................-.....4.7., ..91.,. .1-1-0  Carr,
Adabelle-------.......------------------------.........................26,
112  Carr, Alvin ...........................3.3, 63, 64, 65  Carr, Eldeen
C... -----------------------------------.. 65  Crroll, Louie --------------
- -----------------3-3--.....................--  Carver, Mrs.
Jessie-----......----------------------- ............................26, 89
 Carver, Marie S ..... ................--.-.--.-.-.--.-.--.-.-.3.3....... 
Carver, Sanford.. ----- ----------------------.......... 56, 82  Casanova,
Katherine....--.-.--.-.--.-.--.-.--.-.--.-.--.-.--.-.--.-.--.-.-......22.
Cederstrom,
Moyle--....................------------------.........------------- 21 
Chamberlain, H ...................8.2..,. .1.01.,. ..1.0.2,. .1.03 
Chappel, Marion
J-------..............------....2.6...............----.......24,  Chellis,
Martha.........------------------.........----------.........-----........
33  Chicon, Mary D...................-------------------------
.....-----....----....-.. 26  Chodykin,
J...---------------------.................--------------85..........., 97 
Christensen, Jean M.......-.......................5..2 ., ..8 8 
Christensen,
Virginia............................---------------------------33, 47
Christopher, Jean -...........-....4.-. -8-,- 57, 87, 89, 91  Curch,
Ethel..--------- ------------.-.--.-.-.--. ..... ....1.9...  Church,
Helen....----------- ---------.........3.3., .8.6................  Clark,
Buford................................---------------
---------------------- 45  Clark,
Vance---...................................---------------------------49,
6, 65  Clark, Marion ----- -------------------.....3.3.,
..8.8........................---------  Coates,
Alvin......--.--.-.--.-.--.-.--.-.--.-.--.-.--.-.--.-.--.-.--.-.-
-.--.-...... 44  Cody, Jack
...............---------------------------.-..---....7.1.......  Cole,
Julia R-----.--.-.--.-.--.-.--.-.--.-.- -.-.--.-.--.-.--.--.-.--.-.-
...........3.3..  Coleman, Henry ................
.------------------------.-..-.-..-.. 22  Collier, Christine
E.............--------------4-7-, --8-7--------.................:... 
Collings, Eileen
J.................................53...------------------------------33, 
Conlee, Derry ----------------------------------
.....................6..5..,. ....6..9..  Constant, Earl
......................-.-.--.-.--.-.....64...---------------------------- 
Cook, 
Marinus----------...............................------------------------47,
65  Cook, Virginia M..................................6-5-
-----------------------------47,  Cooper, Kathleen
.............................-----------------------------------.. 59 
Cormier, Norbert.................................4..7..,. .6.9.... 
Cornwell, John..........................................47, 82, 97, 98
Cory, June
R-------------------------------.......................................8..7...,.
..9..1....47,  Cotton, Jack C------------
---------------...............................................7..2..----21,
 Countryman L...-----------..........--------------
.............................8..4.-,- 239, 5  Courtney,
Dale...........................................-------------------------...26,
82, 91  Cowie,
Jean.........................----------................................----------------8--7------44,
 Cowles, Edna M._..................................... 26, 86, 88, 89  Cox,
Ruby C.......-----........ ...-.-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.- ---------------
..... 45  Cram,
Mildred................................-.-..-.-.-.-..-.-.-.-.-..-.-.-.-.-..-.-.
89  Crandall, Florence....... ..........-................................
26  Cratsenberg, Shirlee R ...... 6, 33, 59, 61, 72, 95, 111  Crawford, K.
Jean---------..........-----------...........-------.........33, 59 
Crosett, Verajean.............................-----------------------
--.........49, 87  Crowley, Patricia
M......-------------.......---..........---------------.......4..7....... 
Culbertson, Ruth B........ ..........---------------............. 49, 65 
Cummings, Lois B--------........--------............------......-------
.........--47  Cummins, Nora B .... ................................ .. 20 
Cure, Lillian G..........................................................
47  D  Dahl,
Norman................................-------------------------- 101, 102,
103  Dahl, Wilma
E.....................................................------------------47,
110  Daley, Frances........33, 35, 56, 57, 58, 76, 82, 87, 111  Damon, A.
Louise.......................-----------------------------
...............-----.... 47  Daniels, Jo
A............................................................-------------------4-7-------------
Daugherty,
Adah.............-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-.
- 45  Davis,
Arthur.......................................---------------.........
--------- 33  Davis, Hariette Marie-..............-
........................47, 88, 90  Davis, Russell............33, 82, 96,
97, 98, 99, 105, 107  Davy,
Neill......................................................----------------------6--1-,-
---1-0-438,  Dawson, M. E-----------
.........................................................22, 90  Day,
Dorothy A......................--------------------------
..........................3.3..........  Dean,
Lillian..........................................................49, 83 
DeBruler,
Carl............................-----------...............---------------------3-4-...............
 DeBruler, Ralph ..................- ..................... 9, 63, 64, 65 
DeVries,
William................------------------------------.........................4..7..---..
Deitsch,
Pierre......................--------------------------------......................4..7..----........
 DeJong Glenn C----------
------------------------...................................4.7....................
 Denniston, J. Frances........................- ....................45, 86 
Denton, Daniel............................................................
47  Dochertv. Wilhelmina..................................................
19  Dodd, Harold............................................101, 102, 103 
D odd, Sally M
............................................................. 47  Dodge,
Frances E..................-----------
-----------------------.................4..7....................  Dolan,
Bob.............................----------------------------------------
..........3..4.........................  Dombroski.
Richard........................34, 91, 97, 103, 106  Donovan, Patricia
------------- ------..-..-.-..-..-.- ------- 67  Dorcy,
Arthur.......................................................--------------------------
8--5----48,  Dorcy,
John.......................--------...........-------------------------........................
34  Dorcy, Laura......................---------........------------
--------------.................3.4....  Dow,
Leland...................................-----------------------..........---------------.....
63  Dudek, Eloise M.......-----------
..........--------........---------...............------ 47  Dunn, Harlan..
.---------...........--------................-------------------- 47 
Dutka, Loretta V. -----------------....-----------------..................
48  DuVal, Eva M....................................---
------------------------------ --- 34  Dwyer.
Agne.s...-..-..-..-..-..-...-..-..-..-..-..-..-.-------------- ----------
............................. 34  Dybdahl, Norma
A.......................................--------------------47, 89  E 
Easley, Marie A.................................. . 47, 110, 111  Eastman,
Robert---------............--- ---------------- 34, 91 Eastman,
William--------------....................--.....--... ... 34  Easton,
Dorothy J.........---------------------.......--
.........-----............. 47  Eaton, Reda
E..............-------------------------------------......................3..4...............
Ebert, Andrew
C................-----------------------------.........................4..7.----...........
 Eide, Dorothy M........---
-----------------------....................--------......4..7......  Elken,
Lorraine -----------------..........................--------
.........4.7..................  Elliott, A. Genevieve -
-......................-.4..7..,. ..6. 4, 65  Elliott,
Eleanor...........-.-
..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-..-.-.-. --
19  Elliott, Irene M..................-------------------------------
19..................2.3.................,  Elliott, Mary
Ann................................---------------------------
...........4..8...........  Ellis, John......... ........... .............
26, 44, 56, 82, 91  Emerick,
Gerald..................................------------------------------47,
105  Engelhart, Eleanor E ....................................... 47 
Engelhart, Ma
-------------.......................-------------....................4.7.......-----
----  Engman, Ruth
-------------------------------------.......................3.4............
 Engels, Juanita S............. .......................... 47  Enos, Lois
M------------------------..................................-----....---------
47  Erickson, Dehard ................................. 47, 85, 97, 99 
Erickson, Emma ..................... ......................... 20, 89
Erickson, Ruth .............................................. ..... 34 
Evich, M
itchell............................................................ 34  F 
Facey, Charlotte ----------.........1..2..,. .--2-6..,. ...5..9..,.
...8..7...-.  Fackler,
Bob................-..-.-..-..-..-.-..-..-..-.-..-..-
------------------------- 65  Farrar, Berna
E------------------------------------...................................4..7..
 Farrand, Ruth E..................------------.---------------
-..............---45, 90  Featherkile, Ernest--........
--.................................. 47, 63  Feldt, Audrene M------------
-..............--..4...8-.,. .. 59, 65, 108, 111  Fillinger, Afrieda
A--------------------------- ......................................4- 8 
Fisher, Mary Sue..............-..-.-..-..-.-..-..-..-.-..-..-..-.-.
-------------------- 48 Page 114

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 115

     ----------

Personal Index  F (Continued)  Fitzgerrald,
Geraldine........................................ ... 86  Flanagan,
Jay.........................-----------------------------........................3.4............
 Flotre, Sadie L...................----------
--------------------------...............4..5......................  Foley,
Bette..............................----------------------.........-- 34,
76, 90, 110  Ford, Pearle
P............................-----------------------------------..........4..5..................
Forhan,
Eileen........................................................-----------------------9--0-------87,
 Forsberg, Alice
E..................----------------------------------................4..7.....................
 Foster,
Paul...........................................................---------------------1--0--3-----------...
 Fowler, Frances
W.........................-------------------------------........4..7..............
 Fowler, Larry ..................................................... 47, 97
 Fowler, Richard..................................-------------------------
.........34, 71, 82  Fox, Dorothy
A---------------------------..............................................3..4.-------.....
 Fox,
Marie........................................----------------------------------------..3..4........................
 Francis,
Henry.................................................----------------------6-2--,-
--7304,  Frank,
Charlotte..............................-----------------------........--...48,
87, 88  Franko, Roy......................................-
-----------------8-2--,3 1,8 5, 99, 103  Franzke,
Lloyd....................................---------------------------.........---9-
1....47,  Frazier,
Evelyn..........................................................---------------------2-6-------------
 Fredericks,
Dale................--------------------------...........---------........3..4............
 Frederickson, Beverly................------ .......--------..--..--4, 76,
87, 89  Friese,
Katharine.----------------...........................-------------.................47,
64  Fry,
Eileen..........................................--------------------------------.....35,
72, 88  Frykholm,
Ruth.....................------.......................----------------------.......
35  Fuller, Anita....................................------
----------------------------35, 65  Fuller,
Margaret............-----------------.........----......-----.........35,
90, 95  Fullner,
Ray.....................................------------------------------------....4..7............
 Funk, Ruth-............................ ...... ......................---
49  Fyhn, Irene................................. ... 49, 61, 69, 89  G 
Gardiner, Elizabeth ............ ........................ 65, 88  Garvin,
Ruthelen----------------------------------................................
22 Gates, Dorothy
......................------------------------------------.......... 45 
Gault, Mary
Esther...............................----------------------.........--...
75  Gee, Vivian............................................---------
----------------............... 47  George, Lillian
-...........-.-...............-....-................. .... 22  Geri,
Louis...................................----------------------------------------
35  Germain, Walter-------------------
..............................6..335, , 74, 82, 91  Gerry, Ross
.............................................. 35, 68, 85 Gershak,
Joe................-..-.-..-..-..-.-..-..-..-.-..-..-
------------------------- 48  Gilbert, Betty------------------------
...................................----49, 65, 91  Gilday, James
.............................. .......... 64, 65  Gildersleeve,
Geraldine---------------------.............................--------......
35  Gilliman, Elizabeth-------------...............-----------
..........47, 87, 91  Glenn, Paul.................................-------67
68, 69, 85, 104  Glenn, Thomas--------------
...........--------------..-------.............. 49  Goheen,
James.....-------------------------------....---.... 49  Goninan,
William-----------------------.................................-------64,
65  Gooch, John...............----------------------------------
----.........................4.9..........  Gooding,
Alice------------------------........................------------..........
61 Goodrich, James - 47, 55, 61, 68, 69, 72, 84, 91  Gorman,
Margaret---....----------------------- ............................35, 88,
90  Gragg,
Georgia.....-------------................-----------................... 22,
95 Graham,
Patricia---------------............-------------------...................
35  Greeley, Ruth Marie---------------------------
----.................................. 35  Griffin, Clyde
----------------------.................-..-.-..-..-.-..-..-.-..- ------ 45 
Griffith,  Jacqueline-----------.......--------.............----.......48,
87, 95  Griffith, Ruth----------------------------
.......................................5..2..,. ....4171,0  Grim,
Paul------------------ -................----2-1-------------
.............................----......  Gronholdt, Marie
...................-------------------------------..............3..5.----
...............  Groth,
Alva--------------------------------..........................--------.............4..8...........
 Grubb, Delores  ....................... ......................... 47, 110 
Gunderson, Enith ................ 33.5..,. ...6..5...,. ...8. 6, 89  H 
Haggard, Dr. W.
W-----------------------................................5..4...,. .199,5 
Haines, Charles------------
....................................--------------------.....4..7...............--
 Hall, Adrianne------------...........-----------------
.......................................... 35  Hall, James
"Ed-------.................................--------------------........7, ,
99 Hall, James W......... 46, 47, 75, 77, 82, 96, 97, 98, 99  Hall,
Walter................................................------
------------------8--2-,- 351, 06  Hamilton, Jane E-...............47, 65,
76, 82, 83, 91, 110  Hammingh, Theres
...........--------------------------------.................4..7...................
 Hammond, Donna L--------------------------
.....................................4..7.............-----  Hampton,
Lesley V-----------------..........................6..3.4, 8,6 5,  81, 83 
Hanbloom, Charlotte --------------................-..-.-..-..-..-.-.
-------- 45  Handy, Lyman-------------------
.........................--------------.........4..8..,. . 89  Hansen,
Andrew M----............---------....................------------
.......--4-7........  Hansen, Mernie
M-----------------------......................................---------- 65
 Hansen,
Victor..................-------------------------------............................74,
91  Hansey, Glenn......-.-.-.-.-.-.-..-.-.-.-.-.-.-
.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-..-.-.-.-.- --------- 48  Hansvold, Joyce
I---------------------------------.................................4..8....
Hardy, Howard
-----------------------------------............1.0..4................... 
Harlow, Elsie ................................... 27, 76, 89, 91, 110 
Harman, Ward----------------------------
....................................47, 64, 65  Harmeling, Phyllis
L------------------------------ .............................3..6........ 
Harmon, Edwarda
...................----------------------------------............. 48
Harrington, William--------------------.................................47,
73, 96, 98  Harris, Coral L................------------- -----------36, 82,
84, 87  Harris,
Dave-----------------------....................................47, 101,
102, 103  Harrison, Margaret L ............................................
47  Hart,
Lila................................---------------------------36, 84, 108,
111  Hart,
Robert...............................------------------------------ 47, 64,
65  Hartung, Bernice E.........-----
------------------....................................6..5----48,  Harvey,
Ken---------........................-----------------------------
...............2..7............  Haslam, Christine
A.....------------.................------.........-------------3.6...........
Hastie, Patricia
M-------------------.....--------------............................3..6.....--
 Hatch, William...............---------
----------......................-----47, 61, 69, 85  Hatfield,
Lawson.............-------------------------
................................ 47  Hatfield,
Shirley....------.............................----------------------------.....6..5............
 Haug, Mabel
N..........-------------------------------..................................65,
86  Haugen, Robert................-----
-------------------------------......................5..9.......... 
Hauser, Margaret E...........-.-..-.-.-.-.-.-.-..-.-.-.-.-.-..-.-.-.-.-
.-.-..-.-.-.-.... 27, 111  Haven, Adelaide
B.-----------------------.....................................................
47  Hawke,
Virginia................................................--------------------------22,
111  Hawley, Bruce------------
..................................-------------------------............ 48 
Hays, Naomi F.........................36, 47, 88, 90, 91, 112  Hays,
Robin.............................--------------------------------------...........4..8......................
 Hazelton,
Marian........................-----------------------------------............4..5....................
 Healy, Murray ............................................. 36, 55, 95 
Heaton, Lois
J.........................................-------------------7-5--,-  488,
7, 91  Heimdahl, Lois
H...................-----------------------------.....................8..9........36,
 Heinemann,
Eva.........................................................-------------------6-5-------------
 Helland, Margaret...........---------------
-------.......................--------........ 47  Helm,
Benton.....................--------------------------...............----------
.....3..6...........  Henry Robert
H............----------------------------------......................4..7...............
 Hensell, Helen
B................-------------------------------.......................3.6.............
 Herrin, Chester................-------------
----------------.................................--43, 97  Hicks, Dr.
Arthur C.................................23, 62, 65, 82 Higginbottom,
Les.................---------------------------------................2..7...................
 Hilby, Lois
A............................------------------------............47, 61,
84, 91  Hill, Ruth.......................-------------------- ........48,
51, 54, 84, 87, 95  Hilton, Margaret
A....-----------.........---------------.........................48, 110
Hilton, Margaret
E--.........----------...........................-----------------4-8-...........
 Hjartson, Garder-----------
...............----------...................48, 63, 65, 85  Hjartarson,
Hjortur..............------------------.......................----- 48, 65,
85  Hoag, Albert
---------------------......................--....................................
45  Hoag,
Gilbert...............................-------------------------------------
45  Hoard, James.................................48 85, 105   Hogg, Betty M
-------------------------------------........................8..7.............
 Hogg, Jean M........-------------
.............------------.....................-------8--7---............ 
Holberg, Esther J---------..............................---------8- 297, ,
110, 112  Holbrook, Frank..........-------------.......------........48,
60, 63, 74, 85  Holcomb,
Leroy......................---------------------------................ 48,
61, 64  Hollingsworth, James......-----------------------
...........................---96, 98  Holston Irene
L...----------------------..----------..................... 36 
Holtzheimer,
Elaine----------------------------..................................36, 76 
Hoppe, Victor------------------------------
..................................22, 67, 69  Hopper,
Elizabeth.................. 22, 57, 88  Horn,
Gail................................------------------------------44, 91,
111  Hotchkin, Laincha.................................-------
------------------36, 87, 88  Hovde,
Annis---------...........-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-..-.-.-
-------- 106  Howard,
Wendell.................................------------------------------48,
85  Howatt, Lois ------------------- ....................................
48  Hoyem,
Carol......-.-.-.-.-.-..-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-..-.-.-.-.-.-
-------- 110 Hubert, Dorothy J........-------------............62, 76, 84,
111, 112  Hubler, Ruth E------------------------------------
..................................3..6...  Hudson, John
..................................--------------------------4-5----------
Hudson, Vivian
H..........-------------...........................------------27, 88, 91 
Hughes, Jack......................-------
-------------------....----------....................... 48  Hughes, Lyn
................................-------------------------------------- ..
19  Hunt, Dorothy
V-----------------...................-----------------...............3. 6 
Hunt. Thomas F----------------------
------------..................................2..2...  Hunter. George
------------------------------------ ......................4..8.......... 
Huot, Phyllis
L.........-------------------.................-------......---4....8, 64,
65  Hurd, Veutonne
A--------..........------------........--------...............48, 65 
Hurst, Hilda H.............------------------------------
-------.......................3..6  Husfloen,
Kenneth................................--------------------------------....3.6..........
 I Im pero, Lucile-..................-...............
......................- 45  Irvin, Al------------------------
............................................-------............4.-5----------
 Issler, Mary E.....................---------------4-3----
.........-----...........--------  Iyall,
Mary.......................-------.................-------------------------------...
36  Jaadan, Ruth N -.................--..................---..------36, 91 
Jackson, Russell---------.............---------------------
.................................36, 89  Jacobson, Margaret
R---------..........---------------------
...................1..1...0...............  James,
Richard...........................................-----------------------------........
36  Jarvis, Catherine
R...........................................------------------------4-8------
 Jeffers, Charlette J-........37,  41, 57, 65, 84, 90, 91, 95  Jeffers,
Geneva C .................................. 37, 87, 89, 91  Jellesma,
Lucille C....------------------........................-------------.. 48 
Jenkins, Margaret E..---------------------------
...................................7..6.48,  Jenkins,
Verna................................... 37  Jennings,
William.............---
------------------------................-------.......4..8......  Jensen,
Aagot I.......-----------------......------- .........................--48,
61, 88  Jensen, Robert ----------------------------------.... 48  Jensen,
Rolf.... ............................. 4, 37, 77  Jensen, Victor
.................-----------..-.-..-.-..-.-..-.-..-.-..-.-..-.-..-.-..-.-..-.-..-.-.
-  48  Jewell, Jean
B---....................-----------------------------..48, 89  Johansen, F.
Mon:t..........................------ ---------------- --------- 37 
Joh:nson,
Aurora.........-------------------.....----.........................----------
45  Johnson, Carmella
V...-------------------------...............................1...1..048, 
Johnson, Doris M....................---------------
-----------..........------....4..8.........  Johnson, Dorothy
E..--------------------------------.............................4..8........
  Johnson, Eileen
A....-----------------------..............................8..377, , 110 
Page 115

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 116

     ----------

Personal Index  J (Continued)  Johnson, Elnora
A.................................................. 48  Johnson,
Florence........................................ ....... 18, 84  Johnson,
Glen........................................................ 48, 85 
Johnson, E. Glenys..................................................37, 91 
Johnson, Kenneth .................................................... 45,
65  Johnson, Louise M.....................................................
48 Johnson,
Richard.......................................................... 45 
Jones, Betty E.......................................................48, 76
 Jones, Howard..............................45, 55, 82, 96, 97, 99 Jones,
Margaret E.............................................108, 110  Jones,
Marian A...........................12, 13, 37,  65, 76, 87  Jones,
Marjorie.................................................... 27, 110 
Jones, Monty..............................................................
48  Jorgenson, Helen C...............................................48, 65
 Julius, Margaret F..................................................... 37
Junkin, James........................................... 46, 49, 57, 85 
Junkin, William................................................48, 76, 85 
Just, Evangeline..........................................................
45  K  Kale,
Glenn............................................................64, 65 
Kangley, Lucy..............................................................
23  Karsh, Max................................----------------------------
-----------........4..8........................  Kauffman, Virginia
M.............................................48, 65  Kaufman, Lela
C.......37, 39, 57, 62, 82, 84, 88, 89, 90  Kemp,
James..........................................................27, 28 
Kibbe, Lynus A.......................................................21, 95
 Kilander,
Veda........................................................-----------------------8-8--------48,
 Kilbourne, Charles......................................................
62  King,
Donald................................................................ 48 
Kingsley, Hope............................................................
45 KKiinnsseeyy, , EvaHloypne n C- ...-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-..-.-.-.-.-
.-.-..-.-.-.-.-.-.-..-.-.-.-.-.-.-..-.-.-.-.-.-.-..-.-.-.-.-.-.-..-.....
453 37  Kinsman, Priscilla.........................----------------
------------------...........2..2..................  Kinzer,
Donald.........................------------------------------------
............8..9....................  Klann,
Corinne........................................................48, 65 
Klein,
Lawrence..........................-----------------------------------...........8..6...................
 Kludt, Myrtle
L....................-----------------------------------...............4..8......................
 Klumb, Helen
.............................................................. 29  Kluth,
Caroline........................................................------
-----------------9--1-------48,  Knibbs,
Helen........................................................-----------------------8--8------48,
 Koch,
Lucile..........................................................-..... 49 
Konnerup, Yvonne
M...............................................-------------------8--3----37,
 Kordich, Francis M..................................................... 37
 Kottke, Charlotte .................................................... 48,
88 Kotula, Wayne.......-:...............................................48,
64  Krause, M. Marie--------.............------------------
----.................................37, 87  Krause, Ruth
N.................................................--------------------6-5--,-
-- 9--149,  Krieg,
Philip.......................................................... 48, 89 
Kuder, Merle S.....................................5, 18, 62, 73, 78  Kuhn,
Carolyn S------------------------ ................................6...7..,.
.-6387,, 69  Kuhn,
Clarence............................................................ 38
Kuljis, Mitchell......................................................48,
85  Kuljis,
Winifred.......................................................... 27 
Kurtz, Katherine E..................................................... 43 
Kvam,
Ernest....................................-----------------------------------
....1..0..4...............  Kvam,
Harold.............................................................. 48  L 
Lagerlund,
Enid.....................-----------------------------------...............4.8....................
 Lahti ,Arnold....-------------------
...............................--------48, 64, 103  Landon,
Ed....-----------------------..................................-----....38,
95, 105  Landrum, Rhoda
F.................................................--------------------2-9-------27,
 Lapinski, Stanley..............................---------------------38,
55, 82, 85  Lappenbusch, Charles..............................21, 82, 98,
103  Larson, Gerald..................................................48,
65, 97  Laux, Margaret
M....................................................... 27  LeCompte, Ivan
............................................................ 48   Lee,
Betty E.............................................................. 48 
Leitner, Louise A.................................................48, 110 
Leman, Katherine G ................................................... 48
Lennart, Lucille
E.................------------------------------....................4..9................
 Leach,
Robert............................-------------------------------------...........4..8.....................
 Levin,
Alfred............................-------------------------------------...........4..8.....................
 Lewis, Margaret E.................................................49, 110 
Liebbrand, Robert--......................................................
103   Likely, Harold-...................---
..................................... 48  Lince,
Douglas......................----------- .........----38, 54, 58, 62, 67 
Lindgren, Genevieve A.............................48, 87, 88, 91  Lindsay,
William ---- ------------------------...... 48  Lindstrom, Helen
M.................................. .... 31, 38  Lindstrom, Richard
............................... .. 64  Linrud,
Arthur............................................................ 29 
Little, Helen V...........................................................
65  Lobe, Carolyn --------------------------------...... 44, 48 Lomsdale,
Don.....----...............................---------------4--5-3, 8,1 02,
105  London, Burlon ------------------------ ------........ 48, 91  Loney,
Leif-....--................................ 48  Long, Mrs. Dell
F...................................................27, 67  Longley,
Gertrude........................................................ 22 Loomis,
Donna E......................................................... 48 
Lovegren, May G ----------------------------------....  23  Lowrey, Lois
M........................................................... 48  Lucid,
Betty A.......................................................30, 38 
Lueker, Harold ............................................................
48  Lyman, R.
C.....-----..............--------------------------------...................8..3..................
 Lyon, Lauren ..........................................................
48, 85  M  MacGregor,
Betty........................................................ 48  Machemer,
Pat............---------------------------------
.....................4...8..,. ...6..1.......  MacLeod, Kenneth...----
............................. 38  Magallon, Anna-...
................................. 27, 83, 91  Manuel, Marilyn
................................---------------------4-9--.- ---6-5--
March, Leoleon----........................................................
38, 90  Matzke, Mary-----------------------
..........................................................49, 61  Maus,
Myra--..................... .. ----------------................... 38 
Mayhew, Melba................................55, 59, 70, 91, 111  McAbee,
Robert ............................................... 91, 110  McAulay,
Kenneth----------------............................31, 38, 69, 105, 107 
McCabe, James ............................................. 38, 69, 85 
McCaddon, Frances I---------....------- -----..........................49,
76, 110  McClellan.
Maurice-----------------------------.................................45 77
McClurg,
Edward..------------------------------..............................82, 86 
McClurg, Nolan-- ----------------------------- ---.... 86 
MMccCDuolulogullg, h, Robert
-------------------------------.....................4.8............
McDoug-ll, MMaarryy-
---.-.-.--.-.-.-.-.--.-.-.-.-.--.-.3.8.......................... .. 38 
McGee, Loye --------------...---------------- .................... 18, 57,
94  McGregor, Jean
W............-----------------------------.........................8..6.........-38,
 McGuire, Glenn ....................................... 43, 60, 63, 65 
McHenry Frederick ...---- ------------------------.... 38, 91  McInnis,
Louise A............--------------.................... ...... 48  McKinney,
Lillian....................................-------------------------38, 59,
90  McKinnon, Margaret . ....................... ...... .. 19  McLeod,
Stewart ................................ 44, 55, 57, 60, 74  McMillen,
Vincent..................48, 63, 64, 65, 67, 69, 85  McNamee, Phyllis
..............---- ......................... 38, 67, 87  McNutt, Norma
M....................................................... 49  Mead, Patricia
...................................... 49, 75, 91, 110 Med, May
................................................................. . 22 
Meeker, Helen ....................................................... 44.9
86  Meenk, Edith...................................-------38, 55, 82, 110,
111  Mehlum, Clara
N......................................................... 38  Melendy,
Ruth.............................................................. 23 
Mercer, Gerald...........-...................................... 49,  85 
Merriman,
Pearl....----...............................-------------------------------
23  Meyer, Lavina
J........................................................... 72  Miles,
Gladys V.....--.................................--------------------- 38,
59  Miller, Arnold...---- ............................... 27  Miller,
Art.................................................................. 61 
Miller, Bettie J...........................................................
27  Miller, Donna F........--------------------------------
........................3...8..,. ...8..3....  Miller, Dorlese
............................................... 48, 52, 71  Miller, Dr.
Irving E..................................................... 22  Miller,
James ...................................... 45, 96, 97, 98, 99  Miner,
Wayne ............................................................. 61 
Mitchell, Alick........................................46, 48, 82, 107 
Mock, Jolliette M.... ....................................... 49 Modin,
Elsie........................................ ............ 86  Molby,
Richard............................................................ 49 
Molenkamp, Alice........................................................ 27
 Mollan, Victor.........---- ........................... 45, 85, 104
Monson, Bernice E.................................47, 52, 61, 84  Monteith,
Margaret .................................................... 39  Montes,
Felix...................................................48, 85 Montgomery,
Florence................................................ 49  Moore, Howard
.......- ................................................... 39  Moore,
Jack................................................................ 48
Morgan, Jean E.............................33, 39, 53, 84, 87, 95  Morgan,
Ruth B.--- .................................... 39, 49  Morrison, Nelvia
M..................................................... 49  Morton, Gordon
................................................ 45, 67, 69  Morton, Miriam
............................................................ 28  Moser,
Betty................................... ---- 4, 39, 87, 89  Moses,
Eddie................................................................ 39 
Moses, Joe ............................. 39, 55, 56, 101, 102, 103  Moxley,
Virginia--- ...................................................... 39 
Mueller, Thyra............................................................
49  Mullin,
Robert............................................................ 49 
Munizza, Lawrence.................................................. 103 
Munkres, Alfred................28, 56, 75, 82, 96, 97, 98, 99  Murray,
Norman.................................................... 49, 105  N 
Needham, Jo L.....................................................49, 110 
Neevel, Frances A-------......................... .......... 52, 90, 111 
Neil,
Ralph.................................................................. 62 
Nelson, Boyd............................................................
106  Nelson, John.................................................... 49, 
74, 91  Nelson, May
M............................................................. 49  Newell,
Beverly......................................................49, 65 
Newell, Kathryn.........-..37, 39, 56, 67, 73, 82, 89, 110  Newquist,
Leonard ............................................ 24, 28, 72  Newquist,
Priscilla...................................................... 29 
Nichols, Ruth..............................................................
39  Nickel,
Marion............................................................ 39 
Nicol, Synva K.............................................................
23  Nielson,
Kathryn..........................................................  44 
Nilsen, Beatrice ............................ 39, 65, 87, 88, 89, 91  Page
116

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 117

     ----------

Personal Index  N (Continued)  Nims,
Buell............................................................47, 85 
Nix.
Nancy............................................................------------------------1-0--8-------49,
 Nordquist, Anne......................................................45,
87  Nordvedt,
Art............................................................ 105 
N'urmi, Ralph....................................................49, 82, 97
 O0  Odom,
Evelyn............................................................ 23 
Olsen, Gerry............................................49, 84, 91, 111 
Olsen, June M.........................................................87,
91  Olson,
Dorotny........................................................... 49 
Olson, Katerine.....-----------------------
.............................................. 49  Olson, Oscarine
............................................................ 49 O'Meara,
Patricia .................................................. 48, 87  Olson,
Ralph .............. ......................... ..... --------- 49  Olson, W
inton ...................................................... 49, 103 
O'Neil, William
.................................--------------------------- 46, 64, 65 
Oril, Katherine ...........................----- .... 48  Orr, Dean
......................................... ................... ... 45 
Orton,
Alene................................................................ 49 
Ussewarde, Charlotte.................................................. 49 
Ossinger, Mrs. Mary.................................................... 23 
Owings, Evelyn............................................................
47  P  Page, Joyce
L............................................................. 28  Paglia,
Ray............................................................82, 97 
Parberry, Lorraine...................................................... 39
 Parisi, James............................................28, 85, 87, 91 
Parrish,
Iola................................................................ 49 
Park,
Ruth.................................................................. 49 
Partlow, Gerald..........................................................
49  Patmore, Charlene..............................39, 82, 83, 88,  91 
Pearson, Armond........................................................ 106
 Pearson,
Mary.............................................................. 49 
Perkins, Ruth..........................................................39,
89  Peters,
Bernice............................................................ 49 
Peters, Marian..................................................---
------------------6--3--,- -4695,  Peterson,
Almer......................................................28, 91 
Peterson,
Cecil......................................................---------------4-9--,-
--1--0--5-----  Peterson,
Evelyn....................................................49, 87  Peterson,
Marion.................................. 28  Peterson,  Myrtle.
---------------------------...... 45  Pettyjohn,
Lyle............................................101, 102, 103  Phelps, Myra
............................................................. 28  Pl.elps,
Polly......................................39, 43, 65, 77, 90  Philippi, H.
C ............................................................. 23 
Phillips, Eric..........................................................49,
61  Pickering, Grace................................................. 49,
110  Pierron,
Marion............................................................ 40 
Pinneo, Carol..............................................................
49  Platt,
Ruth.................................................................. 20 
Plympton, Hazel..........................................................
22  Pontius, Leda..............................................49, 110, 111
 Poplack, Jeanette........................................................
65  Porter, Ed
................................................................... 45 
Powers, Madelon..........................................................
23  Prather,
Vonne............................................................ 45 
Pratt,
Jean.................................................................. 49 
Pratt, Parker..............................................................
65  Prince, C. Edward ..................................................
48, 64  Purdy, Norma
.............................................................. 40 Purnell,
Betty ................................................ 40, 83, 89  Q 
Quinn, Leonard.............................. ..................... 40  R 
Rabb, Margaret.................... ....... .... 40, 68, 69, 88  Ramstead,
Blair ................................................ 45, 64, 65  Rank,
Dorothea ............................................................ 31 
Rantanen, Gertrude ......................................................
49  Reasoner, Henry ................................................ 49,
55, 67  Reid, Lois.................................... 40, 82, 84, 87, 88,
91 Reilly, Eileen............................................31, 49, 87, 91
 Rensing, Emily......-....- ..-... .......................................
40  Reynolds, Glenn .................. ...................................
49  Rice, Evyrell---
--------------------------................................. --------- 45 
Rice, Harold .. ...... ........................ ... . 49  Rice, Rowena
............................................................. 45  Rich,
Mary E............................................................. 23 
Richards, Jeanne........................................................ 28
 Richardson, Charlotte............................................23, 57 
Ridder, W illiam................40, 54, 60, 61,  63, 65, 76, 89  Ridgway,
Patricia................................................ 40, 86 
Rittenberg, W inifred.................................................. 29 
Rivord, Alfred..................................................49, 85, 91
Rizzi, Madeline......................................................64, 86
 Roberts, Clarence..................................-----
------------------- 49  Robson,
Brian...............:........................................71, 85 
Rohlfing, Irene................................................ 49, 76, 91 
Ross, Clayton....................................................49, 67, 69
 Rostad, Lloyd.................................................. 48, 64, 69
 Routledge, Mary Ann.................................................. 49 
Ruckmick,
Herbert..................................................-------------
---------6-5-----20,  Rumsey,
Robert.......................................................... 40 
Runden, Cora..............................................................
40  Rundle,
Dorothy.......................................................... 23 
Rundquist, Ellen ................................................... 49, 88
 Rusher, Betty........................................ .... 49, 64, 83 
Rusing, Virginia ............................................
.............. 49  Russell,
George............................................................ 45 
Rutledge, Eileen ......................................... ... 49, 76, 91 
S  Sandstrom, Jane ................................................ 49, 89,
91  Sansregret, Leo ..................................................
......... 48  Sarles, Robert
.................................................. 45, 82, 97  Sawina,
Stanley----------------------------------
-................................. 49  Saxon,
Durward----------------------------------.................................
70  Saxon,
Winston-----------------------------------.................................
44  Schaus, Dorothy E.......................40, 44, 82,  86, 89, 90 
Selene, Bob
.................................................................. 47  Scl
eldt, Lauretta M..................................................... 76 
Schilke, Margarethe S................................................. 49
Schulz, Betty C...........................................................
49  Schuster,
Margaret...................................................... 83 
Schwartz, Ethel..........................................................
44  Schweingruber, Gertrude ................................ 40, 83,  90 
Schweingruber, W illiam............................30, 40, 41, 85  Scott,
Jean.................................................................. 49 
Shannon, Elsie V.........................................................
45  Shannon, Shirley T.........30, 40, 56, 63, 65, 83, 84, 111 Shaver,
Frank.............................................................. 21 
Shelton, Frank....................................................104, 106 
Shepard, Evelyn V ----------------.......................- ...............
40  Sherk, Phoebe E.............................................40, 87, 90 
Shiers, Frank....................................................49, 57, 89
 Shull, Loretta................................. ...................... 
40, 45  Shuman, Ruth L.....................................40, 45, 87, 90 
Siegrist, Barbara..............................................49, 89, 91 
Sievi,
Jack.................................................................. 48 
Simmonds, Beatrice ........-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-
.-..-.-.-..-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.-..-.-.. 49  Simonds,
Ralph......................................................49, 61 
Simonson,  Edward................................................ 40, 45 
Simonson, Justin ............................................ 49, 75, 91 
Simukka, Elsie........................................................40,
45  Siskar,
Rose................................................................ 49 
Skidmore, Carol V....................................................... 69
 Small, Frances E...................................................83, 88
Smith, Clifford..........................................................
104  Smith, Dorothy
M....................................................... 44  Smith,
Francelia B...................................41, 72, 87, 90 Smith,
Glen..................................41, 82, 101, 102, 103  Smith, Edwin W
......................................................... 22  Smith,
Lois............................................................49, 88
Smith,
Margaret..................................---------------------------49,
87, 91  Smith,
Melville............................................................ 49 
Smith, Mickey............--------------- ...........................--
...... 49  Smith,
P..................................................................... 87 
Smith, Vernon..............................................................
31  Snider,
Howard............................................................ 49 
Snider, Vernon............................................................
48  Snow,
Miriam.............................................................. 22 
Solibakke, Betty..........................................................
62  Sooter,
Katie................................................................ 41 
Sorenson, Robert .................................................... 45,
65  Soukup, Clarence
........................................................ 62  Spencer,
Laura............................................................ 41 
Stangle, Norma......................................................49, 61 
Steberg, Borgny..........................................................
41  Stenson,
Art..........................................................49, 103 
Stephens, Mary....................................................28, 111 
Stevenson, Doris.............................. ................. 48, 69 
Stevenson, Harold.................................41.......................
 Stewart, Albert ................................................ 49, 64,
89  Stinnette,
Scott-....................................................... 105 Stirling,
Telene............................................................ 49 
Stoddard, Louise .................................................... 41,
83  Strange,
Edith.......................................................... 65
Strickfaden, Bill ........................................................
75  Stroebel, Josephine ............................................ 41,
83, 89  Strom, Ruth--------------------------------------
.................................... 49  Stuart, Gael
................................................................ 41 
Sullivan, Mark  ................................... 41, 91  Sundback,
Elaine----.....---------........... -4.9............  Sundquist, Leona
.............---............................... 19, 23  Sutherland, W alter
.................................................... 61 Svorinich,
Sylvia........................................................ 49 
Swalling, Ragnhild................................................49. 110 
T  Targus, Stanley.................................61, 82, 94, 97, 98 
Tasoni,
Frances..................................4.1......................... 
Tauscher, Helen......................................................47, 64
 Taylor,
Adell.............................................................. 89 
Taylor, James B......................................................... 41
 Taylor, James H.........................................................
91  Tedford,
Jean.............................................................. 49  Page
117

     -----------

     Klipsun, 1940 - Page 118

     ----------

Personal Index  T (Continued)  Tegenfeldt,
Marie.................................. .... 76, 91  Telenga,
Maxine....----
----------------..................................---------41, 89  Templin,
Georgina...................................................... 44  Thal,
Harold....------------..................................------------49, 61,
85  Thiel, Barbara.....................----------
----------------...................------.....8..3.......49,  Thiel,
Virginia................................--------------------------------
....41, 91  Thomassen ,Joln ....................... 48, 57, 69, 82, 89, 107
 Thompson, Phyllis................................ .... 49, 87  Tibbles,
Ross................................... .... 41, 72, 85  Tiffany,
Bill........................................59, 63, 65, 54, 72  Tisdale,
Robert ....................... 42, 74, 96, 97, 98, 104  Tom s, W arn
...................... .................................. .45, 69  Tonn,
Julia.................................------------
---------------------------- 42  Trent, Wilma--------- ---------
-----------------...... 22  Trickey, Helen ----------------------------
-------.... 42  Tripp, Betty ------------------------------....... 42 
Trotter, W oodrow........................................................
28  Tudor, Rebecca........................................................-
----------------------8--9------42,  Turner,
Anabel..........................................................---------------------4-5--------
-----  Turner,
Lincoln............................------------------------------------..........4..2....................
 Turner,
Virginia.......................................................----------------------4-9-----------
 Turner, Wilma---------------------------
----.............................................4..2.............  Twedt,
Mildred....................................................----------
-------8--4--, ---1-1--0---  U  U llin,
Anne.................................................................. 22 
Upshall, C.
C......................-------------------------------------.............2..2.......................
 Underwood, Mrs. Marion.................................42, 90, 91  V 
Vallentgoed, Elizabeth .......................................... 42, 108 
Van Aver, Albert....................................................22, 62 
Vanderwerff,
Anna...................................................-------------------4--9-----------..
 Van Pelt, Ruth ..................--------------
----------------------..............2..3....................  Vaughn, John
............................................ 101, 102, 103 Vidmore,
Dorothy...................-.........-....................... 49  Vilwock,
Jean..........................................................-----------------------8--3--------42,
 Volk,
Barbara................................--------------------------...............-49,
76, 87  von Scheele, Charlotte ..........................................
42, 89  von Scheele, Eunice
.................................................. 42  W Wagness,
Kenneth................................. 42  Wahrgren,
Elsie-----------------------...................................----
--....42, 88  Walker, Beverly.................................49, 68, 69,
83  Wall, Betty-------------------------------------
................................... 49  Wallace,
Delores-................................. 49  W alsh,
Barbara............................................................ 49 
Walton, DeLayne ................................ 49, 59, 61,  65, 72  W
ardrum , Elaine........................................................ 48 
W arner, Lois-
............................................................... 49  Wa
terbury, Joyce................................4.9....................... 
Watkins, Thomas-----................................................... 49 
Waylett,
Wilson..........................................................-------------------4-5--------------
 Weber, Vaughn....14, 28, 85, 96, 97, 98, 99, 104, 107  Weber,
Wayne....................................6, 26, 29, 82, 107  Weddle,
Allene-....................................................... 48, 49 
Weddle, Cecil...........................--------------
----------------------............4..9.....................  Weedman,
Harold.....................----------------------------------
..............4..9..................  Weeks,
Donald-.................................................42, 67, 69  Weeks,
Naomi--
----------------------------------................................... 43 
Wehmeyer, Avon-----------------------------------
...................................4. 9  Weigle,
William................................-----------------------------------
49  Weihe, Fred
--------------------------------------.....................4.2..............
 Weihe, Robert --................................. 44 Wellington,
Joey--------------------------...................................- ----- 48
 Wellman, Leonard---------------------------
-------................................. 48  Wendling,
Elsie------------------------------------...................................
23 Westmoreland, Barnard ........................ 48, 101, 102, 103 
Westerman, Verna ................................... 48  Weythman.
Ruth-----------------------------------....................................
23  Whalen,
Ellen.........................................................-----------------------4--5-----------
 W heeler, M artha .................................................. 29,
64  W heeler, W
inferd........................................................ 43
Whetstone, Aileen........................41, 42, 76, 83, 87, 91  White,
Anita Ann....................................--------
-------------------------- 49  White,
Henry.-.-.-..-.-.-.-.-..-.-.-.-.-..-.-.-.-.-..-.-.-.-.-..-.-. ....----- 42,
82, 97  W I:itten,
Fleda........................................................ 42, 88 
Wicker, Sara ........................................ 42 59, 67, 69, 87 
Wiley, Violet....................................- 42  Wilkinson, Arthur
----------------------------...... 43 Wilkinson.
Walt-...................-.......-....................97, 107  Willand,
Hazel..................................------------
------------------------ 43  Willey,
Donald-------------------------------..................................45,
48  Williams, Mary Louise ................................................
23  Williams, Bettylou..............29, 68, 69, 88, 89, 90, 110 Williams,
Day................................................49, 70, 104  Willis,
Jack.................................................................---------------------6--5----------------
 Willison, Eleanor........................................................
43  Wilson, Geraldine.......................---
.............................. 49  Wilson, Mabel
Zoe.....................................................------------------2-1-------------
  Wiltse,
Bessie..................................................-------------------------------5-----.....
 Wiltse, Jean --------------- ---------------....... 65  Windsheimer,
William.............................................. 106  Winkel,
Clara...........................-------------------------------------............4.8......................
 Winters, Charles..........................................................
47  Wolfe,
Bill.....................................6.5........................... 
Wollan, Katherine........................................-----------
--------------.-.-..- --.4..  Wood,
Frances............................................48, 63, 83, 88  Woodard,
Charles........................................................ 48 
Woodbridge, Isabelle..................------------------------------
...............4..3...............  Woodring,
Paul........................................
...............----------2----------------------- Worthen,
Jerry............................................................ 48 
Wright, Wilma............................................................
47  Y  York, Pauline................................. ................. 65 
Zaremba,
Elena..........................................................--------------------4--3-----------
 Zylstra,
Marian.....................................--------------------------------.............48,
65  Expression of  Appreciation to: MR. ALBERT P. SALISBURY Of the Western 
Engraving Company of Seattle, Wash-ington.  MR. CHARLES BEARD and MR.
WILLIAM  STANLEY Of the Union Printing Company,  Bellingham, Washington. 
MR. J. W. SANDISON, WILLIAM TIFFANY,  and BRUNO STUDIOS, responsibility for
photography.  MR. PAUL A. SCHENK of Becktold Com-pany,  St. Louis,
Missouri.  MRS. RUTH BURNET for her guidance as  Sadviser.  THE 1940
KLIPSUN STAFF for their co-operation  and willingness to work in the 
production of this annual.  DOUGLAS LINCE . Editor  FRANCES DALEY . Manager
 ,l llllll.l.l.l.l.l....... lll.1111111..1.1..1.1 11111.1.1..1..1. 1
........... IIIIIII  Page 118

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