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1942

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     Klipsun, 1942


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     Klipsun, 1942 - Cover

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Klipsun Nineteen Hundred Forty Two

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page [2] of cover


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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page [i]


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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page [ii]


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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page [iii]

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1942 Klipsun

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Hello Walk  We say hello to you as it is  said on Hello Walk .. a friendly 
hello. We greet you and wel- come  you into the pages of the  1942 Klipsun.
The journey won't  be long . .. just a glimpse into  'Life on the Campus." 
PUBLISHED BY ASSOCIATED STUDENTS  WESTERN WASHINGTON COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page [v]

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JANE HAMILTON, Editor  JULIA KLANN, Business Manager

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FOREWORD  I am to tell you about this  book of memories of the year  1942,
of dreams of the future,  of fourteen headaches and six  tears and fifty
grins . . . of re-quisitions  and rubber cement  and copy.  I am to tell
you about this  book, what it means, how we  feel about it, how we hope you
 feel about it ... And here it  is, a book about you, for you  ... your
book . .. you peo-ple  who make up "Life on the  Campus." The sun glints on
the gold  ball at the top of the flag pole.  Mount Baker glistens in the 
distance like a heaping dish  of ice cream. The thin blue  waters of the
bay stretch out,  out. The green trees sway and bow, sway and bow. These 
rose brick buildings seem  close ... safe.  And yet above the whisper  of
the wind, the soft kiss of the  rain, and the brightness of the  sun, come
the voices of peo-ple,  and their shadows move  swiftly over the ground.  I
don't think I have to tell  you about the 1942 Klipsun.  You already know. 
J. H.

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DEDICATION  Smiling, genial Dr. Cederstrom is well known to the students 
of WWC. Possessing a keen  interest in the daily problems of  living, as
well as abundant energy, he has devedoped many  interests and abilities
outside his profession.  Dr. Cederstrom carries into his classroom the same
vigor  that he displays in his other activities. A profound and thorough 
understanding of his material, coupled with the ability to get it  across
to his students, marks him as a capable and efficient  teacher.  To Dr.
Cederstrom, a fine teacher, a congenial personality,  and an all-'round
good fellow, the 1942 KLIPSUN is dedicated.

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Life on the C

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ampus   CONTENTS  Administration  Classes . . . . . . . . Page 9 
Organization  Activities . . . . . . . . Page 39  Athletics  Campusology .
. . . . . Page 63

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page [xi]

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T WIND  comes  out of nowhere  fearless and strong. Trees stiffen in 
challenge - bow low in  tribute. Across my path dead, dry  things 
reminiscent of  shining life blow. Your hat careens  crazily down the walk 
one jump ahead - like a seeking  heart.  Leaves underfoot -  whirling
whiteness - soft air.  Shuffle, slush, or dream.  It takes more than time
to  make  a year. Date trouble,  history, that is; sing "do",  not so sharp
- Blue and orange,  then what -Pass the salt, this  frog's  heart stops.
Would human  hearts react the same? I'd  start with yours. Hello, the  wind
is kinder to a  pair.  Nature's math is odd.  The libe ' looms up, a rush 
of intellectual air  disperses carefree currents,  or  it should. We learn 
that others too may know what  lies between stiff, bright  cloth and
cardboard walls, they  say,  but today I'm  caught in clouds and cobwebs. 
Soon they'll be gone. I feel the  first cool onrush of the wind.  ADMIN I 
CLASS.

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page [xii]

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 10

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HOW WE GREW  For forty-two years Western Washington College has been
placing highly trained men and  women in teaching positions in the many
towns and cities of Washington. Many, too, are the teachers  in Alaska,
Oregon, California, and the other western states that claim WWC as their
Alma Mater.  Western Washington College, a former state normal school,
first opened its doors in the fall of 1899 with the pioneer president, Dr.
E. T. Mathes, as administrator, heading a faculty of six.  At that time the
now beautiful campus on Sehome Hill was a swamp with just a large Italian 
Renaissance building to one side. The appearance was soon changed, however,
with the draining of  the campus lake, and the addition of three annexes to
the main building.  During the time of these physical changes there were
also  many changes in the curriculum of  the school. At first only a
three-year elementary course and a two- year advanced course were given. 
During the first fifteen years of the school's existence the faculty was
constantly increased in number.  Miss Mabel Z. Wilson, present librarian,
came in 1902 and began work on the now widely known WWC  library.  When Dr.
Mathes resigned in 1914, he was succeeded by Dr. George Nash, who served
for eight  years. A four-year course was added to the curriculum during
this time. Many changes in the campus  and the physical plant were also
proposed. The present Edens Hall, women's dormitory, was built in  1921 and
the heating plant of the school enlarged.  After serving in 1922- 23 as
president, Dr. D. B. Waldo resigned and handed the position to Charles  H.
Fisher, a Pennsylvania administrator, who continued to improve the future
college. Mr. Fisher's work  for a period of sixteen years  put the
northwestern institution on the educational map of the nation.  Two new
buildings were added during this administration, a $500,000 library and an
immense  Physical Education building with a swimming pool annex.  In 1933
the first Bachelor of Arts degrees in education were awarded. This was
followed by the  action of the state legislature which made the school a
college in name as well as in course of study.  Dr. William Wade Haggard,
present head of the college, came here in 1939 and has already  made a
place for himself in the college and community. A new elementary training
school has been  built and the heating plant of the college expanded a
second time.  1942 is a war year, but education must go on. Western
Washington College has carried on by  adding nine defense courses for the
benefit of the students and townspeople of Bellingham, and others  are in
prospect.  A period of prosperity and/or war is usually a period of
decreased enrollment in educational  institutions. The present period is no
exception. The number of students at WWC has decreased, but  education goes
on. This year, as every year, Western Washington College will send another
large  group of highly trained teachers  into the field, where already a
teacher shortage is impending.  THE TRUSTEES-Chairman Dr. W. D.
Kirkpatrick, Steve Saunders, and Secretary Verne Branigin, compose  the
governing body of three trustees at WWC. Appointed by the Governor, this
board formulates and  appraises details of finance, building, and general
policy.  FFI  Ten

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THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE  The theme of the Klipsun for 1942 is very
appropriate and appealing. The Pacific Northwest is nationally known for
its unexcelled natural scenery  and our campus is one of the most
attractive spots in this scenic area. Many  visitors have pronounced our
campus one of the most  beautiful in the United  States because of its
location in relation to Sehome Hill and Bellingham Bay,  its luxurious
grass, which is green the year around, and its trees. There are 
seventy-five varieties of trees on the campus, which include evergreens,
haw-thornes,  dogwoods, holly, and flowering plums. It is especially
noteworthy  that the buildings harmonize well with their surroundings.  The
memory of college days on a beautiful campus from which one may  see the
waters of Puget Sound, snow-capped mountains, and other scenery,  must
enrich one's life, especially in a war torn world. It is hoped that the men
 of Western Washington College of Education, who are now serving their 
country on land or sea, will  journey in their minds to the campus from
time to  time. The Class of 1942 and others of the College will treasure
this book.  W. W. HAGGARD, President.  ,iev'ev

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REGISTRAR  Students of WWC find a sincere adviser in Dr.  Merle S. Kuder,
the registrar. A busy man, he can  always find time to guide and assist
students along  the path of education. His interest and work is .. . 
people. His duties are numerous. Passing on admis-sion  credentials, and
graduation requirements, plus  general student personnel work, are some of
his  duties. Entering freshmen become oriented under  his guidance in the
college problems class.  DEAN OF WOMEN  We present Dean of Women Lorraine
Powers,  who makes her WWC Yearbook debut in the 1942  Klipsun. Formerly
Dean of Girls at East High School  in Sioux City, Iowa, Miss Powers during
the past  year has become an integral  part of our life on the  campus. In
her official capacity she serves on com-mittees  coordinating faculty and
students, super-vises  women's housing, and is social director of  Edens
Hall. It is she who helps the women students  to make their adjustments to
college life through  conferences, talks, or sometimes discipline; in her 
own words, an adviser ... "Not to punish but to  guide" .  DEAN OF MEN  Mr.
Loye McGee has been another prominent  figure in the makeup of the faculty.
In his real  capacity as Dean of Men and instructor in physical  education
he is a well known personage on the cam-pus,  and especially among the boys
who have looked  to him as an adviser and a loyal friend. He super-vises 
the planning of all the summer recreation pro-grams  that bring pleasure to
so many of the summer  students. In his spare time, he teaches a wartime 
first aid class.  'weive  I -

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IN OUR OFFICES  ... an efficient staff is responsible for the smoothly  run
business details of our school. It is their work to  keep detailed student
records, assist with registra-tion,  handle finances, help with testing.
Their offices  are kept busy with student problems.  BLAKELEY, EDWARD A.* 
Bookkeeper for Co-Op.  BUCHANAN, SAM. J.  Financial Secretary  BURNHAM,
MYRTLE  Recorder  EARLE, LOUIS Co-Op. Manager  HOOD, CHARLOTTE  Secretary,
Research Bureau  KING, KATHRYN  Secretary to Director of  the Training
School  MILLIGAN, GENEVIEVE  Secretary to the Registrar  REESE, PEARL
Secretary to the Library  STERNHAGEN, NINA  Assistant in the Extension 
Office  SWANSON, MABEL D.  Student Loan Secretary  TREMAIN, MILDRED 
Secretary to the Dean of Women  YOUNG, ORLENA Assistant in the Office of 
the Registrar  (Not Pictured)  WATERS, DOROTHEA  Assistant in Appointment 
Bureau.  *In U. S. Army.  Thirteen

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FACULTY  Each day from sleepy eight o'clock on, there  stand before us, not
the rank and file' of lecturers  and chalk pushers, but a superior group of
instruct-ors  carefully chosen from all sections of the  country.  They
give to us, from their experience, an under-standing  and a grasp of the
subject matter that  EDWARD J. ARNTZEN, A. M.  Social Science  E. A. BOND,
Ph. D.  Mathematics  MIRA E. BOOTH, A. M.  Public School Music  NILS BOSON,
B. M. E.  Public School Music  HAZEL BREAKEY, B.S.  Art  LYLE W. BREWER, M.
S.  Science  RUTH A. BURNET, A. B.  News Writing, Publications DONALD
BUSHELL, A. M.  Public School Music  S. E. CARVER, A. M.  Physical
Education  MOYLE CEREDSTROM, Ph. D.  English  ETHEL CHURCH  Secretary to
President  LINDA COUNTRYMAN, A. M.  Home Economics  NORA B. CUMMINS, A. M. 
Social Science  LILLIAN GEORGE, B. L. S. Cataloguer  RAMON T. GEORGE, A. M.
 Radio  GEORGIE P. GRAGG  Penmanship  VIRGINIA E. HAWKE, A. M.  Physical
Education  HERBERT R. HEARSEY, M. S. L. S.  Reference Librarian ARTHUR C.
HICKS, Ph. D.  English  ROBERT B. HOLTMAN, Ph. D.  Social Science  VICTOR
H. HOPPE, A. M.  Speech  ELIZABETH HOPPER, A. M.  Secretary, Appointment
Bureau  THOMAS F. HUNT, A. M.  Social Science  LUCY KANGLEY, Ph. D. 
English  Fourteen

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ROW  will contribute to our specific needs and general  education. Their
special interests and hobbies, ex-tending  even beyond the wide scope of
their major  fields, round out their ability to act as our guides, not only
in our studies, but also in our extra-curricular  activities.  LYNUS A.
KIBBE, A. M.  Education CHARLES LAPPENBUSCH, A. M.  Physical Education 
GERTRUDE LONGLEY, A. M.  ' Home Economics  MAY B. LOVEGREN  Typewriting and
Extension  MAY MEAD, R. N.  College Nurse IRVING E. MILLER, Ph. D. 
Education  MARY OSSINGER, M.S.  Science  H. C. PHILIPPI, A. M. * Science 
RUTH E. PLATT, M. S.  Science  HAZEL PLYMPTON, A. M.  Art  CHARLES M. RICE,
A. M. Industrial Arts  CHARLOTTE RICHARDSON,A.M.  Industrial Arts  HERBERT
C. RUCKMICK, A. M. Industrial Arts  DOROTHY RUNDLE, B. S., R. N. ** 
Registered Nurse  ESTHER SAHLIN, A. B.  Art FRANKLIN SHAVER  Printing 
MIRIAM B. SNOW, A. M., M. S.  Librarian of Children's Literature  LEONA 
SUNDQUIST, M.S.  Science  ANNA ULLIN, A. M.  English and Foreign Languages 
C. C. UPSHALL, Ph. D.  Research and Education  ALBERT VAN AVER, A. M.  . L
English  RUTH WEYTHMAN, A. M. Physical Education  MABEL ZOE WILSON, B. L.
S.  Librarian  PAUL D. WOODRING, Ph. D, Psychology  * Deceased  S* In
Medical Corps  Fifteen  u,~~~~~ 11iI " I I . .

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CAMPUS SCHOOL  In the Campus Training School these efficient  and well
trained teachers instruct a kindergarten and  grades one through nine. They
supervise the student  teachers who do their practice teaching as a pre- 
KATHERINE CASANOVA, A. M.  Campus School, 1st Grade  EDNA CHANNER, A. M. 
Campus School, 5th Grade  IRENE ELLIOTT, A. M.  Campus School, 2nd Grade 
EMMA S. ERICKSON, A. M.  Techniques of Teaching  JEAN FERGUSON, A. M. 
Campus School, 6th Grade PAUL R. GRIM, Ph. D.  Campus School, 9th Grade 
VIVIAN JOHNSON, A. M.  Supervisor of Primary Work  PRISCILLIA KINSMAN, A.
M.  Campus School, 3rd Grade  RUTH MELENDY, A. M.  Campus School, 8th Grade
 PEARL MERRIMAN, A. M.  Campus School, 4th Grade  SYNVA K. NICOL, A. M.
Campus School, Kindergarten  MAXINE NORTHRUP, A. M.  Campus School, 9th
Grade  EVELYN ODOM, A. M.  Supervisor, Intermediate Grades,  City Schools 
MARY E. RICH, A. M.  Director, Training School  RUTH VAN PELT, A. M. 
Campus School, 7th Grade  ELSIE WENDLING, A. M.  Supervisor, Junior High
Schools,  City Schools  PAUL LUSTERMAN  Band and Orchestral Instruments 
EDITH R. STRANGE  Piano  NAN DYBDAHL, A. B.  Voice  JOHN ROY WILLIAMS 
Violin  (Not Pictured)  JACK C.  COTTON, Ph. D.  Speech  RANDALL E. HAMM,
Ph. D  Science  Sixteen  requisite to obtaining a certificate or degree.
These  instructors are all experts in modern methods of edu-cation  and
provide an excellent laboratory for the  training of prospective teachers.

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STUDENT TEACHING  After an extensive series of oriention courses in
sub-jects  of general and specific social and cultural impor-tance,  a
student is ready to learn to teach.  Through courses in teaching technique,
the prospec-tive  teacher is introduced to the realities of work in the 
classroom and is guided in the formation of certain basic  methods and
attitudes. Direct observation of the pro-gressive  campus school and the
city schools, advice from  the instructor, and reading research, all have
important  places in this training.  The teaching technique course is
followed by actual  practice teaching. In line with a revision of the
curri-culum  made last fall, students are required to teach all  day every
day for one quarter,  receiving sixteen hours  credit. Degree students
earning eight hours credit, teach  one-half day, and carry  other subjects
to make up their  full load. The new arrangement provides opportunity for 
Mary E. Rich the student teachers to handle dif-ferent  subjects in a
variety of situa-tions,  thus giving their experimental   work a more
professional aspect.  Mary E. Rich, instrumental in build-ing  up the WWC
training school,  creating the junior high school de-partment,  and
planning the new cam-pus  school building, has been a party  to the
successful accomplishments of  all the young men and women who  have gone
out of her school. Miss  Rich's retirement after 17 years of  tireless
service becomes effective at  the end of summer  quarter, 1942, but  the
influence of her personality and  her work will have left a lasting
im-pression.  Top: Miss Mary E. Rich, director of the Campus  Training
School.  Left: Virginia Theil works with children in the   third grade
during a class period.  Right: Nancy Shaw escorts first graders to the 
bus.  Bottom: Student  Teacher Frank Shiers discusses  a science project
with children in the fifth  grade.  Seventeen

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A DREAM  Indeed the realization of a  dream is the new Campus Ele-mentary 
School building which  we have watched growing on  our campus. More than
just  dreams have gone into its crea-tion,  however; Miss Mary E.  Rich,
director of the training  school, has given tireless atten-tion  to myriad
details, and has  applied her practical working  knowledge of the everyday 
problems of a training school.  President W. W. Haggard also  has spent
much time in con-ference  and meetings about the  building.  Especially
fortunate is the  project in having as architects  Bebb and Jones, who have
 worked with contractors and clients to achieve a building  which will
efficiently and effec-tively  carry out a specific pro-  Top Picture:
Architect's drawing of New Campus School. gram. Many difficulties have 
Bottom Picture: New Campus School under construction. been encountered in
obtaining  supplies because of the govern-ment  war time  emergency
program, but most of the problems have now been met  and occupation of the
building is expected to be complete before summer.  Modified Romanesque
architecture characterizes the building. The soft-toned  bricks, cornices,
multi-colored tile roofs, and large Gothic windows are similar to those  of
the library and physical education buildings, with which it was planned to
harmonize.  The Campus School children have also done their part. Above the
beautiful main  entrance-way and in many of the rooms are stained glass
windows which they designed.  During winter quarter they held a ceremony
for laying the corner stone in which were  sealed interesting articles of
their own selection. According to President Haggard,  a governing principle
has been to employ cheerful vibrant colors which will hold much  appeal for
the children and make pleasant, bright rooms. Certainly there is much 
evidence that it is fundamentally a children's building and that there has
been  intelligent planning to meet the needs of children. For instance,
instead of stairs in  the building there are gently sloping ramps. Needed
play space was cleverly provided  for in the first-floor plan including
three large playrooms which will be more practical  fc- the children than a
gymnasium.  Eighteen

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 19

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COME TRUE  To the back of the building is the auditorium which Miss Rich
describes enthus-iastically as a "thoroughly lovely room." It will be
carpeted attractively in blue jaspe  and made charming by the intricate
system of recessed lighting. It is also an excep-tionally  usable room
planned to facilitate group participation.  Also on the first floor is the
nurses' unit which consists of an examination room  and a rest room . The
beautiful and efficient executive offices are on this floor. There  are
cloak rooms for student teachers and observers, and a unit of rooms and
offices  for student janitors.  Thus, although the building is primarily
for a children's school, no phase of the  work has been neglected. The
entire layout of the building is on the class room unit  plan. Each class
room unit consists of the main class room, a work room, a store room,  and
an office. Each room was planned to have an attractive, irregular corner
which may be used as a library, or in many other ways. The large
kindergarten unit has its  own entrance and an unique panel of glass brick.
 The second floor is occupied by the upper grades. Another outstanding room
 here is the pine paneled cafeteria with fireplace, and chintz draped
windows. Dumb  waiters connect it with other parts of the building. The
music room is also on this  floor. The rest rooms are very modern and
attractive and all are done in green tile.  tile.  All the new type
fixtures were carefully selected  and) have been tested in the  present
Campus School. Incidentally in these troubled times it might be comforting 
to know that the building is considered a very good air raid shelter.  And
so you see, work, planning, experience, cooperation, imagination . . all 
went together and a dream came true.  AT LAST ... A DREAM COME TRUE 
Nineteen  I I- ---------- --- i~liL- - ~ - .

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TOP LEFT PICTURE  WWC graduates file down the steps during commencement
exercises.  TOP RIGHT PICTURE  Jim Goodrich and Jack Bennett lay the 1941
class stone on  Senior Walk.  BOTTOM RIGHT PICTURE  As part of Class Day
Exercises, graduates of WWC drop their  ASB tickets to be preserved for
posterity beneath  the class stone.  GRADUATION  Across the stage, down the
aisle, out the door,  down the steps, and out onto the beautiful campus, 
files the graduating class of 1942. Caps and gowns,  emblems of four years
of intensive training and  experience, signify an honor coveted by many, 
awarded to few. The junior class of 1942 brings to  a close the era of
three-year certificates. The major-ity  of these students are walking out
of the halls of  education into a profession worthy of its high rank  in
this democratic nation.  Twenty

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CLASS OFFICERS  Top Left: Dr. Bond, genial Freshman adviser, and Dr.
Holtman, friendly Sophomore adviser.  Top Right: Junior-Senior Officers:
Smiling blond Tom Hewitson, acted as vice-president. Liv Bruseth, popular 
junior, was secretary. Likeable John Hudson was elected president of the
upper classmen.  Bottom Left: Sophomore Officers: Elizabeth Douglas,
activity major acted as secretary. Shirley Heaton was  vice-president, and
versatile Art Clark took the presidency.  Bottom Right: Freshmen Officers:
Bill Wilder was president of the freshmen; Mary Alice Biggs, secretary, 
and Roy Nelson, vice- president.  Representatives of Success - The Guides
and the Guided  Twe nty-one

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TWO OF A KIND  Presenting Frank Shiers  and Jim Junkin, last year's  ASB
president and vice-pres- ident,  all time leaders ... all  time seekers
after a Student  Activities Building.  Two of a kind . . . exec- utively 
inclined, serious (dur-ing  business hours), and effi-cient  . .. "Jug" and
Shiers  as seniors may look back  upon an unwavering record  of service and
personality.  ALLEN, DOROTHEA, Blaine;  Radio BEERS, JENNIE, Creston,Oregon
 BEYER, BARBARA,  Bellingham;  WRA, ACE, WRA Delegate  to Montana  BLICK,
ELLEN, Ferndale;  ACE, Blue Triangle  BODEN, JEANNETTE, Seattle;  WRA, ACE
BOLLINGER, VESTA,  Fruitland, Idaho  BOLSTER, ROSEMARY, Bellingham; 
Valkyrie, ACE, Klipsun Art Editor  BOON, BILL, Mohler, Oregon;  Intramural
Athletics, Norsemen  BURKE, PATRICIA, Bellingham  BURTON, JOAN, Seattle; 
Orchestra, String Ensemble  CAMPBELL, CLINTA,  Port Orchard;   University
of Washington Transfer,  "George Washington Slept Here"  CORNWALL, JOHN,
Kelso;  "W" Club, Football

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DAVIS, HELEN MAY, Everett;  CCF, Band  EASLEY, MARIE, Newport, Ore.;  Board
of Control, Valkyrie,   AWS Treasurer  ELLIS, FRED,  Portland, Oregon;  IRC
 FORESTER, JEAN, Seattle;  GILBERT, BETTY  MARIE,  Deming;  Orchestra, Blue
Barnacles, IRC  HAMPTON, LESLIE,  Hollywood, California; Orchestra. Blue
Barnacles,  IRC  JUNKIN, JAMES, Chehalis;  Board of Control, ASB
Vice-President, ASB Social Chairman  KNOWLES, ALICE,  Bismark, North Dakota
 MILLER, EDNA, Seattle;  Transfer from CWC,  Blue Triangle, ACE  MOHRMANN,
JUNE, Ferndale;  Goddess Thanksgiving Festival, WWCollegian, Band  MOSES,
ED, Castle Rock;  Basketball  NEEVAL, FRANCES,  Bellingham;  WRA President,
ACE.  Valkyrie  CAMPBELL COME  Many had already been  impressed by Clinta's
friend-ly, vivacious personality when  we all became acquainted  with her
as the city-bred An-nabel  Fuller in Mr. Hoppe's  production of "George 
Washington Slept Here."  A drama major, transfer  from the University of
Wash-ington,  she has continued her  college stage career, acting  as
assistant director of "The  Barretts"  and appearing in  "The Man Who Came
to  Dinner" with the Bellingham  Theater Guild,  Twenty-three

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NOLAN, HELEN, Seattle;  Organized House President,  ACE, Vanadis Bragi 
PHILLIPS, POLLYANN, Edwall;  Alkisiah, Drama Club,  "Bachelor Born" 
OLIVER, BERNICE,  Bellingham;  Scholarship Society, ACE,  Blue Barnacles
Secretary  PONTIUS, LEDA, Bellingham;  WRA General Sports Manager,  Blue
Barnacles  REILLY, EILEEN, Tacoma;  Valkyrie, Chairman Homecoming  Rally,
ACE  RIZZI, MADALENE,  Bellingham;  CCF, YWCA, Band  SHAW, NANCY, Anacortes
 SHIERS, FRANK, Bellingham;  Inter-Club Council President,  IR.C President,
Scholarship Society  SLANINKA, IRENE Bellingham;  Scholarship Society 
SPENCER, LAURA, Bellingham  WEBSTER, CLIFF, Seattle;  "W" Club, Golf 
WESTLUND, VERGIE,  Lynden  QUEENLY COED  Frances Neevel was elect-ed  to
the presidency of the  Women's Recreation Asso-ciation  after having served
 on its cabinet. She was one  of the delegates to the con-ference  of the
Athletic Fed-eration  of College Women  in 1941.  For her beauty and
per-sonality  she was chosen to  reign as a princess in this  year's
Homecoming Court.  By election into the Valkyrie  Club she was further
hon-ored.  Twenty-four

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 25

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BEHOLD THE JUNIORS... THOSE UPPER CLASSMEN  PERSONALITY PREXY  Bill
"Hatchet" Hatch has really gone to  work on the WWCE woodpile. After 
sharpening his axe on the Freshman Cup  Bill served on the Board of
Control, made  WHO'S WHO In American Colleges, act-ed  as Student Radio
Head, then culminated  his career by being elected student body  president.
All evidences of his whole- hearted  participation in school activities. 
He does everything well, everyone who  knows him likes him; his personality
is truly  outstanding . . . prerequisite to success.  ADAMS, GENEVIEVE,
Bellingham; WRA  ALVORD, KATHRYN, Centralia;  Music Education Club  Drama
Club  AYLEN, ROBERT, Puyallup  BALCH, FLORENCE, Burlington;  Band, WRA, ACE
 BARBEE, MARIAN, Puyallup;  ACE Secretary, Alkisiah Treasurer,  WRA  BEE,
LOWELL, Kelso;  Board of Control Secretary,  Vanadis Bragi, Band
BELLINGHAM, MILDRED, Glasgow, Montana;  WRA, IRC, Organized House President
 BESTUL, LAURA, Ferndale;  WRA, Alkisiah, Badminton Club  BEZZO, LOREN,
Hoquiam;  Intramural Basketball BROWN, CLARK, Ferndale;  Drama Club,
Navigator Editor,  WWCollegian  BRUSETH, LIV, Darrington; Valkyrie, ACE,
Klipsun  BUCKLEY, EVELYN, Bellingham;  CCF  BYRNES, CATHERINE, Chehalis;
WRA, Alkisiah, Kappa Chi Kappa  CARR, ELDEEN, Bellingham;  Blue Triangle,
WRA  CLARK, VANCE, Seattle  Twenty-five

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 26

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OUR ERSTWHILE PLAYMATES, WHO GREW UP  COLLINS, KATHERINE, Tacoma;  IRC, WRA
CONLEY, DERRY, Bellingham  COOPER, KATHLEEN, Bellingham  CULBERTSON, RUTH,
Keyport; Valkyrie, Co-op Board,  AWS Informal Chairman  CURE, LILLIAN,
Bellingham  DAHL, NORMAN, Edison "W" Club, Football,  Basketball, Track 
DANIELS, JO, Bellingham;  Valkyrie  DAVIS, MARIE, Centralia; "George
Washington Slept Here",  WRA, Organized House President  DAVIS, MARY,
Tacoma DeCLEMENTS, BARTHE, Bremerton;  Vanadis Bragi, ACE  DORCY, ARTHUR,
Bellingham;  Intramural, Sports, Norsemen  DOW, LELAND, Bellingham;  Band 
EASTON, DOROTHY, Bellingham; WWCollegian  EICHNER, EVELYN, Lebanon, Ore. 
ELLIOT, GENEVIEVE, Seattle;  Band  LITTLE "JUG"   You know Bill Junkin . .
.he's the man who  left Sehome, far above the bay's blue  waters, to help
Uncle Sam out on this navy  business. Bill had quite a record here at 
WWCE. He was a member of the Board of  Control and served on the Co-op
Board.  This year's memorable Homecoming Dance  was under his supervision.
He was one of  this school's representatives in WHO'S  WHO in American
Colleges ... and last  but not least Little Jug is really a swell guy. 
Twenty-six

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ALMOST OVER NIGT ... AT LEAST TO ALL  SHE SHALL HAVE MUSIC  Music hath
charm . . . So hath Miss  Rusher. Betty, music major from Bremer-ton  winds
up her engagement with West-ern  College with  a full record of
achieve-ment  behind her. As a sophomore she served  on Board of Control.
She slaved on  the  Collegian staff . . . received mention in  WHO'S WHO in
American Colleges and  is a pepster, too ...  a Valkyrie girl. Always 
interested in music, Betty has been active  in all band activities ... and
she likes to  ski and bowl . . . almost anything athletic.  She is never
too busy for a friendly word  or smile. ENGELHART, ELEANOR, Bellingham; 
WRA, Kappa Chi Kappa,  Paletteers  ERICKSON, OLIVER, Aberdeen;  "Prologue
to Glory",  Norsemen, Klipsun  FARRAR, BERNA, Bellingham;  Drama Club, ACE
FINN, KATHLEEN, Seattle;  Dance Club President,  Blue Barnacles, WRA 
GAINES, LOIS, Olympia; AWS Commission, WRA, ACE  GILROY, JIM, Seattle; 
WWCollegian  GLENN, PAUL, Bellingham; Drama Club President, Tennis Team, 
Student Radio Head  GRIFFITH, RUTH, Bingen;  Badminton Club President,  ACE
President, Dance Club  GUDYKA, PETER, Pe Ell;  "W" Club, Football  HALL,
LORRAINE, Flaxton, N. D.  HALL, WALTER, Bellingham;  HAMILTON, JANE,
Stanwood;  1942 Klipsun Editor,  Valkyrie, WHO'S WHO  in American Colleges 
HANSEN, MILDRED, Seattle;  WRA, Alkisiah, ACE  HARDY, HOWARD, Bellingham; 
MEC, Band, Intramural Sports  HARRIS, VERA, Mason City, Nebraska. 
Twenty-seven

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OUTWARD APPEARANCES... THEY SCARED US  HARRISON, MARGARET, Bellingham; 
Alkisigh Treasurer, ACE, WRA  HAWKINS, JOHN, Blaine;  Tennis, "W" Club 
HEWITSON, THOMAS, Bellingham;  Vanadis Bragi  HILTON, MARGARET, Bellingham;
 Valkyrie, ACE, Blue Barnacles HJARTARSON, HJORTUR, Ethridge,  Mont.; 
Band, A Cappella Choir, Norsemen  HJARTARSON, GARDAR,  Ethridge, Mont.; 
Choir  HOLBROOK, FRANK, Bellingham;  Norsemen, Schussken, WWCollegian 
HOLMES, JESSIE, Camas;  WRA, ACE, Blue Triangle  HOVDE, ANNIS, Everett;
Vanadis Bragi, "W" Club,  Klipsun  HUHTA, HAROLD, Hoquiam;  HUDSON, JOHN,
Yakima  HUOT, PHYLLIS, Bellingham  JELLESMA, LUCILLE, Suquamish;  WRA, ACE 
JONES, MONTY, Sedro-Woolley   KERCHAN, ROBERT, Seattle  PLAYER OF THE YEAR 
Norman Nelson, popular Viking halfback,  was chosen by his teammates as the
Inspira-tional  player on the Blue and White squad.  Their choice was made
in a poll taken at  the end of the football season. He was  also picked by
the WWCollegian sports staff as the outstanding man on the 1941  eleven.
His playing ability and determined  spirit make an ideal and rare
combination.  A "W" Club member by virtue of his ath-letic  achievements,
Nelson, best known as  "Tuffy," quiet and friendly, is far more  than a
football hero.  Twenty-eight

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A LITTLE AT FIRST ... THERE'S SOMETHING  VIVACIOUS LADY  Everything a
Valkyrie president should  be . . . peppy, radiant, and friendly .  Evelyn
Peterson is a girl you'll remember.  'Activity Pete,' secretary of
Interclub  Council and ACE member emerging un-scathed  from student
teaching fall quarter,  added another star to her crown by suc-cessfully 
supervising the annual February  High School Conference. She works for a 
living . . . you've seen her in the reserve  room of the Library.  And
Pete's pretty, too . . . she was  chosen among the ten most beautiful in 
the 1942 Publications Princess Competition.  KLANN, CORINNE, Kent;  String
Ensemble, Orchestra,  Organized House President KLEIN, LAWRENCE,
Bellingham;  CCF  KOTULA. WAYNE, Pe Ell;  WWCollegian Business Manager
Band, Intramural Sports  KRAUSE, RUTH, Everett;  Edens Hall President,  AWS
Commission, Valkyrie KRUEGER, VIRGINIA, Portland, Ore.;  Valkyrie, WRA
Cabinet, Klipsun  KULJIS MITCHELL, Bellingham.  LANGERLUND, ENID,
Burlington;  WRA, Kappa Chi Kappa  LAHTI, ARNOLD, Castle Rock;  "W" Club,
Norsemen  Informal Co-Chairman  LEE, BETTY, Anacortes;  WRA, Badminton Club
 LEITNER, LOUISE, Herndon, Kan.;  WR, Kappa Chi Kappa, Paletteers  LEWIS,
MARGARET, Ferndale;  1 ACE Vice- President, WRA  LEINARD, MARGUERITE 
Seattle  LINDROOS, ESTHER, Grayland;  LINDSAY, WILLIAM, Olympia;  LITTLE,
BLANCHE, Bellingham  Twenty-nine

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ABOUT A TEACHER . . . . BUT WHEN THEY  LOGAN, HAPPY, Puyallup;  LOOP,
HAROLD, Edison; Intramural Athletics, Norsemen,  WWCollegian  LOUDEN,
DOROTHY, Centralia;  Alkisiah, WRA, ACE LOWREY, LOIS, Seattle;  Valkyrie,
WRA, Blue Barnacles  LUEKEN, HAROLD, Bellingham;  IRC, Water Safety
Instructor  LYONS, NANCY, Two Dot, Mont. a  MANUEL, MARILYN, Bellingham; 
WWCollegian News Editor A Cappella Choir,  Homecoming Publicity Chairman 
McMILLAN, LEA, La Conner;  Edens Hall Social Chairman, ACE  McMILLAN,
MARGARET, Seattle  METCALF, GENEVIEVE, Vancouver MITCHELL, ALICK, Pe Ell; 
"W" Club, Football  MODIN, ELSIE, Woodland;  CCF Secretary, Blue Triangle, 
WWCollegian  MONSON, BERNICE, Bellingham;  AWS President, Board of Control,
 Valkyrie MONTGOMERY, LORRAINE, Bellingham;  Drama Club  MUNIZZA, LAWRENCE,
 Puyallup;  "W" Club, Football, Basketball  NIMBLE NORWEGIAN  Blond Mr.
Hovde's talents run in counter  directions, one might say . . . one to his 
head and the other to his feet.  An English Major, Annis is interested 
both in writing and in reading writing. He  carries this talent and
interest into his extra-curricular  activities, being an active mem-bers 
of Vandis Bragi and a pillar on the  Klipsun staff.  At bowling he really
mows them down.  Then he's one of the boys who star in the  spring . . . a
track man, he jumps for the  honor of dear old alma mater.  Thirty

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EMERGED FROM THEIR FIRST HAND TO HAND  EDENS ELECT  Ruth Krause and
Virginia Bell, president  and vice-president respectively of Edens  Hall,
have not confined themselves to keep-ing  the dorm fires burning, but have
worked  in many all-school activities. They have  AWS Commission in common
... Virginia  is vice-prexy, while Ruth was responsible for  this year's
Thursday afternoon 'lifts', the  AWS teas. Both girls are members of the 
Valkyrie Club, Pep Local No. I.  They are among the fourteen WWC stu-dents 
mentioned in WHO'S WHO in Am-erican  Colleges.  NEEDHAM, JO, Shelton;
Valkyrie Vice-President, AWS Secretary,  AWS Leadership Chairman  NEUMAN,
ERNEST 0, Centralia; U. of W. Transfer  International Relations Club 
NEWELL, MARIAN, Olympia;  WRA  International Relations Club  Kappa Chi
Kappa  NICHOLS, RUTH S., Wenatchee  OLLING, SUSAN, Bellingham; Alkisiah,
WRA, ACE  OLSEN, WINTON, Anacortes;  Intramural athletics  O'NEIL, WILLIAM,
Lynden; ASB Vice-President  Norsemen Commission  Freshman Class President 
O'MEARA, PATRICIA, Ilwaco; Valkyrie, ACE, Orchesis  ORDWAY, IRENE, Hood
River,  Oregon;  YWCA President  CCF Social Chairman  Interclub Council 
OSSEWARDE, CHARLOTTE, Bellingham  PEARSON, MARY ANN, Bellingham; 
Secretary-Treasurer Drama Club  Vice-President Blue Triangle  PETERS,
BERNICE, Anacortes;  WRA, Badminton Club Secretary  House President 
PETERS, MARIAN, Olympia  PETTER, MARY, Vancouver, B. C.;  ACE  PHILLIPS,
ERIC C., Bellingham;  WWCollegian Editor  International Relations Club 
Who's Who Among Students in  American College  Thirty-one

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BATTLE WITH THE PROFESSION,WE FOUND  PRATT, HELEN JEAN, Lewiston, Idaho; 
Valkyrie, ACE  Blue Barnacles  PRATT, MILDRED JEAN, Ferndale;  WRA, Band 
Scholarship Society  PRINCE, EDWARD, Onalaska;  Band, WWCollegian 
RANTANEN, GERTRUDE, Winlock;  WRA, Scholarship Society  House President 
REDDEN, GERALDINE, Vancouver;  PaletteersO,r chestra  D)rama Club ROPER,
ROSINE, Olympia;  International Relations Club  WRA, CCF  ROPES, BILL,
Sedro-Woolley; Norsemen Vice-President  Basketball, Track  RUNDQUIST,
ELLEN, Seattle;  Choir, Alkisiah, ACE SAWYER, ROXANNA, Hoquiam;  WRA, Blue
Barnacles  Orchesis  SCHILKE, MARGARETHE, Newport;   Alkisiah  Kann-a Chi
Kappa Secretary-Treasurer  ACE  SIEGENTHALER, BERNICE, E.,  Mist, Oregon; 
Paletteers  SIMONSON, JUSTIN, Seattle  SMITH, KATHLEEN E., Bellingham; 
"Prologue to Glory" l)rama Club Secretary, WRA  SMITH, LOIS JO, Port
Angeles;  Alkisiah President  Kappa Chi Kappa, ACE  SMITH, MICKEY H.,
Longview;  Norsemen President  Board of Control  Interclub Council Vice-
President  GIFTED GODDESS  Chosen fall quarter by the children of  the
training school to reign as Goddess of  their Thanksgiving Festival, Miss
Mohrmann  was much admired by her small subjects.  She is pictured here
with Beverly Ensign,  one of her pupils.  June's popularity and talents,
however,  have not been restricted to the Campus  School. Her 'pomes about
life' have been  a regular feature of the WWCollegian. A  music hobbyist,
she is a regular member of  the band and orchestra. As one of the WWC's
beauties, she contested for the  Publications Princess title.  Thirty-two

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THEY STILL HAD THE SAME OLD FIGHT....  VERSATILE VIKING  Best known for his
outstanding athletic  ability in a variety of fields - basketball  and
tennis for two-skyscraping Lyle Petty-john  is one of WWC's upper-crust
males.  This year he has superintended the activ-ities  of the "W" Club,
the college men of  brawn.  The rest of his record proves that Lyle 
doesn't devote all of his time to his sport-ing  life. He has been active
in the Norse-men,  served as chairman of this year's  Homecoming Queen
Committee, and has  appeared in several Division of Drama pro-ductions. 
SMITH, ROBERT, Aberdeen; Golf, "W" Club  Intramural Athletics  STENSON,
ART, Everett;  Norsemen Club Secretary-Treasurer Rally Committee Chairman 
Men's Party Co-Chairman  STEWART, MARY, Port Blakeley  STILL, HELEN A.,
Blaine  STRASBURGER, AMANDA B., Silver  Springs, Md.  SUNDBACK, ELAINE, 
Bellingham; Alkisiah Secretary  Kappa Chi Kappa Vice-President  WRA
President  SWALLING, RAGNHILD, Marysville;  Blue Triangle Secretary  ACE,
Orchesis  SWANSON, GLORIA, Portland, Oregon;  ACE TEDFORD, JEAN,
Bellingham;  "Prologue to Glory"  Drama Club President  Assistant Director
"George Washington Slept Here"  THOMPSON, PHYLLIS, Kelso;  WWCollegian
Women's Editor  Vanadis Bragi Secretary  Blue Triangle Secretary  WALL,
BETTY, Winlock;  Blue Triangle, ACE  Drama Club WARDRUM, ELAINE, 
Snohomish;  WRA, Paletteers  WATERBURY, JOYCE E., Snohomish; WWCollegian 
WESTERMAN, VERA M., Sedro-Woolley  WILSON, GERALDINE M.,  Winlock  Thirty-
three

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SOPHOMORES ... coming up fast  These are the sophomores, who are still
possessed with vim  and vigor to participate in the many school activities.
They  elected as guides for the year, Art Clark, president; Shirley 
Heaton, vice-president, and Elizabeth Douglas, secretary. The  end of this
year marks the half-way point in their college career  and they are now
beginning to think more seriously of their future at WWCE. Teaching days
are still ahead and they are  looking forward to becoming those much
honored upper class-men.  TOP PICTURE (left)  Top Row: Goff, Haggard,
Pirrung, Heaton, J. Thompson. Bottom Row: J. Klann, S. Elenbaas, B.
Elenbass, J. Hatt, Earlywine.  BOTTOM PICTURE (left  Top Row: King,
Ludwick, Critchlow, Fitch.  Third Row: Clark, Bruen, Rogers, Gaffney,
Carter.  Second Row: Brock,.  Donaldson, Dunn, Gooding, Brown, Huot. 
Bottom Row: Grant, Bowers, Dwelle, Douglas, H. Anderson, Baker,  Darrah,
Beecroft.  TOP PICTURE (right)  Top Row: Donaldson, Dunn, Groger, Washburn,
Neal. Bottom Row: Van Rooy, Murray, Meyers, MacDougall, Messinger.  BOTTOM
PICTURE (right)  Top Row: Cisson, Leiser, Miller, Stoddard, Young.  Third
Row: Munkres, Eckhart, Burrit, Wittler, Van Brockman, Van Wieringen. 
Bottom Row: Watts, Strom, Stroble, Dews, True, Norton, Shellhamer. 
Thirty-four

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FRESHMEN ... we learned the hard way  Many are the rainy days that the
freshmen have seen. Every- thing  seemed so new and different at college.
They had to ad-just  themselves to a new environment, make new friends, and
 do work entirely unfamiliar to them. Bill Wilder served excel  lently as
chief executive, Roy Nelson as vice-president, and  Mary Alice Biggs as
secretary. The upper classmen and the  faculty have been forgiving of their
mistakes and foolishness,  and already see signs of leadership and ability
among them.  They have been the typical freshmen. It was fun, wasn't it? 
TOP PICTURE (left)  Top Row: Killdall, Muckey, Lallis, Richardson, Duncan,
Musgrove.  Third Row: Kosche, Jeffery, Meek, Lehman, Jewel, Watson,
Johnson.  Second Row: Colouzis, Stephens, Langland, Husfloen, Lindberg,
Davenport, Moore, Woodcock.  Bottom Row: Wilkinson, Howem, S. Moore, Main,
Lanterman,  Tangvald, Gibson, Jones.  BOTTOM PICTURE (left)  Top Row: Leu,
Roland, Wilder, Vossbeck, Laffin, Kooberstad, Brockway.  Third Row:
Hancock, Eines, Smithe, Wefer, Kemp, Clifton.  Second Row: Hathaway,
Schaeffer, Phillips, Watson, Campbell,  Rogers, Rockriver.  Bottom Row:
Jones, Kilander, Knol, Mueller, Fegley, Folsom, Miller.  TOP PICTURE
(right)  Top Row: Boice, Baker, Bezer, Bettner, Beverlin.  Third Row:
Bartlett, Anderson, Auer, Benjamin, Castle, Berger.  Second Row: Anderson,
Bishop, Angell, Berg, Bodey, Aus, Bjorkquist.  Bottom Row: Adams, Averill,
Biggs, Anderson, Allen, Asmundsen, Bulmer. BOTTOM PICTURE (right)  Top Row:
Mock, Karlis, Packard, McMurtrie, Griffith.  Third Row: Cooper, Erickson,
Nelson, O'Connor, Kern, Brunswig,  Strankman, Schilke.  Second Row: Lowery,
Ebe, Walling, Griffin, Brown, Burton,  Olsen, Ilgen, McMillan.  Bottom Row:
Haley, Gardiner, Dodd, Lindsay, Grieff, Brudwick,  Defort, Bright. 
Thirty-five

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PRE-NURSING STUDENTS . . . Here Today, Gone Tomorrow  The pre-nursing
course offered at WWC is an exception to the general course  intended to
prepare students for teaching. Likewise, the pre-nursing students are a 
rather exclusive group, entering college one quarter and leaving the
following quarter.  As is often the case, they are here in the morning and
gone in the afternoon, as some  of them are on duty in  the local
Bellingham hospitals when they are not attending  classes.  Where these
students will be tomorrow is hard to predict. With the advent of  war to
our country, the need for trained medical officers and nurses is
imperative.  College, for these people whose schedules are filled with
hours of work and toil,  is no  game. Is is an earnest attempt to fulfill
an obligation to themselves and to their  country. So, hats off to these
students who are doing a patriotic duty by attending  school to receive
education in a profession so vital to our national existence.  FRESHMAN
CLASS  TOP ROW  Top Row: Kingsley, Sanford, Emry, Nix, Mowrey, Hutchinson,
Felton.  Third Row: Sien, Stidham, Hickenbottom, VanRooy, Nelson,
Montgomery.  Second Row: S. Olson, Moll, Lee, Green, Madrey, McDonald. 
Bottom Row: Hatt, Irish, Clendenen, Olds, Kristjansson, Phillips, Morrill. 
TOP RIGHT  Top Row: Diehl, Korstad, Frank, Sandberg, Yorkston.  Third Row:
Johnson, Hobert, Nelson, Dahl, Wright, McFarland.  Second Row: McPherson,
Harkleroad, Vetter, Israelson, Comer, Hardman,  Lagasse.  PRE-NURSING 
BOTTOM LEFT  Top Row: Anderson, Burton, Johnson, Schons, Castle, Adams,
Lobb.  Second Row: Neff, Thompson, Woll, Jeffery, Ebe, Moritz, Wolverton. 
Bottom Row: Decker, Kalberg, Monson, Jewell, Pettit, Slack, Cave,  Johnson.
 BOTTOM RIGHT  Top Row: Trescott, Berg, Griffin, Prater, Saksug, Willits. 
Bottom Row: Bruwick, Mincher, Lee, Kilander, McDougle, Dodd.  Thirty-six

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ANOTHER KIND OF SCHOOL  He's in the army now . .. or the navy . . . or the
air  corps . . .words worn thin since we've had this war on  our hands. But
even before December 7, with "Remem-ber  Pearl Harbor"  and the resulting
boom in local and  national patriotism, Uncle Sam had taken his toll of 
WWC's limited manpower. Many of our boys had signed  up voluntarily,
feeling duty in the armed forces to be their  best contribution to national
defense.  Time was when that twenty-first birthday meant To-day  I Am a
Man. Nowadays the old tune has slightly new  words ... tomorrow I Am a
Uniform. College-bent lads  cling fondly to the last days and months of
their youth and  eye enviously the ages of their younger brothers. Not that
there is any one of them who would not give  his service willingly even at
the expense of deserting a  promising college career at its climax to go
into a strange  world. As the war work has progressed we each have  been
increasingly aware of our responsibility to ourselves  and to our country.
As it continues to progress in the  future, for we know not how long, the
momentum of our  response to it will grow in proportion to its advance. 
The 1942 KLIPSUN pays tribute to its service men  and recognizes their
contribution to the maintenance of  our way of life. May they serve their
country well in time  of war and come back ready to build a lasting peace, 
learned in the cruel futility of war.  Thirty-seven

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THE RAIN  slants  down on walks,  slippery and glasslike. Rain-dimmed
headlights  of cars shine through  the night's  black. Dripping leaves - a
drop falls 'splash"  on  my nose. One  English book is fading on my  coat. 
The moon sails, a gold boat,  over the hill. Girls like flowers,  dance, 
play romance.  One-two, one-two. Missed a beat. Two-one.  Must learn rhythm
- pardon.  Books, long talks - Shakespeare and Jim, does  he  go steady?  A
soprano voice echoes through the  hall, "Jean, phone, and it's a  man!"
Please turn down that radio.  At  midnight, black  coffee and soggy
doughnuts taste good.  Dimming lights - music should  be like this. Soft,
sweet - heart beats. Eyes  sting;  violins sing.  Schubert, thy serenade is
divine.  Now a blue band keeps time.  Boom, sounds the bass drum, boom,
boom, boom. Toes  freezing, nose  red -three sweaters, scarf. With such
attire  should not warm by the fire,  but sometimes I get cold, skiing. 
Click-ety  click!  Music by the linotype man,  last minute copy fan.  And
the rain drips down from the leaves.  ORGANIZATI  ACTIVI

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WE'RE PROUD OF OUR  The governing body of the Associated Students is the
Board of Control. It was headed this year by Bill Hatch, president of the
student body, and Bill O'Neil vice-president,  with Miss Richardson, Mr.
Carver and Dr. Bond, faculty advisers. The other  members change quarterly,
as the term  of some expire and are in turn filled by newly  elected
members.  The Board of Control is the official budgeter of the student
activity fund, appor-tioning  a share of money to each of the ASB sponsored
activities such as music, drama,  athletics, WWCollegian, and ASB social
events.  Bill Hatch, ASB president at WWC for  the year 1941-42, served
faithfully in the  position entrusted to him. It was his duty  to preside
at the student body meetings  and also to act as ex-officio chairman of 
the Board of Control. His wise judgment  accompanied every appointment of
associ-ation  committees and his executive ability  was all to our
advantage.  Top Left: Bill Hatch, ASB President.  Bottom Far Left: Miss
Richardson, Adviser of Board of Control.  Bottom Middle Left: Mr. Carver
and Dr. Bond, Advisers of Board  of Control. Bottom Right: Bill O'Neil, ASB
Vice-President.

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 41

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, LOCAL DEMOCRACY  Much credit is due the Board of Control for initiating
and carrying through a drive  for $1,000 for the remodeling of the training
school gymnasium into a Student Union  room. Unforeseen shortages of
construction materials threw a wet blanket on these  plans but at the same
time gave impetus to another patriotic policy-that of invest-ing  in war
bonds the money already raised. By harnessing and directing the combined 
efforts of all the clubs toward this project, the Board has made
considerable progress  in realizing the goal.  The Co-op Board is a
creation of the  Board of Control, but functions independ-ently  of the
Board. It is composed of six  members and Mr. Louis Earl. The duties of the
Co-op Board are many and varied. It  is they who decide the general rules
and  regulations concerning  the business policies  of the store.
Improvements are also ap-proved  by them. This year Mr. Earl has taken over
the management of the Co-op,  and under his leadership the store has
real-ized  a very successful year.  Co-op Board: Culbertson, Watts, M.
Smith, Hatch,  Monson, Clark, Earl.  Board of Control Members: Rusher,
Hatch, Douglas,  M. Smith.  More Board of Control: Pratt, O'Neil, Easley,
Clark.  Forty-one

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 42

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WE CAPTURE FOR  Since the day of her appoinment to the  position of 1942
yearbook editor, Jane Hamilton has not lapsed for one second  from her
Klipsun consciousness. Working  her creative abilities, both artistic and
liter-ary  to capacity, she has put out a book for  WWC students that has
permanently cap-tured  for them glimpses of their lives on  the campus.  In
addition to being Klipsun editor, versa-tile Jane is a member of Valkyrie,
Vanadis  Bragi, Paletteers, and ACE. She was re-cently  listed in "Who's
Who in American  Colleges."  Organized into a class for the first time, 
the staff of Western Washington College's  Klipsun met formally once (and
informally  many more times) each week to learn under  the general
supervision of Mrs. Ruth A.  Burnet, adviser, and Jane Hamilton, editor, 
the methods and means of publishing a  yearbook. The group thus had
experience  with all the departments of the annual  rather than with just
one small section. As  prospective teachers in a teachers' college,  the
staff learned how to help children in the  problems of putting out a
yearbook.  EDITOR-IN-CHIEF: Jane Hamilton.  Besides all the usual problems
that have to be met by yearbook heads, this year  the problem of financing
plagued the editor and business manager. Finally, by bring-ing  the
loyalties of the student body to the rescue, the  staff managed to find
ways and  means of keeping up the standards set by previous first-class
honor Klipsuns.  It is hoped that this annual, published in a time of war
and uncertainty, will help  to re-create most of the pleasant memories and
experiences of the past year.  FIRST ANNUAL PRESS CLUB CONFERENCE  Top Row:
Esvelt, EWC; Hoff, PLC; Legg, CWC; Stevens, CWC; Hamilton, WWC. Bottom Row:
Phillips, WWC; Palmer, PLC; Holm, PLC.

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POSTERITY TIHE MAKING OF A YEAR  Another feature of the 1941-42 Klipsun
year was the conference  of all the editors  and managers of small colleges
of Washington, held in conjunction with the WWC weekly newspaper, the
WWCollegian, during fall quarter. Ideas on different publica-tions  were
exchanged  and a permanent press conference established. Schools
repre-sented  were EWC, CWC, St. Martin's, and Pacific Lutheran.  Editor
Hamilton's aides-in-chief have been Julia Klann and Hazel Anderson,
respectively business manager and assistant editor of the 1942 Klipsun.  In
her official capacity Julia has worked  faithfully to keep down expenses
without  sacrificing quality-a problem increas-ingly  difficult in the face
of rising prices  and decreased enrollment.  Pictures don't just happen . .
. ask  Hazel. Most of the photography for  this year's annual has been
under her  efficient supervision.  THE STAFF  Top Right: Hazel And-erson, 
Assistant Edi-tor,  and Julia Klann,  business manager, re-lax  after a
busy ses-sion with the Klipsun.  Left Center: Sports  Editors Annis Hovde 
and Virginia Krueger  confer together.  Right Center:  Staff writers Eric 
Phillips and Joy Hatt  await instructions.  Right Bottom:  The Art and
Picture Staff get together to  dicuss different points  of mounting and 
photography.  Assistant Art Editor  Ellen Van Wieringen;  Art Editor
Rosemary  Bolster; Picture Staff,  Bernice Elenbaas and  Betty Groger. 
Forty- three

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 44

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WE PROPAGATE  The WWCollegian Staff, in addition to its regular edition,
put out several special editions which added to the color of outstanding
events and are lasting souvenirs of  memorable occasions. Among these
over-and-above specialties were the Homecoming  edition, the War extra, and
the Publications Prom extra. In April a special edition, to  be sent out to
high school seniors, was published. The WWCollegian attained an all-time 
high in circulation with this issue ... 10,000 copies. THE STAFF  Top: 
Dick King, Sports Editor.  Bernice Shellhamer, Winter  Managing Editor. 
Wayne Kotula, Business  Manager.  Middle Picture:  Standing: Beecroft,
Dwelle,  Loop, Lanterman.  Seated: Ringstad, B. Miller,  Douglas, Bryan. 
Bottom Picture:  Standing: Woodcock, Bee-croft,  Myette, Washburn,  Leek,
Stevens.  Seated: Fjellman, Easton,  Campbell, Baker, Wilkin-son. 
Forty-four

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WWC ACTIVITIES  Eric Phillips, Editor-in-Chief . .  words on a door, which
come to  life just inside to the left. Genial,  hard working Phillips has
been busy  supervising the publication of the  WWCollegipn through a year
of  financial upheaval.  He has extended his journalistic  endeavors to a
radio feature, A College Editor Views the News,  which is an innovation on
the  weekly college newscast.  Eric is now president of the  Washington
Intercollegiate Press  Association, successfully initiated  this year due
to his tireless efforts.  EDITOR-IN-CHIEF: Eric Phillips.  Wayne Kotula,
business manager, has lab-ored behind the scenes to keep the WWCol-legian 
out of the red. His services have been of  unquestioned value, though
undercover of the  excitement created with each edition of the  paper. His
were the everyday  headaches and  worries of caring for the importan+ minor
de-tails  of managing, and of paying all the bills   created by his
editorial staff.  Mrs. Burnet serves in a dual role  as publications
adviser and teacher  of cub reporters. From a crowd  of aspiring
journalists she trains  an effective staff for the present,  and with an
eye on years to come,  discovers and develops managers  and editors of the
future.  Bottom Left: Party at the  print shop during Washing-ton 
Intercollegiate Press  Association.  Bottom Right: Mrs. Ruth A.  Burnet,
Publications Ad-viser.  Forty-five  I

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ONCE THERE WERE TEN PRINCESSES  Hazel Anderson, Sheila Moore, Bernice
Renius, Liv Bruseth, Jo Daniels,  Jane Hamilton, Evelyn Peterson, Gloria
Swanson, June Mohrmann.  Top Picture (lower right corner): Mr. Esquire is
surrounded by admirers  at the Princess Assembly.  Standing: Daniels, Finn,
Groger, DeClements, Mueller, Douglas, Neevel,  Swanson, Hamilton, E.
Peterson.  Middle Picture (lower right corner): V;  and Friday the 13th
inspire decorati  Prom. Lanterman, Myette, Folsoy,

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 47

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AND ONE RULED FOR A NIGHT  PUBLICATIONS PROM  "And the princess of the
Third Annual Publications Prom is . . . LIV BRUSETH,  WWC junior from
Darrington." Thus spake Bill Tiffany as the reigning beauty of the  annual
Klipsun-WWCollegian all-school informal was announced to the dancers and 
the townspeople of Bellingham. Liv was handed the scepter of the press by
former  WWCollegian editor, Clarence Soukup.  In the large gymnasium, which
was gayly decorated with a combination theme of  black cats and valentines
for the Friday, February 13, date, seven hundred dancers  witnessed all the
pageantry connected with the regal affair.  Under the direction of Klipsun
editor, Jane Hamilton, and WWCollegian head,  Eric Phillips, approximately
fifty people on the two publications worked to make the gala occasion a
reality. Feature of this year's prom was the fifteen-minute program 
broadcast to the people of Washington over the new Evergreen network. A
thirty-minute  program over the local station KVOS included the
announcement of the  princess and music by the orchestra.  Forty-seven

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 48

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ASSOCIATED WOMEN STUDENTS  Circle Picture:  Bernice Monson, President.  Top
Picture: AWS Commission:  Bernice Monson, Haggard, Douglas,  Gaines,
Burritt, Bell, D. Miller,  Earlywine, Miss Powers, Heaton,  H. Anderson,
Krause, Miss Coun-tryman.  Lower Left Picture: Kids' Party:  Dwelle, H.
Anderson, Van Wierin-gen.  Lower Right Picture: Registering for  H. S.
Girls' Conference:  At Right: Peterson, Norton, Adams.  At Left: Three
Registrants.  AWS ... Activities  The "ice breaking" Kid Party, sponsored
during opening week, helped to create  a quick spirit of friendliness among
new and old women  students of the college.  Membership in AWS is held by
every woman on the campus. The organization is governed by the AWS
Commission. The Commission, with the club adviser, Miss  Countryman, meets
early, in a pre-school conference, to plan the program for the  year, and
meets regularly thereafter.  The entire club has met once a month during
the year; programs ranged from  talks on travel to student talent programs.
The versatility of each member of this  organization was indexed thru
talent cards, which were kept on file and referred to  when programs were
scheduled.  The highlight of the year was the annual high  school girls'
conference, under the  chairmanship of capable Evelyn Peterson. Other
activities of the club were: the infor-mals,  the regular Thursday
afternoon teas, and the Fall and Spring fashion shows.  Forty- eight

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NORSEMEN ... Service  The Norsemen is a man's service organization,
gov-erned  by a commission. Its purpose is to further school  activities,
to sponsor social affairs, and to add to the  school spirit. The winter
quarter informal and the spring  quarter boat cruise are two of the many
outstanding  Norsemen sponsored social events of the school year.  Mickey
Smith was the chief executive of this organization fall and winter quarter,
and Arnold Lahti succeeded him  during the spring quarter.  Another
purposeful activity of the Norsemen is the  maintenance of the men's lounge
room. Each year they  are active in acquainting new men students with
college  life and activities. They wel-come  all men into the group  and 
have built in the three  years of their existence a de-pendable, 
school-spirited or-ganization  that is a tribute  to WWC. Ramon T. George 
and Loye McGee, Dean of  Men, are the advisers.  NORSEMEN Top: Norse Head: 
Mickey Smith, President.  Middle: Norse Commission:  O'Neil, Ropes, M.
Smith, Stenson.  Bottom:  Pettyjohn, Connell, Hollingsworth.  P'orty-nine

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VALKYRIE  Top Row:  Dwelle, Haggard, Rusher, Bolster,  Lowrey, Heaton. 
Middle Row:  Easley, Krueger, Hamilton, Peter-son,  Douglas, Reilly,
Bruseth, H.  Pratt, Earlywine.  Bottom Row:  Krause, Culbertson, Monson,
Nee-vel,  Needham, Anderson, Hilton,  O'Meara.  W CLUB  Top Row:  Keown,
Glenn, Hovde, Goodman.  Middle Row:  Carver, Mitchell, Pettyjohn, Mc- 
Millan, Lappenbusch.  Bottom Row:  Munizza, Gudyka, Dahl, Fleming,  Nelson.
 VALKYRIE ... Vim  A royal blue sweater plus a club emblem-Val-kyrie 
uniform . . . Service, pep, initiative, loyalty,  school spirit-Valkyrie
tests.  This year, under President Evelyn Peterson, the  club has actively
supported our teams, conducted  campus tours, and stood squarely behind
school  enterprises. Contributions to college social life were  the
Valkyrie sponsored dances--the novel "Buc-caneer's  Brawl" winter quarter,
and the annual  Spring Sports Dance. W CLUB... Vigor  Membership in this
organization is limited to the  letter earning men, who wear a large white
W on  a blue sweater.  Under the leadership of Lyle Pettyjohn and Larry 
Munizza, the W Club has had a most successful  year. Winter quarter they
united with the Norse-men  to sponsor an informal dance. On their own  they
engineered a very successful sports dance in  the spring.  Valkyrie girls,
active in the cheer section, at a WWC  basketball game.  Fifty

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TOP PICTURE-VANADIS BRAGI  Top Row: Bee, German, Barron.  Second Row: Leu,
King, Hicks, Hovde, Hewittson.  Bottom Row: Thompson, DeClements, 
Mohrmann, Hamilton, Bryan,  Nolan. BOTTOM PICTURE-PALETTEERS  Top Row:
Stephens, Bjorkquist,  Brown.  Second Row: Sahlin, Eines,  Siegen-thaler, 
Van Wieringen, Groger.  Bottom Row: Oliver, Anderson, War-drum,  Grieff,
Redden. VANADIS BRAGI ... Literary  For those who are more interested in 
literature, poetry, or special literary topics,  Vanadis Bragi affords
opportunity for ex-pression  and appreciation in this field.  Members
sometimes write short stories,  essays, or verses as a form of diversion. 
PALETTEERS . . . Artful Paletteers was formed by those students  who have a
special interest in art. The  introduction of sketching trips and the 
planning of the Christmas exhibit in the  main hall were two new features
carried on by the club this year.  Ellen Van Wieringen, active mem-ber  of
Paletteers, paints some. WWC scenery.  Fifty-one

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TOP PICTURE-ACE  Top Row: Louden, Gaines, L. Smi'h,  Hansen, Beers, Holmes,
Harrison,  Heaton, Swalling, Rundquist, E.  Peterson.  Second Row:
Siegenthaler, Mohr-mann,  Forester, Oliver, Bruseth, Bolster, Hilton,
Waterbury,  Beyer, Strom, Lewis, Wittler.  Bottom Row: Needhan, Carr, Wall,
 Stroebel, Griffith, Olling, Schilke,  DeClements, Alvord, H. Pratt. 
BOTTOM PICTURE-CCF  Top Row: Mr. Shaver, German, -  Peterson, Klein,
Kildall.  Second Row: Manhart, Rogers,  Meyer, Ordway, Kemp, Lee. Bottom
Row: H. Davis, Modin, Huot,  H. Jones, Buckley.  ACE . . . Professional 
Although only three years old, The Asso-ciation  for Childhood Education
has been  a stimulating club for would-be primary teachers. A toy display
was put on fall  quarter, a mock interview held last quarter  with Mr. C.
Paine Shangle, and various  helpful meetings sponsored throughout the 
year.  Evelyn Peterson, student teacher   and active members of ACE,
dis-cusses  science with two campus school  children.  CCF ... Inspiring
The immediate aim of the CCF is to  promote Christian fellowship among the 
students of the campus. As  often as pos-sible  the club invites Christian
leaders to  speak to them. They hold meetings reg-ularly, often at the noon
hour, but occas-ionally  at their more homey fireside gath-erings. 
Fifty-two

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Jay Hatt knits for Alkisiah  ALKISIAH . . Cultural  Having the distinction
of being the wo-men's  club of earliest origin on the campus,  Alkisiah is
an ever popular club. In an  impressive candelelight ceremony the
in-itiates  pledged their vows. Affiliated with  the State Federation of
Women's Clubs,  Alkisiah devotes  its meetings to the study  of fine arts. 
TOP PICTURE-ALKISIAH  Top Row: Bulmer, Harrison, Rogers, Hatt, Larson,
Mohrmann, Benja-min,  Bishop, Main, Schilke.  Second Row: Hansen, L.Smith,
Rund-quist,   Heaton, Whittler, Wafer,  Meek, Dalby, Richards, Wilkin-son. 
Bottom Row: Oiling, Kosche, Moore, Myette, Louden, Husfloen, Aus,  C.
Smith, H. Anderson.  BOTTOM PICTURE-BLUE  TRIANGLE  Top Row: Clendenen,
Hammond,  Gines, Olson.  Second Row: J. Klann, Shellhammer,  Thompson,
Forester, Holmes, Carr.  Bottom Row: Nollan, Manhart, Stroe-bel,  Strom,
Pearson.  BLUE TRIANGLE ... Service Carrying on with the work done by the 
Girl Reserves, the Blue Triangle sponsors  Thanksgiving baskets and
entertains chil-dren  of the orthopedic ward in St. Joseph's  hospital.
Meetings are held twice monthly   around a cheery fireplace in their cozy
club-house.  These gatherings are presided over  by Pollyann Phillips,
president.  Fifty-three

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SCHOLARSHIP  SOCIETY ... Knowing  This is the only honorary or-ganization 
at WWCE. Their  purpose  is to recognize and  stimulate scholastic ideals.
A  grade point of 3.5 for three  consecutive quarters is required  for
membership.  DRAMA CLUB . . . Starlets  The purpose of the Drama Club is to
 give students an opportunity to express  their abilities on the stage and
over the  radio. Victor Hoppe and Ramon George  are the advisers.  Dramatic
ability is the prime requisite for  membership. This club has been more
than  successful.  TOP PICTURE-SCHOLARSHIP  Top Row: Shiers, Hatch, Barron.
 Bottom Row: M. Pratt, Strom, Mary  Davis, Rantanen, Oliver.  MIDDLE
PICTURE-DRAMA CLUB  Top Row: Haggard, Brock, Neal, Bar-ron,  Alvord. 
Second Row: Pearson, H. Pratt, K.  Smith, Pirrung, True, Tedford.  Bottom
Row: Rogers, Farrar, Dwelle,  Hatt, H. Anderson.  BOTTOM PICTURE - INTER-
NATIONAL  RELATIONS CLUB  Top Row: Young, Leiser, Newman,  Carstenson. 
Second Row: Barron, Phillips, Ellis,  Leuken, Glenn.  Bottom Row: Enos,
Bellingham,  Shiers, Newell, Roper. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS  CLUB ...
Timely  International Relations Club is sponsored  by the Carnegie
Endowment for Interna-tional  Peace. Members are sincerely inter-ested  in
current world affairs and wish to  gain a better understanding of their
impli-cations.  Fifty-four

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HAPPY HOUSES ON THE HILL  Under twenty-three, looking for a place  to lay a
head and park a student lamp? A  typical situation. Getting the list of
ap-proved  houses from the dean of women or  dean of men and shopping
around - a  typical situation.  There are many houses on the hill located
conveniently to the college, and each stu-dent  is free to choose the one
that best  fills his needs. The housemothers are re-sponsible  for
maintaining proper living  standards, as set by the school, for their
group. In most of the houses, community  or private kitchens are provided
for stu-dents  who wish to do their own cooking.  Every quarter the house
members elect a  president, a social chairman, and a reporter.  In addition
to its private social activities  each group participates as a whole in
all-school  affairs.   Preparation of a display for Homecom-ing  and
presentation of skits for the Home-coming  and Campus Day assemblies are 
house projects. Sometime during the year  each house is responsible for one
of the  Thursday afternoon teas in the AWS Room.  This year marked the
successful initial ap-pearance  of the men's houses in the latter 
activity.  FOUR OF THE MANY ORGANIZED  HOUSES ADJOINING THE CAMPUS.  Top to
Botton: Collett Court, Harbor-view  Hall, Edwards' Hall, and Hill-top. 
Fifty-five

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Top Left: Tense moment during a WWC radio broadcast. Tiffany, Folsom,
Glenn. Top Right: Supervisor Ramon T. George at  the controls.  Botton
Left: Sound Effects. Kristjansson, Bottom Middle: Waiting for the Signal.
Bottom Right: Mike Fright! Kristjansson,  Wright, Neal, Glenn. Neal, Mr.
George, H. Anderson. Wright, Glenn, Neal.  RADIO  Under the guiding hand of
Ramon George, of the speech department, the radio  division here at WWC has
carried on many varied types of activities. News casts, dramas, and
on-the-spot broadcasts were aired.  The remote control system was broadcast
over KVOS, a  member of the Evergreen  network, increased the coverage from
1,000 to about 10,000 listeners.  A weekly feature from the college is the
"News-Week-in-Review," broadcasting  campus news. Now high- lighted on this
program is Eric Phillips, editor of the WWCol-legian,  giving a college
editor's views on the news. Bill Tiffany, mellow-voiced  announcer,
assisted George with these presentations. as did Don Neal, Hazel Ander-son,
 and JoAnna Kristiansson.  Student directors for dramas and the operators
of the control board were Paul  Glenn and Bill Hatch.  Aired from the
college studios was a series of Red Cross dramatizations, illustrat-ing 
the inside scenes of the Red Cross in the war. These and other plays were
presented  by the class in radio broadcasting, Speech 120, augmented by
other student talent.  Fifty-six

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HIGH NOTES IN MUSIC  The musical opportunities at WWC are wide and varied,
fitting the needs of both the beginning and the skilled students. We have
three excellent music directors:  Miss Mira Booth, Mr. Nils Boson and Mr.
Donald Bushell. Among the activities offered  are the band, the orchestra,
the string ensemble, and A Cappella choir. Trips are  often taken by these
groups to display our talents before various audiences.  One of the most
impressive musical presentations of the year was the A Cappella  choir's
Christmas concert in the vaulted, cathedral-like halls of the library. Both
college students and townspeople attended.  The band, in blue and white
uniforms, was a symbol of loyalty at the  athletic  events throughout the
year. It added much to school spirit and enthusiasm at the  games.  Every 
Christmas, Miss Booth directs both the Edens Hall carolers and the Edens 
Hall choir. The carolers sing outside faculty windows in the early morning,
and the  choir entertains the tea guests, on the Sunday of the annual Edens
Hall Christmas tea.  Numerous well-known musicians are presented in our
assemblies. Students are  also given tickets to the Civic Music
Association, where they have had the oppor-tunity  this  year of hearing
artists of international reputation, such as Sir Thomas  Beecham, Szigeti,
and the Lhevinnes, duo-pianists.  EDENS HALL CHOIR SINGS AT THE TRADITIONAL
CHRISTMAS TEA.  Fifty- seven

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MUSIC MASTERS  DONALD BUSHELL  Besides conducting the  band and the Western
Wash-ington Symphony Orchestra,  Donald Bushell directs the  String
Ensemble which fills  the background with soft music at formal collegiate
af-fairs.  A fine conductor and  talented 'cellist, Mr. Bushell  is well
known to Bellingham  music lovers.  Top Picture: Band.  First Row:
Bjorkquist, Bartlett, Gardiner, H. Davis, Mohrmann, Dow, Leek, B. Nelson,
Lahti,  Watson, N. Jones.  Second Row: O'Neil, H. Hardy, Rusher, Fackler,
J. Thompson, A. Clark, Bright, B. Hatt, Prince,  S. Anderson.  Third Row:
R. Huot, Elliot, M. Peters, G. Hjartarson, L. Schilke, Hampton, Berry,
Massar.  Bottom Picture: WWC Orchestra during Rehearsal.  C. Klann, C.
Jones, B. Hatt, Prince, Bodey, Elliot, Gardiner, Huot, Watts, Hampton,
Madden,  Hicks.  if/ t y-eight

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CHOIR  Top Row: Dow, Rawlinson, Stoddard, Bezer, Hjartarson, Conlee,
Carstensen, Packard, Goodman.  Bottom Row: Norton, Brown, Tangvold, Howem,
Whittler, Dwelle, Eines, D. Bell,  S. Anderson, Colouzis.  CHOIR NILS BOSON
 The College choir presents the campus songbirds. This organization  was
also plagued this year by the insufficient number of men students,  but the
quality of the personnel is so superior as to outweight the lack  of
quantity. Under the direction of Nils Boson, the choir has partic-ipated 
in many college assemblies, has traveled to nearby cities to pre-sent 
programs, and greatly enhanced the Christmas spirit by their  annual
concert in the stately hall of the library.  BAND   Dressed in trim blue
and white military uniforms, band members may  be seen at all college
football and basketball games and at pep rallies.  Under the direction of
Donald Bushell the band furnished a colorful background for the annual
Homecoming festivities.  The Crystal Ballroom of the Hotel Leopold was the
scene of the  Bandsmen's informal fall quarter.  ORCHESTRA  The Western
Washington Symphony Orchestra gives students,  alumni, and friends residing
near the college an opportunity to take  part in concert playing.  The
Orchestra during winter quarter gave a concert at Stanwood,  and during the
spring quarter presented a concerto recital with Dr. A.  C. Hicks as guest
soloist.  Congenial, witty, slightly satirical... Nils Boson, music 
department head, is best  known by the College at  large for his fine A
Cappella  choir. His enthusiastic sup-port  of the Civic Music Asso-ciation
 has made its Artists  Series available to the  WWC student body. 
Fifty-nine

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GEORGE WASHINGTON SLEPT HERE  Top Picture:  Campbell, Fromme.  Second
Picture from Top: Campbell, Brock, Barron.  Opening the WWC drama season, 
Third Picture from Top: director Victor H. Hoppe presented  "George
Washington Slept Here," in the  Bottom Picture: Edens Hall Blue Room,
penthouse style. He  Barron, Mrs. Haggard, was aided by Jean Tedford,
assistant di-  Dr. Haggard, Campbell. rector; Lorraine Montgomery, stage
man-ager;  and Rudo Fromme, who was in charge  of make-up.  This Kaufman
and Hart comedy caused  the Blue Room to echo with laughs from the  many
amusing and sometimes risque cracks.  The play consisted of humorous
snatches  taken from the life of a family of city suck-ers  who 'got took"
in the country. A cap-able  cast helped to make the play an out- standing 
success.  f .CAST  M r. Kim ber ..................  Newton Fuller
..........  Anabelle Fuller_... . ..... M a d g e Fulle r ............... 
Steve Eldridge. ...... __  K a tie - - - - - - - - - - - - - -  M rs.
Douglas -.......  C layton Evans ... ..........  Rena Leslie .. . . .  H
ester -................. . . .  Raym ond -------- ---  Uncle Stanley
...........  Leggett Fraze.r. .. ........  Tommy Hughes _....  Sue
Barrington.. ..  Miss Wilcox ......  Mr. Prescott _..-......  First Truck
Driver.......  Second Truck Driver ...  _.. ... _ Eric Phillips  .......
Declan Barron  .... Clinta Campbell  .....Margaret Dwelle  ........ Lyle
Pettyjohn  ------- Virginia Norton  Margaret Haggard  ....... Robert Muckey
 .Lois Adams  .............M arie Davis  ._._............Ed O lson 
........... Arthur Brock  Gustav Christenson  --..--.. -Robert Boice 
-.-.-- ..S hirley Folsom  ... Bernice Renius Richard King  . . Don Neal 
... ..... W ill Leek  Sixty

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 61

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THE BARRETTS  "The Barretts" by Marjorie Carleton was  the winter quarter
dramatic production of WWC. The play is based on the lives of  the Barrett
family, ruled over by their  tyrannical father who almost ruins their 
lives. After a brief courtship, charming  Elizabeth Barrett and the
impulsive poet, Robert Browning, outwit the father and  elope to Italy. The
play, although a highly  dramatic one, contains a great deal of  comedy and
humor.  CAST  Henrietta Barrett .........S.h.ir.le.y. .F olsom  Milly .
y..-.........  Ellen Van W ieringen  George Barrett- ---.--..._.
...____Jack Knutson  Octavius Barrett ...... Jack Thompson  Edward
Moulton-Barrett- Declan Barron  John Kenyon-....-... ....._.. - James
Wright  Arabel Barrett ------Jo.A.n.n.a .K.r istjansson  Elizabeth Barrett
-..-...E.l.i.za.b eth Douglas  s Wilson..-------... --.- .-.. .
--------.Rae Burke  Captain Surtees-Cook --.J.u.s tin Simonson  S Robert
Browning......... Will Leek Miss Mitford _______ __ - Joy Hatt  Top
Picture: Leek, Douglas.  Second Picture from Top:  J. Hatt, Barron,
Knutsen, Douglas  Third Picture from Top:  Folsom, Kristjannson, Simonsen,
Douglas  Bottom Picture:  Folsom, Knutsen, Barron, Kristjannson,, J.
Thompson  Sixty-one

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THE SUN  reaches  golden fingers  warm and supple. Life glows and  grows,
glad under its soft  touch. And growing gains new  strength.  My impulse is
 to play. Brightness scatters all  my will to learn of vitamins and war.
I'd sooner  see  you, muddy but  determined, hold that line,  our heroes,
win or lose, and grow hoarse with "Blue White, Fight  Fight."  Winter
comes, but  fall has left stored energy  behind. I watch with  eagerness
lithe bodies, flashing  arms,  and lightning legs.  Look out, that one was
really out of bounds. Time out. Who's  that coming in? Are we still  ahead?
..  Oh, well, there's still  a chance, that is if Uncle  Sam lets Mother
Nature  take her course . . . a privilege  that  now she seldom  has since
days are dark with  war and fear of things to  come. Through the leaves
sunlight  dapples  the smoothness of  a page. Letters dance. Little  men,
fighting ... I'm afraid...  Today the sun shines cold. CAMPU SO

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Top Left Picture:  Bill Leek, leader of the blue and white band.  Top Right
Picture:  Art Brock, capable Homecoming chairman.  Bottom Right Picture: 
Exciting moment during the winning Home-coming  game  with Ellensburg. 
HOMECOMING  Homecoming ... Sigrid IV . . . Vikings versus Wildcats . . .
Freshman bon-fire...  Serpentine and parade. These were the highlights of
Western Wash-ington  College's eighteenth annual Homecoming celebration
held Novem-ber  14, 15, 16.  Art Brock, Seattle sophomore, coordinated the
activities of a large number  of workers on a dozen committees to make the
grads' reappearance on the  campus of their alma mater a joyous one.  The
fourth member of the reigning Sigrid dynasty was pretty Bernice Mon-son, 
Bellingham junior. She was chosen by the members of the football team  from
among the many candidates selected by the clubs and organizations on  the
campus.  Sixty- four

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TOP PICTURE: Homecoming Queen poses with her court of princesses.  Left to
Right: Helen Jean Pratt, Junior Princess; Frances Neevel, Senior Princess;
Bernice Monson,  Homecoming Queen; Bernice Elenbaas, Sophomore Princess;
and Shelia Moore, Freshman Princess.  BOTTOM LEFT: Edens Hall Prize Winning
Homecoming display.  BOTTOM RIGHT: Queen Bernice comes down the aisle on
the arm of President Haggard after her  impressive coronation.  Smiles,
Greetings, blue W's in white chrysanthemums and the cheers of the
crowd-HOMECOMING.  Sixty-five

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Coach Lappenbusch and Captain Hollingsworth.  Western Washington is a
member of  the Washington Intercollegiate Con-ference  along with Eastern
and Central  Washington, Pacific Lutheran, and St. Martins. The Winco
league is one of the  strongest of the smaller college leagues  Df the
Pacific coast; competition is keen  and the boys play a rough, tough brand 
Df football.  With a number of experienced men  answering the opening
whistle, and with  5 tough schedule ahead of them, Coach  Lappenbusch and 
Assistant Coach Roy  Franko set to work. They came up with  s team that
provided the college foot-ball fans with plenty of thrills and
spine-tingling  moments.  FOOTBALL, 1941  The two-head strategists of the  
Viking grid machine, Coach Charles  Lappenbusch and Captain Jimmy 
Hollingsworth, go into a huddle.  Lappy, ending his ninth year as head 
coach of the Vikings, came up with  another fighting outfit this year. 
Captain Hollingsworth, all-conference  guard for three years, played his 
fourth and final season in a  Viking  uniform.  Piling up fifteen first
downs to their  opponents one, the Vikings opened the  1941 season with a
13 to 0 victory over  Linfield College of McMinnville, Ore-gon.  Both the
Viking touchdowns came  from passes, one in the first quarter and  the
other in the second.  Although the Norse were within the  twenty-yard
stripe four times during the  game, they were only able to score one 
touchdown. Targus carried the ball over  the goal line in the beginning of
the sec-ond  quarter. Score Vikings, 7; C.P.S., 0. The Viks made it three
in a row when  they journeyed over the mountains to  take the Ellensburg
Wildcats  into camp  to the tune of 19 to 13. It was a battle  all the way,
but the Viks had what it  takes to win. Sixty-six

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BROMLEY, Tackle  BRYSKI, Halfback  CONNELL, Tackle  CORNWALL, Guard  DAHL,
End ERICKSON, Guard  FLEMING, Tackle  GLASER, Tackle  GOODMAN, Guard 
GRUBB, Guard GUDYKA, End  HEBERT, Fullback  FOOTBALL SQUAD: ON OPPOSITE
PAGE  Front Row: Hardman, Israelson, Cornwell, Dahl, Mitchell, Keown,
Goodman, Glaser, Nelson, Byriski.  Second Row: Hollingsworth, Erickson,
Neal, Sien, Karlis, Smith, Grubb, Sanford, Connell, Van Rooy, Thornton. 
Third Row: Franko, Gudyka, Bromley, Thomas, Targus, Fleming, McMillan,
Packard, Laflin, Emry,  Musgrove, Coach Lappenbusch.  Sixty-seven

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FRANKO, Manager  KEOWN, Fullback  McMILLAN, Fullback  MITCHELL, Center 
MUNIZZA, End MUSGROVE, Fullback  NEAL, Tackle  PACKARD, End  SANFORD,
Quarterback  SMITH, Quarterback TARGUS, Halfback  THOMAS, End  RECORD OF
SCORES  Washington--  Washington.  Washington- Washington_  Washington.. 
Washington-  Washington-  Washington-  TotaL .......  13 Linfield College 
7 College of Puget Sound  19 Central W ashingto.n.. . .........  6 Portland
University.  6 Pacific Lutheran __..................  6 Eastern Washington
.....  20 Saint Martins...  19 Central Washington__.  96 Total ......
....... ...... . . .  Western  Western  Western  Western  Western  Western 
Western  Western  Sixty-eight  00  13  6  --- 25  14  13  7  ---- 78  ... _
 -- - -- - -- - -- -

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 69

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A highly touted Portland University team stopped  the Vikings' win streak.
The game ended in a 6 to 6 deadlock. A pass from Targus to Dahl scored the 
Viking touchdown. Portland also scored on passes. Both touchdowns came in
the fourth quarter.  Pacific Lutherans, led by the little All-Americans,
Harshman and Tommervik, handed the Norse a de-cisive  trimming. Score: 25
to 6. The Lutes were ahead 13 to 6 at the half and went on to score in  the
third quarter and again in the fourth.  Lon Musgrove scored one touchdown
for the Vik-ings,  but one touchdown wasn't enough. Cheney  clinched the
game in  the fourth quarter when Half-back  Joe Wilson scored on an end
run. Final score:  Vikings, 6; Cheney, 14.  The Viks hit the win column
again with  a 20 to 13 victory over St. Martins.  Targus scored two of the
Vikings touch-downs  and Norm Nelson the third. Good  line play featured
the Viking offense.  The Homecoming game proved a big  success as the
Vikings again walloped  Ellensburg by a score of 19 to 7. Bryski  scored
twice, once on the well-known  statue of liberty play. The other Viking 
touchdown came  on a pass from Targus  to Thomas.  VIKINGS TRY FOR POINT 
Musgrove, Bromley, Hollingsworth, INSPIRATIONAL  Tuffy Nelson, after
playing two years  of great football for the Blue and White,  was chosen as
the inspirational player  of the 1941 season. A smart, exper-ienced 
player, Tuffy proved a valuable  cog in Lappy's grid machine. At the  end
of fall quarter Tuffy gave up his  quarterback duties to become a mem-ber 
of Uncle Sam's Naval Reserve.  IN HOMECOMING CLASSIC  Connell, Thomas,
Mitchell, L. Smith.  Sixty-nine

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BASKETBALL  OUR RECORD  WWC.... 65 Paine Field Flyers 37  WWC .... 44  WWC
.... 32  WWC.... 29  WWC.... 37  WWC .... 48  WWC .... 35  WWC... 50  WWC
... 42  WWC... 54  WWC ... 47 WWC.... 55  WWC.... 50  WWC.... 53  WWC... 44
 WWC.... 57  WWC.... 25  WWC ... 40  PLC  PLC PLC  PLC  CPS  EWC  EWC  SMC 
SMC  SMC  SMC  CWC  CWC  CWC  CWC  EWC  EWC  When the Western Washington
College Vikings took the floor against  the Paine Field Flyers, no one had
any idea what Coach Lappenbusch  had in the way of a conference team. When
the game had finished  with the Norsemen on the long end of a 65-37 score,
everyone knew  that the Vikings would be the team to beat for the WINKO
champion-ship.  The Blue and White clad team began the race for the cup by
taking three out of four games from the Pacific Lutheran Gladiators, the
1941  WINKO champions.  BEZER DAHL  MUNIZZA  HARKLEROAD  KINK  LOWERY 
LUDWICK  NYBERG  PETTYJ OH N RICHARDSON  ROPES  WILSON  Seventy

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The Vikings showed they had sustaining power when they took a king's-x game
 from College of Puget Sound Loggers by a 48-49 count.  In the next two
game series, Lappy's men met the other contender for the crown,  The
Eastern Washington College Savages. After losing the first game, 40-35, the
 Norse, lead  by guard Ernie Ludwick, came back and smothered the aspiring
Savages,  50-37.  St. Martins College made the struggle a little bit hard
on the Vikings when they  copped three of the four maple court games. The
results of this series practically  eliminated the WWC team from the
championship.  In the series with the Central Washington College Wildcats
the Vikings wasted  no time-they won three of the four games and set
themselves into the second place  spot.  In the final series of the year
the vitamin men of Lappenbusch took a double beat-ing  from the champions
of the WINKO league, the EWC Savages. Though strong contenders at the
outset of the season the Vikings lost out because  of the lack of reserve
power. However, when the Norsemen ended up in a tie for  second place,
everyone, including Coach Lappenbusch, was happy.  Top Picture:  Exciting
Moment on the Floor. Ludwick, Dahl.  Bottom Picture: BASKETBALL SQUAD  Back
Row: Dodd, Janikula, Strankman, Wilson, Rich-ardson,  Targus, Bezzer,
Snider, Gaffney.  Front Row: Lowery, Harkleroad, Dahl, Pettyjohn,  Ludwick,
Kink, Roper, Munizza, Coach Lappenbusch.  Seventy-one  I

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FRANK  GLENN  KRUEGER  LAHTI  LOOP  STRANKMAN  TENNIS  The prospects for a
successful tennis season look pretty bright as the Klipsun  goes to press.
Thus far the Vikings have decisively defeated the Mount Vernon Junior 
College team twice, and lost a close one to the champion Central Washington
College  Wildcats.  Coach C. F. Lappenbusch is fairly confident that the
Blue and White boys will at  least finish up in second place in the WINKO
league. At the WINKO conference  matches at Eastern Washington College in
the latter part of May the Vikings expect  to have more trouble with Ray
Whitfield and his cohorts from CWC, but are fairly  confident regarding the
final outcome of the matches with the other WINKO con-tenders.  Glenn and
Lahti make up the No. I Viking doubles team, while Frank and Strank-man 
compete in the No. 2 spot. In the matches with the Central Wildcats the No.
2  team proved somewhat stronger but, of course, against their No. 2
contenders. Warren  Frank, Fred Strankman, Hal Loop and Bill Krueger fill
the other positions.  Seventy-two

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GOLF  As the Klipsun goes to press, the prospects for Coach Sam Carver's
golf team  look rather bright. Led by veteran Bob Smith, a member of
Carver's 1941 WINKO  champion team, the Vikings will invade the Eastern
Washington fairways in the latter  part of May to contend for their ninth
consecutive conference crown.  The Norsemen proved they were right in their
fighting when they lost a hard  match to the University of Washington frosh
by the tight score of 8-7.  Besides Smith, the team sports another veteran
from last year, Bob Rogers, and  four newcomers, Ernie Ludwick, Bill
Wilder, Norm Lowery, and Bob McMurtrie.  The Vikings traveled south to
Lacey and Parkland and took just enough time off  to mop up the strange
fairways. At Lacey, Bob Smith and company took the St. Mar-tins  Rangers
into camp to the tune of 13 to 2. The Pacific Lutheran Gladiators were 
easier and fell to the Norsemen, 131/2 to 11/2. A week later the Vikings
entertained the University of Washington freshmen for  a return match. This
time the Carver proteges proved themselves by winning 81/2 to  61/  2-all
with two injured men swinging the clubs.  At this writing all the Blue and
White golfers have between them and the WINKO  crown is a trio of 
three-men teams on the eastern fairways.  LOWERY  LUDWICK  McMURTRIE 
ROGERS  SMITH WILDER  Seventy-three

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1942 TRACK  When Norm Dahl failed to return to school this spring quarter,
the prospects for  a successful track season were dark. Dahl, while running
for the Viking team for three  years, has built up quite a reputation in
the sprint events and had won the majority of  the Norse points in the 1941
conference meet.  Coach Sam Carver's thinclads showed that they were weak
in the running events  when  they met the Central Washington College
Wildcats in the initial track meet on  the new WWC oval early in May. The
Sarboemen from across the mountains ran  away from the Vikings by the
lopsided score of 90-41.  In this meet the Vikings won most of the field
events, though mainly with the help  of Lawrence Munizza, the Puyallup
junior who took first place in three spots: the  discus, the shotput, and
the javelin toss. Earl McMillan was the only WWC man to  cop a second place
in the running events, and that a close second in the 120-yard  high
hurdles.  AYLEN  BEECROFT  COACH CARVER  DAHL  GRUBB HICKENBOTTOM 
Seventy-four

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LEU  NELSON  MITCHELL  MUNIZZA  MacAU LAY  ROPES  In the next meet with the
Pacific Lutheran College Gladiators the following week,  the Vikings were
surprised-they lost what they thought was going to be a relatively  easy
meet. The score: 68-63. The Norsemen came through as usual in the field
events but lost a good many points in the all-important sprint and distance
races. Sterling  Harshman of PLC and  Larry Munizza of WWC each copped 16
points to tie for high  honors. Ed Hickenbottom was the iron man of the
meet; he won the mile and the half-mile  and took a second to Don Leu of
WWC in the two- mile race.  The Norsemen lost an opportunity to gain some
revenge for their first two losses  when their dual meet with the St.
Martin's Rangers was called off.  Toward the end of May the Viking
aggregation will  travel to Eastern Washington  to participate in the
annual WINKO meet. Central Washington's strong squad is  favored to repeat
their last year's championship performance.  Coach Carver, while knowing
that he hasn't the power and speed in sprints and  hurdles, expects to make
a good deal of trouble for the rest  of the contenders in the  field
events.  Seventy-five

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INTRAMURALS  With nearly every man in school partic-ipating,  intramural
sports took on a new  light this year. Basketball, long-time king of 
winter athletics, was dominated by Hilltop  House. The Hilltopers went
through the  entire season without a defeat, closing the  schedule with a
three-game win from the second-lace Sweepers.  Bowling stole the show in
its second year  at WWC. Gaining in popularity every week, the league
produced a lot of com-petition  and many much-improved keglers.  The
Faculty walked off with the honors,  after successfully staving off the
rest of the  teams for two quarters.  Lyle Pettyjohn grabbed the
foul-shooting  contest, with 88 perfect throws from a pos-sible  100, going
on to win the table tennis  championship. Don Roland, pre-tournament 
favorite, came through to win the badmin-ton  singles,  and teamed with
Webb John-son  to make it a clean sweep in the shuttle  sport.  Daniels
Hall won the swimming title in  the second annual swimming meet. The  meet
was climaxed by the record-shattering 100-yard event of Ralph Simonds,
breaking  the pool record set in 1938 by Maynard  Howatt.  Spring saw the
softball league reduced  to two teams, Hilltop and Daniels. Touch  football
was introduced and was received  with much enthusiasm, the softball teams 
playing football between softball games.  Top: Al Biggs prepares for a dive
into the WWC pool.  Second: Mr. Brewer lets one go in the weekly bowling
matches.  Third: Stuart instructs neophyte Bill Bender in the  manly art of
self-defense.  Bottom: Hilltop Intramural Basketball Champions.  Back Row:
Keown, Fleming.  Front Row: Smith, McMillan, Aylen. Seventy-Six

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WOMEN'S  RECREATION  ASSOCIATION  FRANCES NEEVEL  The WRA has been ably led
this past year by Frances  Neevel, president. Frances is very versatile
both in sports  and in school affairs. During spring quarter she took over 
the management of archery along with her other execu-tive  duties, and
supervised the backet social, one of the  events of the year. Through the
inspiration of her enthus-iastic leadership, the organization has risen to
new  heights.  Frances Neevel, President  ORGANIZATIONS Performing the
administrative duties of the WRA is the executive committee,  which is
composed of elective officers. Also assisting in the work of the
organization  is the WRA cabinet, which is made up of the managers of the
different seasonal sports  and the chairmen of standing committees. Leda
Pontius, general sports manager,  with the help of the managers for
individual sports, has carried out a program of activity which has given
the girls at WWC the opportunity to demonstrate their skill  in one or as
many sports as they enjoy. Emmy Earlywine, social chairman, has provided  a
variety of social activities for those who are more socially inclined. 
Since the purpose of the organization has changed in recent years from one
of  athletics and the winning of awards to one of recreation, both social
and athletic, the members voted a year ago to change the name from Women's
Athletic Association  to Women's Recreation Association. The newer name
typifies more clearly the whole  spirit of the organization. Adviser to the
WRA this year has been Miss Virginia Hawke, whose friendly and 
enthusiastic spirit has contributed much to the success of the
organization.  WRA EXECUTIVE  COMMITTEE  Back Row: Fraser, B. Elenbaas, 
Haggard, Krueger,  Earlywine.  Middle Row:  Fjellman, Sundback,  C. Smith,
Blanche  Monson, Easley.  Front Row:  Pontius, VanWierin-gen,  Neevel,
Beyer,  Stangle.  Seventy- seven

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ACTIVITIES  WRA USHERS  Tow Row: Wefer, Van Wieringen, M. Schilke.  Botton
Row: Harrison, Campbell, P. Rogers, Olling.  The WRA recreational program,
which  extends throughout the entire school year,  began last fall with
hockey and volleyball  holding the spotlight. During winter quar-ter,
interest shifted to basketball, badmin-ton,  and volleyball, and when the
sunny  weather of spring began calling the girls  out-of-doors, the program
changed to  archery, tennis, golf, and baseball. Each  sport was directed
by a manager who took  charge of turnouts every week.  Girls who have
displayed unusual skill in  aquatic sports are chosen as members of  the
Blue Barnacles. Besides giving several  parties for the enjoyment of the
members,  this group put on exhibitions of swimming  and diving and
sponsored, with the cooper-ation  of the Norsemen, a mixed swimming  and
diving meet during spring quarter.  Top: CHAMPION DIVER  Diving: Adams. 
Background: Fraser, Benjamin, Blanch Moore, Bishop.  Second from Top: WRA
CABINET  Back Row: Stangle, Bishop, Benjamin, Moore, Jewel,  Sawyer, Wefer.
 Front Row: Neevel, Fraser, Blanch Monson, Adams.  Second from Bottom:
BASKETBALL  Brunswick, Eines, Mueller, Biggs, Olds.  Bottom: VOLLEYBALL 
Seventy-eight

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 79

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OF WRA  Top Right: Members of Orchesis in an interpretive  dance. Betty Ann
Groger, Roxanna Sawyer,  and Jo  Needham.  Various clubs sponsored by the
WRA in-clude  Blue Barnacles, the Riding Club, the Badminton Club, and the
Dance Club. This  year the Dance Club, uniting with a national  dancing
organization, changed its name to  Orchesis. During spring quarter, the WRA
 sponsored an open house for the public  in which the Orchesis presented a
program  of folk dances, the Badminton Club gave  an exhibition of strokes,
and the Blue Bar-nacles  showed their aquatic skills.  Outstanding among,
the events of the  year were the initiation teas during fall and  spring
quarters, the Hallowe'en party of  fall quarter, and the basket social
early in  the spring. The most important event of  spring quarter for the
WRA was the high  school girls' and boys' Sport Day, which  was sponsored
with the aid of the Norse- men.  Guests were boys and girls from high 
schools of Whatcom and Skagit counties.  Also intermingled  with the
regular turn-outs  were hikes and outings in which many  participated. This
year's outings included a  trip to the WRA cabin on Sinclair Island,  and
trips to Mount Baker for skiing.  Top Left: Archery Enthusiasts: Jo
Needham, Minerva  Kern.  Second: Pat Irish and Bob Kurchin in a game of
bad- minton.  Third: Pat Irish swings the bat while Ruth Olds waits  to
catch.  Bottom: Dorothy Miller congratulates Elaine Ringstad  on her
winning game of tennis.  Seventy-nine

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page [80]

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Down Side: Throwing Snow Balls on Church Mountain.  Chet Ullin at Twin
Lakes.  Center Picture: Stuart Fresk and Rolf Jensen take a cold shower. 
Bottom Row: Tyrol McGee. Workshop Trip to the Pulp Mill. Salmon Bake at the
Rocks.

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RECREATION  PROGRAM  Across Top: Kulshan Cabin, Chain Lakes Trip.  Margaret
Hilton relaxes for the night.  "Enjoy Your Summer While Going to School."
That is the intention of more than eight  hundred  teachers and prospective
teachers who come to Western Washington College for the  summer terms.
Through an extensive program planned by the recreation committee under the
leadership of  Dean of Men L. A. McGee, students of WWC are offered
opportunities for excursions across  beautiful Puget Sound to British
Columbia's capital, Victoria, hikes along the trails of the Mount  Baker
national forest, or a rendezvous to "the rocks" for a picnic featuring the
famous Bond-  Baked salmon.  Main feature of the summer school recreation
program is the annual trek to the summit of  10,827-foot Mount Baker, led
by veteran guide Happy Fisher.  Also on the schedule for the summer's
activities are trips to nearby Diablo Dam, interest-ing  field trips to the
plants of Bellingham's ind ustries, and picnics and excursions to the
college  property at Lakewood on beautiful Lake Whatcom.  Yes, the college
"by the mountains and the sea" provides a splendid opportunity for a 
recreational summer of study.  Eighty-one  I

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 82

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PICTURES FROM LIFE'S OTHER SIDE... THE WOMEN  Top left, left to right: 
Easley spring cleans ... The columns . . . Lindroos does the week's ironing
.. .  "I don't believe in signs' ... Phillips ... Dorm girls after the
party... Needham poses  on the beach ... In a bubble bath we find Bruseth
... Doctoring up a cold  . . . Four  of the Doon's goons: Baker, Mohrmann,
DeClements and Bryan . . . Dean of Women  Powers orates ... Behind the Time
. . .On a dorm bed, Alvord.  Eighty-two  i

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 83

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A MAN'S HOUSE IS HIS CASTLE... WE'VE HEARD  Top left, left to right:  The
Glenn's swing it! ... Seven  come eleven . . .We think Bill Wilder is
"tops"  ... The Hospice boys keep it up ... Lyle is Petty interested ...
Boon gets a juicy  one . .. Doc is under cover ... We have cats at WWC . .
. Rolf has pull with Edwards'  Escort Service.  Eighty-three

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 84

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REMEMBER SNOW ON THE MOUNTAIN ...  Top left, left to right:  One happy
little moron (snow-bird) ... Here today . . . gone tomorrow-and so  they
were married . .. Old Man Winter's frigid digits . . . Snow pixies leave
their  marks ... Cold feet with s-no-w shoes on .. . Admiral Byrd without
Pete, the pet penguin ... The house of horrors with its makeup on ... Where
the sun comes up  before the moon can get  out of sight . . . What do I do
now?  Eighty-four

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 85

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SPRING AND SUMMER BACK TO NATURE  Top left, left to right:  Hobo Heaven,
or, the Kulshan trip . . .  Prexy Haggard engages in a mental  tussle . . .
Mrs. Prexy looks hungry ... The beginning of the end of a  perfect day ... 
Gypsy Ross Goodrich struts his stuff at Campus Day .. . Barber-pole Easley
looks  pretty  for the photographer . . . Hunt and Hoppe, the Gold-Dust
Twins, look skeptical  S. . El Lobo . . . Couldn't tell whether or not that
one face is real, but the rest are  bona fide humans... Brockovitch and
Goodmanowski as delegates from Chortechwyil-ski  . . Charter members of the
great fraternity, Rho, Dammit, Rho . .  Eighty-five

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 86

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BUT NO ALL-PLAY AND NO WORK HERE  Top left, left to right:  Look at the
birdie! Pirrung, Miller and Heaton . . . All through, Smith and Lewis  S. .
Knowles and Pratt dare sit on Dack's lawn . . .The archway  . . . Shaver
makes a  good impression. .. Are corsages in order, Art? ... And then Miss
Sundquist announced  a ten-page test . . . Two of a kind, Dwelle and
Haggard . . . Test day finds Dwelle,  Manuel, Miller, Bolster and Renius
hard at work . . . Klipsun editor Hamilton looks  puzzled.

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 87

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HOMECOMING CELEBRATION CLIMAXING A FESTIVE FALL  Top left, left to right: 
Keep an eye on him, Liz! . .. Homecoming bonfire draws Kibbe to the mike .
.  The Vikings Conquer . .. Dwelle drives dippy dodos daffy . . . Track
down them wild-cats,  Vikes! . . Haggard walks off with the queen . . After
classes, we pause to  refresh ourselves . . . Hospice men drag out the
paint to haul in the prize . .. Royalty  kneels ... The band strikes up ...
 Eighty-seven

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 88

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WITH NEVER A DULL MOMENT IN BETWEEN  Top left, left to right:  Babes in the
Woods, or the Party Got Rough . . . High School Leaders' Banquet  held in
Edens Hall . . Decoration Chairman Bolster cuts a pretty figure for the
Publi-cations'  Prom ... First WINCO Press Conference Luncheon ... Boys and
girls dreamily  dance at the Publications Prom . . My money done tole me I
could really cut a  mean rug at the  Friday night rec hours . . . Art
Stenson tippily passes the doughnuts  at the Norsemen's party ... Margaret,
whom are you asking for a cup of tea? . .  Annis and Jane plus Kitty makes
three (poetic license) . . WWC pulchritude, or  It Can't Happen Here." 
Eighty-eight

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THINKING BACK IT'S HARD TO SAY ...  Top left, left to right:  Krueger and
Schilke beat off CWC's mascot . . . Mohrmann crams before exams  . ..
Simonds takes his annual . .. Gardiner, Olds and Hickenbottom relax by the
PE  building in the sun . .. Gooding measures a close one . . . Bryan
studies at home . .  Holmberg displays a good campus day crop . . . Shiers
straightens up the board's  agenda. Eighty-nine

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 90

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00D- BYE$  OO0  Expression of  Appreciation to:  D)R. RANDALL, KEITH
STUDIO, BOB  ROCKRIVER, responsible for photo-graphy.  MR. ALBERT P.
SALISBURY of the West-ern  Engraving Company of Seattle,  Washington.  MR.
CHARLES S. BEARD and MR. WIL-LIAM  S. STANLEY of the Union Print- ing 
Company, Bellingham, Washing-ton.  MR. CY SWATEK of Kingscraft Cover 
Company, Kingsport, Tennessee.  MRS. RUTII BURNET for her guidance  as
adviser.  THE 1942 KLIPSUN STAFF for their ex- cellent  cooperation and
effort in per-forming  the endless number of tasks  that went into this
book. JANE HAMILTON, Editor  JULIA KLANN. Business Manager  GOOD  I  -I  m

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 91

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TOPICAL INDEX  ACTIVITIES ...............................  ADMINISTRATORS
.........................  ALKISIAH .............................  ANOTHER
KIND OF SCHOOL............  ASSOCIATION FOR CHILDHOOD EDUCATION... 
ASSOCIATED WOMEN STUDENTS ............  ATHLETICS .................... 
BASKETBALL  ..............  BLUE TRIANGLE ........................  CAM
PUSOLOGY .........................  CAM PUS SCHOOL
..........................  CLASS OFFICERS .................  COLLEGE
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP..........  CONTENTS ..........  DEANS .......... 
DEDICATION ..............................  D RA M A .........
......................  DRAM A CLUB ..........................  FA C U LTY
... ............................. FOOTBALL .......  FOREWORD ....... 
FRESHMEN ........  G O L F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .  GRADUATION .......................  HELLO W ALK
.........................  HOM ECOM ING ..........................  INDEX
................... ....  INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB.......... 
INTRAMURAL SPORTS .....................  JUNIORS  K LIPSU N
.............................  MUSIC .......................... .....
NORSEM EN ............................  OFFICE STAFF
.........................  ORGANIZATIONS ........................ 
ORGANIZED HOUSES .......................  PALETTEERS .  PRE-NURSING ....
PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE  PUBLICATIONS PROM ......  RADIO ............. 
RECREATION PROGRAM ....  REGISTRAR ...  SCHOLARSHIP SOCIETY ....  SENIORS
.............  SOPHOMORES .......... STUDENT CO-OP ...........  STUDENT
GOVERNMENT ...  STUDENT TEACHING ......  TENNIS ....... TRACK .  TRUSTEES
.............  VA LKY RIE .........................  VANADIS BRAGI
................. : ......  W CLUB ...........  WWCOLLEGIAN .  WOMEN'S
RECREATION ASSOCIATION......  PERSONAL INDEX  A   Adams, Genevieve
...........................  Adams, Lynda ........................ 35, 48, 
Allen, Dorothea .............................  Allen, D orothy
.............................  Alvord, Kay ...................... 25, 52,
54, Anderson, Eleanor .........................  Anderson, Hazel ...... 34,
43, 46, 48, 50, 53, 54,  Anderson, Joyce ............................ 
Anderson, Shirley ................. 35, 51, 58,  Angell, Ruth
............................... Arntzen, Edward
............................  Asmundson, Viola ........................... 
Auer, Elizabeth ............................ 8,  Aus, Jane
............................... 35,  Averill, Pat
................................  Aylen, Robert ........................
25, 74,  Baker, Aileen ............................ 34,  Baker, Jack
................................  B alch, Florence
.............................  B arbee, M arian
............................. Barron, Declan .................... 51, 54,
60,  Bartlett, Norma .......................... 35,  Bee, Lowell
.............................. 25,  Beecroft, Warren .....................
34, 44,  Beers, Jennie ............................ 22,  Bell, Dorothy
..............................  Bell, Virginia ............................
31,  Bellingham, Mildred ......................... 25  Benjamin, Helen
.......................... 53, 78  Benjamin, June
............................. 35  Bennett, Jack ................
.............. 20  Berg, Ethel ................ ................ 35 
Berger, Doreen ............................. 35  Berry, Clive
................................ 58  Bestul, Laura
.............................. 25 Bettner, Kenneth
........................... 35  Beverlin, Don .......
....................... 35  Beyer, Barbara ....................... 22, 52,
77  Bezer, Tony ..................... 35, 59, 70, 71  Bezzo, Loren
............................ 25, 83  Biggs, Al
................................ 76, 84  Biggs, Mary Alice
..................... 21, 35, 78  Bishop, Doris ..................... 13,
15, 35, 78  Bjorkquist, Helen ..................... 35, 51, 58  Blakely,
Edward ............................ 13  Blick, Ellen ...................
.... ..... . 22  Boden, Jeanette ............................ 22 Body, May
Belle .......................... 35, 58  Boice, Robert
............................... 35  Bollinger, Vesta ..................
........ 22, 54  Bolster, Rosemary ..... 3, 22, 43, 50, 52, 86, 88, 90 
Bond, E. A...........................14, 21, 40  Boon, Bill
............................... 22, 83  Booth, Mira
................................ 14  Boson, Nils
.............................. 14, 59  Bowers, Marjean .......
............... 34  Branigin, Verne ............................. 10 
Breakey, Hazel ............................. 14  Brewer, Lyle
............................ 14, 76  Bright, Jeanette .................
........ 35, 48  Brock, Art ................. 34, 54, 60, 64, 85, 87 
Ninety-one

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 92

     ----------

PERSONAL INDEX  Brockway, Bruen ........................... 35  Bromley,
Jack ................... ........... 67 Brown, Clark
.............................. 25  Brown, Don
................................ 34  Brown, Hazel ........................
35, 51, 59  Bruland, Chris ............................... 34  Brunswig,
Betty .......................... 35, 78  Bruseth, Liv......... 21, 25, 46,
47, 50, 52, 82, 88  Bryan, Peggy ..................... 44, 51, 82, 89
Buchanan, Sam .......................... 13, 34  Buckley, Evelyn
.......................... 25, 52  Bulmar, Betty
........................... 35, 53  Burke, Pat
................................ 22  Burnet, Ruth
............................ 14, 45  Burnham, Myrtle
........................... 13  Burritt, Mary ............................
34, 48  Burton, Frances ............................ 35  Burton, Joan
............................... 22  Bushell, Donald
.......................... 14, 58  Byrnes, Kay
............................... 25  Byrski, W alt
............................... 67  C  Campbell, Clinta
...................... 22, 23, 60  Campbell, Gloria ................. 35,
46, 55, 78  Carr, Eldeen .............................  52, 53  Carstensen,
Gustav .......................... 59  Carter, Joe
................................ 34  Carver, Sam ...................... 14,
40, 50, 74  Casanova, Katherine ......................... 16  Castle,
Audrey ........................... 35, 36  Cave, Millicent
......................... 36  Cederstrom, Moyle ........................ 5,
14  Channer, Edna ............................. 16  Church, Ethel
............................ 14  Clark, Art .................... 21, 34,
41, 58, 86  Clark, Vance ........................... 25, 88  Clendenen,
Marian ........................ 36, 53  Clifton, Milton
............................. 35  Collins, Katherine
........................... 26 Colouzis, Georgia .........................
35, 59  Comer, Jack ............................... 36  Conlee, Derry
............................ 26, 59  Connell, Jerry
........................... 49, 67  Cooper, Kathleen
........................... 26  Cooper, Ralph
.............................. 35  Cornwall, John
........................... 22, 67 Countryman, Linda
....................... 14, 48  Culbertson, Ruth ...................... 26,
41, 50  Cummins, Nora ............................. 14  Cure, Lillian
............................. 26, 87  Critchlow, Ed
.............................. 53 Dahl, Norman...............8, 26, 50, 67,
70,  Dahl, Vernon ............................ 36,  Dalby, Henrietta
............................  Daniels, Jo ..............................
26,  D arrah, H elen .............................. Davenport, Helen
...........................  Davis, Helen ......................... 23, 52,
 Davis, Marie ...............................  Davis, Mary
.............................. 26,  Decker, Joanne
............................. DeClements, Barthe ............... 26, 46,
52,  DeFord, Betty ..............................  Diehl, Allen
................................  Dodd, Emmy Lou ........................
35,  Dodd, Harold ............................... Donaldson, Howard
..........................  D orcy, A rt ................................ 
Douglas, Elizabeth. .21, 34, 41, 44, 46, 48, 50, 61,  Dow, Leland
.......................... 26, 58,  D uncan, M elvin
............................ Dunn, Al ............................... 34, 
Dwelle, Margaret ... 34, 44, 48, 50, 54, 59, 86,  Earle, Lewis
........................... 13,  Earlywine, Emaline ................ 34,
48, 50,  Easley, Marie ............... 23, 41, 40, 77,  Easton, Dorothy
......................... 48,  Ebe, Dora ...............................
35,  Eckert, Alice  Eichner, Evelyn ............................  Eines, M
arie ..................... 35, 51, 59,  Elenbaas, Bernice ........... 34,
43, 65, 77, 87,  Elenbaas, Serena ............................  Elliott,
Genevieve ......................... 26,  E lliott, Irene
..............................  Ellis, Fred  Emry, Carol
............................. 36,  Engelhart, Eleanor
..........................  Erickson, Alvin ........................... 35,
 Erickson, Emma ............................ Erickson, Oliver
............................  Fackler, Bob ............................... 
Farrar, Berna ............................ 27,  Felton, Norly
...............................  Fegley, Gerry  Ferguson, Jean
.............................  Finn, K ay ...............................
27,  Fitch, Ed ..................................  Fjellman, Alice
.................... 36, 44, 46,  Fleming, Everett
......................... 50,  Folsom, Shirley ....................... 35,
56,  Forster, Jean ........................ 23, 52,  Frank, Warren
........................... 36,  Franklin, Donna
............................  Franko, Roy ............................. 67,
 Fraser, Jean ......................... 77, 78, Fromme, Rudo
.............................  G  Gaffney, Torn .........................
34, 71,  Gaines, Lois ...................... 27, 48, 52,  Gardiner, Aileen
...................... 35, 58,  G eorge, Lillian..
...........................  George, Ramon T .................. 14, 56, 85,
 Gerfin, Esther ..............................  German, Frank
.......................... 27,  Gibson, Eugenia ..........................
35,  Gilbert, Betty Marie ........................ Gilroy, Jim
................................  G lazer,D on
..............................  Glenn, Paul.............. 3, 27, 50, 56,
72, 83,  Go ff,T om .................................  ,Ninety-two

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 93

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PERSONAL INDEX  G (CONTINUED)  Gooding, Don ............................
34,  Goodman, Dick .................... 50, 59, 67,  Goodrich, Jim
........................... 29,  Gragg, Georgia
B............................. Grant, Lyle ................................
 G reen, Joanne .............................  Grieff, Evelyn .......
.............. 35,   G riffin, R uth .............................. 
Griffith, Douglas ............................  Griffith, Ruth
............................... 27,  Grim , Paul ................... ......
........  Groger, Betty Ann........... 34, 43, 46, 51,  84,  Grubb, Byron
............................ 67,  Gudyka, Pete .........................
27, 50,  Haggard, Margaret ...... 34, 48, 50, 54, 60, 77,  Haggard, William
Wade ........ 11, 60, 65, 85,  Haggard, Mrs. W. W ....................... 
Haley, M ary ..............................  Hall, Lorraine
..............................  Hall, Walter
...............................  Hallmeyer, Eleanor
..........................  Hamilton, Jane .......... 27, 42, 46, 50, 51,
86,  Hammond, Donna ...........................  Hampton, Leslie
............................  Hancock, Bill .............................. 
Hansen, Mildred ......................... 27,  Hardm an, Harold
........................... Hardy, Howard ............................. 
Harkleroad, Lloyd ..................... 36, 70,  Harris, Vera ........
..............  Harrison, Margaret ................ 28, 52, 53,  Hatch,
Bill................25, 40, 41, 54, 85, Hathaway, Lester
...........................  Hatt, J. Elizabeth .........................
36,  Hatt, Joy. ................. 34, 43, 53, 54, 61,  Hawke, Virginia
...........................  H aw kins, John ............................. 
H earsey, John  ..............................  Heaton, Shirley. .........
21, 48, 50, 52, 53, 85,  Hebert, Ed .............................. 36, 
Hewittson, Tom ...................... 21, 28,  Hickenbottom, Ed
................... .36, 74,  Hicks, Arthur C......................14, 51, 
Hilton, Margaret ...................... 28, 50,  Hjartarson, Garder
.......... ......... .28, 58,  Hjartarson, Hjartar
.........................  Holbrook, Frank ......................... 28, 
Hollingsworth, Jim .................. .49, 66,  Holm berg, Fred .........
...................  Holmes, Jessie ........................ 28, 52,
Holtman, Robert ......................... 14,  Hood, Charlotte
............................  Hoppe, Victor ........................... 14,
 Hopper, Elizabeth ...........................  Hovde, Annis. .............
28, 30, 43, 50, 51,   Howen, Sylvia ........................... 35, 
Hudson, John ........................... 21,  Huhta, Harold
.............................  Hunt, Thomas ........................... 14,
 Huot, Phyllis ............................ 28,  Huot, Robert
............................ 34,  Husfloan, Lola
........................... 35,  Hutchinson, Glenn ....................... 
Ilgen, Lois .................................  Irish, Pat
............................... 36,  Israelson, Ed
............................ 36,  Janikula, Joe ....................
..........  Jeffrey, Maxine .......................... 35, Jellesma,
Lucille ............................  Jensen, Rolf
............................. 80,  Jewell, Mabel ........................
35, 36,  Jones, Clayton .............................  Jones, G lendora
............................ Jones, Hazel ........ ...... .......... 35, 
Jones, Monty ........... ........ ... .  Jones, Nada
................................ 36,  Johnnason, Esther ................
.........  Johnson, Betty .......................... 35, Johnson, V ivian
............................  Johnson, William ........................... 
Junkin, Bill ....... ................ 26,  Junkin, Jim
...................... 22, 23, 83,  Kangley, Lucy
..............................  Karlis, John ............................
36,  Kerchen, Bob ............................ 28,  Kemp, Lorna Jean
....................... 35, Keown, Charles .................. .50, 67, 68, 
Kern, Minerva ........................... 35,  Kibbe, Lynus
............................ 15,  Kilander, Leta
..............................  Kildall, Wayne
.............................  King, Dick .......................... 34,
44,  K ing, K athryn .............................  K ingsley, D ick
.............................  Kink, Mitchel ............................
70,  K insm an, Priscilla .......................... Kirkpatrick, W. D
...........................  Klann, Corinne .......................... 29, 
Klann, Julia ......................... 34, 43,  Klein, Lawrence
......................... 29,  Knol, Louella ..............................
Knowles, Alice ........................... 23,  Knutson, Jack
........................... 61,  Kobberstad, Earl
............................  Kolberg, Gladys ............................ 
Korstad, Ole ...............................  Kosche, Ruth
............................ 35,  Kotula, W ayne ..........................
29,  Krause, Ruth .................... .29, 31,  48,  Kristjansson, JoAnna
.................. 36, 56,  Krueger, Bill ............................ 72, 
Krueger, Virginia ................. 29, 43, 50,  Kruzer, Jean
...............................  Kuder, Merle
..............................  K uljus, M itcheu
............................  58 Lagasse, Hector
............................  53 Lahti, Arnold ........................ 29,
58,  36 Laflin, Raymond ......................... 35,  Ninety-three

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 94

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PERSONAL  L (CONTINUED)  Lallas, John ............................... 35 
Lagerlund, Enid ............................  29  Langlund, Inga
............................. 35  Lanterman, Loraine ...................
35, 44, 46  Lappenbusch, Charles ........... 15, 50, 66, 67, 71  Larson,
Lillian ................... ........... 53  Lawrence, Dorothy
.......................... 36  Lee, Betty ......... .....................
.29, 79  Lee, Maxine ............................. 36, 52 Leek, Bill.
..................... 44, 58, 61, 64, 87  Lehman, Edith
.............................. 35  Leinard, Marguerite
......................... 29  Leiser, Andrew ......................... 34 
Leitner, Louise ............................. 29  Leu, Don
............................ 35, 51, 75  Leuken, Harold ............
................. 30  Lewis, Margaret ...................... 29, 52, 86 
Lindberg, Faye ......................... 35  Lindroos, Esther
.......................... 29, 82  Lindsay, M argaret
........................... 35  Lindsay, William
............................ 29  Little, Blanche
............................. 29  Lobb, Eleanor
............................. 36  Logan, Happy
.............................. 30 Longley, Gertrude
............................ 15  Loop, Harold ........................ .30,
44, 72  Louden, Dorothy ................. .30, 52, 53, 82  Lovegren, May
............................. 15  Lowery, Lois
............................. 50,  54  Lowery, Norman ..................
35, 70, 71, 73  Ludwick, Ernie ................... 34, 70, 71, 73 
Lusterman,  Paul ............................ 16  Lyons, Nancy
.............................. 30  MacAulay, Kenneth
.........................  MacDougall, Mary Jane ...................... 
MacDougall, Maxine ......................... Madden, Blaine
.............................  Madry, Alzennie  Main, Mary
............................. 35,  Manhart, Lucille
......................... 52,  Manuel, Marilyn ............................
 Massar, Clifton ............................. McDonald, Anna
............................  M cFarland, M ilton
...........................  McGee, Loye ......................... 12, 80, 
McMillan, Earl. ................ 35, 50, 67, 68,  McMillan, Lea
..............................   McMillan, Margaret
.........................  McMurtrie, Bob ........ ................ 35,  M
cPherson, W arren .........................  M eade, M ay
...............................  Meek, Gerry .............................
35,  Melendy, Ruth .............................  Merriman, Pearl
.................... ...  Messinger, Lyle .............. ........... .34,
Metcalf, Genevieve .........................  Meyers, Catherine
........................ 34,  Miller, Bob ....................... 34, 44,
46,  M illerE, d na ..............................  Miller, Dorothy
......................... 35, Miller, Irving
...............................  Michen, Margie
.............................  M illigan, Genevieve
.........................  Mitchell, Alick.................30, 50, 67, 68, 
Mock, Dick ..... ................. ..  INDEX Modin, Elsie
......................... 30, 52,  Mohrmann, June ...... 23, 46, 51, 52,
53, 58, 82,  M oll, M arjorie .............................  Monson,
Bernice. ........ 30, 41, 48, 50, 65, 87,  Monson, Blanche
...................... 36, 77,  Montgomery, Harvey ........................
 Montgomery, Lorain .........................  Moore, Sheila
................ 35, 46, 53, 65, 78,  M oore, B etty
...............................  M oritz, E sther
.............................  Morrill, Betty
..............................  M oses, E d
................................  Mowrey, Warren
............................  Muckey, Bob ................ ......  Mueller,
Sheila ....................... 35, 46, Munizza, Lawrence ....... 30, 50,
68, 70, 71, 75,  Munkres, Arlene ............................  M urray,
Geraldine  ..........................  Musgrove, Lonzo
..................... .35, 67,  Myette, Maryette ... . .................
44, 46, N  Neal, Don ..................... 34, 54, 58, 67,  Needham, Jo
............... 31, 48, 50, 52, 79,  Neevel, Frances...... 23, 34, 46, 50,
65, 77, 78,  Neff, Pearl .................................  Nelson, Bob
............................. 35,  Nelson, Bruce ........................
36, 50,  Nelson, Norman ...................... 27, 67,   Nelson, Roy
........................ 21, 36,  Neuman, Ernie
.............................  N ew ell, M arian
.............................  Nicol, Synva ...............................
 Nichols, Ruth ..............................  Nix, Doug
.................................  Nolan, Helen ...................... 22,
24, 51,  Northrup, Maxine ........................... Norton, Virginia
...................... 34, 48,  Nyberg, Berwyn ...  O  O 'Connor, K ay
............................. Odom, Evelyn .............................. 
Olds, Ruth ........................... 36, 78,  Oliver, Bernice.
.................. .24, 51, 52,  Oiling, Susan ..................... 31,
52, 53,  Olsen, Leila ................................  Olson, Dorothy 
.............................  O lson, Edw ard
..............................  Olson, Shirley
..............................  Olson, Winton ..........................
31,  O'Meara, Pat ........................... .31,  O'Neil, Bill
.................... 31, 40, 41, 49,  Ordway, Irene
........................... 31,  Ossewarde, Charlotte
.........................  Ossinger, Mary .............................  P 
Packard, Don .................... 35, 59, 67,  P alm er, U na
............................... Pearson, Mary Ann .................... 31,
53,  Pederson, Alice .............................  Peters, Bernice
................. ............  Peters, M arian ....................... 31,
52,  Ninety-four

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     Klipsun, 1942 - Page 95

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PERSONAL  P (CONTINUED)  Peterson, Evelyn ............ 29, 46, 48, 50, 52,
88  Petter, Mary ............................... 31  Pettit, Mary
Lou............................ 36  Pettyjohn, Lyle ................ 33,
49, 50, 70, 71  Philippe, H. C................... ........... 15  Phillips,
Eric.................. 31, 42, 43, 45, 60  Phillips, Joyce
.............................. 36  Phillips, Natalie
............................ 35  Phillips, Polly Ann
........................ 24, 82  Pirrung, Mary .................... 34, 54,
79, 86  Platt, Ruth ................................ 15   Plympton, Hazel
............................ 15  Pontius, Leda ........................ 24,
54, 77  Powers, Lorraine .......... ........... 12, 40, 52  Prater, Fern
........ ...................... 36  Pratt, Helen Jean ... . 32, 41, 50, 52,
65, 82, 86, 87  Pratt, M. Jean .......................... 32, 54  Prince,
Ed .............................. 32, 58  R  R anke, D orothy
.............................  Rantanen, Gertrude .......................
32,  R aw linson, E d .............................  Redden, Geraldine
.......... ............. 32,  Reese, Pearl ............................... 
Reilly,  Eileen ......................... 24, 50,  Renius, Bernice
.................. 8, 36, 46, 54,  R ice, C harles ... ......... .... ....
.. .. ......  Rich, Mary E.............................16,  Richards,
Margaret ....................... 36, Richardson, Charlotte
..................... 15,  Richardson, Nathan ................... 35, 70, 
Ringstad, Elaine .......................... 44,  Rizzi, Madeline
............................ 24,  Rockriver, Bob
............................. Rogers, Bob .......................... 34,
73,  Rogers, Phyllis ................. 35, 52, 53, 54,  Roland, Don
................... ...........  Roper, Rosine ...................
..........  Ropes, Bill ..................... 32, 49, 70, 71, Ruckm ick,
Herbert ..........................  Rundle, Dorothy
...........................  Rundquist, Ellen ..................... 32, 52,
 Rusher, Betty. ................ .27, 41, 50, 58,  INDEX  Sisson, Clifford
............................. 34  Slack, Iola ...................
.............. 36  Smith, Cheryl ............................ 27, 36 
Smith, Elizabeth ............................ 35  Smith, Kathleen
......................... 32, 54  Smith, Les ...........................
67, 68, 76  Smith, Lois Jo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32, 52,
54, 86  Smith, Mickey ................. 32, 51, 59, 85, 87  Smith, Robert
........................... 33, 73  Snider, Howard
............................. 71  Snow, Miriam
.............................. 15  Spencer, Laura .........................
.24, 34   Stangle, Norma ....................... 77, 78, 88  Stenson, Art.
..................... 33, 49, 83, 87  Stephens, Margaret
................... .35, 51, 58  Stewart, Mary Buell.
......................... 33  fternhagen, Nina ...........................
13  Stidham, Gaylord ........................... 36  StillH,e len
................................ 33 Stoddard, Phil
........................... 34, 59  Strange, Edith R ...................
......... 16  Strankman, Fred ..................... 35, 71, 72 
Strasburger, Amanda ........................ 33  Stroebel, Ruby
....................... 34,  52, 53  Strom, Olive ......................
34, 52, 53, 54  Sullivan, Pat ............... ................ 36 
Sundback, Elaine ................... ..... 33, 77  Sundquist, Leona
......................... 15, 86  'Swalling, Ragnhild
........................ 33, 52  Swanson, Gloria ................. .......
33, 46  Swanson, M abel ............................. 13  T  40 Tangvold,
Caroline ........................ 35, 59  72 Targus, Stan
......................... 67, 68, 71  77 Tedford, Jean
........................... 33, 54  54 Thomas, Bob
............................ 67, 68  35 Thompson, Carol
............................ 36  88 Thompson, Jack ......................
58, 61, 83  78 Thompson, Phyllis .................... 33, 51, 53  35
Thornton, Marian ........................... 67  32 Tiffany, Bill .......
......................... 56  75 Tremain, Mildred
........................... 13  15 Trescott, Vivian
............................ 36  15 True, Ozella
............................. 34, 54  Ullin, Anna
................................ 15  Upshall, C. C
............................. ... 15  Sahlin, Esther
........................ .. .15,  Sakshaug, C arol
............................  Slaninka, Irene ......................... 24,
 Sanford, Jim . ................ 36, 67,  Saunders, Steve
............................  Sawyer, Roxanna ......................... 32,
Schilke, Margarethe ................ 32, 52, 54,  Schilke, Lester
.................... 35, 58, 83,  Schores, Clara
..............................  Shaffer, Jane  Shaver, Frank
........................... 15,  Shaw, Nancy ............................
17,  Shellhammer, Bernice ....... ........ .34, 44,  Shiers, Frank
.......... 17, 22, 24, 54, 85, 87,  Siegenthaler, Bernice .................
.32, 51,  Sien, Frank ............................. 36,  Simonson, Justin
......... ................ 32,  Van Aver, Albert
............................ 15  Van Brocklin, Jeanne
........................ 34  Van Pelt, Ruth .............................
16  Van Rooy, Russell ..................... 34, 36, 67  Van Wieringen,
Ellen ..... 34, 43, 48, 51, 77, 78, 84  Vossbeck, Robert .................
...... ... . 35  W Wall, Betty ............................. 33, 52 
Walling, Ecomaac ............................ 35  Ninety-five

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PERSONAL INDEX  W (CONTINUED) Williams, John .............................
16  Wilson, Aubrey .......................... 70, 71  Wardrum, Elaine
......................... 33, 51 Wilson, Geraldine ........................
33  Washburn, Russell .................... .34, 44, 83 Wilson, Mabel Zoe...
............. ......... 15  Waterbury, Joyce ........................ 33,
52 Wittler, Jean ................... .. 34, 52, 53, 59  Watson, Dorothy
......................... 35, 58 Wolverton, Margaret
......................... 36  Watts, Rosemary ..................... 34, 41,
58 Woll, Thelma .:. ............................. 36  Webster, Cliff
.............................. 24 Woodring, Paul ......... ........ 15 
Wefer, Harriet ........................ 35, 53, 78 Woodcock, Jean
......................... 35, 58 Willets, Alice
............................ 34 Wright, Jim ................... .........
36, 56  W endling, Elsie ............................. 16  Westerman, Verna
.......................... 33  W estlund, Virgil
............................ 24  Weythman, Ruth ...........................
15 Y  Wiik, Nan Dybdahl .......................... 16  Wilder, Bill
................... 21, 35, 46, 73, 83 Young, Bill
................................ 34  Wilkinson, Camille ...................
.35, 44, 53 Young, Orlena ............................. 13  Member EST 911
21'1941-42  f ASSO  Ninety-siz

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