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2003_0131 



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     Western Front 2003 January 31 - Page 1



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  Feelin' the beat  Habib Koite and Bamada bring  West African music to the
PAC.  See Story, Page 7. Vikes crush Crusaders  Palm's double-double gives
Vikings  edge over Northwest Nazarene.  See Story, Page 9. 
*• 5 The Western Front Western Washington University
Volume 124 Issue 6 Bellingham, Washington  USA Patriot Act infiltrates
Western  By Abiah Weaver  THE WESTERN FRONT  In the upcoming months, 
Western students who check out  Adolf. Hilter's "Mein Kampf  might find the
FBI reading over  their shoulders, said Bela Foltin  Jr., librarian and
public records  officer.  Under the USA Patriot Act  passed shortly after
Sept. 11,  the federal government could  seize students' personal
information,  including library  records to investigate potential 
terrorist activities.  Last week, librarians throughout the country
gathered  in Philadelphia for the  American Library Association's 
midwinter meeting. The conference,  which ended Wednesday,  examined the
impact of the act  on the nation's libraries.  "Libraries have always been 
concerned about the confidentiality  of patron records," Foltin said. "But
patron records have  always been obtainable for well-specified  legal
reasons. The  Patriot Act just lowered the bar.  That's what concerns
people."  The legislation was designed  to help the FBI monitor  potential 
threats to homeland security.  The act does not require that  students be
official suspects or  that they be notified if their  records are seized.
•  Tom Byrd, Western junior and  political science major,
said he  understands the need for limited  federal surveillance laws, but 
he is concerned the act will compromise  his privacy.  "I am particularly
disturbed  that they can access this information,  and they don't have to 
notify the suspect," Byrd said.  "They notify a person when they  search
their house, and I expect  they would notify me if they  were going to
search my student  records."  Foltin said it is possible, that  ' See
LIBRARY, Page 3  Keith Boiling/The Western Front  Western sophomore Brwyn
Harris uses a computer in Wilson Library. The USA Patriot  Act provides the
FBI access to students' personal information, including library records 
and information saved to Western's server.  Blaine DEA office considers
move to Bellingham  By Jenny Zuvela  THE WESTERN FRONT  Increased drug
trafficking in  Washington has forced the  Federal Drug Enforcement 
Administration to hire new  employees who may relocate to  Bellingham
because of overcrowding  in the Blaine office.  Trafficking has increased,
with  drugs arriving in Bellingham  from Canada, but Thomas P.  O'Brien,
the DEA's Public  Information Officer, said a move  south would not change
operations.  "(The DEA) will be conducting  the same mission," O'Brien
said.  "Agents would just commute. ...  We're still dealing with the same 
problem, but (trafficking) has  increased.... The more people you  have,
the more drugs you take off  the street."  Robert Cayford, the acting
resident  agent in charge of the Blaine  DEA resident office, declined to 
comment on  his office's possible  move to Bellingham.  The DEA will
relocate employees  to somewhere along the Interstate 5 corridor from
Blaine  to Bellingham, O'Brien said.  Task force participation and 
cooperation with federal and  state law enforcement led to the  need for
additional employees,  O'Brien said.  When people quit or are fired,  new
agents must be hired to keep  the number of employees from  dropping to
ensure that state  funding remains constant.  "We can't become stagnant,"
he  said. "We have to increase  or at  least maintain the number of
officers  to maintain the amount of  resources we receive.  "The Faculties
and  Management office is searching  for office space to relocate the 
Blaine office," he said. "Once they  identify the new location, it will  be
made known."  Bellingham Police Lt. Craige  Ambrose said he has no
information  on the possible move, but it  probably would not affect police
 See MOVE, Page 3  Prewar training ruins ecology, speaker says  Global
y*kctions  focal Reactions  By Andrea Boyle  THE WESTERN FRONT  Andrea
Boyle /The Western Front  Speaker Saul Bloom, an anti-war protester and
environmentalist, speaks with Western  senior Alison Bikerstaff after a
seminar  Tuesday night. Photographs of bleeding and burned children, 
aircrafts exploding in the atmosphere and abandoned nuclear weapons sites
flashed quickly before  the eyes of an audience waiting to learn about the 
coming dangers of war in Iraq.  Western students, faculty and members of
the  cdmmunity joined with members of  the  Environmental Center and the AS
Peace Resource  Center Tuesday night in the Science Lecture Hall  to  learn
about the detrimental effects war has on the  environment. .  "The most
important thing you could  be doing is  telling your state representatives
not to go to war,"  Executive Director of Arc Ecology Saul Bloom said.  "It
is a damn foolish thing."  Arc Ecology, based out of San Francisco, is a
nonprofit organization founded in 1984 to address the  environmental and
social impacts of military activities. Bloom, an expert on the effects of
war, gave an  See LECTURE, Page 3  ology professor and director of
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The Western Front at wfront@cc.wwu.edu www.westernfrontonline.com Please
recycle                                 



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     Western Front 2003 January 31 - Page 2



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   2 • The Western Front News January 31, 2003 
l|UI|J||l^||pU§|Ji|  ii^piiMBiilirtiHfciiitaM
•liiBiM^ilHHBBii  BfflBBBIHli^Hi^B  picious internet
posting origi-  IliiiHiiilflflHipHiliSilH SliiifciS^^BBBiMlliiii^ 
iMii^ft^H^lsiiHlHBiiB  iffliifciliHBiliilHiiiB^ 
liiliHiiilllllllllllllllBilllH  uiiMji^iiimi^ HHiHBfciiBBliiwiliiiil!  Do
you think President  Bush is more concerned  with the well-being of the 
United States or with protecting  oil business interests?  Compiled by
Jenny Maag.  Online Poll Results:  the  United States. 3  Peter Lovejoy 
Math education, senior  Kirk Johnson  Computer science, junior Rebecca
Butler  Undeclared, sophomore  'Oil business by 99 ??  far because his 
policies haven't demonstrated  a concern for the  well-being of the average
 citizen.  95.2 percent of voters said Bush is concerned  ,2 percent said
Bush is protecting oil interests.  www.westernfrontonIine.com  'I think
he's most  concerned with  defending the United  States from nuclear or 
biological attacks.  'I think Bush is «   most concerned  with
the well-being of his  approval ratings.  with the well-being of  1.6
percent said both.   APWIRE NEWS BRIEFS  STATE NEWS  Police discover body
hung  in t r e e for one year  Olympia police found a partly  mummified
man's body hanging  from a noose in a tree.  Police said a man with
outstanding  warrants saw the body  one year ago but did not report it. 
The man called authorities Tuesday night after seeing the  body was still
there, Olympia  police Sgt. Paul Johnson said.  Police do not know how the
body  got in the tree or how long.it was  there, Thurston County Deputy 
Coroner Terry Harper said.  Car crash video saves woman  A videotape of a
drunk-driving  crash shown Thursday in Auburn Municipal Court to  jurors
determining whether the  accident's only survivor should  be found
criminally responsible.  After the defense played the  video to the jury,
Municipal Judge  Patrick Burns dismissed two misdemeanor  counts, being an
accom-  Get to know your editors ^^^^•itfBBII^fc^rtl^B^^ 
B^^^^^B^H^^^^^^^^B^^M  The "western front is published twice weekly in
fall, winter and spring; once  a week in summer session. Address: The
Western Front, Western Washington University, CH 110, Bellingham, WA
98225-9100. The Western Front is  the official newspaper of Western
Washington University, published by the  Student Publications Council, and
is mainly supported by advertising.  Opinions and stories in the newspaper
have no connection with advertising.  News content is determined by student
editors. Staff reporters are enrolled  in a course in the Department of
Journalism, but any student enrolled at  Western may offer stories to the
editors.  Advertising inquiries should be directed to the business office
in  College Hall 07, or by phone to (360) 650-3161.  Members of the Western
community are entided to a single free  copy of each issue of The Western
Front.  plice to reckless driving and an  accomplice to drunken driving, 
against Teresa Hedlund. The  judge agreed with her attorney  that she was a
victim of the crash.  Hedlund still faces counts of  providing alcohol and
tobacco to  a minor.  NATIONAL NEWS  Bomber receives sentence  Richard
Reid, the man who hid explosives in his shoes, was sentenced  to life in
prison Thursday.  The 29-year-old British citizen received the maximum
sentence  after denouncing U.S. foreign policy  toward Islamic countries. 
Reid faced 60 years to life for-.  trying to blow up an American  Airlines
flight from Paris to  Miami. Prosecutors said he had  enough plastic
explosives to blow  a hole in the fuselage and kill all  197 people aboard.
Plant explosion kills t h r ee  workers, injures dozens  Investigators
interviewed bandaged  and shaken workers  Thursday to find the cause of a 
deadly blast at a medical supply  factory in Kingston, N.C.  The explosion,
which left three  employees dead and injured 37,  occurred in a section of
the factory  where rubber was mixed and  formed into sheets. Ten people 
remain in critical condition.  Approximately 130 people were  inside the
West Pharmaceutical  Services factory when the explosion  and a raging fire
rocked the  building Wednesday afternoon.  INTERNATIONAL NEWS  Australian t
r a i n derails  A commuter train derailed  during rush hour Friday
morning,  killing at least seven people  and trapping others in the 
wreckage near Sydney.  Rescue workers tried to extricate  passengers from
the cars in the rough terrain of a ravine 20  miles south of downtown
Sydney.  Seven bodies have been found  so far, said Stephen Leahy, a 
spokesman for Westpac Lifesaver  Helicopter, a helicopter emergency 
service. He said at least 16  people were injured.  The train jumped the
tracks  while passing through the ravine near the village of Waterfall. 
Mad cow disease spreads at  high r a t e in Asia and Europe  Slovakia,
Slovenia, the Czech  Republic and Japan have reported  cases of bovine
spongiform  encepalopathy, or mad cow disease,  said Dr. Maura Ricketts of 
the World Health Organization.  More than 180,000 cases of  mad cow disease
were reported  in Britain, and the government  estimates that at least one
million  animals were infected.  Experts believe tainted animal  products
transmitted the disease. Scientists said the consumption  of infected
products is responsible  for variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease,  a fatal
brain disease in  humans. Scientists report 129  cases of the disease, the
majority  in Britain.  AP Wire courtesy KUGS 89.3-FM.  WWU Official
Announcements  Deadline for announcements in this space is noon Friday for
the Tuesday edition and noon Wednesday  or the Friday edition.
Announcements should be limited to 50 words, typewritten or legibly
printed, and  sent through campus mail to "Official Announcements," MS
-9117, via fax to X 4343, or brought in  person to Commissary 111. DO NOT
SEND ANNOUNCEMENTS DIRECTLY TO THE WESTERN FRONT.  Phoned announcements
will not be accepted. All announcements should be signed by originator. 
PLEASE POST  SUMMER QUARTER DEGREE APPLICANTS: Students who expect to
graduate at the dose of summer quarter must   have a degree application on
file in the registrar's office by March 14. Students planning to graduate
fall quarter must  have an application on file by June 6.
Applications/instructions are available in OM 230.  THE  MATH PLACEMENT
TEST is offered in OM 120 at 9 a.m. Feb. 6,13, 20, 27, March 6, 13, and 20
and at 3  p.m.  Feb. 3, 10, 24, March 3, 10, and 17. Registration is not
required. Students must bring photo identification, student  number, Social
Security number, and a No. 2 pencil. A $15 is payable in exact amount at
test time. Allow 90 minutes.  THE MATH PLACEMENT (MAT) schedule and sample
problems may be found at www.ac.wwu.edu/~assess/tc.htm.  AS PEACE RESOURCE
CENTER PRESENTS A FILM, Shifting Sands: The Truth about Weapons Inspections
and the Disarming  of Iraq, tonight at 7 p.m., SL 120. Free and open to the
public.  FIND OUT ABOUT THE HUMAN SERVICES MAJOR at an information session
at 11 a.m. Feb. 5 in BH 227 or call X/7759.  A DISCUSSION ON ISHMAEL, THE
BOOK OF THE QUARTER FOR WINTER, will be held at 4 p.m. Feb. 12 in the WL 
Skybridge. The book is on reserve at Wilson Library and copies are also
available through the Associated Students  Bookstore. For more information,
call Christine Kendall, X/7368.  WEST-B TEST. Applicants to state-approved 
   educator preparation programs and those from other states applying for 
a Washington residency teaching certificate must have a minimum passing
score on basic skills assessment. Residency  teaching certificate
applicants who completed an educator preparation program outside Washington
and have not passed WEST-B may be granted additional time. Test dates:
March 15, May 17, July 19. Western is a test site, however, 
registrationisrequiredthroughwww.west.nesinc.com.  THE MILLER ANALOGIES
TEST (MAT) will be given at 2 p.m. Feb. 11 and March 11 in OM 120.
Registration is  required in OM 120 or by calling X/3080. A $42 fee is
payable at test time. The MAT is not administered on an  individual basis.
Allow Vh hours. Registration limited to 16.  STUDENTS WHO INTERRUPT THEIR
STUDIES AT WESTERN, other than for a summer quarter, must complete an 
application for readmission by the appropriate priority deadline.
Applications are available in OM 200. Priority  deadline is April 1 for
summer continuing into fall quarter and for fall quarter.  A PHOTO EXHIBIT,
"UNSEEN AMERICA," will be on display through Feb. 14 on the third floor of
Wilson Library. The  exhibit is sponsored by the AS Peace Resource Center
and the Ethnic Student Center. For more information, call X/6125.  CHECK
THE TESTING Web site, www.ac.wwu.edu/~assess/tc.htm, for testing schedules.
 INFORMATION REGARDING NATIONAL TESTING is available at the Testing Center,
OM 120.  WINTER QUARTER OFFERINGS THROUGH THE COUNSELING CENTER include
• Relaxation Training, 3 p.m  Tuesdays, OM 540;
• Women's Self-Esteem Group, 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays and
5:30 to 7 p.m. Wednesdays; •  Arts-as-  Exploration, 2:20
to 4 p.m. Thursdays. To register or for more information, stop by OM 540 or
call X/3164.                                              



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     Western Front 2003 January 31 - Page 3



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  January 31,2003 News The Western Front • 3  Move: DEA
recruits more agents  Continued from Page 1   and DEA interaction in the
area.  "Agents from Blaine can be in  Bellingham in 15 minutes," he  said.
"I don't think it matters  much where their office is. ...  When our paths
cross, it's probably  specifically for drug investigations  on the federal
level."  Blaine DEA agents currently  patrol Whatcom County. Recruiting new
agents is a  national effort that is not focused  on only this area,
O'Brien said.  The Bellingham Police  Department cooperates with the 
border patrol, U.S. Customs and  the DEA on the Northwest  Regional Drug
Task Force, which  operates in Whatcom County,  said Joe Giuliano,
assistant chief  patrol agent for the Blaine border  patrol.  One border
patrol agent works  full time for the task force. "It pools the best of all
 resources into one," he said.  The number of drug seizures  coming . from
Canada has  increased in the last two years,  especially at border
crossings,  Giuliano said.  "Smugglers typically go to  the ports (via)
plane and boat,  but now there is significant  movement between ports," he 
said. "We  continue seizing, letting  them know the pressure is  still
there. That's our definition  of success — they're
compelled  to come to us, as opposed to us  simply responding to them." 
Giuliano said the border  patrol  works closely with the DEA.  "The DEA's
primary mission is  to enforce drug laws," he said. "Border patrol's
primary mission  is detecting people who illegally  cross the border. When
we  encounter     drug smuggling scenarios,  we make arrests. ... We  call
them; they send out one or  two agents; they take the seized  contraband
and the smugglers  and put them through the court  system."  The amount of
interaction  between the DEA and border  patrol varies from three to four 
times per week to twice a month.   "It depends what's going on in  the
world of crime," Giuliano  said.  Additional reporting by Abiah Weaver
Lecture: Speaker stresses awareness of war's effects  Continued from Page 1
 interactive speech on the environmental  impacts of prewar preparation  in
the United States.  He discussed the Persian Gulf War and the force it had
on the  earth, as well as how a war in  Iraq will also ultimately affect 
the earth. The seminar focused on many  of the prewar practices that are 
damaging to the environment.  Testing and  refining military  machinery and
weapons has  impacted the soil and animal and  human populations, Bloom
said.  "Everything gets tested, not  just nuclear weapons," Bloom  said.
"Nothing in war gets used that hasn't been tested."  Industrial complexes
and  nuclear testing sites such as the  one in Hanford, or the development 
and production of weapons  in a shipyard in Bremerton, are  capable of
wiping out the major  cities in Russia with one explosion,  Bloom said. 
"Nonconventional war tactics,  including biological, chemical, 
radiological and nuclear  weapons, greatly expand the  destruction of war,"
Bloom said.  "It is literally possible to destroy  the world in several
different  ways."  The aftermath of war is just as  harmful, Bloom said. 
Nondetonated bombs, uranium  depletion, human health, nuclear  winter and
the destruction of  ecosystems are only a few of the  consequences.  Some
of the  solutions Bloom .  offered instead It is literally possible to  of
war were purr destroy the world in  suing social and severaJ different
ways.'  environmental  justice, respect- Saul Bloom  ing weapons Executive
Director  inspectors and of Arc  Ecology  having a greater  appreciation
for  indigenous cultures.  "We are going to learn firsthand  what war is
going to do to  our bodies as a species and to our  natural environment,"
Bloom  said.  Awareness is the center's main  purpose, said Kristine
Newman,  the Environmental Center's coordinator.  "This event is so
relevant to  what is going on right now,"  Newman said. "Environmental 
issues are so intertwined with  social issues."  Information regarding
environmental  consequences on the  United States from storing  weapons and
machinery along  with prewar training worried  audience members.  "I had
never  thought about  what the prewar  effects on the  e n v i r o n m e n
t  were before  this," Western  f r e s h m a n  Ashley Beckett  said. 
Western freshman  Emily  Waters said she was frustrated  that Bloom's
message did not  reach a broader audience.  "It was informative," Waters 
said. "I wish that more people  could have heard about it.  Many of the
people here are  already at least somewhat  aware of the effects of the
war,  but it is those that don't know  anything that need to hear this 
message."  Library: USA Patriot Act allows FBI access to records, provokes
invasion of privacy fears  Continued from Page 1 the FBI is investigating
Western  students' library records.  "The fact that we are so close  to
Canada, coupled with the fact  that Bellingham has been in the  news lately
with the snipers,  makes Western a likely target,"  he said.  It would not
be uncommon for  library records to be investigated,  Foltin said, because
the men  involved in planning the Sept.  11 attacks used computers at 
public libraries.  "My general assumption is  that people are using the
library  appropriately, but you never  know," he said.  In addition to
students, faculty  and staff, Western libraries  are open to Bellingham
community members.  "We don't take IDs at the  door," Foltin said. "It is a
public  place, so we don't know who comes and uses the library."  Earlier
this month, Foltin  gathered the library staff to  develop a policy for
requests. He  said he is concerned about the.  impact of the act on
Western's  M WESTERN  H i WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY  EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING
AWARDS  Nominations Due March 3,2003 President Karen W. Morse has announced
that two "Excellence in Teaching" awards  have again been made possible by
The Western Foundation.  A faculty member from the College of Arts and
Sciences will be chosen to receive the  Peter J. Elich Excellence In
Teaching Award, and a faculty member from, one of the  other Colleges:
Business and Economics, Fairhavcn, Fine and Performing Arts.  Huxley, and
Woodring College of Education will be chosen to receive an Excellence  in
Teaching Award. Nominations arc solicited from alumni, students, or faculty
 members by completing the attached ballot Letters of recommendation may be
 attached.  The following criteria and policies arc used for selection: 
• No person shall receive this award more than once. 
• Only winners will be announced: candidates names will
not be published cither  during or after the process  •
Tenutc is not a requirement but camlkiatcs must ^  Visiting faculty are not
eligible.  • lfanomirmwislxstobccaDsklcrcd,hc/slKwffl 
materials to the committee.  • The award is a teaching
award, not a research award. Submitted materials should  relate to
teaching.  • During the consideration process,
evaluations of current and previous classes may  be sought: recommendations
from students and colleagues may be sought, and a  class visitation may be
conducted. The committee may devise additional or  alternative criteria
upon the announcement The committee will evaluate all  material and make
selections according to their best judgment.  campus. "Personally, I am for
anything  that will protect (Americans),  but we have to be very careful so
 we don't destroy the basic principles  of democracy," Foltin said.  "If
the result of the Patriot Act is  a severe impact on the principles  of
freedom, then we are  marching toward something  that I escaped
— communism."  In 1956, Foltin said he left  communist
Hungary.  Foltin said prior to the act, he  never received any requests 
from the federal government to  release students' records.  Western has
released students'  personal information to  local courts in response to
court  orders. After Western released  this  information, it was used as 
evidence in trials.  The Patriot Act restricts  Foltin from confirming
whether any records were released to the  FBI since Sept. 11, he said.  The
Washington State  Assistant Attorney  General,  Wendy Bohlke, reviews all 
requests for student records,  Foltin said.  "Flashing a badge is one 
thing, but flashing a court order  is another thing," Foltin said.  "We
don't just give out information,  even  to the FBI. But we are  compelled
to comply with the  law, whether we agree with it or  not."  Foltin said
the broadness of  the law angers people since it  does not require the FBI
to justify  its searches. People would  be upset, however, if the
government  did not investigate the  activities of potential terrorists, 
he said.  "We are damned if we don't,  and we are damned if we do," he 
said. "I don't want to judge the  motives of the FBI."  Western's library
records are  purged daily, Foltin said. Unless  the student  has an overdue
 book, the records cannot be  accessed by the government  after the book is
returned. Interlibrary Loan records, however,  can be saved and accessed 
with a court order, he said.  "The student has the option to  save
inquiries and orders,"  Foltin said. "But then it is the  student's fault.
If students want  to protect their privacy, they  need to log out (of the
computer)  every time, and don't save anything  you don't want read."  Once
a student logs off the  campus computers and a new  user logs on, no one
can access  the specific Internet sites the  first student visited, said
Barry  Mendez, Western junior and  computer consultant for  Academic
Technology and User  Services.  Documents saved to the student's  folder on
the university  server, however, can be accessed  under provisions of the
act.  "I think it is unrealistic to  assume they have the manpower  to go
on a broad fishing expedition,"  Foltin said. "Just  because you are
looking at (a  book), it doesn't tell you what  you are thinking about it."
 After     reading the 300-plus  page document, Byrd said he  also found
that the act leaves  students' records vulnerable to  seizure after
students leave  Western.  Whether the student withdraws  or graduates, his
or her  transcripts are kept in storage  forever, transcript assistant 
Tina Fint said.  "I am concerned students  don't have the inclination or
the  time to learn about the act,"  Byrd said. "I think students are
generally unaware and vulnerable  because of this act. Students  can be
targeted and not even  know about it."  S  Excellence in Teaching Awards
Ballot  Letter of recommendation or evaluation may be attached to this
ballot.  Ballots must be received by March 3,2003  Faculty Nominee/Dept:
Nominator/Address: ; •  Signature of Nominator: 
Nominator (circle one): Alumni Student Faculty Faculty nominees of the
College of Arts and Science may be sent to: Ron Klctnknccht,  Dean, College
of the Arts and Sciences, MS9099. Other college nominations may be sent 
to: Stephanie Satzman, Dean, Woodring College of Education, MS9088.  WE BUY
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     Western Front 2003 January 31 - Page 4



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   4 • The Western Front News January 31, 2003  Stock
market fails to meet expectations for 2003  By Marc Dunaway  THE WESTERN
FRONT  Recent stock market changes dashed  hopes for the economy to climb
out of  recession.  Since Jan. 14, the Dow Jones  Industrial Average has
lost 800 points on  8 of 10 negative trading days.  Stock market investors
were optimistic  at the beginning of 2003 because a market  recovery that
began in October  seemed to be carrying into the new year.  The Dow had
went from an October low  of 7,200 points to 8,900.  The "January Effect,"
a concept stating  that the first day of  trading in January sets  the tone
for the coming year, indicated the  United States' economy was headed for 
recovery.  Sept. 17, 2001 marked a negative turning  point in many
investors' portfolios as  the Dow lost 684 points in the largest dollar 
loss in its 109-year history.  Many new Western students watched the value
of their college funds plummet.  The dot-com boom was officially  finished,
and the Sept. 11     attacks  shocked the American people and the  stock
market.  "My mom had to liquidate a mutual fund right after the September
attacks, and part  of that money was to help me with college,"  Western
senior Stephen Moshay said.  Many major corporations and private  investors
are keeping large portions of  their assets in cash, said Dennis Murphy, 
Western's dean of the College of Business  and Economics. Political
insecurity, the prospect of war  and lackluster earnings reports continue 
to weigh on investor confidence.  "We can't disregard war as a bad thing," 
Murphy said, pointing out that the threat  of war brings a lot of
uncertainty to the  market. "And we're also by no means  recovered from the
Internet bust." The confidence of some Western.students  has remained
unshaken despite  the market's recent losses.   Western senior Sean Krier
said most of  his college funds are invested in the stock of  Abbott
Laboratories.  "I'm not worried whatsoever," Krier  said. "I have faith in
the market and I  have faith in the company."  He keeps up on the progress
of the company  by reading the Wall Street Journal  and online  sources. 
"The dot-com boom misled people,"  Western finance graduate Edward 
MacPherson said. MacPherson said he invests in mutual  funds to limit his
risk in investing.  "I'm a long-term investor," he said.  "The market goes
up and down, but history  has shown that over the long term it  always goes
up."  AS pushes for faculty evaluations posted on Internet  By Shauna
Bakkensen  THE WESTERN FRONT  Students may never have to  slap themselves,
consume bags  of coffee beans or pop caffeine pills to sit through another
boring  lecture.  Soon students will be able to  peruse online teacher
evaluations  and select only the ones  who fit their vision of a quality 
instructor. .  Allison Smith, president of  associated students, and Julie 
Krom, vice president for academic  affairs, will speak to the  faculty 
senate Feb. 10 to suggest  appointing two faculty members  to form an
online faculty evaluation  task force.  The faculty senate passed a  motion
in May 2000 allowing a  modified version of in-class evaluations  to be
posted online with,  instructors'permission, Krom said.  The Committee on
the  Assessment of Teaching and  Learning passed and forwarded  the motion
to the Senate, but  due to certain stipulations, no  one followed through
on the  measure, she said.  "It wasn't a priority for anyone,  so we are
going to try another  avenue," Krom said.  Once the task force is formed, 
members will address how to  keep posted information current,  how students
would log on, how  censorship would be applied and  how to avoid libel and
slander.  "I understand faculty concerns,  but students need to know  which
professors to take,  depending on learning styles  and course load," Krom
said.  The online evaluations would  help students make better  course
decisions based on professors'  effectiveness, she  said.  Task force
members will report  the most feasible way to post relevant  information to
the board of   directors. The faculty evaluations  might then be linked to
the AS  Web site, she said.  "Students are the ultimate consumer,"  Krom
said. "For the price,  (students) should receive service  that is above
satisfactory."  Instructors are not required to  have in-class evaluations
performed  and are allowed to select  which comments are sent for  review,
Western philosophy professor  Thomas Downing said. "(Evaluations) play a
big role  in promotion and tenure,"  Downing said.  Instructors are
intimidated by unpleasant remarks, but an  evaluation system should
identify  an instructor's perceived  shortcomings and convince others  of
his or her qualifications,  Downing said.  Phillip Montague, chair of 
Western's philosophy department,  said too much weight is placed on 
in-class student evaluations.  "Student evaluations are the  only mechanism
we accept at  face value," he said. "We don't  ask if a student was in
class,  angry over a grade or what  rationale was used for a low or  high
number."  Faculty pays attention to the  quality of classroom instruction, 
including lecture pace and content.  Faculty then review fellow professors,
he said.  Montague said he would like  to see a system that eliminates 
vague questions.  "If we could establish a system  that would require
reasoned  evaluation on the part of the student,  that student could not 
assign value merely on (the  instructor) being an easy grader,"  he said. 
Although the online assessment  would be available to Western  students, it
would be expected to  contribute helpful feedback to the  faculty, Krom
said.  "I see this as a reciprocal trust  agreement between students  and
faculty," she said. "Students  should give insightful, respectful  comments
and faculty should  take them into consideration."  $2.33 Burger Sale 
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     Western Front 2003 January 31 - Page 5



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  January 31, 2003  ACCENT  Arts   Entertainment The Western Front
• 5  Ii the sprtlight  llllljjlj^l^llll (Bl^^BMiiiBllllI 
February 1  Auction  ^HI^^^^^Hil^B^^^^^fcSB^BB^^^fc»^y 5217
Northwest  ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ( ^ • • ^ ^ ^ ^ I
I H I I I B H B ^ B I H B I I I K S O ^ 312-1103  February 7  "Is your drag
a drag?" This drag makeover workshop teaches everyone Drag show  how to be
kings and queens.  PAC Concert Hall; $8 for students and  Live blues music
$w for general admission; 650-6120
H^^^^ttM^^H^HHffi^HHi^fl^^^^^^B|Ptt^iPgan Wild Buffalo House of Music; 208
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^^^^^M^H^B^fl^HH^H^^HHB^PIHiHiNfl^HiHto^is Bluesday Tuesday at the Wild  ^
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• • I ^ ^ H ^ ^ ^ H B ^ ^ ^ ^ P ^ ^ ^ ^
^ ^ f t ^ with the band Texas Jimmy   
^^^HIHI^^^^^^^^^B^^^^^^^^^B^^^^^^^^^^^^fcfi1 6 W M Buffalo is a 21-and- 
^^^fcf,y  5-  The LGBTA presents the 11th annual  HIV/AIDS Charity Drag
Show. The  ticket price is reduced 50 cents for each  piece of
non-perishable food, up to four  pieces. The LGBTA will donate all  funds
raised to Sean Humphrey House  and Evergreen AIDS Foundation.  February 7-9
 Snowboarding competition  ^ ^ ^ p  ^ B B H I I B i l ^ ^ ^ B ^ ^ ^ B ^ i i
^ K i i H l i i M ^ B f c i E Mt. Baker; free; 734-6771  ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^
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     Western Front 2003 January 31 - Page 6



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  6 • The Western Front Accent January 31, 2003  nning 
across the •  past^  Jacob Block/The Western Front 
Bellingham resident Dorothy Gonsalves gazes at historic  photographs of
Bellingham and Whatcom County from the Sandison  collection at the Whatcom
Museum's ARCO Building on Sunday. The Whatcom Museum of History and  Art
presents panoramic photos of  Bellingham circa 1904  By Jacob Block  The
Western Front  As Bellingham continues to grow and change, J.W.  Sandison's
panoramic photography serves as a permanent  reminder of a time when the
streets of Bellingham  were  paved with brick and bustled with Model-T
Fords  and horse-drawn carts.  The Whatcom Museum of History and Art's ARCO
 Exhibits Building, at 207 Prospect St., will be showing  Sandison's work
until Feb. 23 in its exhibition of 'Taking  the Wider View: J.W. Sandison's
Panoramic  Photographs of Bellingham."  Jeff Jewell, photo archivist for
the Whatcom Museum  of History and Art, co-curated the exhibit with Richard
 Vanderway.  "There has been a focus lately on the redevelopment  of
downtown Bellingham and the fate of historical buildings,"  Jewell said. "I
wanted to show these incredible  photos of old Bellingham that people
rarely get to see."  Sandison took his photographs of Bellingham between
1904 and 1962. Sandison's is one of the only surviving  collections of
panoramic photographs taken in Bellingham during that era, Jewell said. 
"We tend to think of cameras as static, but exhibits  like this show the
artistry of photography," said Kelly  McCarty, a Bellingham resident who
has experimented  with many types of photography. "Not all cameras take 
the same shots —just as different brushes leave
different  marks on a canvas."  The exhibition includes a No. 8 Cirkut
panoramic  camera, which belongs  to Tacoma photographer Ron  Karabaich.
The model number refers to the height of the  film in inches. He gave a
demonstration of a near mint-condition  1931 No. 10 Cirkut at the ARCO
building Jan.  26.  The majority of Sandison's photographs on display at 
the museum were taken on a No. 6, Jewell said. Vanderway said Karabaich is
one of the only active  panoramic photographers in the state.  Karabaich
belongs to the International Association of  Panoramic Photographers. He
said he has been taking photographs for approximately 30 years.  After
customers began asking him for reprints of old photographs, Karabaich
started to collect old photography  equipment, he said. Karabaich now has a
large collection  of old cameras and uses them frequently.  "I bought three
truckloads of old equipment for  $1,500," he said. "Through a lot of trial
and error, I was  able to get them to work/'  At his demonstration,
Karabaich showed dozens of  panoramic photographs from his collection
including a sweeping view of the first pitch ever thrown at Safeco  Field
in Seattle.  "How could you take a 270-degree photograph of a  ballpark
with any other camera?" he said.  Karabaich also demonstrated the level of
detail  that  can be captured with a Cirkut camera.  "With a magnifying
glass, you can actually recognize  people  (in the photo) the size of a
pinhead," he said.  According to biographical information provided at the
exhibition, Sandison bought his Cirkut in 1909. Many of  his group
photographs on display at the museum feature  the students and faculty of
Western's former incarnation,  the Bellingham State Normal School.     
Taken between 1909 and 1914, the campus then consisted  of only Old Main
and the first Eden's dormitory,  making for a sparse, but strangely,
familiar backdrop.  Sandison never left Bellingham after his arrival in 
1904 and spent the remainder of his life here as a well-respected 
commercial photographer working out of a  studio on Holly Street.  He never
retired, and following the death of his wife  Harriet in 1947, he continued
to work out of his Holly  Street studio until his own death in his darkroom
in  1962; he was 89.  The museum is open to the public 12 p.m. to 5 p.m., 
Tuesday to Sunday and offers tours by appointment.  Jacob Block/The Western
Front  Tacoma photographer Ron Karabaich shows a  photograph  he took at a
motorcycle convention  with his Cirkut No. 10 panoramic camera.  Wilson
Library features sexually t  By Jacob Block  Jacob Block/The Western Front 
Director Mark Kuntz looks on as Western professor Dennis Catrell and 
Western sophomore Claire Ryman rehearse a sexually-charged scene from
"Oleanna" on Monday.  The Western Front  Those who want to see foul-mouthed
teachers harass vulnerable  students need go no farther than Wilson
Library.  The north wing of the library will looks more like an academic 
office than a reading room since Western theater professor Mark  Kuntz's
production of David Mamet's controversial play  "Oleanna," opened Jan. 29. 
The play, written as a reaction to the Clarence Thomas hearings  of 1991,
centers on the power struggle that ensues after a student  accuses a
professor of sexual misconduct, threatening to ruin the  professor's career
and personal life.  "One of the reasons for doing the play is to generate
some discussion  about power, specifically within the student/professor 
relationship," Kuntz said.  Another central theme is the role of convention
in speech and   the educational system.  'The play is largely about
political correctness; how you use it  and how it can use you," Western
student and actress Jessica  Kline said.  Eric Reidman, another cast
member, said this is an important  play for Western students to see.  "It
breaks down the boundaries between the pedestals professors  are put on and
the ways in which they are human," he said.  Mamet is known for his candid
portrayals of human situations and  his mastery of creating hard-hitting,
lifelike dialogues, Kuntz  said.  Though it was originally written as a
two-character play, Kuntz  modeled this production on a version of
"Oleanna" he saw a few  years earlier in whic  each character.  Kuntz
decided to*  diversity in his adapt  Five different cast  and five faculty
mer  Kuntz also decided t(  the Johns as a wom£
student/professor reh  Kuntz said he hop  Carol by having five  Every few
minutes  yells "Freeze!" and t other's places on stag  The play opened t 
Many members of the  class. The play was €1  were not
told before  ferent approach to th lt;  "I like the characte:  said. "I
like the diffej  interact with each otl  Western junior Ian  the script or
seeing {  "Each individual p  said. "When one or t  with them."  Sandra
Paetkau, appreciated his multi                                  



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     Western Front 2003 January 31 - Page 7



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  January 31, 2003 Accent The Western Front • 7  West
African  Nicole Russo/The Western Front  Habib  Koite and Bamada bring
their original guitar style to Western's Performing Arts  Center Mainstage
to play in front of more than 500 people.  Habib Koite and  Bamada perform
a  mix of Malian and  world music at the  Performing Arts  Center Mainstage
 By Nicole Russo  The Western Front  Fans from around the world  come to
see Habib Koite  nd his band Bamada.  "Some tell me I give.them hope," said
Koite, a composer,  singer and guitarist. "Others tell me they do yoga to 
my music,"  Koite and Bamada performed on Western's Performing  Arts Center
Mainstage Thursday evening.  The band came to the Northwest after releasing
its  |itiew album, "Baro," in the United States.  "Out of all the world and
all the people that follow  him, he's right here in our little spot,"
Bellingham resident  Cheri Nunamaker said. ICoite's music ^  grates modern
world music. The latest of the band's  three albums adds a Latino beat to
the traditional sound  .of Malian music.  The entire album attracts the ear
to the sounds created  by the Malian instruments. The hypnotic sound
created  by Koite as his fingers slide down the strings of his guitar set
the mood.  "I've never seen anything before like that, live,"  Western
sophomore Aaron Apple said. "They should have  .more shows like that at
Western."  The band's sound is a guitar style some compare to guitar 
legends around the world, including Jimi Hendrix.  Koite's technique merges
the     musical harmonies of  the Malian kora, a harp that produces a
ripping sound,  with an acoustic guitar.  "It's  music that is becoming
more integrated into our  culture," PAC series coordinator Tamara McDonald
said.   The live performance allows the artists to interact with  the
audience and set the atmosphere for the evening. The  show addressed many
themes, including motherhood.  "I sing about women because women  can give
birth,"  Koite said. "The lesson between mother and baby is  strong. The
people must take this as an example."  Bamada's U.S. tour, promoting its
new album, began  inNewYorkCityonJan.il.  When Western was planning this
year's series to bring  artists from around the world to campus, Koite and
Bamada came to mind, McDonald said.  "I've seen him at a couple festivals,"
McDonald said. "I  knew that  he had a big following."  Western managed to
book Bamada for the PAC series  because its current tour brings the band to
Washington  on its way from Oregon. The band is not stopping in  Seattle
during the tour this year even though it has  built a fan base in the city.
 "We brought them into the university because we see  the talent and the
potential," McDonald said.  Koite was born in 1958 at Thies in Senegal. He
is  Malian and comes from a noble line of Khassonke  Griots, a hereditary
caste of musicians, according to his  Web site.  Koite taught himself how
to play the guitar at a young  age while traveling with his mother,
according to his  Web site.  He was accepted to the National Institute of
Arts in Bamako, Mali when he was 20 years old. In 1978, after  six months
at the NIA, Koite became conductor of  Ina  Star, the school orchestra.  He
continued to teach guitar at the NIA after graduation  and formed Bamada in
1988. The name Bamada  traditionally means Bamako, which is the capital of 
Mali. However, music circles founded in 1988 dubbed  Bamada "in the mouth
of the crocodile," a nickname for  the residents of Bamako.  After years of
playing in clubs, Koite and Bamada won  first prize at the Perpignan
Voxpole Festival in France  in 1991, allowing the band to record its first
single.  "I think they're the best band in the world right now," 
Bellingham resident Tanya Kitterman said.  The single, "Cigarette A Bana,"
(No More Cigarettes)  addresses the peer pressures associated with smoking 
and one boy's choice to not  smoke.  "I'm not sure (I'm a role model), but
I try," Koite said.  "It's good for young people to have an example."  mse 
Ltiple actors of different races played  * exual diversity rather than
racial  ers play the role  of Carol, the student,  play the role of John,
the professor,  one of the Carols as a man and one of  in attempt to show
as many different  lips as possible.  Wits will be able to see themselves
in  3 versions of her in the same drama,  g the two-hour play, a Carol or a
John  ion halts while characters take each  sll- out audience on Wednesday
night.  I were students in Kuntz's Theatre 101  •reading
for the quarter. The  students  the play that Kuntz had taken a dif-ng. 
Most students said they enjoyed it.  ges," Western freshman Jeremy Swazo 
jints of view and how (the characters)  elder said it was not at all like
reading  s a  dynamic that's all their own," he  ' them changes, the
dynamic changes  cher's aid for Kuntz's class, said she  cter adaptation. 
"I like the innovation of  switching up the cast members,"  she said. "It
shows probably  a more honest approach to  the play than the original." 
The audience seating is in a  formation  known as "theater in  the round"
in which the audience  surrounds the stage on all sides,  much like a
boxing ring. When  the cast members are not on  stage, they sit with the
audience.  Though he modified the original  script only slightly, each 
Carol and each John are discrete  emotional beings, Kuntz said. One Carol
is vulnerable, one is seductive, one is controlling and  one is cocky.
Kuntz said he designed the  characters partly on the  natural rhythms of
the cast members. They, act in their own  clothes, and all the  props come
from Kuntz's own office.  The cast is divided on the issue of which
character Mamet  intended  to be the protagonist.  'The audience has a
tendency to root for the professor," Kuntz  said. "I think it's clear that
(John) was a jerk, but I want to leave  it to them to decide."
•  Kline, who describes her Carol as "the activist," said
her character  is difficult to sympathize with.  "The script is biased; the
odds are stacked against us," she said.  "We're trying to find the humanity
in Carol to even out the play-  Jacob Block/The Western Front  Western
professor Doug Waldo and Western student Heidi Krilanovich rehearse  a 
difficult scene from "Oleanna''Monday.  ingfield."  Western sophomore and
theater student Katie Zaitz said  Kuntzls production changed her mind about
who to root for.  "Before, I thought Carol was the bad guy," she said. "Now
I  think it's John."  Actress and theater faculty member Deborah Greer said
she wants people to think about the issues the play raises.  "I think the
perfect outcome of this would be for the audience to  feel compelled to be
vocal and discuss this," she said.  After each Saturday night performance,
Kuntz will allow the  audience to do just that in a post-performance
discussion.  Oleanna will be running January 29-31, February 1 and 
February 5-8. Tickets are available for $6 at the PAC box office.          
                           



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     Western Front 2003 January 31 - Page 8



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   8» The Western Front  SPORTS  NCAA II   Intramural January
31,2003  Head to head: Should Title IX be reformed?  Commission needs to
work on enforcing Title IX, not revising it  Annie  Johnson COMMENTARY 
Next week, a national commission  studying reform of  Title IX will vote on
recommendations  to forward to U.S.  Secretary of Education Rod  Paige.
Before Paige thinks  about reforming Title IX, perhaps  he should think
about  enforcing it.  Few other pieces of legislation  in the past 50 years
have had a  more profound effect on American  society than Title IX, which
guarantees equal opportunities for  women in all levels of sports. The 
argument is not about spending  an equal amount of money on  men's and
women's sports. The  focus is on the necessity for  women to have the same
opportunities  as men.  The Department of Education  fields numerous phone
calls  about non- compliance with Title  IX every year and often threatens 
schools with penalties. No'  school has ever been denied federal  funding
for non-compliance  according to a Jan. 30 Washington  Post article.  Last
June, the National  Women's Law Center cited 30  schools for non-compliance
 including the University of Notre Dame, the University of  Miami and
Kansas State  University. None of these  schools were denied federal 
funding or even threatened with  having their funding cut.  The law states
that schools  receiving federal funding cannot  discriminate on the basis
of  gender, meaning athletic scholarships  must be awarded equally  based
on the makeup of the  student body.  One of the commission's
recommendations  is that the number of  scholarships awarded to women 
should be based on interest in  sports, not on the makeup of a  school's
student body. Curt A.  Levey, director of legal and public affairs for the
Center for  Individual Rights, a conservative  public interest law firm,
contends  that current Title IX policy interpretation  is a quota that
should  be revised on the basis of women's  interest in sports.  "I don't
think it's too much to  say that people who are interested  should say
they're interested,"   Levey said in the Washington  Post article. "I don't
think you  should tell women they're interested when they're not."  What
Levey fails to realize is  that women are interested in  sports. The
increase in female  athletic participation since Title  IX was enacted
shows that  females are involved. In 1972  only one in 27 high school girls
 participated in a varsity sport,  according to the Women's Sports 
Foundation. Now, 31 years later,  nearly one in two does.  College
athletics have also  had increased interest and participation  among women.
 According to the foundation, in  1972 fewer than 30,000 women participated
in college athletics.  Today, more than 151,000  women are NCAA athletes. 
Modifications to Title IX would  limit future opportunities for  women in
favor of expanded  chances for men and would violate   gender equity. 
Implementing Title IX's policies  at every level of education is  necessary
to ensure equal opportunity.  The responsibility of the  federal government
is to ensure  equal opportunity, not to add,  discontinue or maintain
sports  teams.  Title IX is not a law that  favors a minority. It is a law
designed to make sure women  get basic rights in the classroom  and on the
playing field.  No legal challenge to the law  has succeeded according to
the  Washington Post article, and a  committee comprised of male  athletic
directors and conference  chairmen has no chance of  being any more
effective.  Reforming Title IX is necessary to abolish its present quota
system  Matt  DeVeau COMMENTARY  Although a well-intentioned  law, Title DC
has many flaws that  need revision. When the 15-mem-ber  Commission on
Opportunity  in Athletics meets next week,  they should revise the
regulations  so Title LX continues to promote  women's athletics but not at
 the expense of men's teams.  Title IX was designed to  eliminate gender
discrimination  in all areas of colleges and  high schools, but it is most 
widely known for its effect on  athletics. It has greatly  increased
athletic opportunities  for women, but it has also  turned into a quota
system.  The current rules require colleges  to distribute athletic
scholarships  to male and female athletes  equally, based on the
institution's  enrollment. At Western,  this means men's baseball, a club 
team, cannot compete at the varsity  level without the university  adding
another women's team.  Rather than adding women's  teams, colleges often
eliminate  men's programs in order to balance  out the proportions of 
men's and women's sports. The  National Association of  Wrestling Coaches
said Title LX  eliminated 355 men's wrestling programs, leaving 22,000
athletes  without a sport to play at  the college level in the past 10 
years. Other representatives  from men's sports such as tennis,  gymnastics
and swimming  have raised similar complaints.  The NAWC has filed a lawsuit
 against the Department of  Education claiming discrimination.  Supporters
of Title IX  often claim such programs are  dropped because of overspending
 on football and men's basketball  teams, but this is not  always the case.
 Marquette University in  Milwaukee, Wis. eliminated its  wrestling program
despite the  fact the team was financed by  a  nonprofit organization
according  to a Mar. 18, 2002 article in  the U.S. News and World  Report.
So, even though the program  was not costing the university  a dime, it was
eliminated  to satisfy a Title LX quota.  Another method of meeting  quotas
is artificially inflating the  number of athletes on women's teams,
particularly crew.  Women's crew is a fine sport,  but because they can be
so large,  some crew teams have been  offering athletic scholarships to 
women who have never even  competed in the sport in order to  keep
proportionality in the athletic  department.  San Diego State University's 
women's crew Web site proudly  proclaims: 'You do not need to  have prior
rowing experience to  join the team!" Methods like this do not help  women
gain equality in athletics.  They simply favor women  who have never tried
crew by  giving them scholarships over  wrestlers who have been working 
long and hard for those same  scholarships and rapidly disappearing  roster
spots.  Title IX was designed to  advance opportunities for women  and
promote equality. It has  accomplished the former but  failed miserably at
the  latter and  should be changed by the commission.  BOOMERS  $2.33 
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     Western Front 2003 January 31 - Page 9



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  January 31, 2003 Sports The Western Front • 9  Palm
leads Western men's winning crusade  Peter Louras/The Western Front 
Western freshman guard Ryan Diggs leaps toward the  hoop past a Crusader
defender in the Vikings' win against  Northwest Nazarene University
Thursday night.  By Joshua Fejeran THE WESTERN FRONT  After splitting two
away  games, the Western men's basketball  team arrived home to  defeat
Northwest Nazarene  University on the shoulders of  Western senior center
Mike  Palm's double-double.  Palm scored a game-high 19  points, pulled
down 12 rebounds,  and contributed his eighth  double-  double of the
season, giving  the Vikings a 80-61 victory  Thursday night at Carver Gym. 
"I was  trying to get a few outside  shots, expand my game a  little bit,"
Palm said.' "We didn't  play like we can today. We had a  couple moments
where we  played really well, but we can  play a lot better."  Palm, who
scored the Vikings'  first 11 points, ignited Western to  a 25-9 lead late
in the first half.  The fifth place Vikings won  their second straight game
and  improved to 11-6 overall and 5-3  in the.Great Northwest Athletic 
Conference.  "It feels good to come back  home," Western junior guard 
Jason Burrell said. "With our  offense we're not a selfish team,  so it's
easy to get into a flow and  just make smart passes, make smart cuts and
just trust your  teammates and everything  should work out."  Burrell
finished the game with  10 points, 7 rebounds and 6  assists.  The Western
men, who shot  less than 50 percent for the game, relied on their
overpowering  defense to hold the Crusaders  to 25 points in the first
half. The Vikings led by 15 at halftime.  The Vikings continued to play 
aggressive defense in the second  half and extend-ed  their lead to
BHiliil^BIBliil  29 with seven  minutes left in  the game.  "The defensive 
end of the  'The defensive end of the  floor is where we hope that  we can
be playing at a  floor is where high level all the time.'  we hope that
Brad Jackson  we can.be play- Western head coach  ing at a high  level all
the  time," Western head coach Brad  Jackson said.  Western freshman guard 
Ryan Diggs made his presence  known offensively, shooting 5-6  from the
field and 2-2 from the  three-point line for 14 points in the first half.
Diggs had some  foul trouble in the second half  and ended the game with 16
 points and 5 rebounds.  'Tm just coming in trying to  score and provide
some offense  for my team," Diggs said. "I didn't   think they were fouls,
but I guess  I got a little too aggressive."  Western junior guard Stefan 
Dickason scored 11 points coming  off the bench.  "I'm^ really enjoying
it,"  Dickason said. "I'm just taking  what I can get and trying to  make
the most of my opportunities.  I'm just doing what it takes  to be a team
player."  Western freshman Darrell  Visser, who got his first start filling
 in for ill Western senior forward  Maurice Tyree, had a disappointing 
night missing all four of  his shots from the field and two free-throws. 
"We had to  make an adjustment  early with  Maurice being  o u t , " J a c
k s on  said. "By  and  large we did a  pretty good job.  We shot the ball 
pretty well and  held them to 28  percent (shooting) for the game.  When
you come out on the plus  side, you have to feel good  about it."  The
Crusaders fell to 3-13  overall and 1-7 in the GNAC.  "They have struggled
this  year, but they've got some guys  that can do some things and  they're
a very well-coached  team," Jackson said.  Western plays another big
conference  game at 7 p.m. Saturday  at Carver Gym against Seattle 
University. The Redhawks are  12-4 overaU and 5-2 in the GNAC.  "We're
going to have a challenge  on Saturday night,"  Jackson  said. "Seattle
University is a  good ballclub. I think it's going  to be a battle. They're
one notch ahead of us in the regional  standings, so it's a big game." 
Come to the Games, Get Crazy,   Get Free Stuff!  Remember to swipe your
student ID card at  the BJue Crew Booth for your prize.  umSSS Swipe 11    
times to enter the $1,000 drawing!  VIHINE WOMEN  SATURDAY, Feb 1st  vs.
Seattle University  Carver Gym, 3:00 pm  f you drink,  Eat  DcTOic  or 
CDIYJE SUFFDRT YDUR VIKINGS  While  Drinking *  /hy? Eating food before and
while drinking  jhelps to slow down the absorption of alcohol  land helps
to minimize  stomach irritation that  wmay cause nausea and vomiting.  1
Drink = 12 oz. Beer =  4-5 oz. Wine = 1.25 oz proof Liquor 
tt^^^^^MlliillBilla*Mcist WWU students do. How do we know? You told us. in
three  H ^ ^ ^ ^  l ^ ^ l l i r a n d o m i y selected samples of WWU
students (1999-5000, N=826;  P ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ l a O Q Q - 2 Q 0 1 ,
N=18Q4; 2001-2002, N= 2104}. 96% reported they 
,..lpllllJiifcH^llllipMalways, usually, or sometimes eat before or while
drinking.  ^gH^^^B^^iw/preventionandwellness for more information          
               



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     Western Front 2003 January 31 - Page 10



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  10 • The Western Front  OPINIONS  Letters   Editorials
January 31, 2003  USA Patriot Act jeopardizes  students' liberties  Western
students are still feeling the aftermath of Sept, 11 through  the slumping
economy and tighter border security. Potentially they  could feel a total
intrusion into their personal records and documents.  University libraries,
under the provisions of the USA Patriot  Act, are required to allow the
federal government to search students'  personal information including, but
not limited to, library,  personnel, admissions and computer records. The
act does not  require federal agents to notify the student, nor does it
require the  student to be a suspect of a federal investigation.  This
blatant violation  of the Fourth Amendment, which protects  against
unreasonable searches and seizures, without even considering  the students
it violates, is wrong. The Patriot Act can only  be validated if those
affected are  notified in the event of an investigation.  The public has no
way of knowing if the act has had any impact   on national security. The
Patriot Act prohibits institutions from  releasing information from records
which have been seized.  Students will never know if the FBI has been
mulling over their  academic activities, including Web sites they have
visited and  books they have checked out. Records of student transcripts,
class  schedules and financial information are a mere stepping stone to 
more personal things such as medical records.  A policy similar to the
Patriot Act has been used in the past, but  the power-hungry leader was not
George W. Bush — it was Adolf  Hitler. In 1933 Hitler
blamed the burning of the Reichstag  building  on the Communists, creating
an environment of paranoia that  allowed him to issue the Enabling Act,
undermining the constitution  and destroying basic civil liberties. While
comparing Bush to Hitler  is somewhat of a stretch, the principles of both
acts are the same:  compromising civil liberties because of a traumatic
national event.  Supporters of the Patriot Act claim that desperate times
call for  desperate measures. If this means monitoring all potential 
avenues for terrorism, right down to university libraries, so  be it.  The
act is intended to aid in the "uniting and strengthening (of)  America by
providing (the) appropriate tools required to intercept  and obstruct
terrorism," according to Section 1 of the act. Obtaining the personal
records of students is not an "appropriate  tool." It is instead a gross
intrusion of privacy that students  should not have to accept without their
notification.  It is now more important than ever that students educate
themselves  about the Patriot Act and other issues of national security.
What once seemed like an issue of little concern to Western's campus 
community is now one that must be dealt with immediately.  Students must
know their rights and be aware of the violation  that could potentially
take place. It is crucial to the constitutionality  of the Patriot Act that
students be notified before their  records are searched or seized. Failure
to do so may send our  country's leaders spiraling into  the same
anti-civil liberty mindset  that Hitler reveled in 70 years ago. 
Frontlines are the opinion of The Western Front editorial board: Helen 
Hollister, Ailey Kato, Paul Nicholas Carlson, Andrea Jasinek, Brandon 
Rosage, Peter Malcolm, Katie James and Jeremy Edwards.  The Western Front 
Editor in Chief: Helen Hollister; Managing Editor: Ailey Kato; Head  Copy
Editor: Sonja L. Cohen; Copy Editors: Jeremy Edwards, Katie  James; Photo
Editor: Peter Louras; News Editors: Paul Nicholas  Carlson, Andrea Jasinek;
Accent Editor: Brianne Holte; Features  Editor: Brandon Rosage; Sports
Editor: Josh Dumond; Opinions  Editor: Peter Malcolm; Online/Assignment
Editor: Lisa Mandt;  Cartoonists: Kellyn Ballard, Tom  Lackaff; Columnist:
Mike Baab;  Adviser: Lyle Harris; Business Manager: Alethea Macomber; 
Advertising  Manager: Joel Hall.  Staff Reporters: Andy Aley, Shauna
Bakkensen, Valerie Bauman, Jacob  Block, Keith Boiling, Andrea Boyle, Ben
Brockhaus-Hall, Christine  Cameron, Bonnie Coe, Livia Dalton, Matt DeVeau,
Marc Dunaway, Joshua  Fejeran, Tim Gadbois, Annie Johnson, Nikki
Langendorfer, Tyson Lin, Sarah Loehndorf, Joe Mack, Jenny Maag, Colin
McDonald, Matt  McDonald, Krystal Ann Miller, Greta Olson, Amanda Peckham,
Jimmy Pell,  Nicole Russo, Niki Smith, David Stone, Yosuke Taki, Rachel
Thomas,  Melissa VanDeWege, Abiah Weaver, Carl Weiseth, Cate Weisweaver, 
Jennifer Zuvela.  And we quote:  "So where ya gonna turn when there's no 
weed to burn? No money to earn and no  knowledge to learn?"  -Louie
Shadowz, co-founder of the late '90s underground hip-hop trio  The
Untouchables, in the     song "We Untouchable."  Overthrow of Iraqi
government up to its citizens  Marc  Dunaway * COMMENTARY  The reasons for
avoiding war  with Iraq go beyond mere antiwar  sentimentalism. Americans 
must be aware that establishing  a new government in Iraq would  create
dangerous and unacceptable  risks to the United States.  Building a foreign
government  is contrary to the principles  of freedom and
self-determination  our nation is built  upon. Our own Declaration of
Independence states, "Prudence,  indeed, will dictate that governments 
long established should  not be changed for light and  transient
causes...." The United  States must recognize this and  defer to the Iraqi
people the  responsibility of instituting  change within their government. 
The United States must respect the sovereignty not of  Saddam Hussein, but
of the  Iraqi people.  Continued aggression by the United States toward
Iraq will  fuel anti-American sentiment in  the Muslim world to a fever
pitch.  The American people will suffer  more from an increase in terrorism
 than they will gain from  replacing Hussein. The additional  risk of
drawing Israel into  the conflict creates an even bigger  risk. If Israel
is attacked  with chemical or biological  weapons, the whole region could 
explode in violence.  The United States should also  avoid conquering Iraq
because of  the long-term consequences. Iraq  is an ethnically divided
country,  and Hussein's repressive government  is the only thing holding it
 together.  Kurdish separatists in the  north have been waging a war for 
independence for 30 years, and  the Shiite population in the south  shares
sentiments with Iran.  The only way the United  States can keep Iraq from
fracturing   is to install another  totalitarian regime to repress  the
Kurds and Shiites, or maintain  a military presence willing  to do it.  The
Bush administration  argues that Hussein poses a significant  threat to
regional stability.  By removing Hussein, the  United States could
theoretically  aid in constructing a democratized  society free of the
repression  and tyranny of the Hussein  regime.  This naive and seemingly 
altruistic reason for the United  States' action is nothing more  than
folly. The Arab world is a conflicted region far beyond  repair by the
United States.  Assuming the Iraqi people  want to be conquered  by the 
United States is blatant cultural  imperialism.  A policy of containment 
toward Iraq minimizes risks to  the United States, while preventing  it
from being drawn into  a prolonged foreign conflict. By aiding opposition
groups within  Iraq, the United States can  encourage reform without 
imposing it.  As citizens responsible for the  actions of elected
representatives,  the people of the United  States need to work within the 
political system to create positive  change. By writing or calling  elected
leaders people can  ensure their voices are heard.  With the steam engine
of  American industry and mass  media marching off to war, the  ballot box
remains the only  option for a concerned citizenry.  If evil must be done
for the  sake of good, then it should only  be done when all other options 
are exhausted.  Attacking Iraq without clear  evidence showing it poses a 
direct threat to the people of the  United States is wrong. Without  such
evidence, the risks to the  United States, both now and in  the future, are
unacceptable and  intolerable.  B-l-N-G-O, B-l-N-G-O, and bingo was his
name-o  Mike  Baab  ACT YOUR  AGE  On Monday  night I learned a  valuable
lesson: Disappointment,  which for me is usually free and  abundant,
actually costs $6.  Monday was the night I  played bingo for the first
time.  When I walked in, I wasn't  aware that I was paying the  equivalent
of a video rental and  two HoHos for an evening of  ink-dabbing impotence. 
I decided to play bingo  because I was getting tired of,  well, renting
videos and eating  HoHos, to be honest. I scooped  up two friends and
headed to  the bingo parlor, which is somewhere  in Ferndale.  If Seattle
is the heart of the  Pacific Northwest and Vancouver,  British Columbia, is
its soul,  Ferndale is definitely its anus.  When we walked in, the first 
thing I noticed was the smell,  which was what I imagine the  smoking
section of an IHOP  would smell like if the P stood  for "pestilence." Most
of the  players were sucking on their  cigarettes like they were trying  to
take the first sip of a very  thick milkshake.  The patrons were dressed
like  members of some sort of retired  lumberjack club. Cowboy boots  were
in full effect, and one  woman appeared to be wearing  a tablecloth.  No
one was talking. Everybody  was staring at their cards and  listening to
the caller, who was  sitting at a microphone near the  back.  "1-22!" he
said,  and the room  immediately erupted in a semiautomatic  cacophony of
taps as  the 80 or so players marked  their cards with their enormous, 
perhaps intentionally phallic,  "daubers."  The three of us walked past 
the scowling players to the  uninhabited cash register like  refugees. We
waited for a few  minutes until a sour-faced  woman came to help us.  We
bought our $6 cards and  tried to explain to the clerk  that  we were bingo
virgins, and  it would be great if she could  explain to us how it worked. 
She made a dismissive "mrmm-rpht"  sound, as if opening her  mouth and
making vowel  sounds was too much work to   put out for the city folk in
front  of her.  We turned around, cards in  hand, and tried to find
somewhere to sit. The bingo parlor  was remarkably crowded, and  we scanned
all the cafeteria  tables for an area with  three  seats together. I could
feel my  See BINGO, Page 11                                                
       



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     Western Front 2003 January 31 - Page 11



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  January 31, 2003 Opinions The Western Front • 11 
Bingo: Speed round  Continued from Page 10 clothes absorbing the smell as 
we stood there, scanning the  mummified patrons for a friendly  face. We
found seats next to a  woman who appeared to have  spent the last 85 years
in a pickle  jar.  When the next game started,  we were ready.  "G-56!" The
caller announced.  is too much for columnist as veterans dominate with
daubers  We leisurely scanned our  cards, daubing every now and  again.
When I was only halfway  through my cards, I heard "I-  31!" from the
front. What the  hell? Why is he going so fast?  "0-65!" the caller
declared.  I sped up, frantically trying to  stab my cards with the dauber.
 The caller  seemed to pick up  momentum, too, and by the time  someone
exclaimed "bingo!" I  was sweating and panting like a  labrador.  I got
faster in the hour I was  there, but I never came close to  winning. After
six games, and  one ill-advised round of "speed  bingo," I never felt even
a  spark of hope. My friends didn't come close to winning  either.  When it
was time to leave, we  all admitted that bingo made us  its bitch. We felt
fatigued and  defeated. None of us had anything  to show for our
frustrating  and possibly carcinogenic  evening.  Bingo was not the bold
new  recreation activity I was looking  for. Next Monday, I'll just call up
 a girl from one of my classes and  ask her out. I will inevitably be 
disappointed, but at least it will  be free.  The Western Front Online 
HUlHBUBIiBBfcp  llllllliliiiliilllSlliil  www.westernfrontonline.com Sunday
Morning  College LifeGroup @ 9:00 a.m.  Worship @ 10:30 a.m.  Sunday
Evening  Hannahs Creek contemporary  worship @ 6:00 p.m.  110 M o r a Si. 
lt;--;rCcjinmerririI in  l^l^lllllpllJllll  jiBiiiwBiiiiiii: l ^ l | H | j
| | | | i i|  ifciiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii  UiiBBIiBllll  jl^j^^ijllllll 
^Hiifliiiiliiiii  SSi^S  BAPTIST  lilllllllllli  * * • *
* . •Sffll % lt;».  Design A Beautiful Beaded 
For Your  Special Person!  Are Your BRAKES making noise?  We have a FREE
brake inspection that you g The creative Beading store  should aet every
30,000 miles.  1 0 % discount with Student ID  Prime Tune   Brakes  in
Sunset Square  671 -2277  it pays  to advertise in the  Western Front 
lllllllIB^  IliHpl^llBpiiilii^piWllllIll  Tuesday Edition = previous
Wednesday 3:00 p.m.  ^•IKiBiiiiilliMlllill  WESTERN FRONT
CLASSIFIEDS  BURGERS, FRYS,   Soda.  $2.95. All day everyday! The  Malt
Shop 1135 Railroad Ave.  1993 TAURUS Wagon. White  w/ gray interior. AM/FM
Cassette V-6 Automatic, Cruise,  Studded Tires, Very Clean!  Asking $2290,
Call 510-2083.  1221 FRANKLIN, 3 BD, 1 1/2  BA Newer, close to WWU $795 
301 GLADSTONE 4 BD, 2  BA, $995/mo  1441 JAMES, 3 BD, 1 BA,  $775/mo  1422
ALABAMA 'B' 3 BD apt  $650/mo  CALL ERA Lakeway Realty at 360-733-4009 
RENT 1 week in Puerta  Vallarta! Room on Beach.  Sleeps 4, $700. Call
734-9259. ROWAN GROVE Condos.  New 4BD twnhse, frplc, gas  heat, skylights,
Baker view, dbl  garage walk to WWU 734-9110.  STUDIO, 2,3+4 Bed Suites. 2 
Steps away from WWU! $250-  $1295. Call 676-0194 ISABELLA APTS. Luxury! w/ 
d, frpl, deck, elevator, micro,  strg, cov'd pkg, WSG   cable  pd. $625-
$1080. Call 676-0194.  INEXPENSIVE CAMPUS  Living: Spaces are available in 
Birnam Wood apartments. Units  are fully furnished and include a  kitchen,
dining area, two  bedrooms, living room, a bathroom and a small patio. All 
utilities included except long  distance telepbne. Laundry  facilities on
site. Two fitness  centers. Come and see why on-campus  living is
convenient and  very cost-effective. Call  us at  650-6565 to get more 
information.  CASH FOR Nintendo, 64,  Super, or Gameboy, Color,  Advance 
Systems or Games.  E-mail:  Cashforgames@hotmail.com  SUMMER CAMP
Counselors  On-Campus Interviews for  Premier Camps in  Massachusetts.
Positions  available for students as  counselors in all team sports 
including Roller Hockey and  Lacrosse, all individual sports  such as
Tennis   Golf, Waterfront and Pool activities,  and specialty activities
including  art, dance, theatre, gymnastics, newspaper, rocketry   radio. 
GREAT SALARIES, room,  board, and travel. June 21st -  August 17th. For
more  information and to apply: MAH-KEE-  NAC www.campmkn.com  (Boys):
1-800-753-9118  DANBEE www.danbee.com  (Girls): 1-800-392-3752. .. 
Interviewers will be on campus  Tuesday, March 4th - 10am- 4pm  in the
Viking Union Building.  BARTENDER TRAINEES  Needed. $250/day potential. 
Local positions. 1-800-293-3985  x227  ARE YOU Looking for a  Meaningful
Volunteer  Opportunity? Join our team  providing support, information   
advocacy to individuals who  have been affected by domestic violence and
sexual assault.  Work with adults or children.  Excellent training   
supervision. Call Domestic  Violence   Sexual Assault  Services, formerly
Whatcom  . Crisis Services, 671-5714.  Training begins Feb. 6.  SUMMER CAMP
Jobs for  men and women. Hidden Valley  Camp (Granite Falls, WA) needs 
resident staff (6/14/03-8/22/03).  Spend your summer in a  beautiful
setting while in  worthwhile employment. Room/  Board/Salary. Positions
include:  Counselors, lifeguards, drivers,  kitchen staff and more. 
Interviews available on campus.  Stop by our booth at the Career  Fair on
March 13th for more information or contact us  directly by phone: (425)844-
 8896 or e-mail: hvc-wa@  ix.netcom.com  1RMMT WANTED 2 Bdrm  Apt. Close to
WWU. Quiet, on  bus line. $275/mo, wsg/incl. D/  W W/D Willing to pay    
part of  lease. Very convenient place!  Call Colin 360-770-8476  ROOMMATE
NEEDED  ASAP $300/mo + 1/3 utlities.  2407 Claudia Court. Call 656-  5533 
20% STUDENT Discount!  Angela London, Naturopathic Physician. Specializing
in  preventative primary care  medicine, women's health,  chronic
conditions, located @  1903 D st. For appointments call  734-9500  STUDENT
GROUPS: Earn  $l,000-$2,000 this semester  with a proven  CampusFundraising
3 hour  fundraising event. Our  programs make fundraising easy  with no
risks. Fundraising dates  are filling quickly, so get with  the program! It
works! Contact CampusFundraising @ (888)  923-3238, or visit 
www.campusfundraiser.com  THE BEST Summer Ever! Camp Starlight, a co-ed
resident  camp in N.E. Pennsylvania,  seeks enthusiastic  upperclassmen to
be General  Bunk Counselors   Specialists  in Athletics, Waterfront,
Outdoor  Adventure   the Arts. Join our  staff from the U.S.   abroad   
enjoy the perfect balance of  work   fun! Good Salary. Travel  allowance.
(6/20- 8/17). For  more info visit  www.campstarhght.com or  contact us
toll free @ 1-877-  875-3971 or at info @ campstarlight.com.  NOT JUST
Another Summer  Job! Female and male counselors  needed for a top summer
camp in  Maine. Top salary, room, board,  laundry, clothing and travel 
provided. Must love working  with young people and have  skills in one or
more of the  following activities: archery, arts (ceramics, stained glass, 
jewelry), basketball, canoeing,  kayaking, rowing (crew), dance  (tap,
pointe, jazz), field hockey,  golf, gymnastics (instructors),  figure
skating, ice hockey,  horseback riding/English hunt  seat, lacrosse,
digital  photography, videographer, piano  accompanist, pioneering/camp 
craft, ropes/climbing (challenge  course) 25 stations, sailing,  soccer,
Softball, tennis, theatre  (technicians, set design,  costumer),
volleyball, water-skiing  (slalom, trick, barefoot,  jumping) WSJ./ swim 
instructors, windsurfing, also  opportunities for nurses, HTML/  web design
and secretaries.  Camp Vega For Girls! Come see  us at www.campvega.com 
APPLY ON OUR WEBSITE!  Fill out the on-line application, e-mail  us at 
camp_vega@yahoo.com, or call  us for more information at 1-  800-993-VEGA.
We will be on  the Western Washington campus  on February 11th in the
Viking  Union Room 460 for information  and interviews from 10am-3pm.  Come
find out more about Camp  Vega! No appointment necessary  ft pays to
advertise  in The Western Front                                         



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     Western Front 2003 January 31 - Page 12



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   12 • The Western Front January 31, 2003  cds (this
year alone): $300  vintage rock posters: about $40 each  letter from
neighbor complaining about music: $0  frame for concert ticket stubs: $ 13 
used turntable: $20  guitar pick necklace: $.75  finding out there's an
Internship for people like you: priceless Apply for a summer internship
with Interscope/Geffen/A M Records at mastercard.com.  You could be sent to
Nashville, where you'll spend five weeks learning from industry bigwigs. 
You might even be flown to  LA to work on the Jurassic 5 album Power in
Numbers.  there are some things money can't buy. for everything else
there's MasterCard.®  toiKM. 18-25, »it»
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