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2009_0206 



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  DR. EMILY GIBSON  DISCUSSES RARE  CASE OF MUMPS  PAGE 2  1  ROCK
CLIMBING^MQRE THAN JUST  EXERCISE  PAGE 8  STUDENTS  CREATE EDGY  LITERARY
MAGAZINE  PAGE 6 Friday, February 6, 2009  AN INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER
SERVING WESTERN WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY SINCE 1970 I W E S T E R N F R O N T
O N L I N E . N ET  Same-sex couples seek more rights  Ashley Mitchell  THE
WESTERN FRONT  On Jan. 28, three months after voters  in California passed
Proposition 8—a  bill prohibiting same-sex
marriage—the  Washington State Legislature introduced 
its own bill to the opposite effect.  If passed, Senate Bill 5688 will give
 same- sex couples the same rights married  opposite-sex couples enjoy, but
would  stop short of defining a union  between  same-sex couples as
"marriage."  As a result of Proposition 8 passing  in California's November
election Western  opinions and ideas surrounding same-sex  marriage have
expanded, said Western senior Amber Aldrich, coordinator for the  Lesbian
Gay Bisexual Transgender Alliance  (LGBTA) student organization.  Western
students started the Queers  and Allies for Activism club when the 
Proposition ,8 protest in Bellingham in  November sparked discussion about 
same-sex • marriage and the rights that come with it, she
said.  In response to all the opinions and  views on campus about the
issue, the LGBTA  is holding an event called the "State  of Queer Union" on
March 4th. This event  will give people a chance to speak about 
Proposition 8, the current bill introduced  in the state senate and
everything regarding  same-sex marriage, Aldrich said.  Large service
centers and groups  such as the American Civil Liberties  Union, Northwest
Women's Law Center  and Equal Rights Washington will join the  campus  at
this event, Aldrich said.  Bellingham residents, like most  coastal cities,
tend to have progressive and liberal views, but opinions vary, Aldrich 
said. On.topics such as same-sex rights  and benefits there is general
acceptance,  but opinions can differ so much that even  the question of the
institution of marriage is up in the air for some people, she said. 
Western sophomore Brittany White,  who identifies herself as a  lesbian,
said  she has found Western to be a fairly liberal  place. She said she
does not feel  see RIGHTS page 4  WESTERN STUDENTS FEEL RECESSION'S PINCH 
1?^^ 7 J  084postings  Student job opportunities dwindle as unemployment
rates rise  Brett Flora  THE WESTERN FRONT •  Western
sophomore Erin Lawhead  is losing her job. After spring quarter, her 
services as a library assistant at the Western  library will no longer be
needed; and  because she does not qualify for work  study, she will have to
supplement her income  through other jobs off campus.  With more students
in Bellingham being  laid off, Caryn Regimbal, manager of  the Student
Employment Center, said the  job postings on the Center's Web site are a 
good a reflection of the nation's slumping  economy.  Luckily for Lawhead,
she has two  off campus jobs at the CreaTiviTea pottery  painting.studio
and tea bar and at the  Abbey Garden Tea Room in Fairhaven to  supplement
the six hours she works in the  library. Jobs she will need when her
library  employment ends.  The Student Employment Center is  a free campus
service that provides students  with job opportunities both on and  off
campus.  During fall quarter 2007, businesses and private employers posted
1,383 jobs  on the Student Employment Center Web  site. During fall quarter
 2008, businesses  and private employers posted only 884  jobs, a drop of
36 percent. \  Western sophomore Ellen Teel has  experienced the economic
pinch first  hand. Teel works for Sodexo in the Viking  Commons dining hall
where she currently  works two shifts that total six hours per  week. Prior
to the first round of budget  cuts, Teel worked three shifts, totaling 
nine hours per week.  Teel said she thinks Sodexo is trying  to save money
by cutting out unnecessary  shifts, like her shift in the dish room. .
Teel, unlike Lawhead, does not have  an off-campus job to supplement her
six  hours at the dining hall. She said she has  not been successful in
finding a job through  the Student Employment Center Web site  or going
downtown in person to submit  her resume to potential employers.  According
to the current job posts on  the Student Employment Center Web site,  the
two primary types of off-campus work  offered for  Western students are
one-time  jobs, such as helping move furniture or  filming a YouTube video,
or specialized  see EMPLOYMENT page 3  VP candidate  'Buster' Brown  visits
Western  Hannah Bostwick THE WESTERN FRONT  Keeping a lecture hall of
nearly 50  board members laughing is no easy task, but Nathaniel "Buster"
Brown, the final  candidate being considered for the position  of Western's
Vice President for Business  and Financial Affairs, did just that at  an
open forum Thursday.  The atmosphere  in the lecture hall  was relaxed, and
despite the seriousness of  the questions asked, Brown kept the mood  light
with witty comments as he discussed  his qualifications and answered a
range of  questions from audience members.  If selected, Brown will have
several  responsibilities, which include ensuring  the financial integrity
of Western, assuring  a safe educational environment and  promoting
positive interaction between  Western and the community.  "I am most
excited for the challenges,  the projects and the ability to work with 
young people in advancing their educations,"  Brown said. "It's different,
and  something I'm not used to."  Brown's resume is extensive, with 
positions ranging from cost accountant to vice president at a variety of
privately-owned  businesses. Working at Western, a  public university,
would present new challenges  for Brown as he crosses over from  the
private to the public sector.  John Lawson, vice provost for information 
technology, said the search committee  has brought in a varied slate of. 
see VP page 5  photo by Alex Roberts THE WESTERN FRONT  Nathaniel "Buster"
Brown is the  final candidate  to visit Western for the Vice President  of
Business and Financial Affairs position.                                   
 



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  2l  See more online at  www.westernfrontonline.net  Friday
•February 6,200? I The Western Front  Feb. 2  ilrti! 
Feb. 4  IBlKt^BSlpIiSi^BillBi  IBIllSSlWlMBiSilliiS 
|IB||p5|Ji»(IlSSKillH  SiiiiBBiWiilJBl^^S^^Bl WEATHER REPORT 
SAT  Hign:44°F  Low: 32° F  Mostly Cloudy  photo by
Carolyn Copstead THE WESTERN FRONT  Jacob Landry (front), a Teach for
America alumnus, discusses issues of race, poverty  and education in
America at a discussion panel  Wednesday night in the Communication
Facility. Approximately 50 students attended the discussion. The panel
consisted of six people,  including two Western professors, two Teach for
America alumni and two students.  Emily Gibson, Student Health Center
medical  director, reassures campus about mumps case  SUN 
High:40°F  Low: 32° F  Mostly Cloudy  (40% chance of
rain)  M0N  High: 40° F  Low: 30° F  Mostly Cloudy 
(Chance of showers) (Catherine Garvey  THE WESTERN FRONT  Days after
treating a Western student  ;for. mumps, Student Medical. Director  ..Emily
Gibson is working to educate the  campus community about the viral illness
and how it can be prevented.  Gibson recently discussed the illness  and
the importance of vaccinations with  Western Front editor. Katherine
Garvey.  Western Front (WF): How often do you  see mumps on campus?  Emily
Gibson (EG): I've been here 20  years, and we've never had mumps. This  is
the first. WF: How easily is it transmitted?  EG: It's droplets, so it's
either coughing  WESTERN WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY  COMMUNICATIONS BUILDING 251
 ' BELLINGHAM, WA 98225  SEND PRESS RELEASES TO:
press@westernfrontonline.net  EDITORIAL DEPARMENT (360) 650-3162  Editor in
chief :  • Zack Hale, editor@westernfrontonline.net 
Managing editor. Rebecca Rayner, managing@westernfrontonline.net  News
editor... '.  lt; •••
• Jeff Twining, news@westernfrontonline.net  News editor.
.Katherine .Garvey, news@westernfrontonline.net  Arts editor. ;Andrew
Frazier, artsandlife@westernfrontbnline.net  Life editor .Audrey
Dubois-Boutet, artsandlife@westernfrontonline.net  Sports editor.
..Stephanie Castillo, sports@westernfrontonline.net Opinion editor.....
Kera Wanielista, opinion@westernfrontonline.net  Photo editor. Hailey
Tucker, photo@westernfrontonline.net  Online editor... : Paul Suarez,
online@westernfrontonline.net  Copy editor. .' ....Jeremy Schwartz,
copy@westernfrontonline.net  Copy editor. Coral Garnick,
copy@westemfrontonline.net  Illustrator .Brandon Kays,
kays.brandon@gmail.com  Faculty Adviser •.. Carolyn
Nielsen, carolyn.nielsen@wwu.edu  ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT (360)650-3161 
Advertising manager..........;.'...... „...Michele
Anderson  Business manager. - Alethea Macomber  The Western Front is
published twice weekly in the fall, winter, and spring quarters and once a
week  in the summer session. The Western Front is the official newspaper of
Western Washington University,  published by the Student Publications
Council and is mainly supported by advertising. Opinions and'  stories in
the newspaper have no connection with advertising. News content is
determined by student  editors. Staff reporters are involved in a course in
the department of journalism, but any student enrolled  at Western may
offer stories to the editors. Members of the Western community are entitled
to a  single free copy of each issue of the Western Front.  and sneezing
[in] that 3 foot radius where  you're near someone and the droplets  would
land on you or contaminated sur-faces,  so if somebody with infected hands 
touches a surface and someone else comes  and touches the surface.  WF: How
concerned should people be?  EG:  I don't think this is a high-risk case. 
The symptoms were not very severe and  that's probably because the student
had  been immunized, so he had some partial  immunity. Do I expect an
outbreak?  I don't. I  think it's going to be one case.  We're about at the
two, two and a half  week mark from when the student initially  exposed
other people on campus and we  haven't seen any other cases that are even 
remotely suspicious. That's a really good  sign.  WF: Have the people who
were in contact  with the student been treated?  EG: They've all received
specific e-mails  and we've checked their immunity status  and everybody
has had their two shots.  There's another group of people, it's about  220
or so on campus, who .are faculty,  staff and students who have waived
their  [measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination]   requirement. We
have just over  200 of those on campus and those folks  have also been
contacted because they're  the most vulnerable to getting sick.  WF: Does
the MMR vaccination protect  against mumps entirely?  EG: The student had
had the two MMRs  and actually had good immunity measured photo by Nicholas
Johnson THE WESTERN FRONT  in blood antibody level. But still, there's 
just not enough sometimes if there's pretty  overwhelming exposure to the
virus.  [There are] certain circumstances like an  airplane where you are
just overwhelmingly  exposed and your immunity isn't enough. What happens
is that the infection  is not as severe, which is what happened  in this
case. So the  vaccination definitely  helps, but it doesn't decrease that
ability  for the patient to expose themselves. WF: Are most people
vaccinated?  EG: We're pretty tough about making  sure people understand
how important it  is to be immunized even though immunizations  aren't
perfect, as this case shows;  but very few people opt out. Three to four 
times a year we'll see somebody who has  swelling in their parata
gland—the salivary  gland—and there
are viruses that can  do that that are not mumps and not as concerning  "as
mumps. But anytime we see it  we test for mumps.  Corrections  In the Feb.
3 issue of The Western Front, a phrase mistakenly used the word "infamy" 
to describe Western program Director Pinky Nelson's induction into the
United  States Astronaut Hall of Fame. Pinky Nelson is a remarkable man
whose accomplishments  as an astronaut deserve a special place in history,
not infamy.  In the same issue, a caption incorrectly credited a photo
taken by Carolyn Copstead.  The Western Front apologizes for this and any
other errors. Errors should be reported  to the managing editor at
managing@westernfrontonline.net.  A                                      



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  westernfrontonline.net I Friday • February 6,2009 NEWS
I 3  EMPLOYMENT: Despite downturn, limited opportunities still exist  from
1  work, in areas such as technology or  child care.  Unfortunately, the
Student Employment  Center has no control over the frequency  or types of
jobs employers post, Regimbal said. The center simply facilitates 
communication between the students  and employers.  ' While the job market
may seem to be  full of doom and glpom, Regimbal said  job opportunities
still exist for Western  students.  Another way students can find work 
through the Student Employment Center  is a  day labor and child care
sign-up list  on the Student Employment Center Web  site. "  Students
create a profile listing their  special skills and work experience then 
employers look through the list, Regimbal said.  To cut down on the
interviewing process,  employers filter through the skills  and work
experience listed on students'  profile pages to narrow down the number  of
prospective employees, she said. Schedule flexibility is a necessity for
these  types of jobs, Regimbal said.  Students can also utilize other local
 job Web sites such as WorkSource, Echo  or the Bellingham Herald, Regimbal
said.  ' She said she  encourages students to  be persistent, but not
over-the-top, if they  have a particular employer they want to  work for. 
Western's career fair on Feb. 12 is  another good place to start job
searching,  said Shar Sarte-Prince, recruitment ser-photo  by.Hailey Tucker
THE WESTERN FRONT  Western senior Sydney Williams (right) helps sophomore
Rowan Ringer (left) create a resume at the Career Services Center  on
Thursday. The Career Services Center works with the Student Employment
Center to help students find jobs and internships.  vices coordinator for
the Career Services  Center.  "Despite the economy, we have as  many
employers coming—80—as we  usually
have," Sarte-Prince said.  Employers at the career fair  are offering  a
decent number of entry-level positions,  and some employers are offering 
immediate job positions in addition to  career opportunities and summer
internships,  Sarte-Prince said.  Another benefit to the career fair is 
that many employers offer on-campus interviews  the following day, Sarte-
Prince  said.  Similar to the Student Employment  Center Web site,
Sarte-Prince said the  Career Services  Web site has a page for  employers
to post weekly jobs and internships.  The difference between the two Web 
sites is that the Student Employment Center  does not post internships. 
Western's winter- quarter career fair  will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
Feb.  12 in MAC Gym in the Wade King Student Recreation Center.  We Develop
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  4 I NEWS Friday • February 6,20091 The Western Front 
RIGHTS: Current senate bill expands on previous same-sex legislation  from
1  awkward holding her girlfriend's  hand in public and considers the
campus  to be better than many conservative places  she has come across. 
Western senior Michelle Agne said  being at Western makes it easy to forget
 what other people throughout the country  feel. The views found on campus
are  generally open-minded and accepting,  something you don't see in other
cities,  she said.  Western senior and facilitator of  Queer Women
Educating and Supporting  Together (QWEST) Kooper Wynkoop  said he has
always felt safe with students  on Western's campus. There are many  LGBTA
clubs and as a result, it provides  a community so that gay and lesbian
students  do not feel alone, he said.  Western freshman Robin Mueller  said
while she feels the campus is accepting  and  liberal, there is always room
for  improvement. .  Being a part of the LGBTQ community  is more than just
going to the club  meetings and identifying as a member of  the queer
community, she said. It's about  how the students treat other students and 
act in everyday life.  Lesbian and gay issues and questions are not easy to
answer with all the common  misconceptions, Mueller said. With  gay and
lesbian students being a minority,  they need allies to help strengthen 
their causes and bridge the gap between   straight and gay people, she
said.  "I think it is important to let people  know that the queer
community doesn't  have one basic higher opinion on [same-sex  marriage],"
Aldrich said. "There are a  lot of varying opinions and thoughts that  can
be dissected, just like any other issue  [in this country]."  Sen. Ed
Murray, D-Seattle, who sponsored  the first domestic-partnership bill in 
April 2007 and participated in the Proposition  8 protest that occurred in
Seattle,  said Senate Bill 5688 is the final step to  opening up all rights
and benefits to same-sex  couples.  Another bill was passed in 2008
expanding  on the first bill's list of rights  While the first two bills
have passed,  this last measure would give same-sex couples  300 new rights
that were not addressed  in the previous two bills, Murray said.  Murray
said he hopes this third measure  passes because it would make even  more
rights and benefits legally available  to same- sex couples.  "[Senate Bill
5688] will finish off the  process," Murray said. "In terms of legalizing 
same- sex marriage, I don't think  we're there yet, but we're getting
there."  Western junior Adam Hurley said even if same-sex marriage is
legalized, he  still does not plan on getting married.  Hurley said he
feels the institution  of marriage is religiously and judicially  based.
Because his life style doesn't currently appeal to either, he does not have
 any interest in the idea of marriage, he  said  "Marriage, both the word
and the  act itself, is a huge deal to many people,"  Hurley said. "Being
lesbian or gay doesn't  change those dreams for some, and so I'll  support
[legalizing same-sex marriage] for  them. But for me, I could care less
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 Brakes  White said she feels this bill would be  beneficial in the matter
of administering  rights to same sex couples. At this point,  people have
to take what they can get and  should not be too picky, she said.  "It is
about baby steps," White said.  "As long as we go at it with persistence 
and keep at it, I wouldn't consider this a backwards step at all."  Agne
said while having those rights  is important, it is still separate but
equal treatment. Since these rights have been  passed, it might be harder
to legalize marriage,  she said.  "If we already have these rights, some 
people might ask why we need the title of  marriage," Agne said. "The 
terminology [of  marriage] is what people assume we want  and the issue
with legalizing [same-sex] marriage is so much more than just a title." 
Wynkoop said he does not feel Washington  is anywhere near legalizing
same-sex  marriage.  "I think it's very easy for people to  say that these
rights are great or that they  don't believe in marriage," Wynkoop said. 
"But the reality is there are a lot of couples  who need  these rights and
can't afford [to  pay for legal service to get the benefits]  and need them
to be legalized." Wynkoop said his two moms fought  years ago for all the
same rights and benefits  that were granted in these bills. They  spent
time and money on lawyers and  counsel, but many couples cannot afford 
that. He said it is great to accept these  rights, but it is important to
keep the ultimate  goal, legalizing marriage, in mind.  Western senior and
self-identified  Christian David Cross said he feels he is  the only person
in his group of friends who  is conservative. If the Washington State 
Legislature gives same-sex couples all the  rights of a opposite-sex
couple, it would  make marriage meaningless, he said.  "Marriage is a term
for a man and  woman," Cross said. "I'm not against gay  and lesbian
students on campus, but I feel  the next logical step, if this bill passes,
 would be legalizing gay marriage, and  that would just take the meaning
away  from marriage itself."  On Thursday, both the Washington  State House
of Representatives and  Sen(ate held hearings to discuss the bills.  Photo
courtesy of Kathryn Bachen Western junior Molly Dermond (right)  and
sophomore Amanda Bergman (left)  participate in the Proposition 8 protest
in  November. "It's important to keep hate  out of the Constitution/'
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  westernfrontonIine.net I Friday • February 6,2009 NEWS
15  VP: Candidate's resume boasts significant private-sector expert  from 1
 candidates and is • excited to have  someone with
Brown's experience come  in.  Brown received a bachelor's degree  in
Business Administration from the University  of Puget Sound (UPS), where he
 played football against Western. After  graduating, he worked for three
years as a cost accountant at Nalley's Fine Foods  while obtaining his
master's degree at  UPS.  Brown said he wanted to do something  different
and diverse, so he left his  job at Nalley's and became a public
accountant,  where he worked with a variety  of clients for nine years. 
Brown held several different positions  with various Northwest companies, 
including Northwestern Drug Co., Egghead  Discount Software and Thurman
Industries,  Inc.  From 1998 to 2000, Brown worked  as the vice president
and chief financial  officer at Football Northwest LLC, which  operates the
Seattle Seahawks and First  Goal Inc., which financed, built and operates 
Qwest Field and Exhibition Center.  His most recent position was at Vulcan 
Inc., Paul Allen's multi-billion dollar  private asset management company,
as  vice president and chief financial officer.  Although new to working at
a university,  Brown is not completely new to  Western.  Brown is currently
a member of Western's  College of Business and Economics Board of Visitors,
which meets quarterly  to discuss curriculum taught in Western's  business
and economics classes.  During the forum, Brown joked that  the position of
vice president for business  and financial affairs is "a full meal deal 
compared to the Board of Visitors position,"  and his time on Western's
campus is  just as much a "look-see" for him as it is  for the selection
committee.  "I've always enjoyed the experience  of coming out here," he
said.  Brown also said that while working  for KPMG, an international
professional  services firm, he recruited Western graduates  because they
were always well-trained  and ready to work.  Due to his experience in the
private  sector, many of the questions asked at the  open forum dealt with
how he would apply  his knowledge to a government institution.  Brown said
one of the key differences  he would face is with whom he would  consult
and liaison to get things done,  adding that he would probably have to 
change how he discusses issues and business  matters. Brown said the last
three positions  he held were at family-run businesses, all  with a
laid-back style of communicating.  In these past positions, he said he
would  run from office to office, asking questions  and
gathering.information.  "I'm not sure if that process would  work here," he
said.  Brown said his biggest challenge  in making the transition would be
interpreting  government accounting standard  boards and deciphering
unfamiliar terminology.  Brown was also asked to describe  how his
experience working with  partnerships  between private and public sectors 
could benefit Western's future waterfront  campus. While working on
projects for Vulcan  Inc., Brown said he gained experience  dealing with
the public sector, specifically  in dealing with the state legislature. He 
said he learned it is important to make  sure all parties involved benefit
from the  partnership by recognizing what is important  to each party
involved and why.  Although Brown admitted not knowing  all the details of
Western's future waterfront campus, he suggested creating a  plan that
works well with the community  as a whole and benefits the investors
involved.  Brown said the public and private  sectors are not comparable,
but the difference between the two would be a welcome  change.  "It's
refreshing," he said. "Rather  than walking up and down halls and into 
offices, it's nice to be around buildings  and see students going to class
and taking notes."  After discussing the differences and  challenges
between the public and private  sector, audience members began to ask 
Brown about his personal strategies in  business and management.  Paul
Mueller,  Western's risk manager,  asked Brown how he would describe his 
management style. Brown responded by  saying he is not a micromanager,.and
that  he builds trust with his staff by empowering  them to do what they
need to do.  "My management style is to question,  to consult and to
advise," he said. "Then, let's go get it done."  In response to a question
about his  personal view on sustainability at Western, Brown said that the
environmental strategies  and priorities of Western should be  built into
the framework of its operations,  and not applied as a secondary measure. 
"Whatever we do, we should be as   eco-friendly as we can be," he said. 
Brown said his role at Western would  be to apply what expertise and
knowledge  he has to the situations he faces, and learn  along the way.  He
said he believes the work experience  he has gained in budget setting will 
help him apply tried and proven approach-,  es to Western's budget.  Toward
the end of the forum, Lisa  Spicer, assistant to the vice provost of
information   technology, asked if Western's  recent decision to cut the
football team  had impacted Brown's decision     to come  to Western. 
Brown said he understands why the  cuts were made, but he also thinks a
balanced  education includes sports and extracurricular  activities. Brown
said he ultimately  does not think any less of Western  because of its
recent cuts, just differently.  In regards to the recent and potential 
budget cuts Western is facing, Brown said  he has been on both sides of
budget cuts  after being let go from a previous job and  having to let
employees go while working  at Vulcan Inc.  Brown said he always tries to
preserve  jobs, but when that is not a possibility,  he handles the
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  6 I Friday • February 6,2009 I The Western Front 
Student volunteers answer  to service  Elizabeth Olmsted 
• • - THE WESTERN FRQNT ;  On the day
of President Baraefc Qbama?s inaugurationy the  Obama Vikings, anAssociated
Stuferits (AS) club previously  dedicated to electing hm  what they could
do to answer the new pre^^ call to service. 
/,.•'''•'.
^'•••i?:': lt;^'
•'• ...'.:.. Through e-rnails;,YoU^be
videos and other online post-  :ings, President Obama encouraged American
citizens to ac-^  tively contribute their efforts to their communities,
causing an  increase in; volunteerism, said Dan Hammill, director of the 
volunteer program at me Whatcom Volunteer Center.  Instead of letting their
mission to promote the president  and his policies fall away, the Obama
Vikings have instead switched their focus and became a.serviee
organization.  At its Inauguration Day party, the Obama Vikings  gained 
five new members, and the club has been actively planning service  projects
to heed the president's call to service since then,  said Colleen Toomey,
vice president of the club.  "He's asking our generation to step up and it
would be  wrong on Dur part to ignore that," Toomey said.  Obama Vikings
President Courtney Steffy said it is time to  follow through with his
grassroots ideas.  "We've become distant from our neighbor and we need to 
get back to being friendly with our neighbor," she said.  Western 
sophomore Amelia Cave joined the Obama Vikings  on Inauguration Day. She
said she joined because she  was looking for a way to serveyand the Obama
Vikings seemed  like a good place to get involved. Obama'S call to service
is timely because it comes on the  heels of an administration that was not
dealing  with the issues  our nation was facing, Cave said: . 
• -'He's calling u inside out"
{she'said.'''';;V:v;''':7'.v';-;,'.'':;-:' .'•.. 
••*• T^e O^  sector,
already home to Circle R, an AS club that focuses on  service projects for
groups and causes such as children, the  homeless and the environment.  It
may be too earlyto report increases in ^plimteers since  the president's
call to sery^  photo      by Katie Greene JHE WESTERN FRONT-Western  junior
Christina Kuusinen makes a Valentine's Day card!  for the elderly and
homeless at a Circle Km?^  photo by Katie Greene THE WESTERN FRONT Circle.
K made Valentine's Day cards for community members  Tuesday. Circle K, an
existing service club, will be joined by  Obama Vikings, which will be
centered on community service.  nihg to see changes.
•...,...  When Western senior Anna Hashman set up the
table for  the Be Our Guest homeless  outreach event at the Campus
Activities  Showcase in January, she did not expect to have conversations 
about change with students eager to participate.  Hashman, president of the
AS club Student-Homeless Outreach  Team, said in the past she has had to
educate people about  the program's activities before she can encourage
therh to volunteer.  Now, they already know what the event is about when 
they approach her: ; : ,;.;^' ,.;.-.  "This time, we had people coming up
and asking, 'Is this  where I sign up?"'she said.  The Be Our Guest program
brings those who are homeless  to on- campus dining halls, where students
sign up to donate  their guest meals to them. This year, Hashman said more
students  signed up to volunteer their meals than they had guests.  :
"There are a lot more students who are aware and wanting  to take action,"
she said*  Similar trends have been seen at the Whatcom Volunteer  Center. 
Hammill said Western students are a large part of the Bell-
mghamcommunity's  volunteer base. Oh Make a Difference  T gt;ay Oct. 25; a
day dedicated to; a variety of service projects,  Westeni stodehts made up
25 percent of the volunteers assisting  the center.  V XAt;^ on Jan. 29,
300  volunteers and 50 professionals provided services such as dental  arid
eye care to  those who are homeless or at risk of becom-lihg  homeless.
Approximately 600 people offered to volunteer,  b u t ^  v ; The W^ had one
 m t\vc gt;fextra people show up to a service progr^ but they  havfe never
had to torn that many people away from a project,  • |'W^
hear that people are ready to  don't want  to watch the parade, they want
to be in it."  ^ s t e r n senior Emily Stebbins, who volunteers at
Community  to: Community Development and the Womencare Shelter  though
Western's Students in Service program, recommends  ipeoplego to campus
events to begin volunteering:  Stebbins said by going to panels and
forums-and by joining  clubs, students can meet people from organizations
that might  want volunteers.  "It is just getting involved enough to know
what's going  on at your campus," she said.  The Obama Vikings plan to
organize volunteer projects  once a month, such as volunteering at the
women's shelter and  Whatcom Humane Society and participating in
environmental  projects.  Western sophomore Daman Waridke, president of the
AS  club Students for Disability Awareness, encourages students to identify
their time commitment and be consistent.  "Be clear bn how big of a time
commitment you would like  to make; evenif it is just halfan hour a
\veekv'he said. "Every  •Jittle bit helpS'."'::';-\
/.^;£; B ;^ cA**  Unsatisfied with c  Carmen Daneshmar  THE
WESTERN FRO  What started out last summer as an idea t  this quarter's
Diarrhea Digest. For Western ju  more Kevin Griffing, Diarrhea Digest is
the si boundless and warm" zine they created and ho{  A zine is a
self-published, underground put  pensively produced. This quarter was the
diges  "City on a Hill." For the next issue's theme "Fro  encouraging
people  to submit all kinds of art, j  theme's interpretations, while being
inspiration  important role in bringing all the pieces togethe  "It's like
the whole diarrhea of the mind a;  start from an idea, start spitting out
the images  after a while, it's all in front of you with a conn  When
checking out the literary magazine  found some inspiration in the lacking
content o  "When I got to Western, I was looking int(  the Bellingham
Review," Griffing said. "When  they talked about 'literature of palpable
quali  ridiculous. That's kind of where  the sarcasm sfc  After three
months of brainstorming, Stroi  own short stories along with Griffing's
poetry the materialising Microsoft Publisher. The tw  Western's Haggard
Hall Copy Center and came  copies of their 23-page zine. A variety of pub 
are offered on campus so anyone could come i:  cation.  Western English
professor Ning Yu, who 1  compared the look of Diarrhea Digest with exit 
"The layout is very wild, and I like it becau  by a student," Yu said.
"This one is very appar*  dent magazines can be somewhat more aestheti 
Associate poetry editor of Jeopardy literar  nior Ari Weinberg also noticed
Diarrhea Dige: Diarrhea Digest, Jeopardy is a full-color, largei  zine
funded by Western's Student Publications  as more professional by some
students.  When it came to Diarrhea Digest's style, \  way to help interest
people. "There is absolutely a certain market of pe  zine] because it looks
underground and unpro:  intrigued by it,"  Weinberg said. "I have to admi 
Unlike most literary magazines, Stroo and  their names after their pieces
of work that show  "We didn't put our names because it's n(  "[When you do]
it's like you plug in a little Diarrhea Digest is filled with art, poetry
and she  made by one of the creators of the zine, Wester                   
                     



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   westernfrontonline.net I Friday • February 6,2009 I 7 
from the underground  urrent literary magazine options, two students give
Western something different to digest  t  idi  NT  etween two friends
became lior Hans Stroo and sopho-lf-  proclaimed "accelerated,   gt;e to
publish every quarter.   gt;lication that is usually inex-s  first issue,
with the theme  Qtier," Stroo and Griffing are  )oetry and short fiction.
The  for the content, play a more  r to connect to a larger idea.  !id
mouth," Stroo said. "You  and thoughts and jokes and  ecting thread." 
scene at Western, Griffing  f other publications,  the literary magazines,
like read the mission statement,  ies.' Try to define that. It's  rted
from."  and Griffing scanned their  and artwork and organized  0 took their
files and $65 to  out with 50 black and white  lication and design services
 1 and make their own publics  Griffing in a class of his,  ing literary
magazines.  se you can see that it is done  ntly political and other stu-y 
magazine and Western set's  raw style. In contrast to  ,  once-a-year
literary maga-  Committee and may be seen  Weinberg said she saw it as a 
pple out there who like [the  fessional and they would be  11 was intrigued
at first."  Griffing refrain from putting  up throughout the zine.   gt;t
about that," Griffing said,  dvertisement and we didn't  illustration by
Kevin Griffing   gt;rt fiction. The art above was  i sophomore Kevin
Griffing.  photo by Hailey Tucker THE WESTERN FRONT  Above: Zine creators
Western junior Hans Stroo (left) and sophomore Kevin  Griffing (right) pose
with their first publication in a campus restroom.The two  want to push
people outside their comfort zones with Diarrhea Digest.  Right: Griffing
sits with Diarrhea Digest in a campus restroom.  want to advertise
ourselves, that's not what it's about."  Flipping through Diarrhea Digest,
readers will find references to Hillary  Rodham Clinton, fake religious
ads, a handful of references to genitalia and  fake hate  mail to the
editor from readers who were "shocked and disgusted  after reading the last
issue." This begs the question: Why is there a deliberate  effort to appear
so crude?  "I think we are both definitely in the mindset that there is a
veil of  politeness on society that people are obsessed with," said Stroo,
who calls  himself the 'Crudeness Monitor.' "We all want to pretend we are
clean, but  we are all animals. It isn't our goal to be crude, but society
is crude," Griffing  added.  To Weinberg and Cheryl Danielsen, supervisor
of the copy center,  crudeness has its place and can help motivate someone
to pick up a zine  and read it.   "Being polite is an extension of making
people feel comfortable and  good." Weinberg said. "However, zines can be
really important in changing  the way you think and so in that context,
being uncomfortable  is a good  thing." . . - . " -  Danielsen, who has
worked for 21 years at the copy center, also commented   on the influence
of crudeness in the zine.  "If a publication appears crude it makes you
decide whether to  read it  or not," Danielsen said. "Something, crude or
not, has to be able to catch  your attention."  When asked about how
censorship plays into the process of making  a publication, Danielsen said
it is not the copy center's job to judge the  content. Students making
their own publication at Western's copy center can print almost anything as
long as it is not illegal or sexually explicit, she  said. -  For Stroo and
Griffing,  inspiration can come from anywhere, including  South Park's
attitude that "nothing is sacred," following politics to experiences 
abroad, and just spending enough time around each other's sense of  photo
by Hailey Tucker THE WESTERN FRONT  humor. The result is what Stroo calls a
visual representation of their sense  of humor.  Despite the shock value of
its content, Yu sees Diarrhea Digest to be just  as valid as any other
literary magazine publication on campus.  "I like the fact that [they are]
doing something—it's very hard to start a  project from
the beginning and to stay with it to the end; the whole process  is always
complicated," Yu said. "I like students to stay engaged. We are in  college
and if students stay engaged that's a sign of our education at Western 
being a very good one."  Weinberg, who has worked on Jeopardy since
September 2008, also  looks at Diarrhea Digest's distinctiveness as a
quality that will help the  zine.  "For zines to get noticed-, it's
important that they have that kind of innovative  controversy to them,"
Weinberg said. "Zines are about self empowerment  but can also be another
venue for political activism if you want  it to be."  Western,senior Cody
Spann, arts editor at Jeopardy literary magazine,  also recognized the
diversity that Diarrhea Digest brought along with it.  "I think it's really
important to have a lot of variety in the magazines  that they have on
campus," Spann said.  "It. was cool to see a zine because  we don't see
many around."  Diarrhea Digest strides away from the traditional path of a
zine by not  making the publication available to the public, but instead it
can be acquired  through contact with Griffing and Stroo.  "We think mass
distribution is dead," Stroo said. "The way to do it is to  give it to
people, that way you get to meet somebody. Every person you give  a
magazine to is like a relationship." .  Online publications replacing print
media may put the effoijs of printing  a zine at risk.  "The thing about
having it online is that it is no longer a piece of art.  There is no shape
to it, you can't go through it the same way," Griffing said.  "It's our
take on what a magazine should be, so we are making it more like a  book
than a magazine, more like a concept album where the songs are connected 
by artwork."  Danielsen, who is around different "print publications every
day, also recognizes this change-in print media.  "I agree that the print
industry is slowing down, but many people want  something in their hand to
read. It makes it more valuable to them and so  they are more likely to
read it," Danielsen said.  Stroo did have a few ideas about how to improve
the zine.  "[Diarrhea Digest] needs executive experience, like-minded
people that  have no regard except making art," Stroo said. "I mean the
only sponsor  we would have would be someone who sells cigarettes, raffle
tickets and  child prostitutes. No respectable company should want to
sponsor us, but  we welcome them."  Although a Web site is planned for the
near future, Stroo said he and  Griffing will continue the zine until huge
statues of them are erected in  downtown Bellingham. Until then, Diarrhea
Digest will maintain its uniqueness  in  each issue they print, he said. 
To obtain a copy of Diarrhea Digest, people must contact Griffing or  Stroo
 through Facebook or e-mail them at the.poop.zpne@gmail.com.               
                      



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  8 I ARTS   LIFE Friday • February 6,20091 The Western
Front  Climmboe rs conquer nature, empower selves  In the gym or on the
elite,-rock climbing provides more than just exercise  Kipp Robertson  THE
WESTERN FRONT  To different people, rock climbing  can be a religious
experience, a social  networking opportunity or simply a way  to have fun,
but no matter how it is interpreted,  rock climbing pushes the human  body
to its limits.  Dr. Joseph Taylor III, associate professor  and Canada
research chair at Simon  Fraser University in British Columbia,  said when
he looks at rock climbing  and the people involved, he not only sees 
humans conquering a mountain, but also  humans conquering their inner
selves.  On Jan. 30, Taylor gave a lecture at  Western on rock climbing
based on his  new book, "Pilgrims of the Vertical: Rock  Climbing arid
Modern Environmental  Culture."  He said the culture of rock climbing has
been suffering over the past few decades  and needs to be reinvented.  Men
and women formed climbing  groups, such as the American Alpine  Club, as
early as 1902 to encourage each  other and ensure
safety— group attributes  that are still found today, he
said.  Over time, rock climbing has diverged   into two different styles:
one incorporating  more traditional aspects where climbers  forge their own
routes up, and the other  relying on preset routes and using less 
equipment, making it more of a sport than  an experience with nature,
Taylor said.  "Climbing originally had an attitude  of 'I came, I saw, I
conquered,' Taylor  said. "Nowadays people are just doing it  as a fun
activity."  Enthusiasts of traditional climbing  hated to see their culture
destroyed by the  later, less technical approach to climbing,  which
developed in the 1980s, Taylor  said. As climbing transformed from a 
lifestyle to a sport, climbing gyms gained  popularity as a form of
entertainment and  exercise, he said.  Climbing gyms were originally built
for elite climbers to practice on, but companies  were forced to expand
their business  model to the masses because the  gyms were so costly to
run, Taylor said.  Elitists of the climbing culture did  not want to lose
their culture and identity  to the public, but eventually, recognized  gyms
assisted the climbing culture, economically,  he said.  "There is a
resurgence of rock climbing  enthusiasts," he said. "But there are  only a
few people who start in gyms that  move to traditional climbing."  Western
senior Calvin Laatsch, a  "Climbing originally had an attitude of  'I came,
I saw, I conquered.1 Nowadays people are just doing it as a fun activity. 
Dr. Joseph E.Taylor III,  professor and author  resource and events
coordinator at Western's  Outdoor Center, said there is still  debate about
the value of climbing gyms.  Laatsch said it may not be climbing in the 
traditional sense of scaling a mountain  and taking risks, but on the other
hand, it  is a good way to get into climbing.  "I have watched people who
began  in a  gym become completely addicted to  climbing," Laatsch said.
"Those same  people, are now climbing all over Washington."  Beginners are
attracted to climbing  gyms because they eliminate the potential risks of
climbing outdoors, Laatsch said.  Once someone has become comfortable  with
the equipment and basic techniques  they will be more comfortable with 
climbing outside, he said.  Wednesday, Feb.11 - 5:15 - 6:15 PM  J E N Lois
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biilllisooiieryou  take it the better.  Photo courtesy of Max Wilbert 
Western senior Calvin Laatch scales a cliff face at Larabee State Park, one
of the many local  spots available for rock climbers to test their skills. 
Mount Erie and Mazama Wash, are great  local spots for new climbers to
learn the  ropes, Laatsch said.  Even though gyms tend to emphasize  the
individual experience, rock climbing  still revolves  around groups,
whether they  are climbing just for fun and exercise or as  a way to
experience a side of nature that is  not commonly seen, Laatsch said. He
said  it is important to choose climbing partners  who  are encouraging and
feels that climbing  companions are a big credit to his progression  as a
rock climber.  "It's important to have chemistry with  the people you climb
with," Laatsch said.  "You need to be  able to feed off of each  other's
enthusiasm."  Rock climbers have always depended  on each other to overcome
physical challenges  that no one could handle alone,  Taylor said. He said
climbing emerged as  a gender-inclusive lifestyle from its onset,  and
women.  "Women were encouraged just as  much as anybody else," Taylor said.
"You  can still see this gender-neutral camaraderie  today in rock
climbing."      Western junior Megan Ferris, promotions  and outreach
coordinator at the  Outdoor Center, said she enjoys climbing  because she
became involved with social  climbing groups. She said by pushing  each
other in a positive way, she has seen  people advance their skill.  "It may
be intimidating at first," Ferris said. "But soon you'll be egging each 
other on and yelling 'go for it."'  To ease the expense for new climbers, 
Laatch recommends the Outdoor Center,  which rents necessary equipment such
as  ropes and  carabineers.  Students may also borrow climbing  guides and
videos from their library, he  said.  Be prepared - have EC In yourmedicme
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  9l  See more online at  www.westeriifrontoiiline.net  Friday
• February 6,20091 The Western Front
•Everything but marriage1 is anything but fair  Frontline
 Opinions of the Editorial Board  This week, Washington state lawmakers 
proposed the "everything but marriage"  bill, which would grant same- sex 
couples all the same rights, protections  and benefits that heterosexual
couples  have always enjoyed.  The bill, if passed, will provide needed 
legal support for same-sex couples. Every  parent or spouse wants, and
deserves, to  know their family will be taken care of if  something should
happen to them. This  bill would ensure that.  If the bill (Senate Bill
5688 and its  partner House Bill 1727) passes, it will be  a great step for
civil rights and equality—  but it's not quite good
enough.  The problem with the "everything  but marriage" bill is evident in
its name.  If same-sex couples have all the same  benefits and of married
couples, it should  simply be called "marriage." "Everything  but marriage"
is an insult to same- sex and  heterosexual couples alike.  "Everything but
marriage" reinforces  the "separate but equal" mindset. This  is the same
thinking that allowed for  "coloreds only" drinking fountains, rest-rooms 
and seats on the bus. As ruled by  the Supreme Court in 1954, "separate but
 equal" is inherently unequal.  As  a society, we have made huge  strides
to distance ourselves from a racial  "separate but equal" stance. The
Voting Rights Act of 1965 finally  abolished "separate but equal" in
politics.  Fouty-four years later we have finally  elected our first
African-American president.  Let's hope it doesn't take as long for  same-
sex couples to achieve the same  rights and opportunities as heterosexual 
couples.  The problem with same-sex marriage,  opponents say, is that it
violates the  sanctity of traditional marriage between a man and a woman. 
Some traditions, no matter how- old,  need to change and adapt with the
times, Today, it makes sense and is right to have  same-sex marriage.  In
2006, Gov. Chris Gregoire supported   a gay rights law. In 2007, Washington
 passed two additional domestic partners  rights' acts. The Associated
Press has  reported that since July of that year 4,940  couples have
registered as domestic partners.  Many traditional marriage proponents 
associate marriage with religion. This  association is flawed because
marriage is  an act practiced by people of all religions  along with people
who aren't religious.  Even if marriage was still solely  associated with
religion, in this country  that should make no difference where  laws are
concerned.  This is America. Don't we pride ourselves  on the separation of
church and  state? Religion should never play a part in  lawmaking of any
sort.  Laws are designed to protect citizens'  rights and freedoms. That
means legislatures  and politicians should be working  to support same-sex
couples rights to  marry—not "everything but marriage." 
For some same-sex couples the desire  to get married goes beyond civil
rights.  Many just want to be able to celebrate their  love for each other
in the same way that  heterosexual couples can. They want to be  able to
introduce the person they love as  their spouse/rather than their
life-partner  or significant other. They don't want to be  treated as
second-class citizens.  Law makers supporting this bill,  namely Sen. Ed
Murray and Rep. Jaimie Pederson, both of Seattle, have stated  they are not
satisfied with this bill either.  But they're interested in passing
"everything  but marriage" because they didn't  think "marriage" would
pass.  They say this is a good interim bill  until they can get a same-sex
marriage  bill passed, which they hope can happen  as early as next year.
Through this bill,  they hope to show people that same-sex  marriage is as
valuable and  cherished as  heterosexual marriage.  Students. should show
support for  their friends, neighbors, family and themselves  by supporting
this bill—and push  their representatives to pass a
same-sex  marriage bill.  Because a win for any group's civil  rights is a
win for everyone, and nobody  should have to settle for     anything less 
than completely equal.  The Editorial Board is comprised of  the
Editor-in-Chief Zack Hale, Managing  Editor Rebecca Rayner, Opinion Editor 
Kera Wanielista and community member-at-  large Eddie Verhulst.  Jon vs.
Everybody: Manners a must on campus  Jon Brandenburg  Columnist  Despite
what my editor says, I am a  gentleman.  If you were to ask any of my
ex-girlfriends—  well, the ones that can actually  speak
English—they'd tell you that Momma  Brandenburg may have
raised an idiot, but she didn't raise a rude idiot.  Unfortunately, I don't
think there are  many mothers of Western students who  could make that same
claim.  Allow me to channel the spirit of  Andy Rooney, who, though
actually very  much alive, has looked like a shambling  corpse since 1987
(also, his eyebrows are  like giant caterpillars and that's gross). 
Despite me being the sexy age of 24 and  Rooney being older than God, I too
find  umbrage in the fact that people in general,  and even at our
beauteous Western, have  decided to give up on the common decency  of being
mannerly to their fellow men  and women.  To me, it's very difficult to
comprehend  how someone could not have manners.  Maybe this is because my
mother used to throw bottles of smooth, oak barrel-  aged, 80 proof, good
old-fashioned  Kentucky bourbon at my head in an alcohol  and
amphetamine-fueled fury whenever  I forgot to say "Please."  Or maybe not.
Or maybe I completely  made up that scenario. Choose your  own adventure! 
And for the record, my mother is a  saint...seriously, she really would
have  had every justification to drink.  Also, for the record, I'm still a
gentleman.  Having manners and general respect  for the people around you
in a public setting  has always been something I admire.  It's as simple as
holding the door for  someone, saying please or simply telling  your
mugging victim, "Hey, thanks for  not forcing me to make super heroes out
of your kids."  Unfortunately, the more time I spend  on Western's campus
the more I realize  that many students must not have been  introduced to
"Miss Manners" at an early  age ("Miss Manners" was the name of the 
hypothetical bourbon bottle my mother  would hypothetically throw at me). 
Aside from the usual old man grievances  that I have, there are a few
things  I've noticed that really peeve my pet: cell phones and smoking.  .
I like cell phones, they are incredibly  useful devices that are vital in
our current times, but that does not mean I want  to hear an inane,
one-sided conversation  while I'm on the bus.  Yes,  I know Chase is
totally hot, and  you'd love to marry him and make babies  or whatever, but
save your highly cerebral  observations about his anatomy for when  you are
not in an enclosed environment, broadcasting your deviancy to all those 
poor souls in earshot.  In other words, don't use the phone  on the  bus,
dummy.  Now, I'm not one of those people  who thinks that a whiff of
second-hand  smoke is going to  give me cancer (knock  on wood), but that
doesn't mean I want to  have smoke wafting into my nostrils as  I  walk
behind you on my way to class.  I'm a lazy man: walking to class is really 
the one decent thing I do for my body,  ,and I don't want that counteracted
by  your need to look cool and mature and to stimulate your "T-Zones" with
the smooth,  slow-burning taste of Camel Cigarettes.  It really doesn't
take much to be considerate  to others. It goes back to the simple  notion
of treating others the way you'd like to be treated.  It's an old idea, but
in practice it's still  pretty foolproof.  That is, unless you are a
masochist  or just a jerk.  Viking Voices  Opinions from around campus 
What annoys yoirthe  most on campus?  Compiled by: Amanda Halle  Meghan
Flannigan  ••*.. Junior  "Walking
behind somebody who is smoking on my way to  class in the morning."  Missy
Minor  Junior  "People stopping to talk in  the  middle of the hallways  on
campus."  Derek McFaul  Freshman  'The 'no skateboarding on  campus'
policy."  Alex Haley  Junior  'Bikers and skateboarders  riding through 
campus."  cartoon by Brandon Kays THE WESTEKN FKONI  ,^hl^ lt;y^MU^ 
=4fcr__                                             



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  10 I SPORTS See more online at  www.westernfrontonline.net  Friday
-February 6,20091 The Western Front  Men's basketball clobbers Seawolves 
Western: 69  Alaska Anchorage: 54  Andrew Sprague  , THE  WESTERN FRONT  In
the lowest point total allowed by the Vikings in  eight years, the Western
men's basketball team was victorious  over the University of Alaska
Anchorage (UAA)  Seawolves Thursday night in Anchorage.  Western jumped out
to an early lead over UAA, scoring  21 points in the first nine minutes.
The Seawolves  picked up the pace after that, slowly narrowing the Vikings'
 lead for the remainder of the first half .Western left  the court at
halftime with a 28-27 lead over UAA.  The Vikings widened their lead in the
second half  over the Seawolves, and Western remained ahead by ten  points
for the final eight minutes of the game.  "We played a great team," Western
senior guard Ira  Graham said. "We had our downs, but we were still able 
to come up."  Four Viking players scored in double figures. Graham  led the
team in scoring with 16 points. Western junior  forward Michael Duty
followed close behind with 14,  Western junior guard Morris Anderson led in
both rebounds  and assists. Freshman guard Cameron Severson  also had a
solid game, coming off the bench to score ll  points.  With this win, the
Vikings' record improved to 14-3  overall and 6-1 in the Great Northwest
Athletic Conference.
•••'.':-.-.  Head
coach Brad Jackson said the win feels good but  anything can happen before
the season is over.  "Any road game is difficult," Jackson said. "We have 
struggled against Alaska these last few years."  Anderson said being in
first place means the opposing  teams will bring their best games when they
play the  Vikings.  "We know we have a target on our back every game," 
Men's Basketball GNAC Standings  iftBKilBBtfHSiiiifeiiiil  Women edge
Northwest Nazarene  Vikings win fourth straight, take over third place in
GNAC standings  photo by Alex Roberts THE WESTERN FRONT  Western junior
forward Gabby Wade goes up for a shot  over a Northwest Nazarene defender
in Thursday's same. Western: 64  Northwest Nazarene: 61  Angelo Spagnolo 
THE WESTERN FRONT  Grabbing their fourth win in a row, the Western women's 
basketball team defeated the Northwest Nazarene  University Crusaders in a
conference match-up Thursday  night in Carver Gym.  With the. victory, the
Vikings move ahead of the Crusaders  to take over third place in the Great
Northwest Athletic  Conference (GNAC). Western junior guard Willow Cabe,
senior center  Claire Pallansche, and last week's GNAC player of the week,
sophomore guard Amanda Dunbar, scored in double  figures.  The Vikings
started the game off with a 10-0 run and,  despite shooting just over 18
percent from behind the  3-point line and 35 percent overall, the team
never trailed  Northwest Nazarene.  The Crusaders cut the lead to one point
with only a minute and a half left in the game. A 3-point play by senior 
forward Jessica Summers put the Vikings back up  by four.  The game was
sealed when the Crusaders' junior  guard Jenee Olds, who led all scorers 
with 20 points,  missed a potentially game-tying 3-pointer.  Pallansche
said the team was pumped up to avenge a  disappointing 9-point loss to the
Crusaders earlier in the  season.  "We had some big payback for this team
for sure,"  Pallansche said.  Western head coach Carmen Dolfo said the win
was  important for conference standings.  "[The game] was a must have,"
Dolfo said. "This  week was huge for us, and then as we head on the road to
 Alaska."  The Vikings battle the Saint Martin's University  Saints at 7
p.m.  on Feb. 7 in Carver Gym before departing  on a three-game road trip
to Alaska and Oregon.  9:30-3 Mon.- Fti *10-5 Saturday 
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   11 I SPORTS Friday February 6,2009 I The Western Front  l to nati 
Amanda Halle  THE WESTERN FRONT  While.some students ride their bikes to
save money  on gas, others ride simply to get around campus or help  the
environment. However, the members of Western's cycling  team ride their
bikes with  one goal—to win.  Formed just six years ago,
Western's co-ed, intercollegiate  club cycling team already has a history
filled with  success. The team has placed first in the Northwest Collegiate
 Cycling  Conference (NWCCC) for the past three  years, placed second
overall in the Division II 2008 national competition and has a close shot,
at placing first this  year.  "We have a reputation for being really good,"
said  Western junior Chris Kliem, who has been on the cycling  team since
his freshman year.  Thirty students ranging from freshman to graduate 
students manage and race on the team. Within the team, there are four
different disciplines—track, mountain, cy-clo-  cross
and road—that compete during different months  of the
year. The season begins at the end of summer with  track bike races. The
mountain bike discipline competes  in October, cyclo-cross races are in
December and road  competitions  begin in March. Team members can choose 
to race in one or all four disciplines.  The team is currently training for
the road race season,  which begins during spring break. Daisy Phillips, 
Western graduate student and cycling team president, said  the team is
currently tied for third place in the nation based  on the scores from
their completion in the track, mountain  and cyclo-cross competitions
earlier this year. Twenty-five of the 30 cycling team members compete  in
road racing. She said if the team competes well in  the road competition,
they have a good chance of placing  first in nationals for their overall
season.  The team is alwaysexcited to have new members join  no matter what
their past experience in biking is, she said.  Phillips admits she did not
know anything about cycling  until she joined the team two years ago and
said many of  the other team members did not either.  Kliem said he did not
start regularly riding his bike  until he lived in Buchanan Towers his
freshman year and  got tired of making the long walk to class every day. He
 said he saw the team ride by him one day and thought it  photo by Carolyn
Copstead  THE WESTERN. FRONT  (From left of right): Western graduate
student Ariel Wetzel, senior Eric Schiller,  junior Tim Hubner and graduate
student  Daisy Phillips coast down Indian Street on a Saturday practice on
Jan. 24.  looked like fun, so he decided to join the cycling team in 
February of 2007.  "Everyone was extremely nice," he said. "The team's 
veterans helped me learn how to ride and train."  Unlike Phillips and 
Kliem, Western freshman Steve  Fisher came to the cycling team with some
past experience.  Fisher said he has been competing in cyclo-cross  and
road racing since he was 14 years old. He has traveled to Europe three
times for competitions, most recently to  Italy for the 2008 Cyclo-cross
World Championship last  January. Fisher said the cycling team's.winning
reputation  influenced his choice to enroll in Western.  "I knew people who
were on the Western [cycling]  team," Fisher said. "So I knew [Western] was
the best  school to come to for cycling."  Female involvement in the
cycling team could be improved,  Kliem said. Men and women race in their
own  divisions during competition and the scores combine to  give them an
overall total.  Within the men's and women's divisions, there are  two
subdivisions, A and B, depending on the racer's time  record".'.Just seven
women are on the team this year, so  having fewer female team members
lessens the chances  of placing high in the women's division,  and
therefore  overall, Kliem said.  However, the women who are already on the
cycling  team are not lacking, Phillips said. The women's A division 
placed first in the NWCCC last year, and for the  last three years women
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  westernfrontonline.net I Friday • February 6,2009
SPORTS 112  |||p||Bi|^gl|i||||||j  |l||BB||^|j|p|||l  ^l^iiliWliill
|(^::p||^Ij|ljj|J||  iiiisiiiiiiliiiSiiii  What was it like being named
Great North-  IBIWIMii^BHIliB  Slt|il|§I^
!llllSiBiBilSfil^^^BipH8  What's your earliest moment playin;  IgHS^^^^m^HB
 CYCLING: Team remains successful without coach or full university funding 
from 11  earners in competition, she said.  The cycling team is a
manageable sport for students  who also need to devote a lot of time to
their academics,  said Kliem. Competitions are held on weekends and most 
of the training is done on the team member's own schedule,  he said.  The
team rides, which take place every Saturday  morning, are the only
organized practices in which the  team members participate. Kliem said he
thinks the hardest  part of being on the  team is not balancing school and 
sport, but motivating himself to get out and train.  "We don't have a coach
and it is hard to motivate  yourself to go out and cycle in the rain for
two hours," he  said. "But as much time you put in, you get out."  Although
the team receives some financial support  from the university, Phillips
said more than half of their  budget and resources come from community
sponsorships.  The sponsorships help cover the cost of the team's  travel,
food and entry into competitions, which can cost  an average of $70 per
person, she said. Some of the team's  largest supporters are Haggen, Group
Health, the Fanatik  Bike Co. and the Sanitary Service Company (SSC). The 
service company has been the team's largest and most devoted  sponsor since
the. team first formed, Phillips said.  "We always wave at the SSC garbage
trucks when we  are riding," she said.  Team members do have to pay for
their own bike  equipment, which can be expensive, said Western junior  Ben
Rathkamp, who has been on the team for two years.  He estimates the cost of
a racing bike and riding shoes  in good condition to be approximately
$1,000. Although  sometimes people join the team with whatever bike they 
could find at the time, Phillips said.  AG  1?ja^^^^^^^^M^^^^MKeja^| 
BesiB0s WESTERN  WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY  * . . - : • .    
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